McKinney October 2020

MCKINNEY EDITION

VOLUME 6, ISSUE 7 ! OCT. 19 " NOV. 17, 2020

ONLINE AT

PAYING TOOMUCH A recent study commissioned by the city of McKinney found 46% of renters and 29% of homeowners are paying too much for housing. Those who pay more than 30% of their income on housing are considered cost-burdened, and those who pay more than 50% of their income are severely cost-burdened.

The study found more than 6,000 renters in McKinney earn less than $35,000 a year and that, as of 2018, there were only 2,648 rental units in their maximum price range of $875 a month.

KEY

Cost burden Severe cost burden

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Renters

Owners with a mortgage

6,364

22%

renters earning less than $35K

Owners without a mortgage

9% 20%

2,648 number of units in their price range

24%

9% 5%

shortage: 3,716 units

SOURCE: ROOT POLICY RESEARCH ! COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

City seeks solutions after a ! ordable housing study Faced with the reality that wages have not kept up with home values in McKinney, local leaders and com- munity members are working to try to help with the city’s signi ! cant lack of a " ordable housing. almost half the renters in McKinney use more than 30% of their income to cover housing costs. Among those renters, nearly half use 50% or more of their income for housing expenses. “We knew that there was an issue,” said Janay Tieken, McKinney’s hous- ing and community development manager. “Nationwide, you’d look at homelessness and a " ordability, so we know that there’s an issue. But it was really nice to get the data.” The study, which was conducted after March, considers how COVID-19 has a " ected residents in McKinney. Tieken said her department has dis- tributed $1.83 million in federal funds to mortgage, rent and utility assistance since June 1 to residents who need help. In addition to the e " ects of the virus, McKinney has experienced CONTINUED ON 18 BY MIRANDA JAIMES On Sept. 15 McKinney City Coun- cil accepted the ! ndings of a housing needs assessment conducted by Root Policy Research, which showed that

IMPACTS

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McKinney o # cials said the coronavirus pandemic and its anticipated e " ect on city operations played a pivotal role the development of the city’s ! scal year 2020-21 budget. The annual budget outlines how residents’ tax dollars and revenue from other sources are allocated. It provides funding for city necessities, such as the McKinney Police Department, McKinney Fire Department and maintenance of roads, water lines and sewers, as well as amenities, such as McKinney’s two libraries and the operation of city parks. When COVID-19 arrived in March, McKinney o # cials tightened the city’s metaphorical belt and began making CONTINUED ON 20 Sales tax streams help lower tax rate for 2020 " 21 budget BY MIRANDA JAIMES AND WILLIAM C. WADSACK

GOING McKinney braced itself for sales tax revenue to plummet in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic. However, the city’s cumulative sales tax revenue collections have remained fairly steady. steady

Expected change originally projected earlier this year due to COVID-19

Actual change in FY 2019-20 compared to FY 2018-19

CANINE COOKIE COMPANY

15% 10% 5% 0% 20% -10% -5%

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SOURCES: CITY OF MCKINNEY, STATE COMPTROLLER’S OFFICE ! COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

LOCAL GETAWAY GUIDE

22

Contribute today! Use your phone camera to scan the QR code or visit

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PAID ADVERTISEMENT

City of McKinney provides excellent value for your tax dollars

City of McKinney - 23% $1,775

Many taxpayers are surprised to learn that only 23¢ of every dollar paid in property taxes goes to the City of McKinney to fund vital services like public safety, streets and parks. This chart shows how property tax dollars are distributed among the four taxing entities. Where your tax dollars go

Collin County - 8% $602

McKinney ISD - 66% $5,147

Collin College - 3% $283

BASED ON A TOTAL PROPERTY TAX BILL OF $7,807 ASSESSED ON AN AVERAGE McKINNEY HOME VALUE OF $349,000

What your tax dollars get you

For each city service funded using property tax dollars, the City of McKinney delivers a big bang for your buck in comparison with the cost of every day items.

PARKS & RECREATION

LIBRARY

! 10 monthly amount per household

! 4

• 2,550 acres of open spaces • 40 parks • 6 recreation facilities • 66 miles of hike and bike trails

• 2 libraries • 1 mobile outreach vehicle • 50,800+ public computer sessions • 1,354,900+ items checked out

monthly amount per household

Compare to: $ 50

Compare to: $ 13

monthly gym membership

monthly Amazon Prime membership

PUBLIC SAFETY

PUBLIC WORKS

! 12 monthly amount per household

! 70 Compare to: $ 80 monthly mobile phone service monthly amount per household

• 15,000+ " re unit responses annually • 11 " re stations • 5,700+ " re inspections annually • Community Health Program, commercial and residential " re

• 72,000+ calls for police service annually • 90 neighborhood watch groups • Crime rate down 24% over the last 5 years (for all UCR crimes) • Victim services, K9, SWAT, School Resource O ! cers, Neighborhood Police O ! cers, Community Services Unit, Mounted Patrol, Forensic Investigations, Tra ! c Unit, summer teen camps, Police Explorers

Compare to: $ 35 tank of gas

and life safety self-inspection program, and McTown Klownz program

• 800 streetlights • 93 tra ! c signals • 4,300 stop signs • 1,789 lane miles of streets

Amounts are based on operating costs and the annual city property tax bill of $1,775 assessed on an average McKinney home value of $349,000. Rev. 09/2020

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Early & Election Day Voting Locations

Children's Health StarCenter

6993 Stars Ave. 2801 Orchid Dr.

Christ Fellowship

Collin College Higher

3452 Spur 399

Quali ! ed voters may vote at any Election Day/Early Voting location, including any additional Election Day voting location open under full contract services with the Collin County Elections Administration. Education Center Collin College McKinney Campus 2200W. University Dr. Collin County Election O ! ce 2010 Redbud Blvd., #102 John & Judy Gay Library 6861 W. Eldorado Pkwy. McKinney Fire Station 5 6600 Virginia Pkwy. McKinney Fire Station 7 861 S. Independence Pkwy. Slaughter Elementary School 2706 Wolford St. Webb Elementary School 810 E. Louisiana St

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McKINNEY COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION www.McKinneyCDC.org

For more information, visit: McKinneyTexas.org/Vote

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MCKINNEY EDITION • OCTOBER 2020

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

MARKET TEAM GENERAL MANAGER Vicki Chen vchen@communityimpact.com EDITOR Miranda Jaimes SENIOR REPORTER William C. Wadsack REPORTER Elizabeth Uclés GRAPHIC DESIGNER Chelsea Peters ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Miranda Barhydt METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Christal Howard MANAGING EDITOR Valerie Wigglesworth ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Breanna Flores CORPORATE LEADERSHIP PUBLISHERS AND FOUNDERS John and Jennifer Garrett GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Warner John and Jennifer Garrett began Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 in P ! ugerville, TX. The company’s mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Today, we operate across " ve metropolitan areas, providing hyperlocal, nonpartisan news produced by our full- time journalists in each community we serve. CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES DIRECTOR Tess Coverman WHOWE ARE

FROMVICKI: Early voting in Texas is underway and will continue until Oct. 30, and Election Day, Nov. 3, is just around the corner. In this issue, read about how county o ! cials have prepared for an in " ux of voters during this unique election year (see Page 12). Readers can also # nd our 2020 Voter Guide online at communityimpact.com/ voter-guide. There, we have posted sample ballots, local candidate Q&A’s, voter ID information and election stories. We will also share results there as they come in. If you are voting in person, identify your polling location, block out time on your calendar, arrange transportation and # nd an accountability buddy to check in with after you’ve both cast your votes. Remember, Collin County voters can cast their ballot at any polling location within the county. Happy voting! Vicki Chen, GENERALMANAGER

BECOMEA#COMMUNITYPATRON Please join your friends and neighbors in support of Community Impact

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FROMMIRANDA: I hope everyone is taking opportunities for themselves this season and exploring places they may or may not have been before. In this edition, we aim to help with that. Check out our Local Getaway Guide on Page 22 for attractions in and around McKinney. Miranda Jaimes, EDITOR

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5

MCKINNEY EDITION • OCTOBER 2020

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened, are coming soon or celebrating anniversaries

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7 Two new businesses, Roll On In and Buzzed Bull Creamery , will open this winter in a shared location at 7001 S. Custer Road, Ste. 600, McKinney. Roll On In will have sushi burritos, sushi tacos, savory sushi donuts, crab rangoon and hibachi in a customizable setting. Buzzed Bell Creamery will o ! er customers ice cream, shakes, and an espresso bar. Adults 21 and up will have the option to have their ice cream infused with their favorite alcohol. www.rollonin.com, www.buzzedbullcreamery.com 8 A new Freedom Powersports is under construction at the southeast corner of North Central Expressway and Bloomdale Road in McKinney. The facility will be built on about 4 acres of land and will consist of approximately 33,000 square feet for recreational vehicle sales and service facilities, according to city documents. The business intends to relocate from its current location at 2110 N. Central Expressway, McKinney, to this new facility, Development Services Executive Director Michael Quint said. An opening date has not been announced. 972-736-9584. www.freedompowersportsmckinney.com ANNIVERSARIES 9 Dogtopia of McKinney marked its " rst anniversary with a fall carnival Oct. 17 at 8416 Stacy Road, McKinney. The modern, nearly 5,500-square-foot, open- play facility allows dogs to socialize and learn skills. Dogtopia also recently com- pleted a fenced-in outdoor area where dogs can enjoy the sun. 972-954-2322. www.dogtopia.com/mckinney E . V I R GI N I A S T . E . L O U I S I A N A S 5

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NOWOPEN 1 CT Provisions opened Oct. 1 at 205 W. Louisiana St., Ste. 102, McKinney, in the former location of The Donut Kitchen. The menu serves American dishes with a mod- ern take, including oysters, mussels, wild boar bolognese and rainbow trout. The bar area also serves signature cocktails and beverages designed to complement the meal. The restaurant has been redesigned and has a walk-up window where people can order drinks to go. 469-631-0707. www.ctprovisions.com 2 Grind Burger Bar Y Taqueria opened Sept. 28 at 3350 Virginia Parkway, Ste. 400, McKinney. This marks the third location of The Grind Burger Bar + Tap Room and the second in McKinney. This newest location features more Tex-Mex items, such as quesadillas and tacos, with meats roasted in-house and dishes made from scratch. 214-548-5787. www.grindburgerbar.com

COMING SOON 5 Gloria’s Latin Cuisine is expected to open around late October at 3635 W. University Drive, McKinney. This will be the 21st Gloria’s restaurant in Texas and will also be one of the company’s " rst free-standing restaurants built by Gloria’s from the ground up. It will feature a new interior design that includes brighter, Latin-inspired decor; colorful booths; expanded outdoor dining; a private dining room and an upscale bar, according to a Gloria’s representative. The restaurant’s menu features Latin and Tex-Mex dishes. www.gloriascuisine.com 6 Phenix Salon Suites is set to open in early November as one of the " rst busi- nesses at McKinney’s newest mixed-use development site, Hub 121. The business will be located at 6700 Alma Road, Ste. 100, McKinney, and will o ! er 34 suites for salon professionals. 469-261-2775. www.phenixsalonstx.com

3 Allay Spine and Pain Management opened in June at 3725 S. Lake Forest Drive, Ste. 114. McKinney. The business is headed by Dr. Douglas Maxey and o ! ers a variety of therapies, such as spinal cord stimulation, to manage or eliminate various conditions, such as back pain, joint pain, neck pain, sciatica, arthritis and complex regional pain syndrome. 469-545-1082. www.allayspineandpain.com 4 The Guava Tree was expected to open the week of Oct. 19 at 104 S. Chest- nut St., McKinney. Owners and operators Onel and Pam Perez said the restaurant will have traditional Cuban menu items, such as Cuban sandwiches, vaca frita, croquettes and pastelitos, as well as Cu- ban-inspired dishes, such as loaded yucca fries, a chicken-fried sandwich, wings and Cuban donuts. In addition to food, the restaurant will also serve a variety of drinks, including mojitos, Guava Tree Sap and McKinney Libre. 972-352-0943. www.theguavatreetruck.com

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY MIRANDA JAIMES

WE’RE COMMITTED TO KEEPING YOU SAFE AND WELL FED!

We’re social distancing, minimizing contact, using Personal Protective Equipment, frequently cleaning and disinfecting high touch surfaces and have hand sanitizer available

LOCALLY " OWNED & OPERATED

RPM xConstruction plans to relocate its headquarters to McKinney.

RENDERING COURTESY PROSS DESIGN GROUP

FEATURED IMPACT COMING SOON RPM xConstruction , a premier construction services ! rm, announced Sept. 9 that it will establish its new corporate headquarters at McKinney Corporate Center Craig Ranch. “After looking at all that the McKinney Corporate Center has to o " er, we chose this site as our future,” RPM Manager Barry Rich said in a news release. “With the tremendous growth of RPM and our a # liated companies over the last 10 years, we feel McKinney Corporate Center Craig Ranch is a perfect ! t for us.” RPM will relocate from its current site in Plano to build a three-story, 90,000-square-foot o # ce building

on Meyer Way in McKinney for its corporate sta " and its approximately 750 employees. “RPM is a leader in their industry and the decision to locate the company’s new HQ in McKinney is one we highly value,” McKinney Mayor George Fuller said in the news release. Construction on the project is expected to begin in early 2021 and to be completed in early 2022. 214-239-4722 www.rpmxconstruction.com

301 N. Custer Rd. #180 McKinney, Texas 214-592-8841 | ! .com/McKinneyUncorkd UNCORKDBARANDGRILL.COM ORDER " ONLINE " FOR " TAKE " OUT " AT

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Roll On In

Dogtopia of McKinney

COURTESY ROLL ON IN

COURTESY DOGTOPIA OF MCKINNEY

CLOSINGS 12 Texana Grill , a new restaurant o ! ering a menu inspired by the Texas Hill Country, closed in September. The restaurant had opened at 1222 N. Central Expressway, McKinney, in July. Before opening as Texana, the building formerly housed El Corazon Tex Mex restaurant. Texana Grill’s menu included items such as smoked barbecue meats by the pound and hand-breaded chicken " ngers. www.texanagrill.com 13 Avalanche Dessert Lounge per- manently closed Sept. 26 due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The dessert lounge o ! ered funnel cakes with a variety of toppings, milkshakes, tableside s’mores and ice cream sandwiches made from doughnuts. The business was located at 3530 W. University Drive, Ste. 200, McKinney. 214-548-5481. www.facebook.com/avalanche dessertlounge

10 MillHouse , a membership-based, all-women coworking center and creative space, marked its " rst year of business Oct. 15 at The Cotton Mill in McKinney. MillHouse is planning for an addition- al 3,500 square feet in the next few months, with two shared photography studios and individual studios for Mill- House members. MillHouse McKinney is located at 610 Elm St., Ste. 1000, McKin- ney. www.millhousemckinney.com NEWOWNERSHIP 11 CBRE Global Investors, CBRE’s real assets investment management subsidi- ary, has sponsored a fund to acquire the Kinstead McKinney Apartments . The sale was completed Sept. 17, according to a news release from developer Zom Living. Kinstead comprises six three-sto- ry buildings along SH 121 with 376 units, per the news release. The property is located at 5701 McKinney Place Drive, McKinney. 833-977-2703. www.kinsteadmckinney.com

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MCKINNEY EDITION • OCTOBER 2020

TO ! DO LIST

October & November events

COMPILED BY ELIZABETH UCLÉS

30 THROUGH 31

LEGENDS OFMCKINNEY

GHOSTWALK Attendees can build their own adventure to learn about various historical tales. Options include a downtown trolley tour, drama productions depicting haunted scenes and a guided tour of McKinney’s oldest homes. Various times. $15-$25. Chestnut Square, 315 Chestnut St., McKinney. 972-562-8790. www.chestnutsquare.org/ghost-walk NOVEMBER 04 ART HISTORY LECTURE This November, the Heard-Craig Center for the Arts’ monthly art history lecture will focus on the similarities and di " erences between the Art Deco and Art Nouveau movements. 12:30-1:30 p.m. Free. Heard-Craig Center for the Arts, 205 W. Hunt St., McKinney. 972-569-6909. www.heardcraig.org 07 INTRO TO KNITTING This beginners class will teach attendees about yarn, knitting and how to do a knitted cast and knit stitch. Students will need to purchase knitting needles and one skein worsted weight yarn for the class. 10-11 a.m. $20. McKinney Knittery, 117 W. Louisiana St., McKinney. 469-714-4002. www.mckinneyknittery.com

OCT. 21

WAYBACKWEDNESDAY CHESTNUT SQUARE HISTORICAL VILLAGE

OCT. 24

FARMERSMARKET CHESTNUT SQUARE

Children will learn about food preservation basics, make jelly or preserves and stamp a label the way it was done 150 years ago. 4-5:30 p.m. $25-$120. Chestnut Square Historical Village, 315 S. Chestnut St., The Bevel House, McKinney. 972-562-8790. www.eventbrite.com/e/wayback-wednesday- handson-heritage-workshop-series-tickets-121782975157

Vendors will o ! er grass-fed beef, free-range chicken and eggs, and farm-fresh produce at the McKinney Farmers Market. Specialty items, such as tamales, pastries, teas, ginger beer, jerky and more, will be available. 8 a.m.-noon. Free. Farmers Market at Chestnut Square, 315 S. Chestnut St., McKinney. 972-562-8790. www.chestnutsquare.org

PHOTOS COURTESY CHESTNUT SQUARE

24 OX&PINEWAREHOUSE SALE Ox & Pine will host its ! rst warehouse sale this October. Various leather products, such as journals, tote bags, luggage tags and lanyards, will be available for purchase. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Free (attendance). 707 N. Chestnut St., McKinney. https://oxandpine.com/

30 CRFSMOVIE ON THE LAWN: ‘HOCUS POCUS’ Craig Ranch Fitness & Spa will host a screening of “Hocus Pocus.” Attendees are invited to bring their own chairs and blankets. 7-8:30 p.m. $5 (adult members), $7 (adult nonmembers), free (children). 7910 Collin McKinney Parkway,

OCTOBER 23 MIKE ALLYN LIVE See classic rock ‘n’ roll artist Mike Allyn perform while enjoying food and wine for purchase. 8-11 p.m. Free. Lone Star Wine Cellars, 103 E. Virginia St., McKinney. 972-547-9463. www.lonestarwinecellars.com

McKinney. 214-383-1000. www.craigranch ! tness.com

Find more or submit McKinney events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES MCKINNEY

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at B Lake Forest Drive and Collin McKin- ney Parkway are nearing completion. The Stacy Road and Collin McKinney Parkway tra " c signal is expected to start oper- ating in mid-October. The Lake Forest Drive and Collin McKinney Parkway tra " c signal is expected to start operating in late October or early November. Timeline: April-November Cost: $800,000

COMPILED BY MIRANDA JAIMES ONGOING PROJECTS 1 ‘Light Up Louisiana’ downtown improvements In September, crews completed the ! rst phase of the “Light Up Louisiana” project, which included all major paving and con- struction from Church Street to Kentucky Street. Through October, the contractor will examine sidewalks and any remain- ing minor construction elements. At this time, new lights will also be placed and begin operating. From October through December, there will be no major construction. The second phase of the project will begin in early January. Visit www.mckinneytexas.org/louisiana for more updates and resources for visiting downtown McKinney. Timeline: May-October (Phase 1), Janu- ary-July 2021 (Phase 2) Cost: $4.9 million Funding source: city of McKinney 2 Stacy Road widening Crews will begin work in late October to widen Stacy Road between Custer Road and Ridge Road. With the widening, crews will add a new travel lane in each direction within the existing median. A new tra " c signal will be installed at the intersection of Stacy and McKinney Ranch Parkway. No major tra " c impact is expected for the month of October. Starting in November, however, drivers can look for intermittent lane closures throughout the project area. Timeline: October 2020-October 2021 Cost: $6.2 million Funding source: city of McKinney 3 Tra ! c signal installations New tra " c signal installations at A Sta- cy Road and Collin McKinney Parkway and

4900 Preston Rd. | Suite 101 Frisco, TX 75034 972-377-8188 –‘™ƒ†…‘—–”›”‘‘Ƥ‰†ˆ™Ǥ…‘

Funding source: city of McKinney 4 Airport Drive improvements

Construction of various improvements along Airport Drive between Industrial Boulevard and Harry McKillop Boulevard/ FM 546 has been underway since April. During the month of October, Wattley Way, or the old FM 546, will be closed at Airport Drive with detour routes provided while remaining intersection improve- ments are constructed. Timeline: April 2020-April 2021 Cost: $1.8 million Funding source: city of McKinney UPCOMING PROJECTS 5 Intersection improvements Construction is expected to begin in No- vember for annual improvements to four major intersections: A McKinney Ranch Parkway and Lake Forest Drive; B Eldorado Parkway and Alma Road; C Hardin Boulevard and White Avenue; and D Virginia Parkway and Stonebridge Drive. The improvements will consist of the addition of new turn lanes and signal improvements. Timeline: November 2020-November 2021 Cost: $2.4 million Funding source: city of McKinney

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MCKINNEY EDITION • OCTOBER 2020

DEVELOPMENT UPDATES

Vote to keep your Collin County Judges, the candidates with the best knowledge & experience for our future. DO YOU THINK EXPERIENCE MATTERS? No more straight ticket voting. Vote from the White House to the Courthouse! EARLY VOTING: October 13 - October 30, 2020 ELECTION DAY: November 3, 2020

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A splash pad is among the features planned for Prestwyck Neighborhood Park. (Rendering courtesy McKinney Parks and Recreation)

PRESTWYCK NEIGHBORHOOD PARK MCKINNEY The city is building a new 17-acre park in the Prestwyck neighborhood at the intersection of Coit Road and East University Drive. The park will include many features, such as play equipment, a splash pad, a pavilion, a sports court, shade structures, o ! -street parking, learning stations and " tness stations. It will also have traditional park amenities that create pedestrian connectivity with trails and landscaping. City o # cials said 10 acres of the park will be city-owned, and 7.6 acres will be owned

UNIVERSITY DR.

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and operated by the neighborhood’s homeowners association. The project’s cost is estimated at $3.3 million. Construction is set to begin in November and to wrap up in late summer 2021.

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Renovations were recently completed at Johnson House, which will turn 150 years old this year. (Courtesy The Heritage Guild of Collin County)

HERITAGE VILLAGE AT CHESTNUT SQUARE FACILITIES

to McKinney documents. The house was purchased by Chestnut Square in the 1980s but had not been renovated until now, per an MCDC presentation. Repairs have been completed to the chimney. New wallpaper has been added to the bride’s dressing room, and eventually, the Heritage Guild will repaper, refurbish or paint the entry hall, the dining room and the main historic room. The project also repaired and repainted the siding at Dixie’s Store, or the 1918 Brimer Anderson Grocery; installed a new speaker and PA system; installed arti " cial turf in the wedding garden; and changed and refurbished the boardwalk, awnings and porches.

MCKINNEY Improvements were recently completed at Heritage Village at Chestnut Square. Located on two blocks at Chestnut and Anthony streets, Chestnut Square is home to " ve historic houses, including the oldest one in McKinney as well as a general store and the former Foote Baptist Church. It is operated by the Heritage Guild of Collin County. The $92,500 project was funded in part by a $59,500 grant from the McKinney Community Development Corporation. Included in the project were renovations to the Johnson House, which functions as a bridal suite for weddings, according

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

PaintedTree residential community to o ! er about 3,400homes inMcKinney

BY MIRANDA JAIMES

the site for the community, Woliver said, and the development will preserve much of it so as to include mature trees and a natural trail system as an amenity to residents. Painted Tree will also feature a 20-acre lake, which is the largest lake in the area, according to a news release from Oxland Advisors. The 1,100-acre site was purchased earlier this month by New York-based JEN Partners. The " rst phases of development for the project will get underway in 2021, and homes will be on the ground beginning in 2022, Woliver said. Painted Tree will feature a variety of homes and builders with price points ranging from smaller $300,000 homes to more expensive options. “That’s what makes a good com- munity,” Woliver said. “A community shouldn’t be exclusive to one. It needs to be inclusive to all.”

Painted Tree, a new community set on more than 1,000 acres in McKin- ney, is being developed with 3,400 residences. Painted Tree will be located north of US 380 near Lake Forest Boulevard and will o ! er houses ranging from detached townhomes and cottages to larger family homes and luxury estates. Oxland Advisors, a Dallas-based development and consulting " rm, will develop the community. “With anything this size, you want to provide homes that " t di ! erent demographics, di ! erent life stages, di ! erent price points,” Oxland Advi- sors founder TomWoliver said. In addition to o ! ering an array of homes, the community will have a focus on nature and the surrounding environment, Woliver said. A 200- acre greenbelt sits in the middle of

Painted Tree will be divided into several districts, including the Village District, pictured here. (Renderings courtesy Oxland Advisors)

BLOOMDALE RD.

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Painted Tree will o ! er an outpost amenity center.

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MCKINNEY EDITION • OCTOBER 2020

Voters heading to the polls in unprecedented numbers NEWS REPORT

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into place by state and local govern- ment to make the process simpler, such as extending early voting, are not enough. He also said he believes the county should have extended voting hours. “I am encouraged that the governor did add another week to early vot- ing,” Rawlins said. “But as far as our county goes, we have not signi ! cantly extended the early voting hours to make it easier for people to vote.” In-person voters are advised to come prepared with who they plan to vote for, to vote during o # -peak hours and to cast their ballot as early as possible. “The goal is to try to … get people … in and out as quickly as possible but not [to rush] them if they want to take time to spend at that machine a little Logistical challenges related to social distancing and sanitation are driving up costs and forcing o " cials to rethink the layout of polling locations. Collin County has spent about $250,000 on additional voting equip- ment, such as ballot counters and curb- side voting devices, Sherbet said. The county has also received an additional $1.2 million in grants for the election. The full cost of the election will not be known until after Election Day, Sherbet added. “I would say, easily, it could increase it by 50% or double the cost possibly when it’s all said and done,” he said. The virus has also spurred a greater bit longer,” Sherbet said. Takingeveryprecaution

BY MAKENZIE PLUSNICK

In the ! rst two days of early voting, 77,223 Collin County voters cast their ballots in person. That surge in voter turnout has administrators preparing for an election that will look quite dif- ferent from those of years past. Polls opened Oct. 13 for early voting in McKinney, and election o " cials are expecting a record number of voters due to an increase in registrations in the county. To prepare for the Nov. 3 election, the county has upped the number of voting centers by 40% and early voting locations by nearly 20% compared to the 2016 presidential elec- tion, Collin County Elections Adminis- trator Bruce Sherbet said. Increased turnout is just one factor driving the county’s decision to add more polling places. County leaders said they hope the changes will also lead to smaller crowds and increased social distancing. “Our biggest objective was to have a safe environment—as safe as possible— in our polling places for our poll work- ers and for our voters,” Sherbet said. State and local leaders have taken steps to try to minimize the inconve- niences posed by the pandemic. Ear- lier this summer, Gov. Greg Abbott extended early voting by six days. Col- lin County is also allowing residents with compromised immune systems or who have trouble standing to vote curbside. However, some, like Mike Rawlins, chair of the Collin County Democratic Party, believe that the safeguards put

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Styluses are required. The county will provide, or voters can bring one from home. Common household items that can be used as styluses include: STYLUSES

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

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number of eligible voters to apply to vote by mail. As of mid-Septem- ber, Collin County expects to receive 30,000 mail-in ballots this election, an increase from the 21,000 mail-in bal- lots it received for the 2016 presidential election, Sherbet said. Neal Katz, executive director of the Collin County Republican Party and chair of the Collin County Ballot Board, said he spent time ahead of this elec- tion reassuring voters that their mail-in ballots will count. The typical rejection rate in the county has been one ballot per 1,000 cast in years past, he said. “It’s not that much,” he said. “Our aim is tomake sure every vote counts if it’s done correctly and fairly.” What toexpect Despite the surge in mail-in ballots, Rawlins said he believes that eagerness to participate in what voters deem a historic election will likely outweigh concerns around the coronavirus pandemic. “My guess is that if this were a nor- mal year, the pandemic would prob- ably depress turnout. But it is not a normal year,” he said. Collin County Republican Party o " cials agreed that the pandemic is TIPS FORVOTING Here are some tips from Collin County Election Administrator Bruce Sherbet on how to make voting as smooth as possible. • Vote early. Early voting runs through Oct. 30. • Vote during o ! -peak hours, such as mid-morning. • Visit www.communityimpact. com/vote to " nd candidate Q&As and more information.

Turnout is expected to surge in Collin County due to an increase in the number of registered voters and to high interest in the election.

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unlikely to deter voters. “Collin County really turns out heavily,” Katz said. “Right now, we have 623,000 registered voters, so I’m expecting 400,000 people to vote.” Collin County allows residents to cast ballots at any county polling loca- tionduring earlyvoting andonElection Day. Voters can check the estimated wait time at each location by visiting the county’s website. All signs point to higher turnout for this election, Sherbet said, adding that he projects 70% of registered voters will participate. “We know even if we had a nor- mal percentage [of voters] you get in a presidential election, which would be somewhere around 66% turnout to 67% turnout, we’re going to set a record just in numbers just because we have so many more registered voters,” he said.

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This year’s election will look di ! erent from those of years past. Here is what voters should know before heading to the polls.

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SANITATIONGUIDELINES Masks are strongly recommended but not required. Collin County will provide masks for those who forgot theirs. Machines will be sanitized between each voter.

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13

MCKINNEY EDITION • OCTOBER 2020

EDUCATION McKinney ISD sees fewer substitutes in classrooms

MISDbegins ! rst steps to build new elementary school A new McKinney ISD elementary school could be ready to welcome students as early as fall 2023. The MISD board of trustees approved a request for quali " ca- tions for architectural services for the elementary school, location unknown, at its Sept. 22 meeting. Current demographic projections indicate the district will need a new elementary school at the start of the fall 2023 school year, according to district documents. “In our last projection, it looks like our schools in the north are becoming over capacity due to growth,” MISD Chief Operations O ! cer Greg Suttle said at the meeting. Construction could start in Sep- tember 2021, and the school would open in August 2023, Suttle said. BY ELIZABETH UCLÉS

SUBSTITUTE REQUIREMENTS

are in higher demand due to COVID- 19 concerns, said Steven Poole, executive director of United Educa- tors Association of Texas. “There’s always been a demand for substitute teachers, and this is just going to heighten that,” Poole said. Some school districts are earmark- ing extra funds to procure substitute teachers this year. In August, Lewisville ISD approved roughly $650,000 in extra funding to cover pay increases for substi- tute teachers. Certi " ed substitute teachers will receive an additional $15 per day, and substitutes with a degree will have an increased pay of $10 per day. As of Jan. 1, daily rates in McKinney ISD are $110 for a certi " ed teacher from any state, $100 for a substitute with a bachelor’s degree or higher and $90 for a substitute with a high school diploma or equivalent. MISD put out a call on its Facebook page Sept. 11 for quali " ed substitutes. Cunningham said the district is

Due to concerns related to the coronavirus pandemic, fewer sub- stitutes have been in McKinney ISD classrooms this year. MISD’s pool of substitutes this school year was larger than aver- age, with 470 active substitutes as compared to the usual 350-400 substitutes, said Cody Cunningham, district chief communications and support services o ! cer. But the number of substitutes in classrooms has been “much lower,” he said. “Only 110 have subbed this year,” Cunningham said in an email late September. “Surveys indicate that over half of our applicant pool is concerned with the COVID-19 pan- demic, and many other applicants have committed to other jobs or have obligations at home.” Cunningham said some substitutes who have worked in years past have decided to stay home to help a child in virtual learning. Across Texas, substitute teachers BY ELIZABETH UCLÉS & MIRANDA JAIMES

• Résumé • Teaching certi ! cate, if applicable • Proof of education (college transcript or high school diploma) • Three references, including at least one from a current or most recent employer All substitute applications with McKinney ISD must be submitted online and must contain the following.

SOURCE: MCKINNEY ISD " COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

optimistic that more substitutes will feel comfortable substitute teaching as COVID-19 cases decline in McKin- ney and Collin County. “We know this will be a challenging year, but we are con " dent that these numbers will increase throughout the year,” he said. Liesbeth Powers contributed to this report.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY& COUNTY

News fromMcKinney & Collin County

HIGHLIGHTS MCKINNEY The Board of Adjustments agreed Sept. 30 that one of the plants operated by Cowtown Redi-Mix has until Aug. 26, 2027, to come into compliance with the zoning for that area or to close. The other plant, Martin Marietta, has until April 29, 2021, to close or to come into compliance. MCKINNEY A new decorated shipping container arrived Sept. 28 on Kentucky Street in downtown McKinney. The container comes from Better Block in a Box, which aims to “promote the growth of healthy and vibrant neighborhoods.” Once set up, the container can become a bar, a kiosk or an inside gallery. The container will allow McKinney to have “pop-up events.” Collin County Commissioners Court Meets Oct. 26 and Nov. 2, 9, and 16 at 1:30 p.m. www.collincountytx.gov McKinney City Council Meets Oct. 20 and Nov. 3 and 17 at 6 p.m. www.mckinneytexas.org McKinney ISD Meets Oct. 27 and Nov. 17 at 7 p.m. www.mckinneyisd.net MEETINGSWE COVER

Runo ! set for SenateDistrict 30

Plansmove forward for newuses on62 acres inMcKinney

BY WILLIAM C. WADSACK

21,814 votes, according to uno $ cial results. The runo " will be held because no candidate received at least 50% of total votes cast. Gov. Greg Abbott has set Saturday, Dec. 19 as the date for the special runo " election. The early voting period for this elec- tion will begin Wednesday, Dec. 9. The District 30 seat represents 14 counties, including a portion in McKinney. Fallon vacated the seat after being nominated to run in the Nov. 3 election for the District 4 seat in the U.S. House of Representatives.

MCKINNEY State Rep. Drew Springer, R ! Muenster, and Republican Shelley Luther of Dallas are headed to a runo " for the Texas Senate District 30 seat recently vacated by Sen. Pat Fallon, R ! Prosper. Springer and Luther received the two highest numbers of votes among six candidates in the Sept. 29 special election. There were fewer than 100 votes separating the two. Springer received 21,903 votes, for 31.83% of the vote, to Luther’s 31.7%, with

BY MIRANDA JAIMES

MCKINNEY More than 62 acres of land in McKinney have been given initial approval for new uses through rezoning. On Oct. 13, the McKinney Planning and Zoning Commission recommended reshu # ing the zoning to keep with the o $ ce and retail elements at the site and also to place them into speci % c tracts. The proposed rezoning provides for seven tracts, ranging from regional o $ ce and residential uses. The project will be presented to City Council at its Nov. 3 meeting.

County plans to remove COVID " 19dashboard

BY WILLIAM C. WADSACK

Commissioners will provide a link instead to the DSHS site, which includes Collin County data and state data. They acknowledged there would be two more commis- sioners court meetings before that date in which they could change their minds if there was a reason to.

COLLIN COUNTY O $ cials said Oct. 13 they plan to remove the Collin County COVID-19 dashboard by the end of the month due to con- tinued inaccuracies in the data being provided by the Texas Department of State Health Services.

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MCKINNEY EDITION • OCTOBER 2020

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