Richardson May 2020

RICHARDSON EDITION

VOLUME 2, ISSUE 9  MAY 20JUNE 17, 2020

ONLINE AT

Local economy relaunch brings mixed reactions

back to business Statewide orders allowed restaurants to reopen their dining rooms at 25% capacity on May 1 and at 50% on May 18. Community Impact Newspaper asked 100 local restaurants about their plans and found that the majority chose to reopen at limited occupancy May 1.

BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER AND MAKENZIE PLUSNICK

no immediate plans/unsure 35%

After six weeks of sheltering in place, Gov. Greg Abbott announced in late April that restaurants and nonessential retailers could reopen on a limited basis. Amid steadily rising coronavirus case counts, some business owners in Rich- ardson said the risk was not worth the reward, while others chose to reopen with added safeguards in place. Augustine Jimenez, owner of Frank- ie’s Mexican Cuisine in Canyon Creek, said he made the decision to reopen May 1 with his customers and employ- ees in mind. Seating was spaced out CONTINUED ON 19

reopened for dine-in May 1 58%

7%

plan to reopen for dine-in May 18

Some restaurants reopened, while others chose to continue with takeout and delivery. (Olivia Lueckemeyer/Community Impact Newspaper)

Ocials in Richardson ISD are preparing for the possibility of remote learning continuing in the fall while also weighing whether virtual school could be a permanent option for some students. RISD announced March 16 the closure of schools to combat spread of the novel coronavirus. The announcement lined up with the end of spring break, which was extended by two days to give educators more time to prepare for the shift. By March 25, the CONTINUED ON 20 BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER AND MAKENZIE PLUSNICK RISDreectsonvirtual learning, plans for next year

“IT’S A CONSENSUS WITH MOST OF MY STUDENTS AND PARENTS THAT WE WOULD ALL RATHER BE BACK IN THE SCHOOL … IT’S DEFINITELY A LITTLE BIT HARDER TO MAINTAIN THAT CONNECTION.”

KATY LEA, RISD TEACHER

Kindergarten student Grace Anne Bennett attends class via Zoom. (Courtesy Alissa Raymond Bennett)

Please join your friends and neighbors in support of Community Impact Newspaper ’s legacy of local, reliable reporting by making a contribution. Any amount matters. Together, we can continue to ensure our citizens stay informed and keep our local businesses thriving. Become a #CommunityPatron

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RICHARDSON EDITION • MAY 2020

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

CONTENTS

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

GROCERY GUIDE

PUBLISHERS AND FOUNDERS John and Jennifer Garrett PUBLISHERDFWMETRO Christal Howard GENERAL MANAGER Leanne Libby, llibby@communityimpact.com EDITORIAL EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Lanane MANAGING EDITOR Valerie Wigglesworth ASSOCIATE MANAGING EDITOR Olivia Lueckemeyer REPORTER Makenzie Plusnick STAFFWRITERS Miranda Jaimes, Liesbeth Powers COPY CHIEF Andy Comer COPY EDITORS Ben Dickerson, Kasey Salisbury ADVERTISING SALES DIRECTOR Tess Coverman ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Tracy Ruckel DESIGN CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Aubrey Galloway ASSOCIATE ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Breanna Flores GRAPHIC DESIGNER Chelsea Peters STAFF DESIGNERS Chase Autin, Cherry He, Ellen Jackson, Caitlin Whittington BUSINESS GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER Claire Love ABOUT US John and Jennifer Garrett began Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 in Pugerville, Texas. The company’s mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. CONTACT US

FROMLEANNE: To be a good journalist is to be driven by a mission to inform, but our team strives to do even more than that. We want our work to be a light in our industry and to our readers every day. We hope that receiving your Community Impact Newspaper in the mail is a light for you and your family during this pandemic. We also hope it inspires you to be a light for others as we all navigate the months of change ahead. Leanne Libby, GENERALMANAGER

FROMOLIVIA: While working from home, we continue to share stories about Richardson during this unparalleled time. Reporter Makenzie Plusnick and I are reporting on all the new ways people are nding to thrive and prove we are all in this together. We would love to hear from you about the stories you want to read. If you have a story idea, please email olueckemeyer@communityimpact.com. Olivia Lueckemeyer, EDITOR

GROCERY GUIDE

6

When and where to shop TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES 8 Road projects to know

THIS ISSUE BY THE NUMBERS

18,966

19

3

5

Rounds of golf

Local sources New businesses Transportation updates

TRANSPORTATION DART bus network redesign CITY& COUNTY Latest local news BUSINESS FEATURE Legendary Black Belt Academy DINING FEATURE

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© 2020 Community Impact Newspaper Co. All Rights Reserved. No reproduction of any portion of this issue is allowed without written permission from the publisher.

CORRECTION: Volume 2, Issue8 The story on Page 8 titled “Dining Guide” should have listed Tineo Peruvian Cafe’s phone number as 214-256-4535.

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RICHARDSON EDITION • MAY 2020

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

GROCERY GUIDE

NOWOPEN Chiloso Mexican Bistro opened March 23 in the Richardson Heights Shopping Center at 100 S. Central Expressway, Ste. 104, Richardson. It was previous- ly located at 700 E. Campbell Road, Richardson. The fast-casual restaurant lets customers build their own tacos, burritos, nachos, salads and bowls. 972-231-3226. www.chilosomexicanbistro.com Fusion Vibes Kitchen + Bar opened April 20 at 100 S. Central Expressway, Ste. 50, Richardson. The restaurant serves dishes inspired by Nigerian food, such as suya wings and waffles and suya steak wraps. It is currently offering limited dine-in as well as pickup and delivery via third-party partners. 972-543-3888. www.fusionvibes.com Nana’s Country Citchen & Catering opened at 2148 E. Belt Line Road, Richardson, on March 14. The restaurant serves daily specials, such as fried chick- en and smothered pork chops. It also offers a regular menu, which includes dishes such as fish and shrimp baskets. 469-917-9245 COMING SOON Burn Boot Camp is opening a location at 120 W. CityLine Drive, Ste. 100, Rich- ardson, according to a spokesperson for the business. The women-focused gym, expected to open in early summer, will offer personal training in group settings. Members can attend unlimited 45-min- ute sessions, get personalized nutrition guidance and have one-on-one meetings with trainers. The gym will also offer complimentary child care. www.burn- bootcamp.com/richardson-tx. A slowdown in construction activity caused by COVID-19 has delayed the opening of Flourish Dental Boutique in Richardson’s CityLine development. The practice was originally supposed to open in February, but owner Toni Engram said she now hopes to open in late May or early June. The holistic, all-natural practice will offer general dentistry services and dental surgery. It is located at 1415 State St., Ste. 800, Richardson. 469-676-2777. www.flourish.dental

Tri Tip Grill is expected to open in late May at CityLine at 1417 Renner Road, Ste. 300, Richardson. The restaurant was initially supposed to open in March but was delayed due to the coronavirus pan- demic. The menu features sandwiches, barbecue platters, burgers and salads. The restaurant also has a location at The Star in Frisco. 972-987-8241. www.tritipgrill.com Victor Hugo’s has pushed back the opening of its Richardson location to late summer, owner Brianna Ruelas said. The restaurant, which hails from its flagship location in Oak Cliff, serves New American bistro-style cuisine, craft brews and signature cocktails. The second location will be located in the Richardson Heights Shopping Center at 100 S. Central Expressway, Ste. 49, Richardson. It was originally expected to open in October. 214-238-6797 (Oak Cliff location). www.victorhugos.com RENOVATIONS The McDonald’s at 550 Centennial Blvd., Richardson, will undergo a series of simple renovations beginning June 8. The fast-food restaurant’s dining room will be closed during construction, but the drive-thru will remain open, and delivery will be available. Construction is expected to be completed by the end of June. 972-690-5049. www.mcdonalds.com CLOSING Chang Jing Korean BBQ in the DFW Chinatown development shuttered Feb. 15, according to a sign on the door. Tofu Factory Korean Cuisine will take its place, according to the sign. The restau- rant, located at 400 N. Greenville Ave., Ste. 11B, Richardson, served traditional Korean food, such as short ribs and pork belly. www.dfwchinatown.com/ changjingkorean Jasper’s temporarily closed its doors at 1251 State St., Ste. 950, Richardson, on March 27. The menu includes pan-seared trout and slow-cooked short rib. It plans to reopen the same date as State Farm, tentatively set for June 1. 214-716-2610. www.abacusjaspers.com

Richardson grocery stores are finding ways to offer food to everyone while also attempting to slow the spread of the virus. Innovations include online ordering, curbside pickup, direct delivery and senior hours.

KEY:

Direct delivery Online ordering

Curbside pickup

Third-party delivery

1 Albertsons 2165 E. Buckingham Road 972-680-1711 www.albertsons.com

469-491-4005 www.dollargeneral.com COVID-19 Hours: 8 a.m.-9 p.m. Senior hours: 8-9 a.m. daily 5 Dollar General 1455 Buckingham Road, Ste. 200 972-587-9390 www.dollargeneral.com COVID-19 hours: 8 a.m.-9 p.m. Senior hours: 8-9 a.m. daily 6 Dog Haus Biergarten 744 S. Central Expressway, Ste. 210 214-935-9121 www.doghaus.com COVID-19 hours: 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Sun.-Thu., 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Fri.-Sat. Senior hours: none Haus Market offers essential groceries

COVID-19 hours: 6 a.m.-11 p.m. Senior hours: 6-9 a.m. Tue., Thu. 2 Aldi 1549 E. Belt Line Road 855-955-2534 www.aldi.us/en/ COVID-19 hours: 9 a.m.-8 p.m. Senior hours: 8:30-9:30 a.m. Tue., Thu.

3 Dollar General 521 W. Campbell Road 469-596-0947 www.dollargeneral.com COVID-19 hours: 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Senior hours: 8-9 a.m. daily 4 Dollar General 531 W. Arapaho Road

7 Fiesta Mart 1332 S. Plano Road

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W. Arapaho Rd.

1112 N Floyd Rd #5 Richardson • (972) 231-4876 www.meredithdavisdds.com

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972-994-4300 www.fiestamart.com COVID-19 hours: 7 a.m.-10 p.m. Senior hours: none 8 Good Fortune Supermarket 400 N. Greenville Ave. 972-798-1168 www.goodfortunesupermarket.com COVID-19 Hours: 8:40 a.m.-8 p.m. daily Senior Hours: none 9 India Bazaar 1425 E. Belt Line Road 972-312-0114 www.indiabazaardfw.com COVID-19 hours: 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Mon.-Tue., 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Wed.-Sun. Senior hours: 10-11 a.m. Mon.-Tue.

COVID-19 hours: 8 a.m.-9 p.m. Senior hours: 8-9 a.m. Tue.-Wed. CVS pharmacy open during special hours

19 Tom Thumb 819 W. Arapaho Road 972-235-3917 www.tomthumb.com

COVID-19 hours: 7 a.m.-10 p.m. Senior hours: 7-9 a.m. Tue., Thu. 20 Tom Thumb 1380 W. Campbell Road 972-680-6010 www.tomthumb.com COVID-19 hours: 7 a.m.-11 p.m. Senior hours: 7-9 a.m. Tue., Thu.

21 Tom Thumb 3411 Custer Parkway 972-470-1360 www.tomthumb.com

10 Indo Pak Supermarket 323 E. Polk St. 972-644-7900 www.indopakrichardson.com COVID-19 hours : 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Senior hours: none 11 Kroger

COVID-19 hours: 6 a.m.-11 p.m. Senior hours: 6-9 a.m. Tue., Thu.

22 Walmart Neighborhood Market 1501 E. Buckingham Road 972-235-9389 www.walmart.com COVID-19 hours: 7 a.m.-8:30 p.m. Senior hours: 6-7 a.m. Tue. Pharmacy & Vision Center open for senior hour 23 Walmart Supercenter 13739 N. Central Expressway 972-656-2501 www.walmart.com COVID-19 hours: 7 a.m.-8:30 p.m. Senior hours: 6-7 a.m. Tue. Pharmacy & Vision Center open for senior hour 24 Walmart Supercenter 15757 N. Coit Road 972-235-0681 www.walmart.com COVID-19 hours: 7 a.m.-8:30 p.m. Senior hours: 6-7 a.m. Tue. Pharmacy & Vision Center open for senior hour www.wholefoodsmarket.com COVID-19 Hours: 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Senior hours: 7-8 a.m.daily 26 Zdar Food & Market 214 E. Spring Valley Road 214-238-3466 www.zdarfoodmarket.com COVID-19 hours: 9 a.m.-9 p.m. daily; noon-8 p.m. during Ramadan Senior hours: none 25 Whole Foods 1411 E. Renner Road 214-273-0902

160 N. Coit Road 972-664-0990 www.kroger.com COVID-19 hours: 6 a.m.-1 a.m. Senior hours: 6-7:30 a.m. Tue., Thu., Sat. 12 Kroger 536 Centennial Road 972-437-2233 www.kroger.com COVID-19 hours: 6 a.m.-1 a.m. Senior hours: 6-7:30 a.m. Tue., Thu., Sat.

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We’re Open!

13 Modern Market Eatery 1411 E. Renner Road 469-393-5800 https://modernmarket.com/ COVID-19 hours: 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Senior hours: none Meal box options available

15 Natural Grocers 677 W. Campbell Road, Ste. 100 972-735-9200 www.naturalgrocers.com/store/ dallas-richardson COVID-19 hours: 8 a.m.-8:05 p.m. Mon.- Sat., 9 a.m.-7:35 p.m. Sun. Senior hours: 9-10 a.m. Sun., 8-9 a.m. Wed.

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16 Sara’s Market & Bakery 750 S. Sherman St. 972-437-1122 www.sarasmarketbakery.com COVID-19 hours: 9 a.m.-8 p.m. Senior hours: none 17 Sprouts 1343 W. Campbell Road 214-442-5961 www.sprouts.com COVID-19 hours: 7 a.m.-10 p.m. Senior hours: none

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18 Target 601 S. Plano Road 214-530-0183 www.target.com

For the most up-to-date listings of grocery options, visit communityimpact.com .

972-479-9990 • 101 S. Coit Rd. Richardson, TX richardsonmercantile@gmail.com

7

RICHARDSON EDITION • MAY 2020

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES

BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER

Technology upgrade at intersections Sixty intersections will be improved following Richardson City Council approval May 4 of an interlocal agree- ment between the city and the North Central Texas Council of Governments. The Minor Intersection Improvement Program will replace aging vehicle-de- tection infrastructure along several city corridors. The $480,000 project will be paid for through a $384,000 federal grant supplemented by a 20% local match of $96,000, according to council documents. The city is required to submit status reports semiannually until the project is completed. Reports are due each year on April 7 and Oct. 7. UPCOMING PROJECT

PLANO PKWY.

PGBT TOLL

RENNER RD.

BRECKINRIDGE BLVD.

RICHARDSON

TELECOM PKWY.

4

CAMPBELL RD.

1

COLLINS BLVD.

ARAPAHO RD.

4

APOLLO RD.

2

and will cost $480,000. INTERSECTIONS 60 The Minor Intersection Improvement Program will upgrade technology at

MAIN ST.

BELT LINE RD.

75

78

SPRING VALLEY RD.

BUCKINGHAM RD.

TM; © 2020 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER CO. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. MAP NOT TO SCALE N

ONGOING PROJECTS 1 Campbell Road widening at US 75 Improvements to Campbell Road will begin in late May. The $2 million project will extend the right-turn lane and add a left-turn lane on the southbound US 75 frontage road, install a westbound auxiliary lane on Campbell from Alamo Road to Collins Boulevard, extend the left-turn lane to allow westbound traffic access Alamo from Campbell and improve the traffic signal at the intersec- tion of Campbell and Collins. The project will be funded through city, state and federal resources. Timeline: May-December Cost: $2 million Funding sources: city of Richardson, Tex- as Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration

2 Main Street infrastructure project Work on the Main Street redevelopment project is still on track in Richardson. In late April, the city announced that pavement installation will continue over the coming weeks and should wrap up around the end of May. At that time, traffic will be realigned, but only one lane will remain open. Construction crews are working four 10-hour days each week to account for potential setbacks, including poor weather, according to the city. Timeline: September 2019-first quarter 2021 Cost: $16 million Funding source: city of Richardson 3 Median work on Lookout Drive The lane closures on East Lookout Drive and the work in the median is in conjunc- tion with the Lookout Drive Lift Station

Project. The lift station is located along Spring Lake Drive just north of Lookout on the Crowley Park property. In addition, part of a Crowley Park parking lot will be used for staging, which may result in some construction traffic on Spring Lake. While work in the median is occurring, the left lane of eastbound and westbound Lookout between Jupiter Road and Spring Lake may be closed to traffic. Timeline: January-summer Cost: $2.3 million Funding source: city of Richardson 4 Plano Road sidewalk construction Crews are adding sidewalk along a stretch of Plano Road as part of the Duck Creek Trail project, which aims to continue the trail north from its current terminus at Plano and Apollo Road to Arapaho Road. From there, the trail will head northwest through the Duck Creek corridor to the

intersection of Collins Boulevard and Glenville Drive. From Glenville, the new trail will run west to connect with an existing trail on the south side of Collins, providing a key connection to the Central Trail. The approximate length of the new 10-foot wide trail is 1.5 miles. The right lane of southbound Plano between Arap- aho and Apollo may be closed to traffic between 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Sections of the road with removed curb and pavement may be closed at all times. Timeline: December 2019-October 2020 Cost: $3 million Funding sources: city of Richardson, TxDOT

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF MAY 6. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT RICNEWS@COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATION City Council sees examples of DART bus network redesign

DARTZOOMPROTOTYPES Dallas Area Rapid Transit is weighing design concepts for its bus network overhaul. The transit agency expects the nal result to be a mix of both options. Here is how a potential redesign could look in Richardson.

COVERAGE CONCEPT

BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER

Richardson City Council got its rst look May 4 at the proto- types for a bus network redesign coming in 2022. The next phase of DARTzoom will reconstruct Dallas Area Rapid Transit’s entire 13-city bus network, Mark Nelson, director of transportation for the city of Richardson, said to council May 4. To oversee the project, DART hired public transit consulting rm Jarrett Walker + Associates, which recently headed up Hous- ton’s bus network redesign. DART’s plan would be budget neutral because it does not include any service additions, Nelson said. The transit agency is currently weighing two approaches for the redesign, Nelson said. The rst would augment the system based on ridership. The second would focus on increasing coverage. About 55% of DART’s bus service is focused on routes with high ridership, while the rest is used to provide coverage, Nelson said. If the transit agency were to focus its redesign around ridership, that share would shift to 85% ridership and 15% coverage. The ridership approach would direct a majority of resources toward high-density corridors, Nelson said. In Richardson, those may include Coit Road, Plano Road, Jupiter Road, East Arapaho Road and routes that service The University of Texas at Dallas. Areas that could see a decrease or loss of service include West Arapaho Road and West Belt Line Road. The alternative, which would prioritize coverage over ridership, would provide less frequent bus service to a larger geographic area, Nelson said. Under that plan, 60% of resources would be directed toward coverage, and 40% would be used for ridership. Council Member Ken Hutchenrider said he was concerned by the loss of service presented in the coverage map example. Member cities in DART’s network contribute 1% of sales tax to fund agency operations. Hutchenrider said he wondered whether residents would still get their money’s worth with fewer routes. “If we do have less coverage at the end of this and we are still being charged the full penny, how is that [a] win for our commu- nity and for our citizens?” he asked. Map examples presented May 4 show the extremes of both concepts, Nelson said. The transit agency expects the nal result to be a compromise between ridership and coverage. Much of the original timeline for the planning and implemen- tation of the project has been delayed due to COVID-19, Nelson said. Service changes are expected to roll out in May 2022.

PGBT TOLL

RENNER RD.

PALISADES CREEK DR.

RICHARDSON

GLENVILLE DR.

SYNERGY PARK BLVD.

CAMPBELL RD.

Key: Weekday midday frequencies Up to 15 minutes

UT DALLAS

COLLINS BLVD.

16-20 minutes 21-30 minutes 31-45 minutes 46-60 minutes Certain times

ARAPAHO RD.

75

BELT LINE RD.

SPRING VALLEY RD.

BUCKINGHAM RD.

MAP NOT TO SCALE N

WALNUT ST.

RIDERSHIPCONCEPT

PGBT TOLL

RENNER RD.

PALISADES CREEK DR.

RICHARDSON

SYNERGY PARK BLVD.

CAMPBELL RD.

Key: Weekday midday frequencies Up to 15 minutes 16-20 minutes

UT DALLAS

COLLINS BLVD.

ARAPAHO RD.

Certain times 21-30 minutes 31-45 minutes

75

BELT LINE RD.

SPRING VALLEY RD.

MAP NOT TO SCALE N

WALNUT ST.

SOURCE: CITY OF RICHARDSONCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Learn more at WaterIsAwesome.com and NTMWD.com/SaveWater .

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RICHARDSON EDITION • MAY 2020

CITY Golf questionedasessential activity as roundsat city’s Sherrill Parksoar

THE GOLF COURSE BECAME BUSIER THAN I’VE EVER

SEEN IT. EVERYDAYWAS LIKE APACKEDWEEKEND.

MISTY KEASLER, RESIDENT OF SHERRILL PARK

BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER

played a total of 8,345 rounds, a 37% increase month over month. The increase in play can be explained in part by the widespread closure of nearby courses in March and April, Magner said. Richardson resident Andrew Laska sent an email in late March to Mayor Paul Voelker along with several other city ocials asking why the golf course remained open while other recreation facilities were closed. In response, the mayor said golf requires minimal contact between players and is therefore a valuable escape opportunity for residents. “Golf diers in important ways from those recreation activities that have been ordered to cease operations during this crisis,” Voelker wrote on March 31. “Participants do not have to share equipment or break social distancing guidelines to participate, for instance.” To minimize contact between play- ers, the city canceled tournaments, closed the pavilion and limited golf carts to one person per ride. In his email, the mayor encouraged residents to report violations of social distancing guidelines by calling 9-1-1, but Keasler said police have enough on their plates. Fees paid by golfers at Sherrill Park act as a revenue source for Richard- son’s operating budget. In scal year 2019-20, golf fund revenues totaled $2.3 million. Keasler said keeping the course open undermined the city’s position that it is committed to attening the curve.

Relaxed rules around outdoor sports in Texas have sparked outcry from some residents who say Sherrill Park in Richardson is busier than ever before. The executive order issued by Gov. Greg Abbott on April 28 allows outdoor sports as long as there is no contact between participants. Addi- tionally, no more than four people can play at one time, according to the order. Guidance from the governor never explicitly prohibited golf, so some courses in Texas, including city- owned Sherrill Park in Richardson, remained open during the shutdown. City leaders have put in place safe- guards to reduce in-person contact, but residents who live near Sherrill Park say those eorts are thwarted by the sheer number of golfers turning out to play. Misty Keasler, whose home of six years backs up to the course, said shelter-in-place orders meant to discourage gatherings have instead brought golfers out in droves. “Every day was like a packed weekend,” Keasler said of the weeks that followed stay-at-home orders. “Golfers were kind of on top of each other.” The golf course has seen an uptick in rounds played over the last three months, Deputy City Manager Don Magner said. In February, golfers played 4,534 rounds. That number increased by about 34% to 6,087 rounds in March. In April, golfers

Sherrill Park is the city’s public golf course. (Makenzie Plusnick/Community Impact Newspaper)

Rounds played at Sherrill Park increased signicantly after residents were ordered to stay at home in mid-March. GOLF ACTIVITY DURING THE SHUTDOWN

4,534 rounds

February: March: April:

6,087 rounds

8,345 rounds

SOURCE: CITY OF RICHARDSONCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

“The city has decided that all of these other businesses need to be closed, but our business that is going to impact us should stay open,” she said. Magner did not address the revenue issue but said the decision to keep the course open is in accordance with ocials at various levels of government, including the governor. “The city is cueing o of Gov. Abbott’s guidance as well as the attorney general’s guidance and the county judge’s guidance that says you can do outdoor activities—golf is an outdoor activity—you just have to make sure you’re adhering to CDC [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention] guidelines,” Magner said. On April 11, the city announced the temporary closure of Sherrill Park. Magner said the decision came on the

heels of an April 10 news conference during which Abbott said courses can remain open as long as certain services, such as the booking of tee times, are done remotely, Magner said. “At the time we did not have the technology in place to be able to do that,” he said. “We wanted to make sure we were compliant, so we decided to shut down.” The city’s IT department quickly upgraded its booking technology, and the course reopened April 15. Then, on April 30, the city announced that putting greens, the driving range and the Pro Shop would reopen under revised guidelines. “We are keeping the golf course open because we have people in the community that consider it an amenity,” Magner said.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

FIGHT COVID19 INNOVATION USED TO

So far, about have been made at a combined cost of 200 $2,000 .

The adapters turn SNORKELS N95 MASKS . into

For health care workers and their families, the adapters are

FREE.

HEALTH CARE

The adapters are made for $10 and are distributed to health care workers for free. (Photos courtesy James Grin)

UTDallasalumni createadapters that turnsnorkels intoN95masks

BY MIRANDA JAIMES AND MAKENZIE PLUSNICK

“I have the distribution channels; I know the people; we have the resources; we have the connection. So I can make a big dierence locally,” Grin said. Using a 3D printer, Baek and Grin prototyped various designs of the adapter needed to convert the masks. Eventually, they landed on a product that paired the adapter with a com- mercially available snorkeling mask and a hospital-grade ventilator lter. The pair enlisted the help of Emerson Automation Solutions in McKinney to 3D print the attachment at cost, Grin said. To test the t of the mask, Grin said they sprayed a solution in the face of a volunteer to check if any moisture seeped through the seal. Once the pair was condent in the product’s ability to lter contaminants, manufacturing began.

Two University of Texas at Dallas graduates are helping regional health care workers ght COVID-19 by con- verting snorkeling gear to N95 masks. “There is a worldwide shortage of masks and other [personal protective equipment], and I did not want to wait until the supply runs out to nd an alternative solution,” Plano-based anesthesiologist Dr. Peter Baek wrote in the summary portion of his GoFundMe page. In hopes of nding a local manufac- turer, Baek approached James Grin, an old friend he worked with in The University of Texas at Dallas’ business incubator. Today, Grin is the CEO of Invene, a Richardson-based health care software company. Grin said he jumped at the oppor- tunity to join Baek in his endeavor.

Using 3D printers, the adapters were manufactured at several facilities, including UT Dallas.

So far, 200 adapters have been made using 3D printers at various businesses and universities, including UT Dallas. The company has also released the computer-aided design of the device online for others to download and use for free. “What that means is anyone can take our design and modify it on their own,” Grin said. The adapter is being distributed for free to health care workers or those close to them, Grin said. Masks have

manufacturing cost. As of May 13, the fund had raised $3,250 of its $5,000 goal. “This is not a money-making initiative,” Grin said. Unlike N95 masks, Grin and Baek’s mask is reusable once the adapter has been disinfected and paired with a new lter; however, the masks are not approved by the Federal Drug Admin- istration and are not meant to be used in place of an FDA-approved product, Grin said. “We are [making] a last-resort mask, which means if everything else goes bad, you use us,” Grin said.

to be purchased separately. Baek set up a GoFundMe to help subsidize the adapter’s $10

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RICHARDSON EDITION • MAY 2020

EDUCATION Plano ISD leaders talk progress during pandemic, future plans

THE PROCESS OF PROTECTION

moving to remote learning. As of May 12, the district saw about 6% of students not participating in remote learning for varied reasons, including Internet connectivity issues. The district’s IT department has provided support, and counsel- ors are also preparing to work with higher-risk students when school resumes. Among the district’s main priori- ties has been keeping its workforce ready for when students return to school, Bonser said. The district passed a resolution in April to allow continued payment of staff. Families and students have been given school supplies by the Plano ISD Education Foundation, and more than 260,000 meals had been distributed as of early May. Internet access has been provided through Park and Connect opportunities at schools and by continued deploy- ment of internet hotspots, Williams said. Anyone with ideas on how to help or who would like to be engaged in helping the district can view oppor- tunities to do so on PISD’s website.

supporting and adjusting to their needs while providing good feed- back,” she said. Remote learning may or may not have a place in the district after the coronavirus pandemic, Bonser said. While it works well for some, it may not for others, she said. “Remote learning, while we’re doing OK, is really not a one-to-one replacement for what happens with teachers and students in the pres- ence of content and great teaching,” Bonser said. As of press time, the district had not made any changes to its school year 2020-21 calendar. “There are some kids that [will] need a ton of extra remediation this summer to catch up and close gaps,” Bonser said. Nearly all students with social, emotional, food and safety needs have been contacted by staff since

BY LIESBETH POWERS

Being flexible has been a strength for Plano ISD as it has faced chal- lenges associated with online edu- cation, district staff said at a virtual town hall April 30. That flexibility will continue to be a priority as the district prepares for a summer and fall of uncertainty. “We will transfer all of our new learning into being smarter and bet- ter and more effective, whatever the future looks like,” Superintendent Sara Bonser said. Since PISD shifted into the third phase of its online learning plan, in which grading guidelines were determined for students, the district has focused on supporting learning from home, PISD Chief Operating Officer Theresa WIlliams said. “We want to make sure that the focus is ... providing [students] with continuity of learning but then also

During the virtual town hall, Superintendent Sara Bonser likened Plano ISD to a city or state with many moving parts. Preparing the district to reopen means addressing the needs of all of those components, which include the following estimates.

53,000 students 300 buses 90 buildings 7,000 employees

SOURCE: PLANO ISD/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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RICHARDSON EDITION • MAY 2020

CITY& COUNTY

News from Richardson

QUOTEOFNOTE “IT’S NOT ABOUT WHATWE ARE ALLOWED TODO. IT’SWHAT DALLAS COUNTY PUBLIC HEALTHAND THE CDC TELL USWE SHOULDDO. IF ENOUGHOF US FOLLOWTHAT, THAT’S ENOUGH TOGET OUR ECONOMYMOVING.” DALLAS COUNTY JUDGE CLAY JENKINS ON WHETHER RESIDENTS SHOULD CONTINUE TO SHELTER IN PLACE CITY HIGHLIGHTS RICHARDSON ISD Nominations are sought for community members who can help plan for an upcoming bond, tentatively scheduled for May 2021. RISD trustees, employees and residents are encouraged to nominate potential members of the committee through a link on the district’s website. COLLINCOUNTY Commissioners voted April 27 to authorize the purchase of more personal protective equipment, COVID-19 testing supplies and sanitization supplies. The authorization allows the county to purchase the equipment and supplies related to COVID-19 with a $2 million cap. RICHARDSON ISD Trustees saw the rst draft of the upcoming school year budget at a May 4 meeting. After paying $364.5 million in recurring expenses, the district will have $12.8 million left to spend on new budget requests, including additional funding for special education, literacy intervention and an expansion of its pre-K program. Richardson City Council Meets June 1, 8, 15 and 22 at 6 p.m. Council has encouraged citizens to watch meetings online at www.cor.net. Richardson ISD Meets June 8 and 15 at 6 p.m. The board is holding virtual meetings via Zoom until further notice. Links to the livestream can be found at www.risd.org. Plano ISD Meets June 23 at 7 p.m. The board has been holding meetings via video conference, which can be viewed at www.pisd.edu/pisdlive. MEETINGSWE COVER

UTDallas research advances infectious disease testing

BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER

be sent to a lab for further testing, Qin said. In Qin’s method, a patient’s sam- ple is mixed with a gold nanoparticle reagent that can detect the presence of a virus within 15-30 minutes. Doc- tors are able to accurately diagnose an infection without ever leaving their oce, he said. Much of the cost associated with currently available tests is tied to labor and equipment used in the lab, Qin said. The reagent needed to conduct Qin’s test can be made at a reasonable cost, he said. Qin’s method can also be used to test for COVID-19 and its antibodies, he said. The next step for Qin is to nd a startup, licensing or a nonprot organization to help get the test approved by the Federal Drug Administration and into the hands of doctors.

RICHARDSON A researcher at The University of Texas at Dallas is behind the development of a test that is up to 100 times more accurate in diagnosing infectious diseases. Associate professor of mechanical engineering Zhenpeng Qin’s project stands to not only improve disease detection but also cut down on health care costs by eliminating the need for costly lab visits. “The goal is to make a rapid assay that doctors can use and can tell with great condence whether their patient has the infection or not without needing to refer to a lab to

do a backup test,” he said. Rapid u tests available at doctor’s oces misdiagnose

anywhere between 30%-50% of cases, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. To get an accurate result, samples must

Gold nanoparticles are synthesized through a process that involves boiling the materials in a ask placed on a stirring hot plate. (Courtesy UT Dallas)

Richardson sales tax revenue up inMarch

BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER

RICHARDSON Newly released data shows Richardson’s sales tax revenue was up in March despite statewide orders that forced many retailers to close their doors. Sales tax collection increased by $202,539 to $3.7 million in March, representing a 5.71% increase year over year, according to the Texas Comptroller’s Oce. This bump in revenue could lessen the budgetary strain brought on by COVID-19. In late April, the city projected its budget would take an $18 million hit, $6.8 million of which was tied to a projected loss of sales tax revenue. AN INITIAL LOOK The city of Richardson got its rst look at how the coronavirus pandemic may have aected sales tax revenue.

The committeemet several times beforemaking its recommendation. (Courtesy RISD)

RISDgroup asks board to adopt middle school model

according to a committee presenta- tion at the May 4 board meeting. Statewide curriculum is bundled for grades 6-8, so keeping those students together makes sense academically, presenters said. The committee also found that sixth-graders are more developmen- tally aligned with middle schoolers than with elementary-age children. The move would also free up space at elementary schools. That in turn could make room that is needed as part of the district’s goal of providing universal pre-K some- time in the future, the committee stated. If the recommendation moves forward, a phase-in plan would be developed, and funding for addi- tional classroom construction and associated space would be included in an upcoming bond package tentatively set for 2021.

BY MAKENZIE PLUSNICK

RICHARDSON ISD A committee has recommended the district adopt a middle school model by moving sixth-graders to junior high campuses. The group spent months studying data and weighing the pros and cons of the option before making a recommendation. If implemented, the change would not occur until school year 2024-25 at the earliest, according to the district. RISD is part of only 5% of Texas school districts that do not oer a middle school conguration,

+5.7%

March 2019 sales tax revenue: March 2020 sales tax revenue: $3.5M $3.7M

SOURCE: TEXAS COMPTROLLER OF PUBLIC ACCOUNTSCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

16

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

BUSINESS FEATURE

BY MAKENZIE PLUSNICK

MORE THAN PUNCHING AND KICKING Legendary Black Belt Academy teaches three core life skills that improve students’ quality of life. • Coordination and motor skills help improve a child’s general health and sports performance, develop the cardiovascular system and build muscular strength. • Self-esteem and condence-building are accomplished through consistent, positive verbal reinforcement. • Respect for instructors, each other and the self is reinforced in each class.

“For the rst time, really, in history, martial artistswho are doing online classes have all been invited into these people’s homes, and that’smuch more personal.”

SOURCE: LEGENDARY BLACK BELT ACADEMY COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Whitt Melton, co-owner of Legendary Black Belt Academy

Students now take lessons via Zoom. (Photos courtesy Legendary Black Belt Academy)

Legendary Black Belt Academy Richardson martial arts business teaches life skills amid pandemic S tay-at-home orders forced Legendary Black Belt Acad- emy to close in mid-March.

Brothers Whitt and Wes Melton own the martial arts business.

“Martial arts is a personal sport in a group setting,” he said. “It’s not like baseball or soccer, where you are limited in the scope of what you can perform.” The studio normally teaches between 100-150 students. The brothers started training in martial arts when they were 6 years old. After they earned their black belts, their father helped them open the rst Legendary Black Belt Acad- emy in Garland. The studio moved to Richardson in 2006. What sets the studio apart is its focus on instilling core life skills, such as condence, discipline, respect, focus, self-control, persever- ance and goal-setting, Whitt said. “We teach way more than

punching and kicking,” he said. “We focus on teaching kids the skills they need to be successful in life.” The online classes have been pop- ular with existing students and have incentivized new students to join the academy, Whitt said. They will con- tinue once in-person classes resume, thoughWhitt said he is unsure what the programwill look like. “To be successful in our business, we have to be willing to do what it takes to not only give value to our members but to keep our community safe,” he said. Summer camps opened to a lim- ited number of students May 18. The business hopes to resume evening martial arts classes on a limited basis June 1.

But the brothers behind the martial arts business found a way to bring the studio to students. “For the rst time, really, in history, martial artists who are doing online classes have all been invited into these people’s homes, and that’s much more personal,” co-owner Whitt Melton said. Whitt and his brother, Wes, who also owns Legendary Youth Sports, said they made the swift decision to pivot to online lessons shortly after closing their studio. Martial arts studios are uniquely equipped for this type of transition, Whitt said.

Instructor Johnny Warren teaches an online martial arts class.

Legendary Black Belt Academy 1980 Nantucket Drive, Ste. 108, Richardson 469-734-6216 wwwlegendaryblackbeltacademy.com

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