Keller - Roanoke - Northeast Fort Worth Edition | Sept. 2020

KELLER ROANOKE NORTHEAST FORTWORTH EDITION

2020 PUBLIC EDUCATION EDITION ONLINE AT

VOLUME 2, ISSUE 5  SEPT. 24OCT. 21, 2020

A NEWNORMAL

District ocials institute safety measures amid COVID19 pandemic

INSIDE

18

Teachers and students at Keller ISD and Northwest ISD have returned for in-person instruction with safety protocols, such as face masks, in place. (Courtesy Keller ISD)

KEY DATES:

Aug. 26: Keller ISD school year begins for all students.

Sept. 11: All NISD sta undergoes COVID-19 training in preparation for in-person learning.

Sept. 14: In-person instruction begins for NISD students who chose that particular learning model.

Aug. 20: Northwest ISD school year begins with students in virtual instruction.

‘Urbandestination’ NorthCity is starting to take shape inNortheast FortWorth BY IAN PRIBANIC

N. TARRANT PKWY.

URBAN L I FESTYLE

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The developers of the North City project at I35W and US 287 in Fort Worth are attempting to create an all-in-one destination with options to live, work and play.

projected visitors per year

300- ac r e

McKeever, a Fort Worth native, is spearheading the 300-acre North City development at the intersection of I-35W and US 287 in one of the fast- est-growing subdivisions in the coun- try. North Fort Worth is “ripe” for this CONTINUED ON 21

2 . 5M

site

35W

As with other successful properties, such as LegacyWest in Plano or Market Street in The Woodlands, the goal with North City is to create a mixed-use urban village, said Steve McKeever, owner of McKeever Companies.

SOURCE: MCKEEVER COMPANIES COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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$ 1 50M

investment

The North City development, which will be built over the next 10 years, is just seven miles from downtown Fort Worth. (Ian Pribanic/Community Impact Newspaper)

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KELLER - ROANOKE - NORTHEAST FORT WORTH EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

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hosted by Medical City Alliance Sponsored in part by netima and the keller chamber of commerce SPOOKTACULAR OCTOBER 31, 2020 10:00 a.m. — 2:00 p.m. @

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

CONTENTS

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

MARKET TEAM GENERAL MANAGER Ana Erwin, aerwin@communityimpact.com EDITOR Ian Pribanic REPORTER Sandra Sadek GRAPHIC DESIGNER Ellen Jackson ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Arlin Gold

FROMANA: Businesses and schools have been facing similar challenges in recent months. Both have had to nd ways to make people feel safe enough to want to return in person, whether for shopping or for educating our youth. We know our cities and school districts have spent countless hours in preparation. As such, our annual Public Education Edition (see Pages 13-19) looks a little dierent this year. Inside, you can read about the measures and eorts our school districts are taking to protect our kids and their sta. You can also learn more about a new residential and commercial development coming to North Fort Worth called North City (see Page 21). This development has faced familiar challenges in 2020, and our story details the new plans to bring it to life in this growing area. I encourage you to support our local advertisers and maybe to send a virtual high-ve to a teacher. We can all use a little extra support right now. Ana Erwin, GENERALMANAGER

METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Christal Howard MANAGING EDITOR Valerie Wigglesworth ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Breanna Flores CORPORATE LEADERSHIP PUBLISHERS AND FOUNDERS John and Jennifer Garrett GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Warner John and Jennifer Garrett began Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 in Pugerville, TX. The company’s mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Today, we operate across ve metropolitan areas, providing hyperlocal, nonpartisan news produced by our full-time journalists in each community we serve. BECOMEA#COMMUNITYPATRON CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES DIRECTOR Tess Coverman WHOWE ARE Newspaper’s legacy of local, reliable reporting by making a contribution. Together, we can continue to ensure citizens stay informed and keep businesses thriving. COMMUNITYIMPACT.COMCIPATRON CONTACT US 7460 Warren Parkway, Ste. 160 Frisco, TX 75034 • 6822231418 PRESS RELEASES KRNnews@communityimpact.com SUBSCRIPTIONS communityimpact.com/subscriptions © 2020 Community Impact Newspaper Co. All Rights Reserved. No reproduction of any portion of this issue is allowed without written permission from the publisher. Please join your friends and neighbors in support of Community Impact SUPPORT LOCAL JOURNALISM

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Now Open, Coming Soon &more TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES 8 North Tarrant Express closure

VOTERGUIDE

SAMPLE BALLOT Election information CANDIDATE Q&A

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Responses from local candidates

THIS ISSUE BY THE NUMBERS

PUBLIC EDUCATION EDITION

Local sources 28

New businesses 7

Local candidate Q&As 13

Pages of Impact Deals 10

DISTRICT DATA

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Enrollment numbers and other data CAMPUS DEEP DIVE

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KELLER  ROANOKE  NORTHEAST FORT WORTH EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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NORTHEAST FORTWORTH

377

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114

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BYRON NELSON BLVD.

35W

ROANOKE

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INTERMODAL PKWY.

Lupe Tortilla Mexican Restaurant

Spirit Halloween

N. OAK ST.

IAN PRIBANIC/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

IAN PRIBANIC/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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3 A Lupe Tortilla Mexican Restaurant location officially opened in July at 9409 N. Freeway, Fort Worth. The restaurant offers dine-in, curbside and to-go options for classic Mexican cuisine, such as na- chos, chilaquiles and more. 682-350-5301. www.tex-mex.com 4 Premium custom automotive and res- toration shop StreetMod Designs opened Aug. 3 at 12815 Harmon Road, Fort Worth. A family-owned business, StreetMod De- signs is run by husband-wife team David and Ashley Knapp. 682-250-6182. www.streetmoddesigns.com 5 A Spirit Halloween store opened in August at 5860 N. Tarrant Parkway, Fort Worth. The seasonal chain store offers a wide array of Halloween decorations and costumes for all ages. 866-586-0155. www.stores.spirithalloween.com 6 Tarrant County Lift Co. began ser- vicing the North Fort Worth and Tarrant County areas in August. The lift and automotive repair company is located at 12061 Katy Road, Ste. 305, Fort Worth. The company offers various services, including lifts and levels and window tint and headlight restoration. 817-770-0502. www.tarrantcountyliftco.com 7 Fyzical Therapy and Balance Centers opened Aug. 31 at 409 N. Oak St., Ste. 220, Roanoke. The community clinic offers in-person and telehealth services, such as balance therapy. 682-502-4440. https://fyzical.com/roanoke-tx 8 Popular cookie delivery service Tiff’s Treats will open a new storefront in October, according to staff. The second location in Fort Worth, the store will be located at 9427 North Freeway, Fort

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T PKW

PARK VISTA BLVD.

KELLER HASLET RD.

TIMBERLAND BLVD.

STONEGLEN RD.

E. BLUE MOUND RD.

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KELLER PKWY.

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Bodybar Pilates

COURTESY BODYBAR PILATES

SHADY GROVE RD.

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Worth. 682-382-0200. www.cookiedelivery.com COMING SOON 9 Filling a vacancy in Keller Town Center at 1110 Keller Parkway, sit-down restaurant Fat Papa’s is expected to open by the end of 2020. The restaurant serves Chicago-style Italian food, such as pasta, Italian beef sandwiches and hand- tossed pizza. www.fatpapaschicago.com 10 A Lululemon location is expected to open in 2020 at the Tanger Outlets at 15853 North Freeway, Fort Worth. Lululemon stores feature selections of women’s and men’s clothing, including athletic wear, pants, shirts, sweatshirts and more. 877-263-9300. www.lululemon.com 11 A Bodybar Pilates studio will open in 2020 at Keller Town Center at 1400 Keller Parkway, Keller. The studio offers a blended workout that focuses on strength, toning and modern movement.

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K W Y

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KELLER

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TEHAMA RIDGE PKWY.

WESTERN CENTER BLVD.

MAP NOT TO SCALE N TM; © 2020 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER CO. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

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NOWOPEN 1 Victoria’s Secret opened a new loca- tion July 27 at the Tanger Outlets in N. Fort Worth. The store, located at 15853 N. Freeway, Ste. 700, Fort Worth, offers a wide variety of women’s clothing, make- up and accessories. 800-411-5116. www.victoriassecret.com

2 The newest pediatric physical ther- apy option in Keller, Free To Move And Play , opened in July at 630 B Stoneglen Drive, Keller, inside of Allison’s Therapy Corner. The health care provider uses evi- dence-based therapeutic treatments that help children gain mobility and develop- ment. 903-574-3750. www.freetomoveandplay.com

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surgery. The center will also oer four leading-edge operating rooms, two private recovery rooms, a separate pediatric recovery area and a waiting area. The latest in patient safety technology will be featured, according to the release. 817-639-1000 www.medicalcityhealthcare.com

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It also has a spa-like environment and offers single-use equipment options that are sanitized after each use. 817-862-9550. www.bodybarpilates.com 12 A CityVet location is expected to open at 9633 N. Freeway, Fort Worth sometime in 2020. The veterinary service offers boarding, grooming and more. 214-522-0030. www.cityvet.com 13 A Crumbl Cookies location is coming soon to the Presidio Junction shopping center in North Fort Worth. Located at 9100 Tehama Ridge Parkway, Fort Worth, it will be the second Crumbl Cookies in Fort Worth, following a downtown spot at 2300 W. Seventh St., Fort Worth. Crumbl Cookies offers a weekly, rotating menu of fresh-baked cookies. 682-285-2798. www.crumblcookies.com 14 A Wendy’s location is under construction in North Fort Worth at the

intersection of Golden Triangle Boulevard and Alta Vista Road. Once complete, it will be the third area location, along with restaurants on North Tarrant and West- port parkways. Wendy’s restaurants serve burgers, chicken sandwiches, fries and more. 817-439-8620. www.wendys.com IN THE NEWS 15 Ariat International , a manufacturer and designer of high-quality equestrian wear, announced Sept. 17 it will establish a new 1 million-square-foot distribution center and regional headquarters in the North Fort Worth-Alliance area. The distribution center is expected to open this fall, according to a statement from Denton County, and the headquarters is expected to create 75 jobs and $40 mil- lion in capital investment. 977-702-7428. www.ariat.com

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KELLER - ROANOKE - NORTHEAST FORT WORTH EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES

BY IAN PRIBANIC

Dr. Robert Schmidt

Dr. Ajai Cadambi

Dr. Theodore Crofford

Dr. Daniel Wagner

Dr. Steven Weeden

Dr. Steven Ogden

Dr. Jeffrey McGowen

The Keller Hicks Road exit was accessible as of Sept. 15. (Ian Pribanic/Community Impact Newspaper)

Keller Hicks, I-35W o-ramp closure As part of the North Tarrant Express project, the southbound exit for Keller Hicks Road and Golden Triangle Boule- vard from I-35W is expected to close in the fourth quarter of 2020. The closure is expected to last until summer 2021. Trac needing to access the o-ramp will be redirected to the Heritage Trace Parkway or State Highway 170 exits. The NTE project has continued throughout the COVID-19 pandemic as construc- tion crews adhere to health and safety guidelines related to the virus. The $662 million Phase 3C of the NTE will add two northbound and two southbound toll lanes in order to supplement the previ- ously completed toll lanes along I-35W between North Tarrant Parkway and downtown Fort Worth. Once it is com- plete, drivers will have access to contin- uous highway and frontage roads along a 7.1-mile stretch of I-35W between North Tarrant Parkway and Eagle Parkway. Timeline: Fourth quarter 2020- summer 2021 Cost: $662 million Funding source: NTE Mobility Partners

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HOW ITWORKS TxDOT urges all drivers to remain sober To combat drunken driving, the Texas Department of Transportation

of Texas, there were more than 380 alcohol-related accidents on Labor Day weekend in 2019, which killed a total of 12 people and injured 55 more.

launched the Plan While You Can Campaign, which aims to reduce preventable crashes and save lives by reminding drivers to plan a sober ride home if they are consuming alcohol. “If you plan to drink alcohol and go out, make the plan for a sober ride,” said TxDOT Executive Director James Bass. “It’s an easy decision that can prevent senseless tragedies and save lives.” Driving under the inuence not only increases the risk of death or serious injury; if caught driving drunk in Texas, drivers face up to $17,000 in nes and fees, along with possible jail time and loss of their driver’s license. In the state

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Spend the night.

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ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UP TO DATE AS OF SEPT. 21. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT KRNNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY& COUNTY

News from Keller, Roanoke, Tarrant County & Northwest ISD

COMPILED BY IAN PRIBANIC

NUMBER TOKNOW Voters in Northwest ISD will decide Nov. 3 on five referendums, including a voter- approved change to the district tax rate and four district bonds totaling $986.6 million. A pair of board positions will also be on the ballot. To comply with state law, the district’s 2020 bond election will be split into four referendums: school facilities and capital improvements; other recreational facilities; renovations to stadiums; and technology devices. 5

Tarrant County extends COVID-19maskmandate TARRANT COUNTY In August, Commissioners Court voted unan- imously to extend the county’s to Vinny Taneja, director of Tarrant County Public Health. The downward

Tarrant County mandate requires businesses in the county to imple- ment a “Health and Safety Policy” that, at minimum, requires all employees and customers to wear face coverings. “Our goal ... is to hopefully get voluntary compliance,” Whitley said in June.

trend indicates that the face mask mandate is working, Taneja said. “We want people wearing masks,” Tarrant County Judge Glen Whitley said. “This is an inconvenience that can help us get past this.” First established June 25, the

disaster declaration and face mask mandate related to the COVID-19 pandemic until Nov. 30. The county has seen a 10% decrease in hospitalizations related to COVID-19 since July, according City of Keller set to adopt lower property tax rate KELLER In August, City Council set a maximum possible tax rate of $0.395 per $100 valuation for fiscal year 2020-21, which begins Oct. 1. The new maximum rate is almost a half- cent lower than the current rate of $0.399. Keller residents will see a decrease to the tax rate for the eighth straight year, according to Mayor Pat McGrail. Since FY 2013-14, the property tax rate in Keller has decreased by nearly five cents, down from a high of $0.44219.” “We’ve done a good job with tax mitigation and trying to lower the rate,” Director of Finance Aaron Rector said. Earlier this year, Keller City Council adopted a homestead exemption of 14%. As such, the average property tax bill is expected to decrease from $1,407 per year to $1,390 per

Current tax rate: per $100 valuation $1.42

City budget inRoanoke provides 2020-21 outlook ROANOKE City officials are taking a cautionary approach to the fiscal year 2020- 21 budget. General fund revenue is antic- ipated to increase 1.68% to $21.7 million over the next year, but officials anticipate a continued impact from the COVID-19 pandemic on business operations, sales and investment. In addition, the general fund has already been affected by increased needs related to the coronavirus pandemic, officials said, such as personal protective equipment and reduced revenue from courts and recreation. City Manager Scott Campbell has instituted a hiring freeze on several city positions, and the city has eliminated two personnel positions. Officials have also proposed a tax rate of $0.37512 per $100 of assessed valuation, which remains unchanged from last year. City officials have said the focus of capital improvement projects in the upcoming year will be citywide infrastructure upgrades, including a number of street improvement projects in the downtown area. “These projects will be evaluated on an as-needed basis based on current road conditions,” officials said.

LOWERING TAXES The city of Keller is adopting a lower property tax rate.

Proposed tax rate: per $100 valuation $1.4663

TAX RATE

$0.44219

2013-14

EARLY VOTING: Oct. 13-30 ELECTION DAY: Nov. 3

$0.399

2019-20

-1.00%

Fort Worth City Council Meets at 7 p.m. three times each month on Tuesdays. www.fortworthtexas.gov Keller City Council Meets at 7 p.m. the first and third Tuesdays of each month. Meets at 7 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month. www.roanoketexas.com Keller ISD Meets monthly; dates, times and locations may vary. www.kellerisd.net Northwest ISD Meets monthly at 6:30 p.m.; dates may vary. www.nisdtx.org www.cityofkeller.com Roanoke City Council MEETINGSWE COVER

$0.395

2020-21

SOURCE: CITY OF KELLER/ COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

year, Rector said. “Looking at what occurred between 2014 and now, [there is] about a $300 reduction to the average tax bill,” Rector said. The maintenance and opera- tions rate, or the rate for general fund activity, will account for $0.32419 of the total rate, which is a slight decrease from the previous year, he said. Mean- while, interest and sinking rate, or the rate for debt service, will account for $0.07081, which is about a half-cent decrease.

For Keller City Council Place 5 STEPHEN HUMENESKY

Committed to: • Serve the city and its citizens full time • Work on suitable growth and re-growth for Keller

www.commonsenseforkeller.com • Facebook: Stephen Humenesky common sense for Keller Political ad paid for by Stephen Humenesky campaign.

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KELLER - ROANOKE - NORTHEAST FORT WORTH EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

GUIDE

Candidates and information for November elections

COMPILED BY IAN PRIIBANIC

VOTER GUIDE 2020

DATES TOKNOW

NORTHWEST ISD BOARD OF TRUSTEES Trustee, Place 6 Lillian Rauch* Jennifer Zazula Trustee, Place 7 Ron Hastings* Jennifer Murphy NORTHWEST ISD 2020 BOND Proposition A School facilities and capital im- provements, $937,702,000 Proposition B Other recreational facilities, $23,573,000 Proposition C Renovations to stadiums, $8,840,000 Proposition D Technology Devices, $16,485,000 SPECIAL ELECTION: VOTER APPROVED TAX RATE ELECTION Proposition E Ratify effective tax rate of $1.4663 per $100 valuation WHERE TOVOTE Tarrant County residents can vote at any county voting location during the early voting period and from 7 a.m.-7 p.m. on Election Day. Denton County residents can vote at any county voting location during the early voting period but only at their specific precinct location from 7 a.m.- 7 p.m. on Election Day.

OCT. 13 First day of early voting OCT. 23 Last day to apply for ballot by mail* OCT. 30 Last day of early voting NOV. 3 Election Day *DATE RECEIVED, NOT POSTMARKED

SAMPLE BALLOT

*Incumbent

D Democrat

G Green

I Independent

L Libertarian

R Republican

Supreme Court, Place 8 R Brett Busby* D Gisela D. Triana L Tom Oxford Court of Criminal Appeals, Place 3 R Bert Richardson* D Elizabeth Davis Frizell Court of Criminal Appeals, Place 4 R Kevin Patrick Yeary* D Tina Clinton Court of Criminal Appeals, Place 9 R David Newell* D Brandon Birmingham LOCAL U.S. House, District 12 R Kay Granger* D Lisa Welch L Trey Holcomb U.S. House, District 26 R Michael C. Burgess D Carol H. Iannuzzi L Mark Boler Justice, 2nd Court of Appeals District, Place 6 R Mike Wallach D Delonia A. Watson Texas Senate, District 12

Texas House, District 63 R Tan Parker* D Leslie Peeler Texas House, District 91 R Stephanie Klick* D Jeromey Sims Texas House, District 92 R Jeff Cason D Jeff Whitfield G Brody Mulligan Texas House, District 93 R Matt Krause D Lydia Bean Texas House, District 98 R Giovanni Capriglione* D Debra Edmondson State Board of Education, District 14 R Sue Melton-Malone* D Greg Alvord TARRANT COUNTY Tarrant County sheriff R Bill Waybourn* D Vance Keyes Tarrant County tax assessor-collector R Wendy Burgess* D Ollie Boss Anderson

Tarrant County commissioner, Precinct 3 R Gary Fickes* D Kathy Braatz Tarrant County constable, Precinct 1 R Dale Clark* D Scott Gerlikovski KELLER CITY COUNCIL Mayor Tag Green Armin Mizani Mark Mathews Council, Place 5 Stephen G. Humenesky Chris Whatley*

NATIONAL

President R Donald J. Trump* D Joseph R. Biden L Jo Jorgensen G Howie Hawkins U.S. Senate R John Cornyn* D Mary “MJ” Hegar L Kerry Douglas McKennon G David B. Collins STATEWIDE Texas Railroad Commission R James “Jim” Wright D Chrysta Castañeda L Matt Sterett G Katija “Kat” Gruene Supreme Court, Chief Justice R Nathan Hecht* D Amy Clark Meachum L Mark Ash Supreme Court, Place 6 R Jane Bland* D Kathy Cheng Supreme Court, Place 7 R Jeff Boyd* D Staci Williams L William Bryan Strange III

Council, Place 6 David A. Tashman Mujeeb Kazi Ross McMullin ROANOKE CITY COUNCIL Council Ward 1 Holly Gray-Moore* John Dolly

R Jane Nelson* D Shadi Zitoon

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CANDIDATE Q&A WHY DID YOU DECIDE TORUN FOROFFICE?

2020 Voter Guide

Get to know local candidates running in the general election

*Candidate responses may have been edited for space. Some responses were recorded prior to the COVID-19 pandemic. For complete candidate responses go to communityimpact.com.

Keller mayor

Incumbent

TAG GREEN

ARMIN MIZANI

MARK MATHEWS

“We need leadership with vision that looks beyond this month, this year, or even this decade to assure we stew- ard our city’s resources with excellence and integrity.”

“Keller’s future success is dependent on the collective effort between our residents, city leaders, Keller ISD, and the business community. I could not be more excit- ed about the opportunity to help lead that effort.”

“We all have a choice: We can complain or choose to help make our city better. I choose to be ‘for’ some- thing. I’d like to see Keller do better.”

Keller City Council, Place 5

Keller City Council, Place 6

“My belief is that one should be involved in the community and [that] one should offer their experience where they can best be used.” STEPHEN G. HUMENESKY

CHRIS WHATLEY

DAVID A. TASHMAN

MUJEEB KAZI

ROSS MCMULLIN

“I have a heart for service in my community. When I see citizens' input being ignored, I don’t feel that is right. I feel motivated to make sure I main- tain my position so I can be a listening ear for the citizens.”

“I am deeply committed to serving the community. With an infusion of new leadership, we can make our city even more successful and continue to make it a great place to live.”

“Leaders cannot govern at Town Hall unless they are will- ing to embrace the values of Keller’s residents. We must put the needs of all 46,000 Keller residents first.”

“I learned a long time ago you can’t influence change by sit- ting on the sidelines. Change is needed in Keller. So I decid- ed to enter the race. In other words, put up or shut up.”

Northwest ISD trustee, Place 7

NISD trustee, Place 6

Roanoke City Council, Ward 1

RON HASTINGS

“Educational equity for all students is something that is very important to me and what drives me. Vari- ous volunteer opportuni- ties have motivated me to learn more and understand the current and future needs of the district.” JENNIFER MURPHY

LILLIAN RAUCH

HOLLY GRAY-MOORE

JOHN DOLLY

I want to continue to contribute to the community … by being a responsi- ble steward and taking a reasoned and researched approach to maintain and improve the quality of the schools.”

“One area that is being overlooked is the social and emotional needs of the stu- dents. Band and fine arts are both vital to develop- ment, [as are] academics, facilities, technology, ath- letics, vocational programs [and] transportation.”

“I am running for office because the current council- person has been there for 15 years. There seems to be a part of our ward that is under- represented and has asked me to run.”

“[I am running out of] a desire to help shape the future of Roanoke and, honestly, be- cause I love Roanoke. We have made some amazing progress over the years, but there is still more work to be done.”

Did not respond to inquiry. JENNIFER ZAZULA

11

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2020 PUBLIC EDUCATION EDITION

N O R T H W E S T I S D  K E L L E R I S D S N A P S H O T DISTRICT DATA COMPILED BY IAN PRIBANIC See how Keller ISD and Northwest ISD student enrollment and stang data compare from the 2015-16 school year to the 2019-20 school year, the most recent year in which data was available. SOURCE: TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER STUDENT ENROLLMENT 201920 TEACHER STATS TOTAL NUMBER OF TEACHERS AVERAGE TEACHER SALARY

201920 ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS

20.63%

27.84%

60.24%

STATE AVERAGE

1,676 2,412

$60,708 $61,319

201920 ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS

6.14%

SCHOOL DISTRICT STATS TOTAL NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES 2,631 4,298 TOTAL NUMBER OF CAMPUSES 29 47

9.13%

2015-16

2016-17

2017-18

2018-19

2019-20

20.26%

FROM 201516 +19.37% +3.18%

STATE AVERAGE

13

KELLER  ROANOKE  NORTHEAST FORT WORTH EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

Public Education Edition 2020

NOR T HWE S T I S D DATA AND D EMOG R A PH I C S BY C AMP U S CAMPUS DEEP DIVE COMPILED BY IAN PRIBANIC Northwest ISD is made up of 29 campuses from K-12. When compared to Keller ISD, NISD has greater percentages of white students and Black students. The district also has smaller percentages of Asian students and Hispanic students. SOURCE: TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

DEMOGRAPHICS

ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 201920 DATA

1 Clara Love

697 773 613 474 401 679 577 785 596 695 598 766 482 650 806 639

284 <10 11

71 205 <10 <10 398

2 Cox

89 <10 63 80 124 <10 <10 494

3 Curtis 4 Haslet 5 Hateld 6 Hughes

106 <10 97 123

121

<10 <10 260 <10 <10 342

106 <10 <10 45 81

85 N/A 19

64 60 <10 <10 251

188 <10 37 83 148 <10 13 395

7 Justin

183 <10 <10 15

125 <10 <10 422

8 Kay Granger

78 <10 41

50 139 <10 24 524

9 Lakeview

28 <10

33 18

75 <10 22 446

ACCOUNTABILITYRATINGS All Texas school districts and campuses will receive a Not Rated: Declared State of Disaster label for their 2020 accountability ratings, according to the Texas Education Agency. Texas students take the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness each year to measure standards in reading, writing, math, science and social studies and are traditionally given letter grades ranging from A-F based on performance. Although the coronavirus pandemic is ongoing, the state has said all students will be required to take the STAAR exam in 2021, as of press time. The ratings are based on several categories, including Student Achievement, School Progress and Closing the Gaps, all of which compare student performance. FOR 2020 AND BEYOND

2019 RATING

10 Lance Thompson

189 <10 12 111 155 <10 <10 402

11 Nance

142

12

27 111

151

<10 <10 285

A NISD

12 Peterson

184 <10 70 121 185 <10 12 373

OVERALL RATING Exemplary performance Recognized performance Acceptable performance In need of improvement Unacceptable performance

13 Prairie View

214 <10 <10 26 183

N/A <10 263

14 Roanoke

147 <10 85 43 208 <10 <10 302

15 Samuel Beck 16 Sendera Ranch

36 <10 59

24 111

N/A <20 599

114 <10 17 78 126 <10 <10 405

17 Seven Hills 18 Schluter 19 Thompson

517

274 <10 <10 13 175 <10

<10 317

882 346

122 <10 25 78 196 <10 12 561

28

<10

15 11

71

<10

<10 239

DEMOGRAPHICS

MIDDLE SCHOOLS 201920 DATA

20 Adams

1,349 255 <10 83 192 337 <10 36 694

21 Chisholm Trail

490

210 <10 <10 13 151

<10 <10 314

201819 STUDENTTEACHER DEMOGRAPHIC BREAKDOWN

DISTRICTWIDE STATE AVERAGE

22 Gene Pike

1,017 304 <10 14 97

257 <10

26 614

23 Medlin 24 Tidwell 25 Wilson

1,102

97 <10 68 53 170 <10 27 776

1,027 165 <10

51

111 210 <10 17 630

929

206 <10 23 95 202 <10 12 593

STUDENTS

TEACHERS

DEMOGRAPHICS

9.43%

12.6%

1.8%

10.6%

AFRICAN AMERICAN

HIGH SCHOOLS 201920 DATA 26 Byron Nelson

0.54%

0.4%

0.6%

0.3%

AMERICAN INDIAN

4.86%

4.7%

0.9%

1.9%

ASIANPACIFIC ISLANDER

2,478 306 <20 144 187 464 <10 51 1,613 2,541 469 15 97 296 560 <10 51 1512

22.12%

52.6%

7.9%

27.7%

27 Eaton

HISPANIC

28 Northwest

1,908 476

<20 34 127 495 <10

40 1,195

1.73%

2.4%

0.9%

1.1%

29 Steele

201

201

46 <10 <10 18 N/A <10 130

MULTIPLE RACES

NOTE: RANGES E.G., <10, <20 INDICATE COUNTS ARE NOT AVAILABLE I.E., MASKED TO COMPLY WITH THE FAMILY EDUCATIONAL RIGHTS AND PRIVACY ACT FERPA.

61.32%

27.4%

88%

58.4%

WHITE

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

Public Education Edition 2020

K E L L E R I S D DATA AND D EMOG R A PH I C S BY C AMP U S ACCOUNTABILITYRATINGS All Texas school districts and campuses will receive a Not Rated: Declared State of Disaster label for their 2020 accountability ratings, according to the Texas Education Agency. Texas students take the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness each year to measure standards in reading, writing, math, science and social studies and are traditionally given letter grades ranging from A-F based on performance. Although the coronavirus pandemic is ongoing, the state has said all students will be required to take the STAAR exam in 2021, as of press time. FOR 2020 AND BEYOND The ratings are based on several categories, including Student Achievement, School Progress and Closing the Gaps, all of which compare student performance.

Keller ISD is made up of 47 campuses from K-12. When compared to Northwest ISD, KISD has a smaller percentage of white students and greater percentages of Asian and Hispanic students.

SOURCE: TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

DEMOGRAPHICS

B KELLER ISD OVERALL RATING Exemplary performance Recognized performance Acceptable performance In need of 2019 RATING

MIDDLE SCHOOLS 201920 DATA 25 Bear Creek 26 Chisholm Trail

964

76 <10 75 40 123 N/A 43 684 515 <10 74 132 348 <10 52 299

911

27 Fossil Hill 28 Hillwood

829

434 <10 88 107 290 <10

41 297

1,288 383 <10 105 126 319 <10 63 664

29 Indian Springs 30 Keller Middle 31 Parkwood Hill 32 Timberview 33 Trinity Meadows 34 Trinity Springs

952

113 <10 65 50 151

N/A 50 634

1,014

65 <10 74 31

138 <10 34 732

1,198 369

<10 97

132 275 <10 53 631

improvement Unacceptable performance

1,168 216 <10 79 141 211

<10 67 660

981 954 733

312 <10

51

91 269 <10 57 505

285 <20 58 91 244 <10 42 506

35 Vista Ridge

332

<10 117 112 207 <10 34 257

DEMOGRAPHICS

DEMOGRAPHICS

ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 201920 DATA

HIGH SCHOOLS 201920 DATA

1 Basswood 2 Bette Perot 3 Bluebonnet

381 593 527 631 595 505 582 553 476 378 570 445 450 787 417 558 552 593 680 466 497 438 569 605

229 <10 25 56 181

N/A <20 103

36 Central

2,560 689 14 232 238 629 11

114 1,292

127 <10 39 47 123 <10 28 349

37 Fossil Ridge

2,288 1,066 <10 307 358 787 <10 125 704

228 <10 41

44 152 <10 <20 265

38 Keller

3,154 205

<20 215 114 426 <10

137 2,239

4 Caprock

304 <10 30 51

231

N/A 25 296

39 Timber Creek

3,211 665 <20 266 305 730 <10 148 1,738

5 Eagle Ridge 6 Florence 7 Freedom 8 Friendship 9 Heritage

100 <10 42 58 108 N/A 40 348

42 <10

22 <10 56 N/A 24

397

201819 STUDENTTEACHER DEMOGRAPHIC BREAKDOWN

182 <10 47 39 172 <10 24 297

DISTRICTWIDE STATE AVERAGE

242 <10 39

98

132 <10 21

251

241

<10 58 78 111

<10 39 184

N/A

10 Hidden Lakes 11 Independence 12 Keller-Harvel

15 <10

15 <10

42

17 295

STUDENTS

TEACHERS

127 <10 <20 43 113 <10 32 358

97 <10 28 26 81

<10 21 284

13 Liberty 14 Lone Star

30 <10

53 19 40 <10 15 319

8.95%

12.6%

3.7%

10.6%

AFRICAN AMERICAN

174 <10 101 68 141

N/A 30 449

15 North Riverside

252 N/A 19 33 176 23 N/A 166

0.47%

0.4%

0.3%

0.3%

AMERICAN INDIAN

16 Park Glen 17 Parkview

113 <10 31

32 97

N/A 30 371

350 <10 87 78 153 <10 28 349 127 <10 39 47 123 <10 28 349 125 <10 129 43 98 N/A 50 369

8.84%

4.7%

1.5%

1.9%

ASIANPACIFIC ISLANDER

18 Perot

19 Ridgeview 20 Shady Grove 21 Sunset Valley 22 Whitley Road 23 Willis Lane

22.98%

52.6%

9.8%

27.7%

HISPANIC

26 N/A 36 11

52 N/A 18 349

197 <10 105 65 115 <10 28 177

4.79%

2.4%

1.7%

1.1%

MULTIPLE RACES

262

<10 <10 15 146

<10 17 244

80 <10 33 22 79 N/A 30 413

53.97%

27.4%

83%

58.4%

WHITE

24 Woodland Springs

115 <10 23

56 109 <10

37 375

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

EDUCATION

Public Education Edition 2020

Nonmedical vaccine exemptions rising for students inKISD, NISD

OPTING OUT

The number of K-12 students in Texas receiving nonmedical, or conscientious, exemptions for required vaccinations has increased statewide over the past eight years.

Statewide

KISD

NISD

BY IAN PRIBANIC

start to get concerned.” A conscientious exemption can be granted when a parent objects to the state’s vaccination requirements based on personal beliefs, religious or otherwise. As such, a parent or guard- ian has the legal right to exclude their children from otherwise required immunizations. According to DSHS ocials, while the number of vaccinated students is far greater than that of those who are unvaccinated, the risk for an outbreak remains and grows higher when more than 5% of students are unvaccinated, ocials said. Across the state, the number of K-12 students receiving nonmedical, or conscientious, exemptions for required vaccinations increased in 2019-20 for the 10th straight school year, according to data from the Texas Education Agency. Numbers from the TEA’s annual

0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5

The number of students opting out of the state’s mandatory vaccination requirements has been on the rise in recent years in Keller ISD, Northwest ISD and other school districts across the state of Texas. During the 2019-20 school year, some 3.3% of NISD students received exemptions from state vaccination requirements for reasons of conscience, according to the Texas Department of State Health Services; 2.84% of KISD students received such exemptions protection into the community as you possibly can to protect everybody,” DSHS Media Relations Director Chris Van Deusen said. “If it’s one [unvac- cinated] person and everybody else is immunized, it’s not going to be [a problem], but when you see immu- nization rates falling under 95%, you during the same time period. “You want to build as much

*AS OF APRIL 30

survey gauging immunization status reect responses from roughly 1,200 public districts and 900 accredited private schools in Texas. The most recent survey available as of April 30 indicates that 1.35% of K-12 students in the state received conscientious exemptions during the 2019-20 school year, up from an average of 1.20% in the 2018-19 school year. SOURCES: TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY, TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF STATE HEALTH SERVICES COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

REQUIREDVACCINES

• Measles, Mumps, and Rubella (MMR) • Varicella • Meningococcal (MCV4)

• Diphtheria/ Tetanus/

Pertussis (DTaP/ DTP/DT/Td/Tdap) • Polio

• Hepatitis A • Hepatitis B

NOTE: CONSULT YOUR DOCTOR ON TIMING AND DOSAGE.

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KELLER  ROANOKE  NORTHEAST FORT WORTH EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

Private school guide 2020

CONTINUED FROM 1

Students return to in-person learning

of in-person instruction. “Masks will protect [students and sta] from exposure and hopefully prevent the need to quarantine in some circumstances,” NISD Superin- tendent Ryder Warren said. “We’re going to be really strict, and it’s for everybody’s protection.” Tracking COVID19 in schools The Texas Education Agency requires school districts to report conrmed COVID-19 cases weekly for a statewide dashboard that tracks positive cases among students and sta. The tracking system, with assis- tance from the Texas Department of State Health Services, began mon- itoring public schools statewide in mid-September. “Data on the number of cases in schools is of paramount interest to parents, students, teachers, sta, public health experts, policymakers and the larger community,” ocials said in a statement. Keller ISD and Northwest ISD have both established district COVID-19 dashboards to help parents and students monitor active and inactive cases across each district. As of Sept. 21, there were 31 active COVID-19 cases in KISD, including 21 students and 10 employees. “If a student tests positive, we have to trace anyone they’ve been within six feet of for more than 15 minutes,” KISD Superintendent Rick Westfall said. “The quarantine numbers can balloon because of all the places kids are going.” In response to a lab-conrmed COVID-19 case, districts must provide parental and public notice and notify local health department ocials. School districts must also close o and perform extra cleaning on places that were heavily used by an individ- ual who tests positive. As of Sept. 21, ocials with NISD have conrmed 22 active cases of COVID-19 across the district, including four cases at Roanoke Elementary. “Being able to publicly share the accumulated case totals … will help us to further support the health and safety of all Texans,” the TEA said. Transporting students safely Even during a pandemic, school districts have to ensure access to education, but the coronavirus has

made the logistics of bus transporta- tion even more challenging. Changes made by districts to keep students and sta safe include seat assignments and route changes. “Parents are encouraged to transport their children to limit the number of riders on school buses,” NISD Operations Director Bobby Aucoin said. “Masks must be worn at all times while on a bus, and all buses will be sanitized between trips and disinfected at the end of the day.” According to Aucoin, NISD parents received initial bus routes beginning Sept. 11 along with a guide to a bus tracking app. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released guidelines for school districts and bus operators to follow to mitigate spread of the virus. They include frequent cleaning of high-touch areas, limiting the number of people on each bus and posting signs to encourage social dis- tancing and other safety precautions. “Safety is what were all about,” said Joe Fessler, director of Texas Central School Bus, which provides buses to KISD. “We’re screening our employ- ees, using social distancing and facial coverings and training employees how to identify symptoms.” KISD buses are also following CDC guidelines that recommend seating no more than two children in a seat, cracking open windows and roof hatches for cross-ventilation, and using dierent boarding procedures, such as entering from the back and exiting from the front. “We’re looking at extra cleaning and disinfecting daily in the after- noon and having drivers wipe down and [disinfect] high-touch areas all day long,” Fessler said. “There are fewer riders, so we’re utilizing our existing eet.” Food service at school Providing meals for students in both face-to-face and remote instruc- tion has presented new obstacles for school districts. “We always have ways to improve, and that’s going to be a constant thing throughout the year,” Westfall said. “You try it out for a while, and if it doesn’t work, you continue to make improvements.” The number of students applying for reduced lunch programs is expected to slightly increase as the school year progresses, Texas

BY IAN PRIBANIC

30 due to the need to quarantine 25 teachers who may have been exposed to students and other sta who tested positive. The 2020-21 school year ocially began Aug. 20 for Northwest ISD with virtual-only instruction. NISD students did not return to the classroom in person until Sept. 14. Ocials at Keller ISD delayed the start of the school year until Aug. 26. Students had an early-release schedule during the rst three days

Educators in the Keller-Roa- noke-North Fort Worth area are mod- ifying operations and procedures as they contend with thousands of students returning to school amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Ocials at Keller ISD and North- west ISD have not been exempt from the impact. COVID-19 protocols have already forced the closure of Keller ISD’s Fossil Ridge High School and a shift to remote learning until Sept.

INPERSON LEARNING Keller ISD students began the school year Aug. 26 with in-person and virtual instruction. Northwest ISD students began remote instruction Aug. 20 and returned to in-person instruction beginning Sept. 14.

COVID19 PROTOCOL

Keller ISD and Northwest ISD students may return to campus after a COVID-19 diagnosis if the following occurs.

24 hours with no fever and symptoms have improved 10 days have passed since symptoms rst appeared

Student receives a negative COVID-19 test

Student provides a doctor’s note showing an alternative diagnosis

P ERSONAL P ROTECTIVE E QUIPMENT

KELLER ISD

PREK1ST GRADE: Face masks are required while on buses, in common areas and when entering or exiting campuses. 2ND GRADE12TH GRADE: Face masks are required at all times when social distancing is not possible, except when eating or drinking.

NORTHWEST ISD

All students and sta: Face masks must be worn at all times and social distancing must be practiced when possible, including entering and exiting buses, walking between classes and in common areas.

BUS TRANSPORTATION

KELLER ISD

NORTHWEST ISD

• Students using bus services are required to wear masks. • Students are seated back to front, and windows are cracked open.

• Masks must be worn at all times. • Bus riders are encouraged to socially distance and use hand sanitizer when exiting the bus.

NUTRITION PROGRAMS

KELLER ISD

NORTHWEST ISD

• Meals from cafeteria will be pre- packaged and boxed to minimize face-to-face contact. • Classes will go to lunch on staggered schedules.

• Packaged lunches may be provided at desks to avoid large congregations in lunchrooms. • Classes with lunch pickup will be staggered, with all students six feet apart.

SOURCES: NORTHWEST ISD, KELLER ISDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

18

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