Franklin - Brentwood Edition - June 2021

FRANKLIN BRENTWOOD EDITION

2021 H E A L T H C A R E E D I T I O N

ONLINE AT

VOLUME 3, ISSUE 4  JUNE 15JULY 12, 2021

Ocials ght barriers, hesitancy to encourage COVID19 vaccinations

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and local hospital ocials estimate communities need between 70%-90% of the population vaccinated against COVID-19 to reach herd immunity to protect the entire area. As of early June, just over 45% of all Williamson County residents were fully vaccinated. HERD IMMUNITY REACHING FOR

BY WENDY STURGES

Over the last six months, many residents in Wil- liamson County patiently waited for their phase of Tennessee’s COVID-19 vaccination plan to begin. Now, with all residents age 12 and older able to receive the vaccine free of charge, health ocials are working to make sure demand for the vaccine stays steady enough to bring an end to the corona- virus pandemic. “Since December 2020, the health department has provided more than 85,000 vaccines for residents in Williamson and surrounding counties,” Williamson County Health Director Catherine Montgomery said. While Williamson County ranks second among Tennessee counties, with just over 45% of all resi- dents fully vaccinated, only about a third of residents statewide have been fully vaccinated as of early June. That number is less than half of the estimated 70% vaccination rate needed to reach herd immu- nity—in which enough members of the community are immune to the virus to protect the whole popu- lation—according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Health care ocials say many residents are still hesitant or unwilling to receive a vaccine due to uncertainty about its safety or misinformation about its contents and eectiveness. CONTINUED ON 14

WENDY STURGESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

HOW DOES HERD IMMUNITY WORK? Herd immunity is achieved when a large enough portion of the population becomes immune to a disease—either by surviving the illness or receiving a vaccine—which makes transmission less unlikely and protects even those who are not immune and not able to receive a vaccine.

HOW CLOSE IS WILLIAMSON COUNTY TO REACHING COVID-19 HERD IMMUNITY? Williamson County needs at least 25%more of its population to get the vaccine to achieve the lower threshold of heard immunity, according to health ocials.

Percentage of fully vaccinated out of all residents

Immune

Not immune

Infected

45.04%

Williamson County

34.3%

Tennessee

70%+

Herd immunity goal

SOURCES: MAYO CLINIC, TENNESSEE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

HEALTHCARE EDITION 2021

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FROMLACY: Welcome to our annual Health Care Edition! This past year has been lled with so many questions about health as our community navigated COVID-19, and it is mind- boggling to look back at our 2020 edition, when vaccines were still far on the horizon. Today, local health departments are vaccinating anyone 12 years of age and older who wants a COVID-19 vaccine. With vaccines now readily available, health ocials say the next hurdle is making sure as many people get vaccines as possible to ensure the community is protected. Our issue this month features local health experts who talk about how many people in the community have received the vaccine and what barriers still remain for those who have not. Lacy Klasel, PUBLISHER

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FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • JUNE 2021

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

NOWOPEN 1 Vintage Vine 100 held a soft opening in mid-May at 4051 Aspen Grove Drive, Franklin, as one of the newest tenants at McEwen Northside in Cool Springs. The wine bar oers a wide selection of wine varietals by the bottle or glass, or diners can choose one of the bar’s curated wine ights. Vintage Vine also features beer and bourbon menus with local and craft options and a food menu that includes charcuterie boards and small bites as well as atbreads and salads. An ocial grand opening is expected to take place in the coming weeks, according to the company. 615-567-6200. www.vintagevine100.com 2 Big Bad Breakfast opened in early May at 1201 Liberty Pike, Ste. 101, Frank- lin, at the Liberty Station building. The restaurant, which also operates a location in Nashville, oers breakfast and lunch, serving signature dishes such as shrimp and grits, house-cured Tabasco brown sugar bacon, chicken and waes, biscuits and breakfast skillets. 615-656-5539. https://bigbadbreakfast.com 3 Owner Elizabeth Cervantes opened Ability Cuts on May 10 inside Sola Salon Studio at 1731 Mallory Lane, Brentwood. The shop oers haircuts for children and adults, but specializes in haircutting for those with sensory needs. 615-944-1888. www.facebook.com/abilitycuts 4 Franklin Walking Tours launched June 4 in downtown Franklin. The company oers guided tours of the his- toric downtown area and will also host Psychic Walk tours featuring readings from psychic Deb Lantz, according to owner Alicia King Marshall. Tours range from 90 minutes to two hours and fea- ture themes such as Downtown Charm, Grim and Ghostly, and Picture Perfect. Tours can be booked online and begin at Landmark Booksellers, 114 E. Main St., Franklin. 615-604-7171. www.franklinwalkingtours.com COMING SOON 5 Radio network nonprot Educa- tion Media Foundation will relocate its headquarters from Rocklin, California, to Franklin, according to an announcement from CEO Bill Reeves. The announce-

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MAUREEN SIPPERLEYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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ment was made during Williamson Inc.’s Outlook Williamson event May 12. The organization operates KLOVE, a Chris- tian radio station, as well as podcasts and the Air1 network. The EMF will work temporarily from the Schneider Electric building, located at 6700 Tower Circle, Franklin, before building its own perma- nent facility in the near future. A move-in date at the permanent facility has not been announced. www.emroadcasting.com 6 We Rock the Spectrum , a senso- ry-based gymnasium for children, is slated to open in late summer or early fall at 1113 Murfreesboro Road, Ste. 203, Franklin, according to local owners Steven and Samantha Komarnitsky. The gym features equipment intended to stimulate the sens- es and facilitate social development, according to the company. 818-996-6620. www.werockthespectrum.com RELOCATIONS 7 Fitness studio Manduu announced the relocation of its Cool Springs location from 125 Cool Springs Blvd., Franklin, to downtown Franklin, 99 E. Main St., in late April. The studio oers 15-minute guided workouts while con- nected to an electrical muscle stimu- lation suit, according to the company. 615-716-2404. www.manduu.com 8 Haven Birth and Wellness announced in early May it has relocated to a new space in the same building at 574 Franklin Road, Ste. 215, Franklin. The oce oers home-based midwifery care including prenatal, birth, newborn and postpartum care. 615-436-6235. www.havenbirthandwellness.com

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ASPEN GROVE DR.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TODO LIST

June-July events

COMPILED BY WENDY STURGES

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JUNE 1820

JUNETEENTH CELEBRATION DOWNTOWN FRANKLIN

Hayes House

McEwen Northside

WENDY STURGESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

COURTESY MCEWEN NORTHSIDE

The Franklin Justice & Equity Coalition has partnered with the Battle of Franklin Trust, Fuller Story and the city of Franklin to host the inaugural Juneteenth Gala at Carnton, a festival in the Public Square in downtown Franklin and a Sunday worship service at Strong Tower Bible Church. Times and locations vary. Free (admission to festival and worship service, $100 per person for gala). http://ecwilco.org

9 Martial Arts and yoga studio The Harvest Concept , previously known as Harvest Martial Arts, will hold a grand opening later this summer for its new studio at 313 Independence Square, Franklin. The studio, previously located at 335 Independence Square, now features two practice oors and a retail shop. The Harvest Concept oers high- intensity training, kickboxing and archery classes. www.theharvestconcept.com EXPANSIONS 10 Franklin Bakehouse announced May 29 it has begun construction to expand its existing shop at 100 E. Main St., Franklin to include a restaurant as well as a boutique wine and liquor store, both ex- pected to open later this summer. Franklin Bakehouse, located inside Harpeth Square, features a bakery, deli and market oering coee drinks, pastries and baked goods and daily meal specials. 615-628-8493. 11 Peace, Love and Little Donuts cele- brated its one-year anniversary June 1 at its Brentwood location at 213 Franklin Road, Ste. 120, Brentwood. The bakery oers gourmet miniature doughnuts in a variety of avors, such as banana crunch, apple pie, chocolate chip cookie dough and raspberry true. The shop also oers fresh-brewed coee. 615-964-7995. www.peaceloveandlittledonuts.com RENOVATIONS 12 Local nonprot Friends of Franklin Parks kicked o a campaign on May 19 www.franklinbakehouse.com ANNIVERSARIES

to restore the historic Hayes House in Franklin. The 4,200-square-foot home, located near the dog park in The Park at Harlinsdale Farm, was built in the 1890s as a home for the Harlin family, who used the land as a horse farm from the 1940s to the early 2000s, according to FOFP. The nonprot organization is working in partnership with the city of Franklin to raise $750,000 to restore the home. Once complete, the home will be used as rental space for weddings, events and fundraisers as well as a platform for educational opportunities. 615-674-5388. www.friendsoranklinparks.org IN THE NEWS 13 A new mural, titled, “What Lifts You?,” debuted in mid-May at McEwen Northside in Cool Springs. The mural, painted by Nashville artist Kelsey Mon- tague, features a series of kites with tails that visitors can take photos holding onto and is painted on the side of Vintage Vine 100, located along Aspen Grove Drive. www.mcewennorthside.com CLOSING 14 Oce Depot will close its loca- tion at 330 Franklin Road, Ste. 306C, Brentwood, in the Brentwood Place shopping center, according to signage in front of the store. The company oers oce supplies, furniture and electronics as well as printing services. Oce Depot also operates locations in Cool Springs and Belle Meade. An exact closing date has not been announced. 615-373-5778. www.ocedepot.com

WENDY STURGESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

JUNE 18 MOVIE IN THE PARK The city of Franklin hosts a movie night at Pinkerton Park. Residents are encouraged to bring their own chairs and blankets to sit on during the movie, and concessions will be available for purchase. The movie shown will be the 2019 Disney lm, “Frozen 2.”. 8 p.m. Free (admission).405 Murfreesboro Road, Franklin. 615-791-3217. MARKNIZER 4D THEATRE As part of its Family Spotlight Program, the Franklin Theatre hosts performances from comedian and juggler Mark Nizer. This is a rescheduled performance, and www.franklintn.gov 25 THROUGH 26 tickets previously purchased will be transferred, according to the theater. 8 p.m. (Sat.), 2 p.m. & 8 p.m. (Sun.). $19.50-$29.50. 419 Main St., Franklin. 615-538-2076. www.franklintheatre.com 26 WORTH THE TRIP WATERMELON FESTIVAL The annual festival returns to Lucky Ladd Farms with a splash pad, water slide, games, contests and watermelon slices. Festival admission is included in the price of general admission tickets.

10 a.m.-4 p.m. $14.99-$29.99. 4374 Rocky Glade Road, Eagleville. 615-274-3786. www.luckyladdfarms.com 27 CARNTON SUNSET CONCERT SERIES The Battle of Franklin Trust kicks o its annual concert series at the Franklin historic home Carnton with a performance from Rubicks Groove. Food and drinks can be purchased at the event, or guests can bring their own. 6-8 p.m. (gates open at 4 p.m.). $12-$15 (adults), $5.50-$8 (children). 1345 Eastern Flank Circle, Franklin. 615-794-0903. www.boft.org JULY 04 RED, WHITE AND BOOMCELEBRATION The city of Brentwood hosts this annual Independence Day event featuring a reworks show, food trucks with concessions for purchase and live music from Tim Akers and the Smoking Section. 7 p.m. (reworks begin at 9 p.m., with a post-reworks music performance). Free (admission). Crockett Park, 1500 Volunteer Parkway, Brentwood. 615-371-0060. www.brentwoodtn.gov

Find more or submit Franklin and Brentwood events at communityimpact.com/event- calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

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FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • JUNE 2021

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES

COMPILED BY WENDY STURGES

BRENTWOOD

Avenue North in downtown Franklin. The project is slated to be complete by the end of the year, according to city ocials. Timeline: summer 2020-winter 2021 Cost: $5.3 million Funding Source: city of Franklin, federal funding 3 Mack C. Hatcher Parkway extension Work along the Mack C. Hatcher Parkway is on schedule to wrap up this fall, according to the city of Franklin. The rst phase of the project will create a two-lane road from Hillsboro Road to Del Rio Pike in Franklin, with a bridge over the Harpeth River. The full project will include a four-lane roadway and an additional bridge; however, a timeline for that project has not been determined. According to a May 20 update from TDOT, drivers can expect lane closures along Hwy. 96 West between Front Street and Boyd Mill Avenue as crews continue access road work. Timeline: 2019-fall 2021 (phase 1 only) Cost: $45.12 million (phase 1 only) Funding sources: TDOT, city of Franklin

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REGIONAL PROJECT 4 Murfreesboro Road widening

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This TDOT project will widen Murfrees- boro road from Arno Road in Williamson County to Veterans Parkway in Ruth- erford County. The road will be recon- structed and widened from two to four lanes, with a center-turn lane and 10-foot shoulders along an 18.7-mile stretch. Because of the length of the project, construction will be broken up into four sections: Arno Road to Wilson Pike, Wil- son Pike to I-840, I-840 to Coleman Hill Road and Coleman Hill Road to Veterans Parkway. Construction on either end of the roadway—from Carothers Parkway to Arno Road and Veterans Parkway to Overall Creek—have already been completed. Timeline: 2019-TBD (Wilson Pike portion expected to be complete in 2024) Cost: TBD Funding source: TDOT

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scores on an international level

ONGOING PROJECTS 1 Franklin Road widening

Tennessee Department of Transportation crews continue work at the intersection of Franklin Road and Moore’s Lane near Brentwood to widen the road from two to four lanes with a continuous center-turn lane. Drivers can expect reduced speeds along the roadway. The project was slated to be completed in 2020; however, TDOT ocials said the timeline has been ex- tended to allow for more time to relocate utilities. Timeline: January 2020-April 2022 (Phase 2) Cost: $27.4 million Funding source: TDOT

PHOTOS BY WENDY STURGESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

HOW ITWORKS When do drivers need to get a Real ID? Drivers will now have an extra year and a half to obtain a Real ID, which will be required for adults traveling on a U.S. commercial ight or entering certain federal buildings. The U.S. Department of Homeland Secu- rity announced in late April it extended the previous deadline to get the new identication card from Oct. 1 to May 3, 2023. Real IDs will feature markings, such 2 Hwy. 96 West multiuse trail Barriers are still in place along Hwy. 96 West as the city of Franklin continues work on a new 1.6-mile multiuse trail on the westbound side of the roadway. The new trail, expected to be 10-12 feet in width, will extend from Vera Valley Drive to 5th

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as a star in a circle, at the top of the card. Those who do not have a card by the May 2023 deadline will be required to use another acceptable form of identication, such as a passport, to board a ight. Individuals applying for a Real ID must have, at a minimum, documentation showing their full legal name, date of birth, Social Security number, two proofs of residence and legal status. Acceptable documents include a W-2 or a paystub, according to the DHS.

Drivers now have until May 2023 to get a Real ID drivers license.

heifranklin.com

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF MAY 21. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT FRBNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY& COUNTY

News from Franklin, Brentwood & Williamson County

COMPILED BY WENDY STURGES

CITY HIGHLIGHT BRENTWOOD Mayor Rhea Little was appointed to serve another two years as mayor during the Brentwood City Commission meeting May 10 following his re-election to the commission. Franklin Board of Mayor and Aldermen Meets June 22 and July 13 at 7 p.m. at 109 3rd Ave. S., Franklin. Workshop meetings are always held two hours prior. In-person seating may be limited. 615-791-3217. www.franklintn.gov Brentwood City Commission Meets June 28 and July 12 at 7 p.m. at 5211 Maryland Way, Brentwood. In-person seating may be limited. 615-371-0060. www.brentwoodtn.gov Williamson County Schools board of education Meets June 21 at 6:30 p.m. 615-472-4000. www.wcs.edu Franklin Special School District board of education Meets June 19 at 6:30 p.m. at Freedom Middle School at 750 Hwy. 96 W., Franklin. 615-794-6624. www.fssd.org MEETINGSWE COVER

Brentwood City Commission votes downmotion to censure vicemayor

Two street portions renamed after Black leaders in Franklin FRANKLIN Two street portions near downtown Franklin will be renamed for Black leaders following approval from the Franklin Board of Mayor and Aldermen on May 11. The rst—an extension of 3rd Ave- nue that runs through Bicentennial Park—will be renamed for civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. The second—an extension of 3rd Avenue on the west side of Hillsboro Road leading to the Hill property—will be named for Allen Nelson Crutcher “ANC” Williams, who opened the rst Black-owned business in downtown Franklin in 1863.

BRENTWOOD Vice Mayor Nelson Andrews narrowly avoided being censured by the Brentwood City Commission after a resident accused him of breaking city codes. During the commission’s May 10 meeting, Andrews was accused by resident Gerald Witcher of violating city codes by illegally parking 21 vehicles on green space along a roadway. Andrews is the owner of Andrews Transportation Group, which operates three car dealerships in the city and has been undergoing renovations. City Manager Kirk Bednar said he granted Andrews exibility to park cars temporarily while construc- tion was ongoing. In response to the accusation, Andrews said the cars were parked on the green space due to a construction delay. Some commissioners came to Andrews’ defense, citing past

occurrences when Witcher made sim- ilar calls to censure past commissioners. However, Commissioner Mark Gorman

Nelson Andrews

made a motion at the end of the meeting to censure Andrews until his business followed city codes. The commission voted 3-3, with commissioners Ken Travis, Susannah Macmillan and Gorman voting in favor; Mayor Rhea Little, Anne Dunn and Smithson voting against; and Andrews abstaining. As the vote was tied, the motion did not pass, according to Little. City Attorney Kristen Corn said during the city’s May 24 meeting the motion was not ocial as the commission did not follow proper censuring procedures.

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ANNUAL COMMUNITY  HEALTH CARE REAL ESTATE  EDUCATION COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM. VISIT

HEALTH CARE SNAPSHOT

COMPILED BY WENDY STURGES

COMPARING COUNTY HEALTH These rankings are updated annually but include data from previous years. There are other factors included that are not listed.

2021 STATEWIDE HEALTH CARE RANKINGS OUT OF 95 COUNTIES

HEALTH OUTCOMES INCLUDE:

• LENGTHOF LIFE • QUALITYOF LIFE , such as the number of poor mental and physical health days reported

HEALTH OUTCOMES

13 14 14

11 8

1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Length of life Overall

HEALTH FACTORS INCLUDE:

WILLIAMSON COUNTY

• HEALTHBEHAVIORS , such as smoking, obesity, physical activity, excessive drinking, alcohol-impaired driving deaths, sexually transmitted infections and teen births • CLINICAL CARE , including health insurance coverage; number of physicians, dentists and mental health providers; preventable hospital stays; and u vaccinations • SOCIOECONOMIC FACTORS , such as educational attainment levels, children in poverty, income inequality and violent crimes • PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT FACTORS , such as air pollution, drinking water violations, housing problems and long commutes

MAURY COUNTY DAVIDSON COUNTY

10

Quality of life HEALTH FACTORS

10 6

6 9

Overall

Health behaviors

7 4 9

19

Socioeconomic Physical environment Clinical care

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SOURCES: ROBERT WOOD JOHNSON FOUNDATION, UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN POPULATION HEALTH INSTITUTE, COUNTYHEALTHRANKINGS.ORG, TENNESSEE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTHCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Williamson County has seen a signicant drop in active COVID-19 cases in recent months. Data is accurate as of June 8. COMBATING COVID19

PEOPLE AGE 12+ WITH AT LEAST ONE DOSE

The majority of COVID-19 cases in the area have recovered.

COUNTY CASES

113,674 - 50.89%

309,727 - 47.85%

Active - 97 Deaths - 218 Recoveries - 28,013 Active - 262 Deaths - 954 Recoveries - 89,080

Total 28,328

41,658 - 46.23%

COUNTYVACCINATIONS

State average 2,570,660 - 39.9%

VACCINATION DEMOGRAPHICS

4.57% 3.05%

1.44%

Asian

3.31% 14.22% 7.36% 3.12% 6.29% 4.67% 66.4% 53.87% 64.27% 18.03% 17.08% 18.25% 4.53% 5.45% 3.98%

Black

Total 90,296

PEOPLE AGE 12+ FULLY VACCINATED

Hispanic

99,656 - 45.04%

White

265,440 - 42%

Other

Active - 25 Deaths - 174 Recoveries - 13,412

35,846 - 40.92%

Total 13,611

Unknown

State average 2,166,204 - 34.3%

9

FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • JUNE 2021

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

HEALTH CARE FACILITIES

Local hospitals, ERs, urgent care & retail clinics

2 0 2 1 H E A L T H C A R E E D I T I O N

COMPILED BY WENDY STURGES

6

7

KEY

Hospitals

Retail clinic

Urgent care clinic

Walk-in clinic

R

U

W

COVID19 testing

COVID19 vaccines

Flu vaccines

T

V

F

HOSPITALS

4 TriStar Southern Hills Medical Center 391 Wallace Road, Nashville 6157814000 www.tristarhealth.com • Trauma level: N/A • NICU level: N/A • Total number of employees: 495 • Total number of beds: 126 • Notable programs and specialties: chest pain, joint and spine, and primary stroke centers 5 Vanderbilt University Medical Center 1211 Medical Center Drive, Nashville • Trauma level: I • NICU level: IV • Total number of employees: 24,039 • Total number of beds: 1,131 • Notable programs and specialties: Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Eye Institute, Psychiatric Hospital 6 Williamson Medical Center 4321 Carothers Parkway, Franklin 6154355000 www.williamsonmedicalcenter.com • Trauma level: N/A • NICU level: IIB • Total number of employees: 1,800+ • Total number of beds: 185 • Notable programs and specialties: Turner-Dugas Breast Health Center, Bone and Joint Institute of Tennessee, Cardiology and Chest Pain Center, Joint and Spine Center CLINICS &URGENT CARE Franklin 7 Ascension Saint Thomas Urgent Care U T F 509 Hillsboro Road, Franklin 6154722139 www.urgentteam.com 6153225000 www.vumc.org

Williamson Medical Center

Ascension Saint Thomas Urgent Care

1 Ascension Saint Thomas Hospital Midtown 2000 Church St., Nashville 6152845555 www.healthcare.ascension.org • Trauma level: N/A • NICU level: III • Total employees: 2,800+ • Total beds: 680+

PHOTOS BY WENDY STURGESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

8 CareNow Urgent Care U T F 2017 Mallory Lane, Franklin 6156563239 www.carenow.com 9 The Little Clinic R T V F 1204 Murfreesboro Road, Franklin 6154654600 www.thelittleclinic.com 10 The Little Clinic R T V F 3054 Columbia Ave., Franklin 6155500091 www.thelittleclinic.com 11 MinuteClinic R T V F 1154 Liberty Pike, Franklin 6157911164 www.cvs.com/minuteclinic 12 Physicians Urgent Care U T V F 155 Covey Drive, Ste. 100, Franklin 6154721550

1834 W. McEwen Drive, Ste. 110, Franklin 6158754200 www.vanderbilthealth.com 15 Vanderbilt Health and Williamson Medical Center Walk-in Clinic Franklin W T V F 919 Murfreesboro Road, Franklin 6157917373 www.vanderbilthealth.com Brentwood 16 America’s Family Doctors & Walk-In Clinics W F 1195 Old Hickory Blvd., Ste. 103, Brentwood 6153732000 afdclinics.com 17 CareNow Urgent Care U T V F 210 Franklin Road, Ste. 4B, Brentwood 6159646160 www.carenow.com 18 Physicians Urgent Care U T V F 700 Old Hickory Lane, Ste. 207, Brentwood 6154573864 www.physiciansurgentcare.com 19 Vanderbilt Health and Williamson Medical Center Walk-in Clinic Brentwood W T V F 134 Pewitt Drive, Ste. 200, Brentwood 6153712481 www.vanderbilthealth.com NOTE: VACCINE AVAILABILITY MAY VARY BASED ON DEMAND. CALL LOCATION TO VERIFY AVAILABILITY. THIS LIST IS NOT COMPREHENSIVE.

• Notable programs and specialties: Joint Commission-certied Advanced Primary Stroke Center, Joint Commission- certied advanced chest pain center, Beaman Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, comprehensive women’s care, Cancer Center, Joint Replacement Institute, Spine Institute, Heart Center, Blue Distinction Center in bariatric care 2 Ascension Saint Thomas Hospital West 4220 Harding Pike, Nashville 6152222111 www.healthcare.ascension.org • Trauma level: N/A • NICU level: N/A • Total employees: 1,700+ • Total beds: 540+ • Notable programs and specialties: Joint Commission-certied Comprehensive Stroke Center, Joint Commission-certied advanced chest pain center, Cancer Care, Joint Replacement Institute, Spine Institute, comprehensive cardiac services 3 Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt 2200 Children’s Way, Nashville 6159361000 www.childrenshospitalvanderbilt.org • Trauma level: I • NICU level: IV • Total number of employees: 400+ • Total number of beds: 305 • Notable programs and specialties: cancer, transplant, trauma, sickle cell disease, developmental disorders, ENT

www.physiciansurgentcare.com 13 Physicians Urgent Care U T V F 5021 Hughes Crossing, Ste. 165, Franklin 6157948877 www.physiciansurgentcare.com 14 Vanderbilt Health and Williamson Medical Center Walk-in Clinic Cool Springs W T V F

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FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • JUNE 2021

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

HEALTH CARE

2 0 2 1 H E A L T H C A R E E D I T I O N

COVID19 facemask restrictions ease inWilliamson County

Masks on or off? According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, vaccinated individuals now have fewer restrictions related to face masks, especially when indoors. Unvaccinated individuals should continue to wear masks in some instances.

Vaccinated

Unvaccinated

BY WENDY STURGES

Exercise outdoors Attend a small, outdoor gathering Go to a crowded, indoor shopping center Eat indoors or visit a bar Safe Unsafe

events since 2019. Ocials said the event will be outdoors, and residents have learned enough measures in the past year to determine whether they need masks. “The community will decide on their own if a concert is too crowded and they feel safer wearing a mask or even not attending,” Mayor Rhea Little said during a city commission meeting. “I personally think we are all ready to return to some normalcy after the pandemic.” In addition to having nearly half of its population at least partially vac- cinated, Williamson County has also seen a sharp decline in active cases, dropping to less than 100 cases as of early June. Active case levels have not been that low since March 2020, according to data from the Tennessee Department of Health. Although Williamson County has not had a mask mandate in place

After more than a year of following coronavirus safety protocols, many residents in Williamson County are seeing a return to pre-pandemic life as government and health ocials lift restrictions. While Gov. Bill Lee discontinued executive orders that allowed government entities to enforce mask mandates after April 28, a signicant change came when the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced May 13 that vaccinated individuals no longer had to wear faces masks when inside or outside. Ocials said the change came after studies determined vaccinated individuals had “minimal” risk of contracting or spreading the virus. On May 11, the city of Brentwood announced masks would not be required during its summer concert series, one of the city’s rst big

SOURCE: CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTIONCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

since late February, local school districts kept requirements in place as the vaccine had not been available to those younger than age 16. However, in May, both Williamson County Schools and Franklin Special School District announced masks would not be required for students and sta on campus during summer programs as the student population in schools will be much smaller, allowing for more space to social distance. While neither districts have

announced if masks will be optional for the 2021-22 school year, WCS Superintendent Jason Golden said he is optimistic that will be the case. However, students and sta can continue to wear masks if they feel comfortable doing so. “We have no projection at this point,” Golden said. “We don’t anticipate that we will ask to require them, at most we anticipate an encouragement or recommendation or an option.”

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13

FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • JUNE 2021

VACCINE CONCERNS

DESIGNED BY LINDSAY SCOTT & CAITLIN WHITTINGTON

members of the general public who want them, but there is still work to be done to reach those who do not have easy access to or are not likely to get the vaccine. While the CDC and the TDH have repeatedly announced the vaccine is safe to receive, misinformation sur- rounding its safety and ecacy still exists due to the speed at which it was developed, according to Dr. Susan Bai- ley, president of the American Medical Association, which works to provide informationandsupplies tophysicians. “We feel very condent that no cor- ners were cut during the manufactur- ing process,” Bailey said. “A lot of red tape was cut, and a lot of nancial risk was cut for the vaccine manufacturers so they were able to overlap phases of the research and do some things simultaneously.” In April, the TDH released the results of a market study detailing subsets of the Tennessee population age 18 and older who had not received a vaccine and were hesitant or unwill- ing to get one. The study included responses from approximately 1,000 representatives from all 95 counties across the state. According to survey results, 46%-64% of residents across varying races expressed concern about the safety of the vaccine. When asked what they fearedmore, 41% or all respondents said they were afraid of death from COVID-19, while 59% stated they were more afraid of death due to the vaccine. However, the study found that those hesitant to get a vaccine were more likely to trust information com- ing from their personal physician than friends or elected ocials, something national and local health ocials are counting on. “One thing AMA has been advo- cating for since the vaccines were authorized is to get them into more physicians’ oces, because physicians have always been vaccines’ greatest Montgomery said the state, through county departments, is also working to reach vulnerable populations who may not have a primary care pro- vider or may have trouble traveling to appointments. “The state, regional and local health departments are making eorts to reduce barriers for COVID vacci- nations,” Montgomery said. “For ambassadors,” Bailey said. Removing barriers locally

In a recent study released in April, the Tennessee Department of Health found, out of 1,000 people, a number of residents who had not received the vaccine were hesitant or unwilling to do so based on uncertainty about the vaccine’s safety.

UNCERTAINTY OF VACCINE SAFETY

WHO DO RESIDENTS TRUST MOST? The study also found residents hesitant to get the vaccine were more likely to trust personal physicians than any other source. Not all sources are listed below.

CHANGING MINDS The survey did nd, however, individuals are most likely to get a vaccine to protect a member of their family when asked which group they would get vaccinated for.

A number of those surveyed said they were unsure whether the COVID-19 vaccine was safe.

Personal physician (Most) Hospital physician Family member Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Pharmacist State or local health ocial Friend Spiritual leader No one State elected ocial TV or movie celebrity Music celebrity (Least)

1

Who would residents be most likely to get a COVID-19 vaccine for?

How do hesitant residents feel about COVID-19 vaccine safety?

Family: 55.3% Self: 27% Country: 7.6%

Economy: 6.3% Community: 2.4% Friends: 1.3%

48.9% were unsure if the vaccine is safe. 25.8% believe it is not safe. 25.3% believe it is safe.

12

SOURCE: TENNESSEE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

SETTING THE RECORD STRAIGHT There are many myths surrounding COVID-19 vaccines that medical professionals hope to dispel, but there are still unknowns surrounding available vaccines.

CONTINUED FROM 1

To help encourage those who have not yet received a vaccine to schedule an appointment, in May, the Tennes- see Department of Health launched a new public service announcement campaign—Give it a Shot—to help dis- seminate educational resources about the vaccine through TV and internet advertising. “The most eective tool we have for combatting the COVID-19 virus is a vaccine,” TDH Commissioner Dr. Lisa Piercey said in a May 19 news release. “We recognize many Tennesseans have questions or concerns about the COVID vaccines, and our goal is that these messages help to address some of those hesitancies. At the end of the day my hope is we will continue to see a steady increase in vaccine uptake across our state as more and more individuals feel more comfortable and condent in receiving the vaccine.” Vaccine hesitancy, misinformation Ocials say Tennessee has made progress in getting vaccinations to

CAN COVID-19 VACCINES:

Yes

No

Unknown

Cause someone to contract the virus?

Cause someone to test positive for COVID-19?

Alter someone’s DNA?

Cause problems with pregnancies?

Protect against existing variants in the U.S.?

Cause someone to have u-like symptoms? Cause blood clots in rare cases with women younger than 50?*

Be eective against the virus for longer than 6 months?

*AS OF THE CDC’S UPDATED RECOMMENDATIONS MAY 6, ALL BLOOD CLOTS CAUSED BY THE JOHNSON & JOHNSON VACCINE WERE IN WOMEN YOUNGER THAN 50 WITH LOW BLOOD PLATELET COUNTS. THE CDC BELIEVES THE VACCINE’S BENEFITS OUTWEIGH THE RISKS, BUT RECOMMENDS WOMEN YOUNGER THAN 50 BE AWARE AND SEEK TREATMENT IF THEY SUFFER BLOOD CLOT SYMPTOMS. SOURCES: CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION; SUSAN BAILEY, AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION PRESIDENTCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

14

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

example, nurses from our STRIKE [team] are visiting those who are homebound or living in shared and congregate living facilities to oer vac- cinations. Other nurse teams are going into local jails, and local health depart- ments are scheduling vaccinations through outreach opportunities.” Additionally, major hospital centers like Vanderbilt are also working to make getting the vaccine more conve- nient for residents.Aspart of itsCOVID-

health guidelines and get vaccinated. “We oered a free program at no cost to and open to all Tennessee businesses to try to educate folks ear- lier, reduce barriers and share best practices,” she said. Achieving herd immunity Despite hesitancy to get the vac- cine, health care experts agree it is the only way to ensure an end to the coro- navirus pandemic. While Williamson County has one of the highest vaccination

Have youever known someone . . . Have youever known someone . . .

+

WHONEEDEDHELP so they could stay at home instead of moving to a facility? WHONEEDEDCARE to be able to start immediately? WHONEEDED TRANSPORTATION assistance to and from your office? WHOHADQUESTIONS about in-home care options? WHO ISAVETERAN and needs funds for in-home caregiving? WHONEEDSACCESS to our experienced Care Team? WHONEEDEDHELP so they could stay at home instead of moving to a facility? WHONEEDEDCARE to be able to start immediately? WHONEEDED TRA SPORTATION assistance to and from your office? WHOHADQUESTIONS about in-home care p ions? WHO ISAVETERAN and needs funds for in-home caregiving? WHONEEDSACCESS to our experienced Ca Team? + + + + +

+

+ + + + +

19 response eorts, Vanderbilt health o- cials are working with local employers to set up on-site vaccina- tion clinics at work- spaces, according to Donna Skupien, senior director of Vanderbilt Health Employer Solu- tions. The program helps reach residents who are often working during doctor’s oce hours.

THEMOST EFFECTIVE

rates in the state, local experts say it is still not enough to achieve herd immunity, which helps protect those who are vaccinated as well as those who cannot get the vaccine due to medical condi- tions or age.

TOOLWE HAVE FOR COMBATTING COVID19 IS A VACCINE.” DR. LISA PIERCEY, TENNESSEE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH COMMISSIONER

“Those who are currently ineligible to receive the vaccine [such as] chil- dren, infants, those with underlying medical conditions, are at risk of being infected,” Montgomery said. “Vac- cinating eligible individuals who do not have these conditions is critical to stopping the spread of the pandemic.” However, it is not clear on when or if Williamson County will reach vacci- nation or immunity levels needed for herd immunity, Montgomery said. “We can’t speculate on who will or won’t get the vaccine,” she said. “It is our goal to vaccinate any Tennessean that is willing to receive a vaccine.” Dr. Andy Russell, chief medical o- cer for Williamson Medical Center, said the rate of those fully vaccinated should be closer to 70%, or more ideally 90%, to achieve community immunity. The topic was discussed during Franklin Mayor Ken Moore’s State of the City address May 19. “The quickest way for us to get out of this is to get vaccines,” Russell said. “While we’re at [over 40% fully vaccinated], that’s fantastic, but to reach that herd immunity that every- one’s heard about, we need at mini- mum 70%, and other estimates go as high as 90% of the population to receive the vaccine.” Matt Stephens contributed to this report.

1-800-410-2570 | CornerstoneCaregiving.com 1-800-410-2570 | CornerstoneCaregiving.com 615-821-0330 4004 Hillsboro Pike, Ste. B238 Nashville, TN 37215 CornerstoneCaregiving.com Bonded, licensed, insured

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“We have Vanderbilt Corporate Health and Wellness, and we have 20 nurses that are a part of that team,” Skupien said. “We can prepare to book to almost any employer [for a clinic]. We’ve done it on the side of the road for highway workers, we’ve gone into corporate settings, we’ve gone to live events. We have a very pliable team that we’ve been working with for years.” Skupien said Vanderbilt has also partnered with a number of William- son County entities and businesses, including Battle of Franklin Trust, the Franklin Marriott Cool Springs and Bar-BCutie Smokehouse as part of Good to Go Nashville, which encour- ages residents, visitors and employees in Middle Tennessee to implement RESOURCES Residents who want to learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine can continue their research at local sites below. LEARN MORE ABOUT THE VACCINE:

www.tn.gov/health www.covid19.tn.gov www.cdc.gov FIND A VACCINE SITE NEAR YOU: www.vaccinender.org

For more information, visit communityimpact.com .

15

FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • JUNE 2021

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