New Braunfels | August 2020

NEWBRAUNFELS EDITION

VOLUME 3, ISSUE 9  AUG. 10SEPT. 4, 2020

ONLINE AT

First round of PPP loans oered temporary relief, saved local jobs

borrowed time Paycheck Protection Program loans from the Small Business Administration helped businesses avoid layos.

businesses received loans OVER 1,800 jobs retained OVER19,000

BY LAUREN CANTERBERRY

On July 6, the Small Business Administration, or SBA, released data showing that 1,806 NewBraunfels businesses received a total of more than $118.4 million in federal aid through the Paycheck Protection Pro- gram, or PPP. The Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act, or CARES Act, was signed into law March 27 to pro- vide American employers with nearly $350 billion for PPP loans, according to the SBA.

In New Braunfels, SBA data showed 229 companies—corporations, non- prots, independent contractors, sole proprietors and limited liability com- panies—received loans ranging from $150,000 to $5 million. SBA data shows that another 1,577 New Braunfels businesses received loans of $150,000 or less. The published information includes the names of businesses that borrowed more than $150,000. CONTINUED ON 20

SOURCE: U.S. SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER received loans between $150,000 and $5 million 229 COMPANIES received loans of $149,999 or less 1,577BUSINESSES

WARREN BROWNCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

New Braunfels resident and astronaut is Texan of the Year

While on the moon in 1972, Charles Duke and John W. Young used the Lunar Roving Vehicle to explore 16.5 miles of the lunar surface, take photos and set up experiments. ASTRONAUT CHARLES DUKE PICTURED COLLECTING LUNAR SAMPLES AT STATION 1

BY LAUREN CANTERBERRY

New Braunfels resident and 2020 Texan of the Year, Brigadier General and Apollo astronaut Charles Duke knew from an early age that he wanted to break the bonds of gravity but never dreamed he would walk on the moon. Born in 1935 in Charlotte, North Carolina, Duke said that he always wanted to be a pilot. “My rst inspiration was my desire to y airplanes,” Duke said.

COURTESY NASA

CONTINUED ON 22

“If our whole goal is to have school every day… thenwearing amask is theway to do it.”

 ANDREW KIM, CISD SUPERINTENDENT

IMPACTS

EDUCATION

LOT 59

TIPSY COW

6

13

15

17

Contribute today! Use your phone camera to scan the QR code or visit

Please join your friends and neighbors in support of Community Impact Newspaper ’s legacy of local, reliable reporting by making a contribution. Any amount matters. Together, we can continue to ensure our citizens stay informed and keep our local businesses thriving. Make an impact. Become a #CommunityPatron.

SUPPORT LOCAL JOURNALISM

COMMUNITYIMPACT.COMCIPATRON

Up To $ 1,500 Off New AC! Plus, $ 200 Off a MicroPure Air Purifier! *

AT Y O U R S E R V I C E It’s comforting to know there are some things you can always count on. Relying on GVEC Home ® when it comes to your home comfort is one of those. Whether you need AC/heating repairs or service or plan to purchase a whole new system—we’re at your service to meet all your heating and cooling needs.

P

LIMITED TIME OFFER!

Up To $1,500 Off New AC & No Interest for 5 Years! * Plus, $200 Off a MicroPure Air Purifier! Hurry—Offer Ends September 15!

* Receive $1,000 off select AC/heating systems with installation plus $500 off when you sign up for a Comfort Check AC maintenance plan at time of purchase. Receive a MicroPure unit as a system add-on for only $400 ($600 value). Financing available with approved credit. Offer may not be combined with any other GVEC Home offer. Coupon must be presented at time of purchase. Offer subject to change without notice. Offer expires 9/15/2020. TACLB00018344E | TECL32802

GVEC Membership Not Required

FOLLOW US!

AC/HEATING SOLAR ELECTRICIANS SALES MAINTENANCE REPAIR

833.682.3800 | gvecACservice.com

2

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

1/4-ACRE SITES with Hill Country Views! Non-Age Restricted! All Age Groups Welcome

# M ake S ummer L ast 4 ever!

NEWHOMES FROM THE $280’S

LACIMATX.COM

512-337-6093

512-791-7253

512-834-9294

1-800-247-3779

3

NEW BRAUNFELS EDITION • AUGUST 2020

THE BLAKE AT NEWBRAUNFELS IS COMING SOON!

join our exclusive founders club and take advantage of the following benefits:

• $350 rent credit each of the first 6months • Special move-in day gifts • Ribbon cutting on move-in day

• Rent lock through February 2024 • $100 Salon credit • Social media recognition

• Community Fee reduced to $1,500 • $1,000 rent credit for referrals* • 10 guest meals

Call (830) 217–8290 to see how YOU can become a Founding Member of The Blake at New Braunfels!

* Restrictions apply, contact The Blake for details.

TEXAS’ PREMIER ASSISTED LIVING & MEMORY CARE COMMUNITY 220 creekside crossing | new braunfels, texas 78130 | (830) 217–8290 | www.blakeatnewbraunfels.com

Taking Care of New Braunfels, too. It’s QUICK, CONVENIENT, AFFORDABLE! Services include minor trauma, acute allergies, laboratory services, digital x-ray, sports and band physicals and much more. • Board-certified providers • State-of-the-art facilities and equipment • Services for adults and children • No appointment necessary • Open year round and holidays for extended hours • No overcrowded emergency room GRMC Urgent Care Center For your safety, we will be screening all patients who enter and limiting additional visitors during this time of COVID.

1761 S. State Hwy 46 Suite 104 New Braunfels, TX 78130 830.433.7816 grmedgroup.com

NOW OPEN!

4

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

CONTENTS

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

MARKET TEAM GENERAL MANAGER Heather Demere, hdemere@communityimpact.com EDITOR Warren Brown REPORTER Lauren Canterberry

FROMHEATHER: What a strange summer it’s been. It’s hard to remember when it started and when it ends with the school year about to begin again. Read our education briefs for what both local districts have planned.

GRAPHIC DESIGNER Monica Romo ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Kayla Brooks METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Travis Baker MANAGING EDITOR Amy Denney ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Haley Grace CORPORATE LEADERSHIP PUBLISHERS AND FOUNDERS John and Jennifer Garrett GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Warner CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES DIRECTOR Tess Coverman WHOWE ARE John and Jennifer Garrett began Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 in Pugerville, TX. The company's mission is to build informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Today we operate across six metropolitan areas, providing hyperlocal, nonpartisan news produced by our full-time journalists in each community we serve. BECOMEA#COMMUNITYPATRON Please join your friends and neighbors in support of Community Impact Newspaper’s legacy of local, reliable reporting by making a contribution. Together, we can continue to ensure citizens stay informed and keep businesses thriving. COMMUNITYIMPACT.COMCIPATRON CONTACT US 16225 Impact Way, Ste. 1, Pugerville, TX 78660 • 5129896808 PRESS RELEASES nbfnews@communityimpact.com SUBSCRIPTIONS communityimpact.com/subscriptions SUPPORT LOCAL JOURNALISM © 2020 Community Impact Newspaper Co. All Rights Reserved. No reproduction of any portion of this issue is allowed without written permission from the publisher.

Heather Demere, GENERALMANAGER

IMPACTS

6

Now Open, Coming Soon &more TRANSPORTATION

FROMWARREN: This month’s Payroll Protection Program story shows that although hundreds of jobs were saved, we’re not out of the woods yet. For a reprieve from the pandemic, read about astronaut, New Braunfelser and Texan of the Year Charles Duke.

9

I35 and Kerlick Lane CITY& COUNTY

11

News from local government EDUCATION BRIEFS News fromNBISD and CISD BUSINESS FEATURE

Warren Brown, EDITOR

13

THIS ISSUE BY THE NUMBERS

15

Lot 59

Local sources 19

New businesses 12

3

Apollo astronaut featured 1

Transportation project updates

ADVERTISEWITHUS

Read daily news updates and nd out what's happening in your city and nearby areas. communityimpact.com DAILY DIGITAL Sign up for our weekly e-newsletter to get local content more frequently in your inbox. communityimpact.com/ newsletter WEEKLY INBOX

Our mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team.

DINING FEATURE Tipsy Cow IMPACT DEALS

17

24

One way we help local businesses thrive is by providing a platform that allows business owners to impact a broad and informed audience by advertising alongside the hyperlocal news and feature stories. Contact us today for your print and digital advertising needs. communityimpact.com/advertising

Local coupons

CORONAVIRUS COVERAGE All content in this print publication, both editorial and advertisements, was up- to-date as of the press deadline. Due to the fast-changing nature of this event, editorial and advertising information may have changed. Please visit communityimpact.com and advertiser websites for more information.

Proudly printed by

communityimpact.com

@impactnews_nbf

facebook.com/impactnewsnbf

WWW. PLUMEYER.COM | 830 - 606 -1505

5

NEW BRAUNFELS EDITION • AUGUST 2020

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

6

2673

9

1102

8

35

306

12

Laurel Grace Yoga COURTESY OF LAUREL GRACE YOGA

337

13

CENTRAL PLAZA

5

3

New Braunfels. The biscuit company offers homemade biscuits, sandwiches and more. 830-387-4894. www.drinkoffrhodes.com COMING SOON 6 Laurel Grace Yoga will open a new studio space located at 351 Main Plaza, New Braunfels, in August. Lauren Welch started the yoga practice in August 2019 with online classes and on-site instruc- tion for groups and will now offer more in-person classes at the studio. 309- 648-5427. www.laurelgraceyoga.com 7 The Industry Salon & Studios opened in July at 382 S. I-35, Unit A, New Braunfels. The salon offers hair cuts, styling and color and has two additional rooms available for lease for estheticians, massage therapists or other specialists. 830-703-0873. 8 Agave at Gruene Rapids , a new 15-unit condominium development, is now under construction on a 2.3-acre riverfront lot at 1228 Ervendberg Ave., New Braunfels. The condos range in price from $485,000- $825,000, will have three to four bedrooms and will be unfurnished. 832-788-2294. www.agaveatgruenerapids.com 9 A new neighborhood named Gruene- field is currently under construction at 1312 Fox Glen St., New Braunfels. The neighborhood is being built by Gehan Homes and Bellaire Homes and includes 221 lots. 210-347-9191 10 A new boat dealership called Nxtlvl Marine will open at 1980 N. I-35, New Braunfels, in August. The business will offer surf boats, pontoon boats, speed boats and more. 979-743-1200.

46

11

CENTRAL PKWY.

14 20

INDEPENDENCE DR.

15 4

MAIN PLAZA

1101

6

2

18

1

17

46

7

10

19

16

1044

35

725

MAP NOT TO SCALE N TM; © 2020 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER CO. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

NOWOPEN 1 The third Traveling Gypsy location opened at 265 W. San Antonio St., New Braunfels, in May. The original store opened in Seguin, and the second is locat- ed in Gruene. All three shops offer antique furniture, collectible items and other vintage home goods. 830-312-7372. www.travelinggypsy.org 2 Wild Water Seafood Kitchen opened June 16 at 486 Landa St., New Braunfels.

The restaurant serves shrimp, fried cat- fish, boudin and more. 409-330-0328. www.facebook.com/wwseafoodkitchen 3 Bee Easy Craft opened its first store at 2090 I-35, Ste. 5109, New Braunfels, on July 20. The craft store offers crochet, quilting and craft supplies as well as yarn and apparel. 830-632-5775. www.beeeasycrafts.com 4 Pedego Electric Bikes opened at 231 Landa St., New Braunfels, on July 1. The

locally owned business is part of a chain with more than 125 branded stores in the United States. Pedego bikes start at $1,895 and have cruising distances of up to 60 miles on a single charge. Bikes are available in a variety of color combina- tions and styles, and rentals are also available. 830-312-6704. www.pedegoelectricbikes.com 5 New Braunfels Biscuit Co. is a new branch of OffRhodes Craft Beer Station and opened June 17 at 1528 E. Common St., N MAP NOT TO SCALE

WE’VE GOT YOU COVERED! COMALTEX is committed to being YOUR insurance agency Celebrating 70+ years as an independent insurance agency in New Braunfels

OVER 240 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE. Personal Insurance • Business Insurance • Life/Health Insurance 1110 Eikel Street | New Braunfels,TX 78130 | 830-625-7511 www.comaltex.com

6

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY LAUREN CANTERBERRY

14

18

Pale Horse Drinkery and Sky Bar COURTESY OF NEW BRAUNFELS CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

River’s Edge A Texas Steakhouse (WARREN BROWN/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER)

16 Opened in August 2019, Iron Hill Fitness is located at 839 I-35, Ste. D, New Braunfels. The gym offers group workout sessions, personal instruction, kickboxing lessons, boot camps and more. 830-312-8108. www.ironhillfitness.squarespace.com 17 What Once Was Old Vintage will celebrate its first anniversary Sept. 1 at 968 W. San Antonio St., New Braunfels. The store offers vintage and new home decor, furniture and virtual sales on Facebook. 830-708-0306. www.whatoncewasold.com 18 Opened in September 2019, Heidi M. Photography specializes in newborn, child and family photography. Sessions are available by appointment only. 909-528- 6840. www.heidimphotography.com NAME CHANGE 19 On July 17, River’s Edge A Texas Steakhouse opened at 1515 Keuhler Ave., New Braunfels, in the building that pre- viously housed River Hofbrau. Guests can enjoy indoor and outdoor seating, views of the Guadalupe River, live music and

www.nxtlvl-group.com 11 Skip’s Beer Wine and Liquor will open its second New Braunfels location at 2084 Central Plaza, Ste. 109, New Braunfels, in September. The business offers craft beer, wine and liquor and has one additional location in New Braunfels as well as shops in Cibolo and San Anto- nio. 830-358-7520. www.skipsliquor.com 12 The Daiquiri Depot , a drive-thru shop specializing in frozen to-go daiqui- ris, will open at 311 FM 306, Ste. 1A, New Braunfels, later this fall. 830-850-0070. www.facebook.com/thedaiquiridepot/ ANNIVERSARIES 13 Pioneer Senior Solutions , a company that offers income and long-term nursing home asset protection for senior citizens, will celebrate one year in business at 1619 E. Common St., Ste. 503, New Braunfels, in August. 800-576-8547. www.pioneersenior.com 14 Pale Horse Drinkery and Sky Bar will celebrate one year in business in early August but is currently closed due to the state order to close bars due to the corona- virus pandemic. The establishment offers handcrafted cocktails at an upscale lounge and rooftop bar at 2031 Central Plaza, Ste. 101, New Braunfels. 830-743-1067. www.palehorsenb.com 15 Das Nutrition Haus will celebrate one year in business in mid-August at 392 Landa St., New Braunfels. The Monday through Friday health club offers a list of meal-replacement smoothies and ener- gizing teas. 210-307-9218. www.facebook.com/dasnutritionhaus

The newMarktplatz building was expected to be complete in time for Wurstfest 2020. (Warren Brown/Community Impact Newspaper)

FEATURED IMPACT WURSTFEST CANCELED On July 23, the Wurstfest Association of New Braunfels announced the cancellation of Wurstfest 2020, which was scheduled for Nov. 6-15. According to a press release, the Wurstfest Board of Directors decided to cancel the festival after reviewing the latest local COVID-19 information. “This will be the rst time Wurstfest has canceled a festival in our 60-year history,” 2020 Wurstfest President Randy Rust said in the release. “When we looked at how festival operations would have to change to prioritize safety, plus the related operational restrictions, we just didn’t feel we would be able to provide the Wurstfest experience we are known for.” Each year over 175,000 visitors attend the festival and bring in an average of $7 million for the Wurstfest Association and local vendors that operate booths on the grounds. According to Rust, plans for fundraising eorts to support nonprots that benet from the festival will be announced in the coming weeks. Sherry Bettersworth, director of New Braunfels Performing Arts, shared that the closure was disheartening but not unexpected.

“We were so excited for our new booth and the new building. … But I had a feeling it was going to happen because I just couldn’t see how that was going to work,” Bettersworth said. Like many other nonprot organizations, Bettersworth relies on her Wurstfest booth to provide funds that are used throughout the year to cover expenses related to the performing arts academy. In light of new regulations, Bettersworth shared that she and her team have begun planning ways to oer classes and perform shows in a safe way, including hosting plays outdoors. The association also announced that the 2021 festival, which will mark the 60th Wurstfest, will take place Nov. 5-14 and will utilize the new Marktplatz building, set to be completed this fall. 178 Landa Park Dr., New Braunfels 830-625-9167 www.wurstfest.com

more. 830-626-2200. www.riversedgenb.com CLOSINGS

20 Sizzle Kitchen , which opened in the building that previously housed Hiccups & Churroholic, closed in June. The restaurant was located at 2031 Central Plaza, Ste. 103, New Braunfels, and offered Asian fusion cuisine and a variety of tea and coffee options. 830-632-5566

LANDA ST.

N

7

NEW BRAUNFELS EDITION • AUGUST 2020

The Simple Life

MeyerRanchTX.com

NEW MODEL HOMES NOW OPEN!

< CRANES MILL RD.

New Homes from the $200s

Follow us @ MeyerRanchNB

830-213-7397

46

337

Graphics, photographs and maps shown are representational only and should not be relied upon as depictions of existing or proposed community improvements. Final development may differ from these representations. Subject to change without notice. ASHTON WOODS HOMES • BELLA VISTA HOMES • GEHAN HOMES • HIGHLAND HOMES JUELL HOMES • PRINCETON CLASSIC HOMES • TRENDMAKER HOMES

NEW BRAUNFELS

35

8

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES

COMPILED BY WARREN BROWN & LAUREN CANTERBERRY

ONGOING PROJECTS 1 I-35 improvement project

NEWBRAUNFELS

Drivers should prepare for a series of trac switches when traveling on I-35 between New Braunfels and the Hays County Line. In the second week of August, a southbound main lane trac switch will be used to accom- modate work crews, according to the Texas Department of Transportation. A northbound main lane trac switch will happen during the last week of August, and the southbound frontage road’s outside lane will have a trac switch at the end of the month. Timeline: March 16-March 2023 Cost: $64 million Funding source: TxDOT 2 Kerlick Lane improvement project The second phase of the Kerlick Lane improve- ment project began the rst week of August after a delay in April. The work includes spot base repair and paving on Kerlick between Mis- sion Hills Drive and Walnut Avenue. Drivers can expect shifting lanes of trac in the area and are asked not to park vehicles along the curb in the construction zone from 7 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday. The milling and overlay of Kerlick and Walhalla Street are scheduled for

1102

1

306

3 I-35 at Watson Lane The exit ramp to Watson Lane on the northbound side of I-35 began a long-term closure Aug. 1. The work is a phase for the construction of a new intersection that will have dedicated turnarounds on the frontage roads between Kohlenberg Road/Conrads Lane and Watson Lane. The ramp is expected to reopen in summer 2021, according to TxDOT. A trac detour will require travelers to exit the in- terstate early at the northbound I-35 Kohlenberg/Conrads exit ramp. Timeline: Aug. 1-summer 2021 Cost: $64 million;part of the I-35

337

2

35

3

35

46

758

improvements project Funding source: TxDOT

late August, weather permitting. Timeline: August-winter 2020 Cost: $966,001 Funding source: 2019 bond program

1044

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF JULY 30. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT NBFNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

725

N MAP NOT TO SCALE

NEW T ECHNOLOG I E S CL AS S I C CUS TOMER CARE FREE service calls FREE estimates FREE service calls FREE estimates CALL FOR DETAILS Satisfaction guaranteed 830-358-1499 ClassicAirConditioningAndHeating.com TACLB27092E

Target 7% Returns Texas Real Estate Backed Investments

Stallion Capital Management is a private investment firm for accredited investors.

Learn more: Live Webinar Sign-Up at Stallioninfo.com 100% SECURED by Texas Real Estate A Dedicated

Regular CASH FLOW option

and Seasoned TEAM

invest@stallioncap.com | 512-219-5558 | stallioncap.com

9

NEW BRAUNFELS EDITION • AUGUST 2020

Award-winning roofing company

ROOF DAMAGE?

LET’S REMEDY IT! SAFETY IS OUR TOP PRIORITY We are offering phone & email quotes

888�HAIL�PRO 24h Customer Call Center www.remedyroofing.com

WORK. STORE. PLAY. Smaller, More Affordable, Flexible Space

For Sale / For Lease Starting at 1,500 SF UNIT 701 · 60 x 50 = 3,000 SF · Finished Private Restroom w/shower, Kitchenette, HVAC & MORE! FOR SALE $604,500 Estimate P&I Payment $2,500 FOR LEASE $3,500 / Month NNN UNIT 702 · 30 x 50 = 1,500 SF + 450 SF Mezzanine Total Rentable 1,950 SF · Finished Mezzanine, Private Restroom, Kitchenette, HVAC & MORE! FOR SALE $327,500 Estimate P&I Payment $1,360 FOR LEASE $2,200 / Month NNN ***LOAN / LEASING RATES & TERMS SUBJECT TO APPROVAL & QUALIFICATION

Work | Store | Play Creative Office Warehouse / Distribution Light Fabrication E-commerce Man Caves & More

210-791-0065 | www.PersonalWarehouse.com Steve@PersonalWarehouse.com • 7637 FM3009, Schertz, TX 78154

10

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY& COUNTY

News from New Braunfels, Comal County & Guadalupe County

COMPILED BY WARREN BROWN

QUOTEOFNOTE “ALL OF US DON’T KNOWWHAT’S COMING THIS NEXT YEAR; WE DON’T HAVE A CLUE.” SCOTT HAAG, COMAL COUNTY PRECINCT 2 COMMISSIONER NUMBER TOKNOW $110,000,000 After receiving approval from New Braunfels City Council on July 13, New Braunfels Utilities will apply for reduced-cost financial assistance to the tune of $110 million to support the expansions of the Sam C. McKenzie Jr. Water Reclamation Facility and the Surface Water Treatment Plant. According to NBU, the assistance could save as much as $17 million for the life of the projects. CITY HIGHLIGHTS NEWBRAUNFELS City Council approved an expenditure of $385,000 on July 27 to purchase a fleet of 64 new golf carts for the Landa Park Golf Course. The current fleet of 60 carts is six years old and has begun to break down, according to a city official. In a 5-1 vote, District 5 Council Member Jason Hurta dissented. All meetings may be viewed online. New Braunfels City Council Meets second and fourth Monday of each month at 6 p.m. • 830-221-4000 www.nbtexas.org Comal County Commissioners Court Meets Thursdays at 8:30 a.m. 830-221-1100 • www.co.comal.tx.us Guadalupe County Commissioners Court • Meets Tuesdays at 10 a.m. 830-303-8869 www.co.guadalupe.us MEETINGSWE COVER

Counties approve discretionary tax increasemeasures COMAL COUNTY AND GUADA- LUPE COUNTY Commissioners courts in Comal and Guadalupe The July votes in Comal and Guadalupe counties established that the property tax rate can be increased by up to 8% at the discretion of each county’s Commissioners THE IMPACT OF PROPERTY TAX RATE INCREASES

counties voted during meetings on July 30 and July 21, respectively, to approve orders that could increase property taxes by up to 8%. The orders allow the increase with- out requiring voter approval, which is normally required when a proposed tax rate increase is greater than 3.5%. In the 2019 tax year, Comal County’s property tax was 37.7915 cents per $100 of property value and Guadalupe County’s was 38.19 cents per $100 of property value. According to Comal County Judge Sherman Krause, the increase would only be used to meet specific chal- lenges that could arise in the next year. “It doesn’t mean we have to go up to 8%; it doesn’t mean we have to go over [the proposed] 3.5%,” Krause told the court. “It just means that we have that ability to do it.” Revenue from the additional rate increase could be used to cover expen- ditures related to natural disasters or the coronavirus, but it could also be used to avoid dipping into cash reserves to meet normal budget items. Krause said the recommended budget for 2021 budget would increase the tax rate by 3.5% but would require Comal County to use a portion of its cash reserves for budgeted items. Comal County Precinct 1 Commis- sioner Donna Eccleston and Precinct 2 Commissioner Scott Haag expressed concern about using cash reserves to pay budgeted expenses. A tax increase greater than 3.5% is a potential solution that would avoid cutting budgeted items.

Court. The table below illustrates the impact of various changes to county property taxes, but do not include other taxing entities such as school districts.

Current and adjusted Tax rate Comal Comal + 3.5% Comal + 8% Guadalupe Guadalupe + 3.5% Guadalupe + 8%

$100K property value tax bill

$200K property value tax bill

$300K property value tax bill

$377.92 $391.14 $408.15 $381.90 $395.27 $412.45

$755.83 $782.28 $816.30 $763.80 $790.53 $824.90

$1,133.75 $1,173.43 $1,224.44 $1,145.70 $1,185.80 $1,237.36

SOURCES: COMAL COUNTY, GUADALUPE COUNTY/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

time in order for us to even consider it in the future.” Despite the unanimous approval of Order 444 in Comal County, commis- sioners expressed their intent to keep the tax rate increase as close to 3.5% as possible. “We’re going to do our best to keep our tax rate as low as we can, but there are things that we have to provide,” Haag said. “And that’s my promise to the people, that regardless of how we vote today on this issue, I’m going to fight as hard as I can to keep that tax rate as low as it is.” In Guadalupe County, the measure was passed with a 3-2 vote, with County Judge Kyle Kutscher and Precinct 4 Commissioner Judy Cope voting against. The prevailing argument for the measure was to streamline the process if taxes did need to be increased for an unforeseen reason. “I think it truly does give us some beneficial options to make decisions in the budget,” Kutscher said. “When I’m really pushed to make a decision, I don’t think we’re going to need it.”

“I like being close to that 3.5%; what I don’t like is spending our cash reserves to make sure we’re under- neath it,” Haag said. Krause and Guadalupe County officials noted that expenses could be cut from the budgets of their respec- tive counties to avoid the tax rate hike or use of cash reserves, but they did not get into specifics of what could go to the chopping block. Eccleston told her fellow commis- sioners that dipping into cash reserves could cause trouble later if funds were needed to qualify for Federal Emer- gency Management Agency support in the event of a flood or if liquidity was needed on short notice. Legislation passed in 2019 contains a provision that permits the additional tax increase without an election when a state of disaster has been declared. The orders had to be approved by the courts before the end of July to preserve the option for the 2021 annual budget. “It doesn’t matter what our rate ends up to be,” Eccleston said. “But this has to be done at a certain point in

Let us refine your view.

PLAN YOUR NEXT HOME PROJECT WITH US FROM YOUR FOUNDATION TO YOUR ROOF. WE HAVE ALL YOUR RENOVATION & REPAIR NEEDS COVERED.

Serving Hays, Comal, Blanco & Kendall Counties

steelhorseconstructors.com

NOWOFFERING STUDENT SPECIALS FOR FALL 2020

2188 State Hwy 46 West Suite 102 | New Braunfels 830.302.3357 | www.refinedeyecare.com

Kitchens

Baths

Outdoor Projects

North: 512-855-3215

info@steelhorseconstructors.com

South: 830-885-2035

11

NEW BRAUNFELS EDITION • AUGUST 2020

Jaime Simmons, DDS Board Certified Pediatric Dentist

830-302-2044 2163 Stephens Place, Suite 106, New Braunfels, TX 78130 www.texastykespediatricdentistry.com ACCEPTING NEW PATI ENTS

Utility Bill Assistance Did you know you can help customers in our community who are experiencing extreme hardship and are in financial need? Please consider donating! The NBU Utility Bill Assistance Program is designed to aid customers in our service area who are experiencing extreme hardship and financial need. New Braunfels Foodbank manages the program for NBU and the amount of assistance that can be provided to customers to help pay for electric, water, and wastewater charges on the bill.

Located at Freiheit Village 2055 Central Plaza, Suite 110 | New Braunfels, TX 78130 www.postalannex.com

If you are experiencing a financial hardship, visit nbfoodbank.org/our-programs/ benefits-assistance/nbu-utility-assistance to complete an online form. If you would like to join NBU in assisting our community, please call the New Braunfels Food Bank at 830.327.6000 or visit www.nbutexas.com/billassist to learn more and to make a tax deductible donation.

nbutexas.com

Start with a free Placement Test to see how Kumon can help your kids advance SUCCESS! LET US HELPMAKE THIS SCHOOL YEAR A

IMPACT ma k e a n Become a #CommunityPatron.

PRESCHOOL - HIGH SCHOOL

ENROLL NOW AND SAVE UP TO $50! * We’ll create an individualized lesson plan that fits their needs. Kumon Math and Reading Center of

SCHERTZ

5580 FM 3009, Ste. 114 Schertz, TX 78154 kumon.com/schertz 210-642-0000

SUPPORT LOCAL JOURNALISM

CONTRIBUTE TODAY COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM� CIPATRON

*Enroll between 8/16/20 and 10/15/20 to waive the Registration Fee of up to $50. The Registration Fee includes services such as processing, student evaluation and lesson plan development. Registration Fee waiver only valid at participating Kumon Math and Reading Centers. Most Kumon Centers are independently owned and operated. Additional fees may apply. See Center for applicable terms and conditions. ©️ 2020 Kumon North America, Inc. All rights reserved.

12

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

EDUCATION BRIEFS News from Comal & New Braunfels ISDs Comal andNewBraunfels ISDs to begin 202021 school year with in-person and remote learning

COMPILED BY LAUREN CANTERBERRY

MEETINGSWE COVER

Comal ISD Meets Aug. 27 and Sept. 24 at 6 p.m. at the CISD District Oce, 1404 N. I-35, New Braunfels 830-221-2000 • www.comalisd.org New Braunfels ISD Meets Aug. 10 and Sept. 14 at 7 p.m. at the NBISD Administration Center, 1040 N. Walnut Ave., New Braunfels 830-643-5705 • www.nbisd.org Masks or other approved face coverings will also be required to be worn by all employees and visitors, in addition to NBISD students in grade four or higher and CISD students ages 10 and up. “We know that kids interacting with our teachers face-to-face is the best way to educate,” Kim said in the July 20 episode of his podcast, “Comal Radio.” “If our whole goal is to have school every day ... then wearing a mask is the way to do it.”

NEWBRAUNFELS ISDAND COMAL ISD During a July 28 board meeting, the New Braunfels ISD board of trustees elected to begin the school year Aug. 24 with both in-person and remote instruction options for students. Comal ISD will also oer parents the choice between in-person and remote instruction options when classes begin Aug. 25. Guidelines issued July 17 by the Texas Education Agency gave Texas school districts the option of oering online-only classes for the rst four weeks of the 2020-21 school year. In larger cities, such as San Antonio and Austin, public health authorities took advantage of that four-week “transition window,” as TEA

Commissioner Mike Morath called it, to delay on-campus instruction until at least Sept. 8. The Bexar County Health Authority also issued a health directive July 17 that would have prevented schools in the county, including ve CISD campuses, from oering on-campus instruction until after Sept. 7, according to CISD Superintendent Andrew Kim. However, legal guidance issued July 28 by Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton argued that the authority to issue orders to close schools on a preventive basis lies solely with school district leaders. Both school districts have provided detailed back-to-school plans on their respective websites with information regarding campus safety precautions,

extracurricular activities and tenta- tive schedules. According to the districts, parents will have the ability to choose either in-person or remote learning for each nine-week grading period two weeks before the period ends. “We know that our decisions that we’re making to social distance and protect children in schools are going to have a bearing on what decision they make two weeks prior to the start of school,” NBISD Superintendent Randy Moczygemba said. Class schedules are also being adjusted to maximize social distancing and some teachers may be dedicated to teaching online courses only depend- ing on the number of students regis- tered for in-person or remote learning.

BACK TO SCHOOL IN NEWBRAUNFELS CISD and NBISD have implemented plans for the return to in-person and online instruction.

“ONCEWE GET INTO SCHOOL, WE PLAN TOOFFER THE OPTIONOF REMOTE ONLYORONCAMPUS TO EVERY STUDENT, PROBABLY FOR THE REMAINDEROF THE YEAR.” RANDY MOCZYGEMBA, NEW BRAUNFELS ISD SUPERINTENDENT

“THESEGUIDELINESARENOTONLY FORSTUDENTS, BUTALSOFOR TEACHERS.…WE’VEGOTTOWORRY ABOUTBOTHGROUPSOFPEOPLE THATARE COMINGTOGETHER.” ANDREW KIM, COMAL ISD SUPERINTENDENT

NBISD

BOTH

CISD

First day of school: Aug. 25 Kim hosts a podcast, “Comal Live,” each week. CISD will utilize three online learning platforms.

First day of school: Aug. 24 Moczygemba hosts a parent Zoom conference every Wednesday at 5:30 p.m. NBISD will be using asynchronous learning for remote instruction.

Students will be able to participate in remote or in-person instruction and can change their preference at the end of each nine-week period. All sta, students and visitors will be required to complete a virtual health screening each day before coming to school.

Students who choose remote learning can still participate in extracurricular activities. Approved face coverings will be required . Social distancing measures will be implemented at all campuses.

SOURCES: NEW BRAUNFELS ISD, COMAL ISDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Local community develops remote-learning options

CREATING A SAFE OPTION The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has released guidelines for any child care facility to create a safe learning environment for students and adults.

NEWBRAUNFELS ISDAND COMAL ISD As schools prepare to begin in-person and remote instruction, parents and teachers are concerned that families will not have access to child care if a student has to switch to online learning during the year. “We’re going to be remote this year at one point or another,” said Norma Cowan, an eighth-grade social studies teacher at Oak RunMiddle School. “There are somany people that are having to choose between working and staying home with their kids, and they can’t aord to lose their jobs.” This uncertainty inspired Traci Owens, who is also a teacher at ORMS, to write a proposal for a program she calls “study pods.” According to Owens, the idea is for local busi- nesses, nonprots and other groups to oer a space for children to bring their devices and complete their schoolwork under the supervision of an approved

volunteer while their caretakers are at work. Owens shared the idea with Cowan and other com- munity members who helped her create a Facebook page called Real Solutions for Remote Learning where people can learn about the idea and share information. “[The page] is community members, business mem- bers, parents, teachers and anybody just looking for a way to help,” Owens said. “When we do go remote, it’ll be the teachers providing the lesson … but parents need somebody to help facilitate their kids getting on and doing it.” Several businesses and organizations have already developed plans for remote learning child care programs, and Owens hopes to see more options become available. “I would love to see some low-cost or no-cost options out there,” Owens said. “The more people that want to help, the better we’ll do.”

• Set up hand hygiene stations throughout the facility. • Regularly clean and disinfect surfaces and frequently used spaces.

SOURCE: CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • Create separate entrance and exit routes. • Implement screening procedures such as questionnaires and temperature checks. • Ensure all volunteers or employees have adequate qualications to work with children. • Require face coverings to be worn at all times. • Provide at least 6 feet of space between children not from the same household.

13

NEW BRAUNFELS EDITION • AUGUST 2020

AT EDENHILL community FIND YOUR

Independent Living Assisted Living Memory Care Nursing and Rehabilitation

Call to schedule your virtual tour: 830-625-6291

631 Lakeview Blvd, New Braunfels www.EdenHill.org

The Grove at Vintage Oaks

The Grove at Vintage Oaks & Veramendi From the $300’s

Veramendi

46

337

1863

35

Carefully Crafted For You

Mon – Sat 10am – 6pm, Sunday 12pm - 6pm • 210.807.8244 • Scottfelderhomes.com

14

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

BUSINESS FEATURE Lot 59 A vintage store built on historic roots K athryn “Kat” Balmos, owner of Lot 59, claims a heritage that can be traced back to the beginnings of New Braunfels in 1845. Julius Voelcker, a member of one of New Braunfels’ founding families, claimed lot No. 59 when the city’s land was divided, and he launched a pharmacy business downtown, according to Balmos. A New Braunfels native and descendent of Voelcker, Balmos got her start in retail as a manager for J. Crew and then as a regional manager and director of recruiting for Abercrombie and Fitch. “I learned how to build a brand, how to market and how to merchandise,” Balmos said. When she moved back to New Braunfels, Balmos opened Lot 59 in 2013 not far fromwhere Voelcker’s pharmacy once was, and she curated new and vintage clothing, decor, jewelry and locally made art. In 2018, Balmos opened her second store, The Local, which focused more on apparel but still highlights the work of local artists and designers. “I really wanted [The Local] to be a little bit more representative of New Braunfels,” Balmos said. “The Lot is very, very unique and has personality … whereas The Local is me being really retail smart.” When businesses had to close or adjust their oper- ations in response to the coronavirus pandemic, the teammarketed its inventory online and collaborated with vendors to create craft kits to give customers newways to support both shops. “Not only do we represent the two stores, but we represent the 25 artists within my store that are all local,” Balmos said. “Our rst priority was keeping the momentum of sales moving.” According to Balmos, the support of the commu- nity helped sustain both businesses and allowed her and her team to plan for the coming months. “I know that I am so fortunate to be able to be open,” Balmos said. “Lighting a candle and making sure the music is at the right volume, all of those things matter … the whole goal, no matter what I have in there, is that people walk in and feel good.” BY LAUREN CANTERBERRY

Lot 59 opened in 2013 in New Braunfels and was named after the plot of land acquired by Julius Voelcker in 1845. (Lauren Canterberry/ Community Impact Newspaper)

Kathryn Balmos (center) works closely with her general managers Stephanie Lewis (left) and Kaitlyn Braune (right). (Courtesy May Carlson Photography)

Lot 59 343 W. Cross St., New Braunfels 830-221-5692 www.lot59tx.com Hours: Mon.-Thurs. 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Fri.-Sat. 11 a.m.-9 p.m., closed Sun.

N

15

NEW BRAUNFELS EDITION • AUGUST 2020

Transfer high-rate credit card balances

$ 0 Balance Transfer Fee

• Consolidate all your cards into one monthly payment • Pay off balances faster with a lower interest rate • $0 fraud liability on unauthorized credit card purchases

Pediatric Dentist, Board-Certified The Breathe Institute Ambassador Meet New Braunfels' "Tooth Fairy"

385 Landa Street, New Braunfels, TX smilepediatricdentalcare.com 830-327-7007 SPECIALIZING IN TONGUE AND LIP TIE Lela Matthes-Matos

Apply today

Membership eligibility required. Subject to credit approval. Rates, terms and programs are subject to change; other restrictions may apply. Balance transfer(s) may not exceed your available credit limit. You should continue to make all required payments on your other accounts until you conf irm that the balance transfer has been made. Cash back rewards or points are not earned on balance transfers or cash advances. RN530737

NOWContracting Licensed Agents | New Location 1423 N. Walnut Suite 103, New Braunfels, TX 78130

Call or Text Now, the Service is Completely FREE! 210-473-4120

Robert Brooker Licensed Insurance Agent Agents may be compensated based on enrollment.

HealthMarkets Insurance Agency Health | Medicare | Small Group | Life | Supplemental

16

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

WHAT IT TAKES TO KEEP THE COW

To meet demand at Tipsy Cow, owner Mike Chase and his employees use commercial-grade equipment to churn out gallons of ice creamwithin minutes.

The production takes 10MINUTES.

Each production makes up to 6GALLONS.

Each tub is 1.5 GALLONS.

Daily production is as high as 35 TUBS.

32 ADULT and kid- friendly avors

DINING FEATURE

Tipsy Cow serves more than 30 kid-friendly and alcohol-infused avors of ice cream, some inspired by customers. (Courtesy Tipsy Cow)

Tipsy Cow Creamery scoops out its niche with specialty frozen treats M ike Chase toyed with the idea of opening an ice cream business in New Braunfels for a year before opening Tipsy Cow, a creamery that lives up to its name with alcohol-infused selections. BY WARREN BROWN

just as popular, and cookies and cream is a best seller, according to Chase. “We didn’t want to just have alcohol; we wanted it to be really good,” Chase said. “We want it to be the best ice cream in town.” The store oers dairy-free options such as Pina Colada and Sangria Sorbet as well. Another draw at Tipsy Cow is its prize wheel for repeat customers, which features a chance for a year of free ice cream. Chase keeps a box of name cards of lucky customers that have scored the coveted reward. Chase previously worked at Schlitterbahn for 24 years before opening Tipsy Cow in 2018 and credits the water park as a contributor to his business acumen. In the future, he said he hopes to open a second New Braunfels location, although it will be a while due to the coronavirus. In spite of the pandemic, Chase said he has seen an outpouring of support from the community. “When COVID-19 hit, we had customers coming by once a week buying three or four pints, saying, ‘We don’t want you to go out of business,’” Chase said. “I knew New Braunfels was going to be ne when that started happening.”

Chase began his foray into frozen treats by making ice cream in his garage and sharing it with friends. The novelty of adult avors earned the New Braunfels business a following large enough to expand into a second storefront in San Marcos. “We needed something that grabs people’s [attention],” Chase said. “We didn’t want to be just another ice cream shop; we wanted to be dierent.” Chase’s method and recipes for infusing alcohol are a secret, but customer feedback and input have been a component of the Tipsy Cow’s success. Some avors, such as Lemon Blueberry Cheesecake, began as suggestions. Other avors, such as Strawberry Margarita, Bailey’s Salted Caramel and Pina Colada, are posted to the menu board on the wall of the small but cozy store in Freiheit Village. Although these avors are used to attract adult customers, alcohol-free oerings at Tipsy Cow are

Owner Mike Chase worked at Schlitterbahn for 24 years before pursuing his passion for ice cream. (Warren Brown/Community Impact Newspaper)

Tipsy Cow 2154 Gabriels Place, Ste. 104, New Braunfels 830-302-7448 www.newbraunfelstipsycow.com Hours: daily noon-10 p.m.

35

1101

GABRIELS PI.

N

17

NEW BRAUNFELS EDITION • AUGUST 2020

Receiving, Restock, Picking, Forklift and Shipping for warehouse in South New Braunfels Apply at www.goretail group.com or in person at 175 Southwestern Ave. Ste. 110, South

NOW HIRING

New Braunfels (Off I35, exit 184 Rueckle Rd.)

(512) 444-3555

COMMERCIAL INSURANCE PLANS, MEDICAID, MEDICARE, AND TRICARE

Clinic Based & Telehealth Appointments Available

Physical Therapy | Occupational Therapy | Speech Therapy

Pediatrics 830-214-7640

Adults 830-214-1798

Referrals and Medical Records 830-214-1802 | 830-632-5884 (Fax)

2660 E. Common St. Suite 101 | New Braunfels, TX 78130 www.txrehabspecialists.com

18

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

FINANCING AVAILABLE Call today for a free estimate

808 W County Line Rd,New Braunfels, TX 78130 | (830) 627-7663 | www.FellerRoofingNB.com

LIFETIME WARRANTY

BLINDS � SHADES � SHUTTERS � AUTOMATION � LEGENDARY SERVICE � IN NEW BRAUNFELS SINCE 1983

GET 20% OFF HUNTER DOUGLAS SONNETTE SHADES THROUGH THE END OF AUGUST

MICHAEL HERNANDEZ michael.hernandez@hodell.com 830-606-6215 For more info contact:

19

NEW BRAUNFELS EDITION • AUGUST 2020

CONTINUED FROM 1 Names of businesses receiving less than $150,000 were not released. Most of the businesses that received aid also reported the number of jobs retained as a result of the pro- gram—19,075 jobs in New Braunfels, according to the data. To be eligible for a PPP loan, busi- nesses and organizations were required to provide detailed information about their monthly expenses and payroll costs, according to the SBA. Communities In Schools CEO Christine Douglas said the nonproit was granted a loan of $601,000 in early April after working with its bank to compile detailed records of payroll, property and employee ben- eits payments. “We were approved for the exact amount that we asked for,” Douglas said. “I think in the big picture, those were small loans compared to a lot of other businesses that were getting you know, $10 million and things like that, so we felt very fortunate we got it on the rst round.” Congress approved an additional $320 billion in funding for PPP loans in May, which have an interest rate of 1% and a maturity of two years for loans issued prior to June 5, and ve years for loans issued after June 5. Loans may be forgiven if businesses can show that they used the majority of their funds to pay employees, that the business made concerted eorts to rehire sta that was laid o prior to the loan being received and several other criteria outlined by the SBA. “It isn’t just getting the money,” Douglas said. “Nowyou’re going tohave to be sure that you document every sin- gle thing so that it’s extremely clear to the SBA how you use the funds.” According to Kellie Stallings, Connec- tions Individual and Family Services executive director, the rigorous process of applying for loans and tracking the use of the loans will be challenging for

how loans

PPP

businesses. “I thinkwe’re already used to govern- mental scrutiny and making sure that we are carefully tracking and reporting, our expenses,” Stallings said. “For your average business, I think that would have been a nightmare.” In addition to PPP loans, local busi- ness owners also had the opportunity to apply for economic injury disas- ter, or EID, loans and the city of New Braunfels’ Small Business Grant pro- gram, according to Jerey Jewell, the city’s director of economic and commu- nity development. The grant program received 216 applications and was created to oer up to $10,000 per business with 50 or fewer employees that had also applied for either an EID or PPP loan, Jewell said. Among businesses in New Braunfels that applied for a grant and an EID loan or a PPP loan, the median amount received was $22,800, Jewell said. Businesses receivea temporaryboost The loans provided temporary relief for local employers and helped them keep their operations running and their sta paid while mandatory closures were enacted. “Having these funds has made a world of dierence in allowing us to balance our budget, because as a non- prot, you know we have to have a bal- anced budget going forward into the year,” Douglas said. “If we wouldn’t have those [funds] to count on, thenwe would be having to lose employees and we would be having to cut services, and we just can’t do that.” In June, the Greater New Braunfels Chamber of Commerce’s vice pres- ident of economic development, Chester Jenke, delivered personal pro- tection equipment to businesses and spoke with owners about the future of their establishments.

Small businesses applied for loans to assist with payroll and other payments. Congress plans to issue a second round of PPP loans this fall.

work

THE PAYCHECKPROTECTION PROGRAM PPP DEFINITION

authorizes up to $669 billion in forgivable loans to small businesses with 500 or fewer employees to pay their employees during the COVID-19 crisis. A business owner submits a PPP loan request at www.sba.com. The business owner lls out the necessary information and submits documents, including average monthly payroll costs. The requested loan amount should be 2.5 times the averagemonthly payroll cost. Loans can be granted by any existing U.S. SBA lender or any participating federally insured institution. Business owners are encouraged to applywith their current bank or lender. Each business can only receive one loan of up to $10million. HOWTHEYWORK: ALOOKBACKATROUNDONE:

March 27, 2020 The CARES Act is signed into law providing nearly $350 billion for PPP loans.

May 2020 Congress provided an additional $320 billion in funding for PPP loans.

Aug. 8 The deadline for PPP loan applications is extended from June 30 to Aug. 8.

April 3, 2020 Small businesses, sole proprietorships and nonprots with 500 employees or fewer can apply for loans.

April 10, 2020 Independent

June 2020 Congress passed the Paycheck Protection Program Flexibility Act to make changes to the program.

Fall 2020 Congress is expected to nalize plans for additional funding.

contractors and self- employed individuals were allowed to apply for loans.

HOWWILL LOANSBE FORGIVEN? If businesses meet these criteria, their loans will be fully forgiven: Spend 60% of funds on payroll. The remaining 40% can be used for other expenses. 60% 40% 31, 2020, or give proof of attempts to ll positions. Use PPP funds within 24 weeks, or six months, of receiving the loan. Rehire full-time equivalent employees that were laid o by Dec.

SOURCE: U.S. SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATIONCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

brauntex.org (830) 627-0808

Season

20 - 21

ON SALE NOW

20

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8 Page 9 Page 10 Page 11 Page 12 Page 13 Page 14 Page 15 Page 16 Page 17 Page 18 Page 19 Page 20 Page 21 Page 22 Page 23 Page 24 Page 25 Page 26 Page 27 Page 28

communityimpact.com

Powered by