New Braunfels Edition | June 2022

NEW BRAUNFELS EDITION 2022

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HEALTH CARE EDITION

VOLUME 5, ISSUE 7  JUNE 4JUNE 30, 2022

Direct pay for mental health care eclipses insurance payments

GROWING NEED During the COVID-19 pandemic, organizations such as Communities in Schools saw more students and families seeking support as demand for mental health services rose.

Between March-October 2020, mental health-related emergency department visits increased compared to 2019

31% of children ages 12-17

24% among children ages 5-11

BY ERIC WEILBACHER

ACROSS 59 CAMPUSES IN SOUTH CENTRAL TEXAS, CIS HAS SEEN:

For patients seeking access to men- tal health care and counseling, the burden of getting the cost covered can prove daunting. According to the American Psy- chological Association, 30% of psy- chologists do not accept insurance, requiring the patient to petition their insurance provider to pay them back all or at least a portion of what they paid out of pocket for care. As many independent practitioners do not hire CONTINUED ON 29

Hours of mental health support provided

Students who have received suicide prevention services

According to data from National Alliance on Mental Illness: 1 IN 5 1 IN 6

163*

30,000 35,000 40,000 25,000 20,000 0

205

youths reported the pandemic had a signicant negative impact on their mental health.

youth ages 6-17 experience a mental health disorder each year.

2018-19

2020-21

2021-22*

2019-20

School year

*AS OF APRIL 2022

According to the American Psychological Association, 30% of psychologists do not accept insurance. The average cost of a any mental health therapy session is $100-$300 , Care Access to

SOURCES: CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION, COMMUNITIES IN SCHOOLS, NATIONAL ALLIANCE ON MENTAL ILLNESSCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Mental health needs among children on the rise BY LAUREN CANTERBERRY

and social settings, mental health providers throughout Central Texas have seen a sharp increase in demand for ser- vices for children as diagnoses of anxiety, depression and behavioral issues rise. “I have noticed the anxiety like never before, and [chil- dren] are not really sure where it’s coming from,” said Cindy Cattin, a licensed professional counselor at New Braunfels High School. “They can’t pinpoint where it’s coming from, but they need our space. They need somebody to talk to.”

In 2021, more than a third of high school students sur- veyed in the U.S. reported experiencing poor mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic, according to data released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Data from the CDC also showed that, compared to 2019, the proportion of emergency department visits that were related to mental health increased by 24% among children ages 5-11 and 31% among youth ages 12-17 in 2020. In the wake of the pandemic as children return to school

SOURCE: AMERICAN PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSOCIATION COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER adding up to thousands over a year.

CONTINUED ON 26

2022

HEALTH CARE EDITION

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NEW BRAUNFELS EDITION • JUNE 2022

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THIS ISSUE

ABOUT US

Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the rst edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and Pugerville, Texas. Now in 2022, CI is still locally owned. We have expanded to include hundreds of employees, our own software platform and printing facility, and over 40 hyperlocal editions across three states with circulation to more than 2.8 million residential mailboxes.

HIGHLIGHTS FROM THIS MONTH

FROM HEATHER: In our annual Health Care Edition, you will nd a front-page story on mental health and a story regarding insurance coverage. Next month is our annual Real Estate Edition. If you are interested in advertising information, please reach out to nbfads@communityimpact.com. Heather Demere, GENERAL MANAGER

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FROM ERIC: Mental health care needs increased during the COVID-19 pandemic. In this issue we look at how schools and counselors addressed the increase in need (see Pages 26- 27), and also how mental health care is increasingly paid for without insurance (see Page 29). Eric Weilbacher, EDITOR

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NEW BRAUNFELS EDITION • JUNE 2022

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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OAK RUN PKWY.

GENERATIONS DR.

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CREEKSIDE CROSSING

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Roost

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COURTESY ROOST

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COMING SOON 4 Crumbl Cookies is slated to open a New Braunfels location at 2180 Hwy. 46 W., Ste. 102, this fall. The cookie com- pany oers over 120 rotating avors and has locations throughout the country. 210-864-0757. www.crumblcookies.com 5 In May, GMBC, an Austin-based development company, broke ground on its new condominium called The Mercer in New Braunfels. The 42-unit develop- ment will be constructed at the corner of Creekside Crossing and FM 1101 and is slated to be completed in summer 2023. 830-215-0282. www.themercernb.com 6 New Beginnings Hospice is slated to open at 790 Generations Drive, Ste. 205, New Braunfels, later this fall. The new facility will oer hospice services and is now hiring sta before opening. 830-310-7303 7 On May 19, Tricon Residential Inc. and HHS Residential broke ground on a new single-family rental home community called Tricon Trail Creek in New Braunfels, according to a press release. The com- munity is the third of 13 planned Tricon neighborhoods in Texas, according to the release. Located near The Barndominium along Hwy. 46, the community will in- clude 180 single-family houses with three and four-bedroom options. Development is slated to continue through 2022 with a grand opening planned for summer 2023. 8 A new La-Z-Boy store is slated to open at 2094 N. I-35, New Braunfels, in early 2023. The company was founded in 1927 and has locations around the world. Stores sell a variety of furniture, includ-

GABRIELS PL.

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ELIZABETH AVE.

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TRADE CENTER DR.

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OLD NACOGDOCHES RD.

LAKE DUNLAP

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SCHWAB RD.

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MAP NOT TO SCALE

N TM; © 2022 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER CO. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

NOW OPEN 1 Roost opened a new location in Freiheit Village in New Braunfels in May, according to General Manager Zane Mc- Cartney. The restaurant also has locations in Tyler and Longview. Located at 2124 Gabriels Place, Ste. 101, Roost serves sandwiches, soup and chicken salad. www.roosttexas.com 2 A new dance tness studio called

DivaDance opened inside NuFitness Haus located at 1410 S. Business I-35, Ste. C, New Braunfels, in May. DivaDance has locations around the country and oers choreographed dance tness classes set to popular music. 830-201-0004. www.divadancecompany.com/locations/ new-braunfels-texas 3 In early May, The Goddard School opened a New Braunfels location at 582 Geneva St. in the Veramendi com-

munity. The campus is part of a larger network of schools around the country and oers child care programs for children ages 6 weeks-6 years old, according to a press release. Enrollment is now open for the program, which uses play-based learning and social-emotional develop- ment curriculum. The 10,500-square-foot center has 10 classrooms, space for 182 children and is bringing 24 teaching jobs to the area, according to the release. 830-420-6700. www.goddardschool.com

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY LAUREN CANTERBERRY

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DivaDance

The Goddard School

COURTESY DIVADANCE

COURTESY THE GODDARD SCHOOL

Case managers Charles Laws and Heather Herrera are part of the First Footing Program team and assist individuals experiencing homelessness.

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COURTESY NEW BRAUNFELS HOUSING PARTNERS

FEATURED IMPACT COMMUNITY In a May 25 press release NB Housing Partners announced that a plan to renovate the Comal County Senior Citizens Center, located at 655 Landa St., for the permanent home of the First Footing program was canceled. NB Housing Partners and the Salvation Army had entered into a verbal agreement with the Comal County Senior Citizens Foundation to eventually use the property to house individuals experiencing homelessness, according to the release. NB Housing Partners and other local nonprot organizations joined to create the First Footing shelter program in February 2021. The program uses hotel space to house those experiencing homelessness locally and has served more than 300 individuals, over 80% of which are from the New Braunfels area, said Kellie Stallings, administrator of First Footing. Plans to move the program into the former senior center were halted when an environmental review and ood plain mapping study showed that extensive ood-proong was needed to meet requirements for compliance with the city of New Braunfels occupancy codes, according to the release. While NB Housing Partners and the

Salvation Army had prepared for some expenses associated with ood mitigation, the addition of up to two years to the construction timeline was not expected and do not align with the program’s relocation schedule, according to the release. “We are saddened 655 Landa St. didn’t work out for the First Footing program,” Stallings said in the release. “We are continuing to explore other locations right now.” The organization previously tried to purchase a hotel located at 201 Loop 337, Stallings said in an email, but the deal fell through. Funding provided by the Community Development Block Grant was tied to the location and cannot be transferred to another site, she said. No other potential sites have been announced, and the group plans to continue leasing hotel space until a new location is secured, Stallings said. “We have short-term funding to continue our current hotel lease,” Stallings said in an email. “This option is not cost- eective or sustainable in the long term and utilizes resources that could be diverted to direct services.” In addition to providing shelter, the program connects individuals with local support resources, assists with job searches and ultimately works to nd permanent housing.

The Mercer

Pat's Place

RENDERING COURTESY GMBC

BRIAN RASHCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

ing reclining chairs, sofas, beds and more. 210-824-3981. www.la-z-boy.com EXPANSIONS 9 In early June, local nonprot Room Redux will open new oce and ware- house buildings at 2051 Bunker St., New Braunfels. Founded in 2018 by Susie Vybiral, Room Redux coordinates with caregivers, caseworkers, counselors and volunteers to transform the rooms of chil- dren who have endured trauma in order to create a safe space where they can heal. The organization now operates in more than 20 cities around the world and will use the new buildings as its international headquarters. Room Redux partnered with Arched Cabins, a Houston company that designs building kits for small cabins, to construct the arched structures that will house donations and oces. 830-745-3387. www.roomredux.org 10 Rockin R River Rides opened a new on-site bar called The Gruene Light at 1405 Gruene Road, New Braunfels. The bar will sell drinks and feature live music

on select Fridays and Saturdays through- out the summer. 830-629-9999. www.rockinr.com ANNIVERSARIES 11 Pat’s Place , located at 202 S. Union Ave., New Braunfels, celebrated 45 years in business May 15. The restaurant opened in 1977 and serves hamburgers, enchiladas, sandwiches and a variety of daily specials. On May 20, the restaurant announced that the establishment had been sold to new owners who will take over operation. Previous owners Carol Guedry and Terry Moorhead had been considering selling the business for more than a year, according to Guedry. 830-625-9070. www.patsplacenb.com 12 Raba Kistner celebrated 10 years at the company’s New Braunfels location in May. The rm, located at 211 Trade Center Drive, Ste. 300, oers engineer- ing, geology, project management, infra- structure oversight and more services. 830-214-0544. www.rkci.com

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NEW BRAUNFELS EDITION • JUNE 2022

TODO LIST

June events

COMPILED BY LAUREN CANTERBERRY, EDMOND ORTIZ & JARRETT WHITENER

LIVE MUSIC THE GRAPEVINE 1612 Hunter Road, New Braunfels 830-606-0093 www.grapevineingruene.com JUNE 10 Soul Ethos (Trio) 11 Bret Graham, Colton’s Kin 12 Tex Porter 17 Wilkinson’s Quartet 18 Sylvia & Matt Kirk, Phil Luna Band 19 Slim Bawb 26 Will Owen Gage KRAUSE’S CAFE 148 S. Castell Ave., New Braunfels 830-625-2807 www.krausescafe.com JUNE 25 The Ben Zuniga Band PHOENIX SALOON 193 W. San Antonio St., New Braunfels 830-643-1400 www.thephoenixsaloon.com JUNE 10 Waves 11 3 Man Front 24 Shady Blackwell 25 Cadillac Drive REDBIRD LISTENING ROOM 1260 S. Elliot Knox Blvd., 08 Lederhosen Junkies 09 Rick Cavender Band 10 The Georges 16 Michael Alanis Band 19 Julian Escobedo New Braunfels 830-606-7886 www.redbirdlisteningroom.com JUNE

18 RUN AND FLOAT THROUGH TOWN Enjoy New Braunfels’ rivers and parks during the annual Dos Rios Splash and Dash 5K. Runners participating in the event will begin at Cypress Bend Park and continue through Prince Solms Park. Racers will have the option to oat the river through the tube chute before nishing the race. 6:45 a.m. (packet pickup), 7:55 a.m. (kids run starts), 8 a.m. (5K starts). $10 (kid’s race until June 14), $15 (kid’s race after June 14), $25 (race price until June 6), $25 (virtual race price), $30 (late registration June 7-17), $40 (day- of registration). Cypress Bend Park, WORTH THE TRIP June 18 Celebrate Juneteenth Real Life Amphitheater will host the Juneteenth Family Festival with entertainment for all ages. Notable activities include a carnival, a concert, a 5K walk-run and more to help celebrate. Perpetual Innovations is partnering with the Impact Network and other community leaders to host the event. 8 a.m.-10 p.m. Free-$88. 16765 Lookout Road, Selma. 210-714-4810. www.reallifeamp.com June 25 Enjoy a festival and parade The annual San Antonio Pride Bigger Than Texas Festival and Parade oers a day lled with activities in the Tobin Hill neighborhood. The festival includes food, entertainment, a health fair and more. 11 a.m.-7 p.m. at Crockett Park, 1300 N. Main Ave., San Antonio. The Pride parade begins at Dewey Street and North Main Avenue at 9 p.m. Admission: $TBA for festival; free for parade. 210-287-3970. www.pridesanantonio.org

JUNE 11

CELEBRATE PRIDE COMAL COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS

Celebrate pride with Riverside Pride’s New Braunfels Pride event sponsored by Fiesta Youth. The event will include live music, vendor booths, food trucks, drag shows, family-friendly activities and more. 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Free. Comal County Fairgrounds, 701 E. Common St., New Braunfels. www.riversidepridetx.org

JUNE THROUGH JUNE 25 ‘THE WONDERS OF WATER’

local vendors and enjoy food and drinks from food trailers. All pets must be leashed and have current vaccinations. 1-5 p.m. Admission with donations of pet food, litter, animal beds or other gift donations to be given to the Comal County Crisis Center and local animal shelters. 2032 Central Plaza, New Braunfels. 830-626-3500. www.villagevenuenb.com 17 BOOTS & BUBBLES Enjoy a night out beneting Room Redux during the Boots & Bubbles event. Attendees are encouraged to dress up, and the event will include live music, food trucks, a kid zone, a silent auction and a live auction. 6-10 p.m. $20 (per person, sponsorships available). The Allen Farmhaus, 2606 FM 758, New Braunfels. 830-312-9289. www.roomredux.org/boots-bubbles 17 THROUGH 19 NEW BRAUNFELS TATTOO EXPO More than 150 award-winning tattoo artists will participate in the annual New Braunfels Tattoo Expo hosted by Ink Masters Tattoo Show. 1-11 p.m. (June 17), 11 a.m.-11 p.m. (June 18), 11 a.m.-9 p.m. (June 19). $20 (single-day entry), $35 (full weekend pass). New Braunfels Civic/ Convention Center, 375 S. Castell Ave., New Braunfels. 877-242-2007. www.inkmasterstattooexpo.com

Visit the New Braunfels Art League for the spring show titled “The Wonders of Water.” Following an opening reception May 29, the show will be open to the public and will feature pieces inspired by water from a variety of artists. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. (Mon.- Sat.), noon-5 p.m. (Sun.). Free. 239 W. San Antonio St., New Braunfels. www.thenewbraunfelsartleague.com 11 LEARN ABOUT OWLS Young nature lovers will learn about the role of owls in the local ecosystem with the Saturday SEAM: Owl Pellets program. Participants will study owl pellets to learn about the diets of native species. This program is designed for children in kindergarten through third grade. 10-11 a.m. $3 (Headwaters member youth: supporter and contributor level), $4 (Headwaters member youth: family level), $5 (general admission). Headwaters at the Comal, 333 E. Klingemann St., New Braunfels. 830-608-8937. www.headwatersatthecomal.com 11 PAMPER YOUR PET The Village Venue will host its rst Pet Expo at the Freiheit Village plaza. Attendees can bring their pets to shop

12 Josh & Kristi Grider 17 Courtney Hale Revia 18 Greg Hall 19 Slaid Cleaves 26 Drew Kennedy

503 Peace Ave., New Braunfels. www.nbparksfoundation.org

Find more or submit New Braunfels events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATION UPDATES NBU begins work on Grandview water main project In May, New Braunfels Utilities began work on the nearly $5.5 million Grandview Pump Station and Dis- charge Line Upgrade project, which is ROAD CLOSURES 46

COMPILED BY LAUREN CANTERBERRY

ONGOING PROJECT

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Portions of Kerlick Lane and Loop 337 Frontage road will be temporarily closed during construction.

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slated to conclude in December. On May 9, Pesado Construction Co. began rock sawing trench lines, according to an NBU press release, and will continue until late August. The work will require a partial lane closure on the Loop 337 frontage road near HEB, according to the release. Additional lane closures on Kerlick Lane will also take place between May and August, but two-way trac will continue. “We understand this work will

Loop 337 bridge Work is continuing on the new Loop 337 bridge at River Road as crews with the Texas Department of Transportation work to install an over- pass above River. The overpass begins west of the Rock Street exit and ends west of the River Road intersection. Timeline: February 2021-fall 2022 Cost: $14.2 million Funding sources : Alamo Area Metro- politan Planning Organization, TxDOT

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Timeline: August- December 2022 Cost: $5.5 million

SOURCE: NEW BRAUNFELS UTILITIES COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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all 4,000 GPM to be pumped into and utilized within NBU’s Kerlick, West- pointe, Mission and Copper Ridge pressure zones,” Schorn said. The utility company will also

intend to work as quickly as possible to complete it on time and on budget.” The project will replace approxi- mately 1,800 linear feet of water main between the utility’s Well No. 4 and the Grandview Ground Storage Tank and Pump station site, according to the NBU. Additionally, a third pump will

UPCOMING PROJECT

inconvenience many drivers in the Loop 337 frontage road/Hwy. 46 and Walnut Avenue/Kerlick Lane areas and apologize for this disruption,” NBU Chief Water Engineer Shawn Schorn said. “This project is part of our master plan to help ensure that the residents of New Braunfels con- tinue to have reliable access to water for the foreseeable future, and we Klein Road settlement reached by New Braunfels and J3 Co. During an April 25 meeting, New Braunfels Phase 1 of the project, which included the portion work on the project was moving forward and be installed at the pump station to increase the rm pumping capacity from 2,400 gallons per minute, or GPM, to 4,000 GPM. “The water main upsizing will allow upgrade approximately 2,850 linear feet of water main along Walnut and Loop 337 from the current 16-inch line to a 24-inch line. For additional information about the project and trac changes, visit the NBU project website and search “road closures” at www.nbutexas.com, or call 830-608-8971.

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Goodwin/Conrads lanes improvements

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF MAY 16. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT NBFNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM. The Goodwin Lane/Conrads Lane Im- provement Project is now in the nal design phase. The project, which was approved by voters in the 2019 bond election, will widen Goodwin between FM 306 and Conrads from two to three lanes, install sidewalks, add turn lanes and more. Timeline: summer 2022-summer 2024 Cost: $21.4 million Funding source : New Braunfels 2019 bond

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City Council approved a set- tlement agreement relating to a lawsuit between the city and J3 Co. for construc- tion on Klein Road. Work was halted on the Klein Road Reconstruction Project after portions of the rst phase experienced roadwork failures.

of Klein between Walnut Avenue and FM 1044, was approved by voters in the 2013 bond program. In 2018 the city entered into a $7.16 million contract with San Antonio-based construction rm J3 Co. for the reconstruction project. According to the city,

$1 million in change orders were approved before the nal layer of asphalt was applied. Roadway failures were exposed while paving. The settlement allows the city to retain $598,137.43 for roadway repairs, while J3 accepted $48,519.61 for completed work.

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NEW BRAUNFELS EDITION • JUNE 2022

LIVE LANDA @ 2022 FREE SUMMER CONCERT SERIES THURSDAYS IN JUNE AND JULY 4 | 7-9PM | LANDA PARK DANCE SLAB

JUNE 9 Roadside Libby JUNE 16 The Revs JUNE 23 Jay Eric and Rumor Town JUNE 30 Soul Sessions JULY 4 J Abram Band 2022 SCHEDULE

LIVE MUSIC • FOOD TRUCKS • FAMILY ACTIVITIES

1617 New Braunfels Street 830-608-0690 Tues. - Fri. - 11am - 9pm Sat. - 10am - 9pm Sun. - 10am - 8pm

Buy One Get One 1/2 OFF Equal or lesser value at $19.95. Lunch Only. Not Valid During Brunch or Dinner Service. Expiration 08-31-22.

Reservations Recommended Scan for menu & to make reservations

Sunday Family Style Fried Chicken Only Sundays 5pm - 8pm. Exclusively Fried Chicken. Regular menu not available on Sunday Night

Taco Tuesdays - New creative tacos every week! Come in for lunch or dinner on Tuesdays and enjoy $2 domestic beer, 50% off select wine by the bottle. Taco ‘Bout a Discount!

Enjoy Live music on the patio and a 3-course all-you-can-eat fried chicken supper finished off with homemade cobbler and ice cream. Kids 12 and under eat free!

10

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

EDUCATION BRIEFS

News from Comal & New Braunfels ISDs

COMPILED BY LAUREN CANTERBERRY

QUOTE OF NOTE

Comal ISD approves 4% salary increases for all employees

Comal ISD Meets June 23 and July TBD at 6 p.m. at the CISD District Oce, 1404 N. I-35, New Braunfels 830-221-2000 • www.comalisd.org New Braunfels ISD Meets June 13 and July 11 at 7 p.m. at the NBISD Administration Center, 1000 N. Walnut Ave., New Braunfels 830-643-5705 • www.nbisd.org MEETINGS WE COVER NBISD, Megan Strateman-Willis and Morgan Renaud joined incumbent Wes Clark on the board. In CISD, newcomers Amanda Jones and David Krawczynski took their seats. “THIS IS THE ONE THING WE HAVE CONTROL OVER AS GOVERNANCE AND OVERSIGHT. … LET’S SHOW THAT WE’RE SERIOUS ABOUT CLOSING THIS PAY GAP.” JASON YORK, COMAL ISD TRUSTEE FOR DISTRICT 3 AND BOARD PRESIDENT DISTRICT HIGHLIGHTS NEW BRAUNFELS ISD During a May 9 meeting, the New Braunfels ISD board of trustees approved a 3% raise for all sta starting at the district’s salary midpoint. Paraprofessionals received a $2 per hour increase, and the starting teacher salary in the district increased to $52,500. COMAL & NEW BRAUNFELS ISDS New members of the boards of trustees for Comal and New Braunfels ISDs were sworn in following the May 7 election. In

ANNUAL SALARY INCREASE

Through the recently passed VATRE, Comal ISD employees have been promised at least a 3% raise each year for the next four years. FOR SCHOOL YEARS: • 2021-22 3% RAISE

COMAL ISD On May 3, the board of trustees unanimously approved a compensation plan for the upcoming school year that includes a 4% salary increase for all employees. During an April 28 board meeting the board voted to postpone the approval of salary increases after district sta unexpectedly changed their recommendation from a 3% salary increase to a 4% increase the afternoon of the meeting. In November voters approved a Vot- er-Approved Tax Ratication Election that increased the district’s main- tenance and operations tax rate on the condition that the district would utilize revenue generated to raise sta pay and to hire new positions.

Through the VATRE, all sta and teachers are guaranteed at least a 3% pay increase each year, starting with the 2021-22 school year, over the next four years, said Bobbi Supak, assistant superintendent for human resources. During the April 28 meeting, Supak presented the board members with the proposed compensation plan for the 2022-23 school year that included additional teaching positions, increased stipends for some extracur- ricular coordinators and the 3% raise that would increase starting teacher salary to $50,500. Superintendent Andrew Kim announced that sta had changed their recommendation to pursue a higher salary increase after property

• 2023-24* • 2024-25*

4% RAISE

FOR SCHOOL YEAR: • 2022-23

SOURCE: COMAL ISD COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER *PROJECTED

appraisals for Comal County were provided to the district. The pro- jected taxable value of property in Comal County rose more than 30%, according to the Comal County Appraisal District.

NBISD plans additional school and renovations for two elementaries

CAMPUS SHUFFLE Instead of combining the two schools, Carl Schurz and Seele will be renovated. A middle school is proposed for the previous combined-campus site.

NEW BRAUNFELS ISD On May 9, the New Braunfels ISD board of trustees approved a plan that will preserve two elementary school campuses that had previously been slated to be combined into a new campus. Approximately $35 million was set aside to construct a new elementary school at the site of the former Ninth Grade Center, located at 659 S. Guenther Ave. as part of the district’s 2018 bond.

Once complete, the campus was expected to accommodate approximately 850 students and replace Carl Schurz and Seele elementary schools, which were built in 1924 and 1950, respectively. Construction on the new school at Legend Pond is estimated to begin in August and conclude in late 2024. Work on Carl Schurz and Seele will likely begin in June 2023 and conclude in May 2024, according to the district.

SEELE ELEMENTARY

CARL SCHURZ ELEMENTARY

N

N

PROPOSED NEW ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

PROPOSED MIDDLE SCHOOL NO. 3

KLEIN MEADOWS

BUTCHER ST.

LEGEND POND

35

N

N

SOURCE: NEW BRAUNFELS ISDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Call today to schedule an appointment

LICENSE #27092E | TACLB27092E

11

NEW BRAUNFELS EDITION • JUNE 2022

SUMMER READING IS FOR EVERYONE

Summer Conservation

To keep your utility bill as low as possible, take advantage of the following tips and information and help save water, energy, and money during the hot summer months.

JUNE 4 - AUG. 5 Programs and prizes for kids, teens, and adults!

Energy Conservation Tips

Adjust the Thermostat • For maximum comfort and energy efficiency in your home, set your summer thermostat to 78 degrees. • Save energy while you are away by installing a smart thermostat. Some new thermostats are also Wi-Fi enabled and can be controlled from your mobile devices. Lights • Increase your home comfort level by only turning on lights you need, especially during the late afternoon hours to save energy during the hottest part of the day. • Making the switch to LED lights in the home can save energy not only because they use less electricity than traditional bulbs, but they also produce less heat! AC/Heating System • Replace the filters once a month — or more often if they get dirty. General REBATE OFFER * • One of the easiest ways to reduce energy usage on a hot afternoon is to simply leave the house. Try a new restaurant, read a book at the library, or enjoy some time in the parks. • Ceiling fans are a great way to increase the comfort of a room. Fans can make you feel up to four degrees cooler than the thermostat setting! REBATE OFFER *

@NBPLTX | nbtexas.org/library

Water Conservation Tips

REBATE OFFER * Indoor • Take showers instead of baths. • Never use the toilet to dispose of trash. • Do not allow the water to run while brushing your teeth or shaving. • Only run the dishwasher with a full load. • Install aerators on your kitchen and bathroom faucets to use less water. • Install a low-flow showerhead. Outdoor • Harvest the rain. Buy or make a rain barrel or a cistern to collect water for your plants. • Use drought-tolerant plants that are adapted to this area to reduce outdoor water use by 20 to 50 percent. • Wash your car with a bucket and sponge instead of a running hose. • Avoid watering on windy days. REBATE OFFER * • Set sprinklers to water the lawn, not sidewalks and driveways. • Water before 10:00 a.m. and after 8:00 p.m. Evaporation losses are up to 60 percent higher during the day.

For less than $1 a month, you can help support local nonprofits by rounding up your bill through PEC’s Power of Change Program. Join Power of Change today at pec.coop/change. What would you give to make a change? BRADY’S BRIDGE: POWER OF CHANGE GRANT RECIPIENT THE POWER OF INCLUSION

* For a complete list of current rebates, visit nbutexas.com/rebates .

Learn more at nbutexas.com/energy-efficiency-resources.

Pedernales Electric Cooperative

12

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY & COUNTY

News from New Braunfels

COMPILED BY LAUREN CANTERBERRY

QUOTE OF NOTE

New economic development plan announced NEW BRAUNFELS A new eco- nomic development strategic plan was introduced to city stakehold- ers and officials during a May 17 quarterly investors meeting of the Greater New Braunfels Economic Development Foundation, outlin- ing a plan to attract high-paying jobs, support startups and create office and industry space, among other goals. The plan, titled Confluence Economic Development Strategy, is expected to be implemented over five years beginning in Jan- uary, according to a press release from the Greater New Braunfels Chamber of Commerce. Confluence will be enacted through a public-private partner- ship among the city, chamber, the foundation, and other entities. PLANNING PRIORITIES The new economic development plan outlines six strategic priorities.

New Braunfels City Council Meets June 13 and 27 at 6 p.m. at 550 Landa St., New Braunfels 830-221-4000 • www.nbtexas.org Comal County Commissioners Court Meets June 9, 16, 23 and 30 at 8:30 a.m. at 100 Main Plaza, New Braunfels 830-221-1100 • www.co.comal.tx.us MEETINGS WE COVER CITY HIGHLIGHTS NEW BRAUNFELS The city of New Braunfels is now accepting applications for a portion of the approximately $10.9 million in total American Rescue Plan Act funds that were allocated to the city by the U.S. Department of Treasury. Local nonprofit agencies can submit applications for the funding online, and applications are open through June 9, according to a city press release. Capital improvement projects that are eligible for funding are those that would address health or education disparities, address social health, provide investment in housing and neighborhoods, or promote healthy childhood environments. “MY TOP HOPE IS THAT WE CAN RECRUIT AND HIRE ADDITIONAL STAFF TO REALLY BE ABLE TO OFFER THE PROGRAMS THAT WE HAVE SCHEDULED FOR JULY AND NOT HAVE TO CANCEL ANYTHING ELSE.” STACEY DICKE, PARKS AND RECREATION DIRECTOR FOR THE CITY OF NEW BRAUNFELS, ON PARKS DEPARTMENT STAFF SHORTAGES

CREATING AN ORDINANCE

The animal services advisory board first discussed the creation of an ordinance in late 2021.

OCT. 2021

Board postpones ordinance recommendation to conduct further research DEC. 2021

MARCH 2022

MAY 2022

Board discusses a potential ordinance for the first time

Decision postponed

Board recommends pet sale ordinance for City Council approval

following closed session meeting

A date for the city to evaluate the ordinance has not been determined.

SOURCE: CITY OF NEW BRAUNFELS/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

New Braunfels advisory board recommends pet sales limits

NEW BRAUNFELS After more than six months of deliberation, the New Braunfels Animal Services Advi- sory Board on May 4 recommended an ordinance to regulate the sale of dogs and cats in retail pet shops. New Braunfels officials began considering potential regulations in October after City Council members recommended that the board should discuss options for an ordinance to address commercial animal sales. City staff reviewed similar ordi- nances in other cities in Texas when drafting the options, said Christo- pher Looney, planning and develop- ment services director for the city. One option the officials evalu- ated was an ordinance passed by San Antonio in October 2020 that banned the commercial sale of pets within city limits. The newly recommended ordi- nance in New Braunfels prohibits retail pet shops from the sale, lease or transfer of a dog or cat unless the animal was obtained by the shop from an animal shelter or animal

welfare organization, according to city documents. Additionally, the board recom- mended amending the definition of “animal welfare organization” in the existing code of ordinances. Previously, an animal welfare organization was defined as “any not for profit group with 501(c)(3) status whose primary mission includes animal welfare,” according to city documents. The recommended amendment adds the stipulation that such orga- nizations do not include an entity that breeds animals or one that purchases pets from other breeders. As with the ordinance in San Antonio, private breeders who sell directly to the public are not affected by the ordinance. A one-year grace period for existing pet shops to come into compliance has also been included in the recom- mended ordinance, Looney said. A date for the proposed ordi- nance to be presented has not been determined.

1 2 3 4 5 6

Attract quality jobs in target industries Create competitive office and industry space Support the success of startups Align and optimize workforce assets Improve mobility and transportation options Execute proactive land-use and development strategies

SOURCE: GREATER NEW BRAUNFELS ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION/ COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Do You Need Health Insurance? 830-620-MUND

6/24 Tommy Elskies and the Bayou Kings 7/1 Rockabilly Friday with The Prairie Rattlers 7/2 Jim Lauderdale

COMMERCIAL

LIFE & HEALTH

AUTO & HOME

Visit our calendar for more events: www.rileystavern.com 8894 FM 1102 New Braunfels, TX 78132

Proudly Serving New Braunfels Since 1976

13

NEW BRAUNFELS EDITION • JUNE 2022

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER IS PROUD TO SAY THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS HEALTH CARE EDITION 2022

GOLD SPONSOR

At Smile Advanced Dental Care & Smile Pediatric Dental Care we provide a superior dental experience for your entire family. Dr. Lela understands that dental visits can be intimidating and even frightening for young children. Her specialized training as a pediatric dentist, and as a parent, allows her to calm little nerves and make appointments a breeze. She has devoted much of her continuing education perfecting her skill as a tongue- tie preferred provider. Dr. Prospero Matos knew as a young child that dentistry was his calling. Although he is trained and skilled in all areas of dentistry, he especially enjoys placing implants. Serving the families of New Braunfels and surrounding areas, our team is passionate about creating a warm, reassuring environment that gives our patients a lot to smile about!

GOLD SPONSOR

At Zenith Integrated Specialists our goal is to empower independent primary care clinicians by providing the support, tools, and resources to ensure each patient receives the right care, at the right time, and at the right place. With credible healthcare data, shared best practices, innovative technology and programs, and open- minded clinicians, we will make a dierence in how aordable care is delivered in our community. Zenith Integrated Specialists brings podiatry, endocrinology, and psychiatry services to our New Braunfels clinic, with neurology and rheumatology joining us in the fall. At our San Marcos clinic, we provide neurology services. Our variety of specialists are taking same to next day new patient appointments. Medicare and Medicare Advantage plans are welcome. Call 830-631-8182 or visit www.zenithspecialists.com to schedule your appointment today!

ZEN TH Integrated Specialists

SILVER SPONSOR

SILVER SPONSOR

At GRMC’s Urgent Care located in Clear Springs, our providers care for the entire family – from pediatrics to geriatrics. We oer a full range of urgent care services, from broken bones, to the u and more. Our knowledgeable sta and state-of-the- art facility ensure quick and aordable medical services year-round.

EdenHill is the only not-for-prot Life Plan Community in our region. For 112 years we have been giving back—to our residents, their families, and the greater community. Last year alone we provided over $1.2 million in uncompensated care to aging Seniors. EdenHill: Live in a community built on values.

SILVER SPONSOR

TO READ ALL COMMUNITY IMPACT GUIDES AND SEE REGULAR TOPIC UPDATES,

HealthTexas Medical Group was established by local physicians who recognized the need for primary care doctors to combine their passion, skills and resources to improve the health of the patients with the local community. Quality and compassionate care, with outstanding service. Every patient. Every time. That’s the HealthTexas Experience.

ANNUAL COMMUNITY  HEALTH CARE REAL ESTATE  EDUCATION COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM. VISIT

14

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

HEALTH CARE SNAPSHOT

Local health care data and information

COMPILED BY LAUREN CANTERBERRY

2022 STATEWIDE HEALTH CARE RANKINGS OUT OF 244 COUNTIES

COMPARING COUNTY HEALTH These rankings of all counties statewide are updated annually but include data from previous years. The factors listed are not comprehensive.

HEALTH OUTCOMES INCLUDE:

• LENGTH OF LIFE • QUALITY OF LIFE , such as the number of poor mental and physical health days reported

HEALTH OUTCOMES

18 16 34 20 26 39 27

19 10 13

Length of life Overall

HEALTH FACTORS INCLUDE:

COMAL COUNTY GUADALUPE COUNTY

• HEALTHBEHAVIORS , such as smoking, obesity, physical activity, excessive drinking, alcohol- impaired driving deaths, sexually transmitted infections and teen births • CLINICALCARE , including health insurance coverage; number of physicians, dentists and mental health providers; preventable hospital stays; and u vaccinations • SOCIOECONOMICFACTORS , such as educational attainment levels, children in poverty, income inequality and violent crimes • PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT FACTORS , such as air pollution, drinking water violations, housing problems and long commutes

Quality of life HEALTH FACTORS

8 8

Overall

Health behaviors

12 11

Socioeconomic Physical environment Clinical care

198

110

SOURCES: ROBERT WOOD JOHNSON FOUNDATION, UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN POPULATION HEALTH INSTITUTE, COUNTYHEALTHRANKINGS.ORG COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

TRACKING VACCINATIONS

As of May 26, more than 95,000 Comal County residents and 91,000 Guadalupe County residents have been fully vaccinated against COVID-19, 64.97% and 58.39% of eligible residents, respectively.

COUNTY VACCINATIONS DOSES BY WEEK 14,000 12,000 Peak

PERCENTAGE OF RESIDENTS AGE 5+ FULLY VACCINATED 95,371 - 64.97%

FULLY VACCINATED POPULATION AGE BREAKDOWN

2.39% 3.16%

5-11

223,521 239,852 Total

4/12/21-4/18/21

4.17% 5.53%

12-15

10,000

9,279

91,336 - 58.39%

40.08% 45.89%

16-49

4/12/21-4/18/21

8,000

10,096

25.97% 24.54%

50-64

6,000

21.92% 16.61%

65-79

17,686,878 - 65.59%

4,000

5.45% 4.26%

80+

2,000

State average

0.02% 0.01%

Unknown

0

2020

2021

2022

SOURCE: TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF STATE HEALTH SERVICESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

HEALTH CARE AND SOCIAL ASSISTANCE INDUSTRY EMPLOYMENT

SAN ANTONIONEW BRAUNFELS METRO MAY 2021 OCCUPATION ESTIMATES

HEALTH CARE EMPLOYMENT TRENDS Since September 2019, Comal and Guadalupe counties have seen a 2.15% and 2.1% decrease in employment in the health care and social assistance industry, respectively.

Annual mean wage

Employment

Sept. 2019

Sept. 2020

Sept. 2021

800

$51,330 $34,140 $264,220 $240,520 $78,870 $186,710 $278,570 $99,630

Emergency medical technician Licensed vocational nurse Family medicine Obstetricians and gynecologists Pediatricians

7,155

6,190

2-year change -2.15%

6,892

390 400 500

7,001

4,146

18,720

Registered nurses Physical therapists Psychiatrists

2-year change -2.10%

3,865

1,320

SOURCE: U.S. BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

4,059

110

15

NEW BRAUNFELS EDITION • JUNE 2022

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