Heights - River Oaks - Montrose Edition | February 2020

HEIGHTS RIVEROAKS MONTROSE EDITION

VOLUME 1, ISSUE 11  FEB. 5MARCH 3, 2020

ONLINE AT

PRIMARY ELECTION GUIDE 2020

LOCAL CONTRIBUTIONS in the Lp

In the past three preprimary donation cycles, fundraising activity has increased sharply in the Heights, River Oaks and Montrose area.

Number of donors

Amount donated

2011: $6.21M

2,956

4,138

2015: $10.14M

8,037

2019: $10.71M

$0

$4M

$8M

$12M

SOURCE: FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSIONCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Ahead of the March 3 primaries in Texas, campaign fundraising from some of the Houston area’s top donor strongholds has far exceeded the past two election cycles that featured presidential contenders, data from the Federal Election Commission shows. In fact, in the Heights, River Oaks and Montrose area, donors contributed over $10.7 million in 2019, a 72% increase compared to the same point in time in 2011, the year before the 2012 primary season. Larger sums of money are being donated, but an increasingly important factor, campaign experts said, is an increas- ing base of donors overall. There are almost three times as many donors from the area, FEC records show. National trends as well as competitive races locally, which have a record number of candidates on the pri- mary ballot, are driving the surge in donors, said Mark Jones, a Rice University professor and fellow with the Baker Institute for Public Policy. CONTINUED ON 12 Houston donors step up aheadofMarchprimary BY MATT DULIN

In FourthWard, faith perseveres Lue Ammon Williams stands at the site of a demolished church in Freedmen's Town. She is raising funds to reclaim the property. (Emma Whalen/Community Impact Newspaper)

Patchwork of neighborhood preservation eorts keeps ght alive

BY EMMA WHALEN

skyline towering over. The story of Mt. Carmel Missionary Baptist Church follows a similar pattern of many historic structures in Freedmen’s Town, a community established by former slaves in the late 1800s. Also known as Fourth Ward, the neighborhood is located next to Bualo Bayou and downtown and referred to by some as the “Mother Ward” because of its historical signicance to Houston’s African Amer- ican community. A xture in the neighborhood, Mt. Carmel was built in 1914, remodeled in 1940 and eventually

Where dozens of parishioners once gathered at Mt. Carmel Missionary Baptist Church in Houston’s Freedmen’s Town, a handful still meets on Sundays at the vacant lot it stood on. “We will give God the glory when we bring our church back up and hopefully keep it a community, because when I was going to this church, it was one of the largest ones out here,” parishioner Lue AmmonWilliams said. Where those parishioners once followed concrete steps up to Sunday service, they now follow them to a view of townhomes and the downtown Houston

CONTINUED ON 16

ELECTION GUIDE Primary 2020

IMPACTS

6 LIVE MUSIC GUIDE

9 WHO IS ON THE BALLOT?

11 BUSINESS FEATURE

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HEIGHTS - RIVER OAKS - MONTROSE EDITION • FEBRUARY 2020

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

CONTENTS

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

IMPACTS

6

Now Open, Coming Soon &more

PUBLISHERS AND FOUNDERS John and Jennifer Garrett PUBLISHERHOUSTONMETRO Jason Culpepper ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Kristina Shackelford GENERAL MANAGER Nicole Ray, nray@communityimpact.com EDITORIAL EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Lanane MANAGING EDITOR Marie Leonard SENIOR EDITOR Matt Dulin CITY HALL REPORTER Emma Whalen COPY CHIEF Andy Comer COPY EDITORS Ben Dickerson, Kasey Salisbury CONTRIBUTINGWRITER Johnny Peña ADVERTISING SALES DIRECTOR Tess Coverman ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Lauren Slovisky DESIGN CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Tessa Hoee SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNER Anya Gallant STAFF DESIGNER Stephanie Torres BUSINESS GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER Claire Love ABOUT US John and Jennifer Garrett began Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 in Pugerville, Texas. The company’s mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. CONTACT US

FROMNICOLE: Freedman’s Town is one of the most historically relevant areas in our city. This month we explore its rich history and highlight the many changes that have taken place over the years and the organizations working for preservation.

Nicole Ray, GENERALMANAGER

FROMMATT: The Heights-River Oaks-Montrose area was responsible for about $1 out of every $4 donated to federal campaigns in Houston in 2019. We learned more about who and what local donors are supporting and explored the surge in small donations as well.

TODO LIST

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Local events and things to do TRANSPORTATION Houston seeks input on expanded walkability policy

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Matt Dulin, SENIOR EDITOR

PrimaryElectionGuide2020

THIS ISSUE BY THE NUMBERS

VOTER GUIDE

11

Local sources 12

New businesses 8

Community events 10

Live music venues 3

Candidates in local primaries BUSINESS FEATURE

13

Kuhl-Linscomb

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DINING FEATURE

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Empire Cafe

© 2020 Community Impact Newspaper Co. All Rights Reserved. No reproduction of any portion of this issue is allowed without written permission from the publisher.

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HEIGHTS  RIVER OAKS  MONTROSE EDITION • FEBRUARY 2020

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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W. 26TH ST.

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290

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W. 20TH ST.

45

W. 19TH ST.

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HOUSTON

(Courtesy Jeni’s Splendid Ice Creams)

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5 Drift , a new sports bar at 1207 W. 20th St., Houston, in the Heights, opened Jan. 10. The bar features a tropical beach theme with a full-service bar, special cocktails, food trucks on-site, and 50 TVs, including a 204-inch TV on the patio. www.facebook.com/driftbarhouston 6 Jeni’s Splendid Ice Creams , a Columbus, Ohio-based chain, opened at 375 W. 19th St., in the Heights, on Jan. 9. The chain, known for its rich flavors such as Salted Peanut Butter with Chocolate Flecks, also distributes ice cream through several retailers, including Whole Foods stores in the Houston area. The shop took the place of the Carter & Cooley Co. sandwich shop, which closed in August. 346-335-1394. www.jenis.com 7 Hando , a hand-rolled sushi bar, opened Dec. 18 at 518 W. 11th St., Hous- ton. At the restaurant, which offers bar seating only, diners can choose from a series of roll “flights” as well as sushi and snacks a la carte and custom cocktails. www.handohtx.com 8 A new bar in the Midtown area, Lost & Found , held its grand opening Jan. 5 at 160 W. Gray St., a former location of The Ginger Man. The new bar offers a vibrant interior design, renovated patios, cocktails and kitchen serving “Southern hospitality” fare. 832-649-3050. www.instagram.com/

WHITE OAK PARK

WHITE OAK BLVD.

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OLIVER ST.

EDWARDS ST.

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MEMORIAL PARK

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BUFFALO BAYOU PARK

L L E N P K W Y .

DALLAS ST.

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W. GRAY ST.

610

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527

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MAPNOTTOSCALE

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NOWOPEN 1 The Austin-based fast-casual chain Tarka Indian Kitchen opened its new location at 3701 S. Shepherd Drive, Ste. A, in Upper Kirby, on Jan. 29. The restau- rant serves curries, kabobs, biryanis and flatbreads, with vegetarian, vegan and gluten-free options. 832-582-7102. www.tarkaindiankitchen.com 2 City Orchard opened Jan. 15 at 1201 Oliver St., Houston. The cidery produces

hard ciders using apples from the Great Lakes region but also serves beer brewed on-site as well as a selection of domestic and imported wines. It also will sell pizza, crepes, and other specialty bites from its City Orchard Food Truck. 832-648-7773. www.cityorchardtx.com 3 Voodoo Doughnut opened its first Houston location at 3715 Washington Ave., Ste. A, Houston, on Jan. 15. The shop offers creative doughnut names and recipes, is known for its bacon maple bar and recently

rolled out The Cannolo, its take on cannoli. 346-802-3138. www.voodoodoughnut.com 4 The food truck Sticky’s Chicken held a grand opening for its brick-and-mortar location at 2313 Edwards St., Houston, on Jan. 11. The location serves the same items that won a following, including fried chicken wings with a sweet glaze, chicken and rice, and loaded french fries called Sticky’s Sticks. 713-703-5230. www.getstickys.com

lostandfoundmidtown COMING SOON

9 Eighteen 36 , a new Houston-themed bar and restaurant, will take the place of Owl Bar, which closed last year, at 2221 W.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY MATT DULIN & EMMA WHALEN

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Hando (Courtesy Al Torres Photography)

(Courtesy Eighteen36)

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Alabama St. It will hold a grand opening Feb. 7. With a name that references the city’s founding year, the bar will operate on the first floor of the property, with Road- ster Grill , a Greek-American restaurant that was based in Bellaire until 2017, on the second floor. Owners Jason Scheinthal and Jake Stein remodeled the space to offer a variety of seating, a new patio with covered areas and an outdoor fireplace. The remodel also includes a drive-thru window. www.bar1836.com 10 Locally owned coffee roaster Tenfold Coffee plans to open its new building at 2522 Yale St., Houston, in February. The converted warehouse space will house a cafe and roastery, including a quality con- trol lab, where staff will provide training and workshops for wholesale customers as well as for members of the public. The cafe will serve coffee-based drinks, as well beer, wine and small food items. www.tenfoldcoffee.com 11 The Institute of Contemporary Dance Houston expects to open its studio at 1302 Houston Ave., Ste. 300, Houston, by early spring. The space will include three dance studios, led by founder Marlana Doyle, former artistic director of Met Dance, and will offer dance and movement classes for all skill and age levels. Summer camps will also be offered. 713-804-6646. www.houstoncontemporary.org RENOVATIONS 12 The Blue Bird Circle resale shop reopened Jan. 13 after an extensive three-month renovation of its facility at 615 W. Alabama St., Houston. The vol-

unteer-run shop sells donated clothing, furniture and home goods, with proceeds benefiting research and medical care for children with neurological disorders. The nonprofit was founded by a group of Houston women in 1923. 713-528-0470. www.thebluebirdcircle.com CLOSINGS 13 The Greek-American restaurant Theo’s , 812 Westheimer Road, Hous- ton, closed Jan. 5 to make way for the Montrose Collective, a mixed-use retail and residential project that will also include a Houston Public Library location. The restaurant, which dates back to the 1920s, was known as One’s a Meal until it was renamed in 2011. 713-523-0425. www.theoshouston.com 14 The Heights location of Kindred Hospital , 1800 W 26th St., will close by March 17. The network is closing four Houston and two Dallas-Forth Worth hospitals as part of a consolidation effort. Employees may be offered positions else- where, the company said. 832-673-4200. www.kindredhealthcare.com IN THE NEWS 15 For an initiative dubbed Insta11ations , the city of Houston and the Houston Arts Alliance commissioned local artists to cre- ate art for each of the city’s 11 City Council districts. The artists’ work will be revealed this spring. In District C, which covers most of the Heights and Montrose area, artist Michael Stevenson was selected for the College Park Cemetery site at 3225 Dallas St. https://insta11ations.com

The lobby of The Gordy serves a community meeting space at the center of the campus. (Photos courtesy Stages/Amitava Sarkar)

FEATURED IMPACT NOWOPEN Almost four years after Stages purchased the site, the theater unveiled its new $35 million campus to the public Jan. 18. The Gordy, a former warehouse for the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, at 800 Rosine St., has been transformed into a site featuring three state-of- the-art performance venues, expanded rehearsal and meeting space, and a 300-space parking garage. Patrons will also nd some new amenities: a full- service bar, a spacious patio and balcony, and a lounge for VIP donors complete with wine storage. “We envision The Gordy as a creative hub, buzzing with activity day and night, seven days a week,” Stages Managing Director Mark Folkes said. The performance spaces are the Sterling Stage, a 251-seat thrust theater; Lester and Sue Smith Stage, a 223-seat arena theater that is the only one of its size in Houston; and the Rochelle and Max Levit Stage, a 134-seat black box theater with multiple seating congurations. The enhanced theaters expand the creative freedom for future productions with new capabilities for lighting, sound

The Sterling Stage has 251 seats.

and set design, he said. On the Levit Stage, the theater will experiment with oering long-run productions with no predetermined end date, Stages Communications Director Lise Bohn said. “They will run as long as there is market and community support,” she said. “There’s nothing like that in Houston.” 713-527-0123. www.stageshouston.com

UPCOMING SHOWS Now throughMarch 15: “The Fantasticks”

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HEIGHTS - RIVER OAKS - MONTROSE EDITION • FEBRUARY 2020

TODO LIST

February-March events

FEB. 22

LEARN THE ART OF THE ART CAR ART CAR MUSEUM

Ahead of the annual parade, art car artists host an open workshop at the Houston Art Car Museum and oer advice to aspiring art car artists. 1-4 p.m. Free. 140 Heights Blvd., Houston. 713-861-5526. www.artcarmuseum.com

29 KICKOFF RODEO SEASONAT THE DOWNTOWN PARADE The annual monthlong Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo kicks o with its downtown parade featuring this year’s grand marshal, Houston Dash Capt. Kealia Ohai. 10 a.m. Free. Walker Street at Bagby Street, Houston. 832-667-1000. www.rodeohouston.com MARCH 04 TALKABOUT LIFE’S BIG QUESTIONS AT HUMANHQ Local therapy practice Modern Therapy hosts monthly group discussions at its conversation-focused meeting place, Human HQ. Talks are facilitated by therapists on a variety of topics. The March session centers on nding purpose and contemplating life’s “big questions.” $28. 1404 Allston St., Houston. 281-783-9297. www.humanhq.org 06 THROUGH08 CELEBRATE 85 YEARS OF THE RIVER OAKS AZALEA TRAIL The River Oaks Garden Club Azalea Trail marks 85 years with tours of four private homes, the Bayou Bend Home and Garden, the Rienzi property and the Forum of Civics, which will host exhibits, food trucks and a marketplace. Proceeds benet a variety of local nonprots. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. $30. Multiple locations. 713-523-2483. www.riveroaksgc.org 07 HEAD TO THE HEIGHTS CRAWFISH FESTIVAL The Greater Heights Chamber of Commerce hosts its annual festival serving up fresh mudbugs courtesy of Nola Crawsh King of New Orleans, along with other food options, local vendors and live zydeco music. 10:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Free, but food tickets can be purchased in advance until March 1. 411 W. 20th St.,

FEBRUARY 08 CELEBRATE ANTI VALENTINE’S DAY

Montrose outpost Rudyard’s Pub hosts an “anti-Valentine Bash” in partnership with Defunkt Magazine, with poetry and prose readings, a musical performance and a local comedian serving as emcee for the evening. 8-11 p.m. Free. 2010 Waugh Drive, Houston. 713-521-0521. www.rudyardshtx.com 07 THROUGH08, 14 AND 15 LEARNHOWTO CRAFT GLASS The artist collective Juggernauts Glass hosts a two-hour glassblowing class at its Heights studio. Participants learn to make a heart-shaped glass pendant. Times vary. $75. 214 E. 27th St., Houston. 832-378-8842. www.juggernautglass.com 09 LEARN FROMAMENIL COLLECTION CURATOR Edouard Kopp, the chief curator of the John R. Eckel, Jr. Foundation Menil Drawing Institute, discusses Berlin artist Jordine Voight’s work titled “Vertical.” The wall drawing, produced in 2019, was inspired by the Gulf Coast landscape and resources. 3-4 p.m. Free. 1412 W. Main St., Houston. 713-525-9400. www.menil.org/drawing-institute 15 DANCE TO CUBANMUSIC Cafeza, a First Ward coee shop and bar, hosts a Cuban tribute band to Santiago de Cuba, La Tribu Cubana. Limited seating is available, as dancing is encouraged. 9:30-11 p.m. 1720 Houston Ave., Houston. 832-203-8016. www.cafeza.com 22 LET THE GOOD TIMES ROLL Three Houston bar hot spots, downtown, Midtown and Washington Avenue host a pub crawl with drink specials, free beads and koozies. Tickets serve all three areas. 3-9 p.m. $3 (general admission), $8-$11 (VIP with T-shirt). www.htxpubcrawls.com

Houston. 713-861-6735. www.heightschamber.org

Find more or submit events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY MATT DULIN AND EMMA WHALEN

LIVEMUSIC

MCGONIGEL’SMUCKY DUCK 2425 Norfolk St., Houston 713-528-5999 www.mcgonigels.com FEBRUARY 06 Amanda Pascali and the Family, 7 p.m. 07 Bill Kirchen, 7 p.m.; Trace Bundy, 9:30 p.m. 08 What’s Opera Duck? 6:30 p.m. & 9 p.m. 11 Austin Lounge Lizards, 7:30 13 Jordi Baizan, Alex Coba, Scott Duncan, 7 p.m.; Andrew Duhon Trio, 9:30 p.m. 14 Kelly Willis, 7 p.m. 15 Terri Hendrix, 7 p.m.; Clandestine, 9:30 p.m. 18 Ken Gaines w/ Wayne Wilkerson, Susan Elliott, David Starr, 7:30 20 Vance Gilbert, 7 p.m.; India Ramey, 9:30 p.m. 21 Seth Walker, 7 p.m.; Jesse Dayton, 9:30 p.m.

WHITE OAKMUSIC HALL 2915 N. Main St., Houston 713-237-0370 www.whiteoakmusichall.com FEBRUARY 0 6 Devil Makes Three, 8 p.m. 07 Moon Hooch and the Main Squeeze, 8 p.m.; Colter Wall, 8 p.m. 08 Backspace, 6:30 p.m.; Deadeye, 8 p.m. 09 The New Pornographers, 7 p.m. 12 Theo Katzman with Rett Madison, 7:30 p.m. 13 Andy Shauf with Molly Sarle, 7 p.m. 15 Baynk, 7 p.m. 18 That 1 Guy, 7 p.m. 21 Colony House, 7 p.m. 22 Pinegrove, 7 p.m. 23 Ingested, 6 p.m. 24 Pepper, 7 p.m. 24 Vale of Pnath with Gorod and Wolf King, 7 p.m. 25 Illiterate Light, 7 p.m. 26 R.LUM.R, 7 p.m. 27 Brother Ali, 7 p.m. 28 Pup, 8 p.m. 28 Dylan LeBlanc with Anthony DaCosta, 7 p.m. 27 Sloan, 8 p.m. 29 The Wonder Years, 6 p.m.

HEIGHTS THEATER 339 W. 19th St., Houston 214-272-8346 www.heightstheater.com FEBRUARY 07 YOLA with Thomas Csorba, 7 p.m. 15 Marty Stuart and His Fabulous Superlatives, 7 p.m. 16 Lost Dog Street Band with Casper Allen, 7 p.m. 20 Ian Moore with Sue Foley, 7 p.m. 21 Kat Edmonson with Adam Levy, 7 p.m. 2223 Marc Broussard with Jackie Venson, 7 p.m. 26 The Lone Bellow with Early James, 7 p.m. 27 Amanda Shires: Atmosphereless Tour, 7 p.m. 28 The Steeldrivers with Granville Automatic, 7 p.m. 29 Anderson East & Foy Vance, 7 p.m.

22 Guy Forsyth, 7 p.m. 27 Adam Hood, 7 p.m.; Piper Jones, 9:30 p.m. 28 Sisters Morales, 7 p.m.;

South Austin Moonlighters, 9:30 p.m.

Bayou Soul singer-songwriter Marc Broussard performs at the Heights Theater in February. (Courtesy Heights Theater)

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HEIGHTS  RIVER OAKS  MONTROSE EDITION • FEBRUARY 2020

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES

COMPILED BY MATT DULIN, KELLY SCHAFLER & EMMA WHALEN

PROJECT UPDATES

WESTHEIMER RD.

NEXT STEPS Feedback can be provided during three upcoming public hearings at Houston City Hall at 901 Bagby St., Houston. Walkable Places Ordinance framework: 2:30 p.m. Feb. 20 Transit-oriented development ordinance amendments: 2:30 p.m. Feb. 20 Walkable places pilot areas: 2:30 p.m. March 5 Comments can also be submitted at www.houstontx.gov/planning . Northside and East Downtown. Within these areas, development would be required to follow guidelines that promote walkabil- ity and are specic to each area. These developments would also be subject to fewer processes that the city requires of projects that request walkable features. Developers would also be able to apply to earn a Walkable Places designation outside the pilot.

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Shepherd Drive reconstruction The Upper Kirby Redevelopment Authority expects the design for the rebuild of Shepherd Drive from Westheimer Road to I-69 will be completed soon. After that, bid- ding on construction could begin in February with work starting as early as this April, according to Upper Kirby Projects Director Lee Cisneros. Timeline: April 2020-TBD Cost: TBD Funding source: Upper Kirby Redevelopment Authority

Transit corridor development rules are in line for an update. (Courtesy Visit Houston)

City seeks input onwalkability

Two policy changes that aim to make Houston more dense and pedestrian-friendly are taking steps toward nal City Council approval this spring.

mandatory, including reduced park- ing requirements, wider sidewalks and streamlined permitting. The ordinance would also extend to the proposed bus-rapid transit corridors throughout the city.

N

One policy change recommends expanding the Transit-Oriented Development Ordinance, passed in 2009, and making its standards Study nds free fares could cost $170million AMetropolitan Transit Authority of Harris County study on eliminating Another eort known as the Walk- able Places Ordinance establishes pilot areas in Midtown, the Near

45

B A G B Y S T .

Bagby Street road diet Construction began in January on a project that will reduce Bagby Street to three and four lanes from six lanes, which will allow for wider sidewalks, a bicycle lane, additional trees and other beautication eorts. Street closures may aect access to the Heights and Montrose area. Timeline: January 2020-December 2021 Cost: $28.8 million

vehicles and operators. Addition- ally, Fernandez said it would take several years to purchase vehicles and hire personnel, which would result in an estimated launch date of 2024 for fare-free service. “It’s not like we have an extra $70 million lying around with all the things we want to do,” board Chair Carrin Patman said.

2019, at the board’s nance and audit committee meeting Jan. 15. The study showed that although free fares for all riders would increase ridership by 30.4 million rides annually, implementing the program would not only cost about $70 million annually in lost farebox revenue, but it also would incur over $100 million in additional operating costs to add

ride fares left both METRO board members and ocials seemingly unconvinced of the likelihood of implementing it in Harris County. Julie Fernandez, lead management analyst for revenue and fare policy at METRO, presented results of the fare- free study, which launched January

Funding source: Downtown Redevelopment Authority

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF 1162020. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT HRMNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

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10

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

GUIDE

Candidates and information for the March primaries

Important dates

GUIDE ELECTION Primary 2020 COMPILED BY MATT DULIN AND EMMA WHALEN

WHERE TO VOTE

Feb. 18: rst day of early voting Feb. 21: last day to apply for early voting by mail Feb. 28: last day of early voting March 3: primary election day Voters can vote in the Republican or Democratic primary, but not both.

Visit communityimpact.com to see a full list and map of where to vote during early voting and on election day. Where can I vote?: Voters in Harris County can vote at any vote center on election day and at any vote center open for early voting. place system in which the county election precinct polling places are eliminated and instead any registered voter eligible to vote in the county-run election may vote at any polling place. Precincts: A voter is registered in the county election precinct that contains the voter’s residence address. Each election precinct established for an election shall be served by a single polling place located within the boundary of the precinct. Vote centers: This is a polling

Follow along for election night coverage at communityimpact.com.

SAMPLE BALLOT

R: Republican D: Democrat

D: Ann Harris Bennett* D: Jack Terence Department of Education, At-Large Place 5 R: Fred Flickinger D: Erica Davis D: Paul Ovalle Department of Education, At-Large Place 7 R: Kay Smith R: Don Sumners D: David W. Brown D: Andrea Duhon D: W.R. “Bill” Morris D: Obes Nwabara County commissioner Precinct 1 D: Rodney Ellis* D: “Willie D” Dennis D: Maria T. (Terri) Jackson County commissioner Precinct 3 R: Tom Ramsey R: Susan Sample R: Brenda Stardig D: Diana Martinez Alexander D: Zaher Eisa D: Erik “Beto” Hassan D: Michael Moore D: Morris Overstreet D: Kristi Thibaut County Constable Precinct 1

R: Wendell Champion R: Truly Heiskell R: T.C. Manning R: Nathan J. Milliron R: Ava Reynero Pate D: Sheila Jackson Lee* D: Michael Allen D: Donovan Boson D: Marc Flores D: Jerry Ford Sr. D: Stevens Orozco D: Bimal Patel STATE U.S. senator R: Virgil Bierschwale R: John Anthony Castro R: John Cornyn* R: Dwayne Stovall R: Mark Yancey D: Chris Bell D: Michael Cooper D: Amanda K. Edwards D: Jack Daniel Foster Jr. D: Annie “Mama” Garcia D: Victor Hugo Harris D: Mary “MJ” Hegar D: Sema Hernandez D: D.R. Hunter D: Adrian Ocegueda D: Cristina Tzintzun Ramirez D: Royce West Railroad commissioner R: Ryan Sitton* R: James “Jim” Wright D: Roberto Alonzo D: Chrysta Castañeda D: Kelly Stone D: Mark Watson Texas House of Representatives, District 134

D: Ann Johnson D: Ruby Powers District 145

FEDERAL U.S. president R: Roque “Rocky” De La Fuente Guerra** R: Bob Ely R: Zoltan G. Istvan R: Matthew John Matern R: Donald J. Trump* D: Michael Bennet D: Joseph R. Biden D: Michael R. Bloomberg D: Cory Booker D: Pete Buttigieg D: Julián Castro D: Roque “Rocky” De La Fuente** D: John K. Delaney D: Tulsi Gabbard D: Amy Klobuchar D: Deval Patrick D: Bernie Sanders D: Tom Steyer D: Elizabeth Warren D: Robby Wells D: Marianne Williamson D: Andrew Yang U.S. Rep. District 2 R: Dan Crenshaw* D: Elisa Cardnell D: Sima Ladjevardian D: Travis Olsen U.S. Rep. District 7 R: Maria Espinoza R: Wesley Hunt R: Joe Walsh R: Bill Weld

R: Martha Elena Fierro D: Christina Morales* District 147 D: Garnet F. Coleman* D: Colin Ross D: Aurelia Wagner District 148 R: Luis La Rota D: Anna Eastman D: Cynthia Reyes-Revilla D: Penny Morales Shaw D: Emily Wolf HARRIS COUNTY District attorney R: Lori Deangelo R: Mary Human R: Lloyd Wayne Oliver D: Kim Ogg* D: Carvana Cloud D: Audia Jones R: John Nation D: Vince Ryan* D: Ben Rose D: Christian Dashaun Menefee Sheri R: Joe Danna R: Paul Day R: Randy Rush D: Ed Gonzalez* D: Jerome Moore D: Harry Zamora County tax assessor- collector R: Chris Daniel D: Todd Overstreet County attorney

TURNOUT & DEMOGRAPHICS

March 2016 presidential primaries turnout

30%

of eligible voters in Texas voted in the primaries.

Republican: 19.9% | Democrat: 10.1%

Harris County overall 14.4%

Percentage of population with high school or higher education Median age

77008 35.2

96%

77007 33.6

96%

610

45

77019

10

34.1 85%

D: Alan Rosen* D: “Ced” Collier D: Gilberto “Gil” Reyna D: Perry D. Wesley

R: Laique Rehman R: Jim Noteware R: Kyle Preston R: Cindy Siegel D: Lizzie Fletcher*

77006 34.1

N

59

85%

U.S. Rep. District 18 R: Robert M. Cadena

R: Sarah Davis* D: Lanny Bose

77027

77098

32.8

34.1

97%

98%

**ROQUE “ROCKY” DE LA FUENTE RUNNING IN THE DEMOCRATIC PRIMARY IS THE SON OF ROQUE “ROCKY” DE LA FUENTE GUERRA RUNNING IN THE REPUBLICAN PRIMARY. * INCUMBENT

11

HEIGHTS  RIVER OAKS  MONTROSE EDITION • FEBRUARY 2020

CONTINUED FROM 1

The top ZIP codes for federal campaign contributions in Houston in 2019 were concentrated in the Loop and the city’s west side. Contributions originating from 77002, downtown Houston, may have been registered from donors’ places of work. DONATION disparity Amount donated >$1M $600K-$1M

1 Hushang Ansary, former diplomat, businessman and chairman of Stewart & Stevenson until 2019 The top ve Houston donors gave a combined $7.34 million to political committees in 2019. Million-dollar donors

$2.39M

2 Shahla Ansary, philanthropist, wife to Hushang Ansary

$300K-$600K $100K-$300K <$100K

$1.43M

3 Richard Weekley, co-founder of David Weekley Homes, chairman of Weekley Development Co.

It’s my mission to save you money.

$1.29M

4 Stephen Chazen, former president and CEO of Occidental Petroleum

290

59

$1.15M

5 JC Walter III, chairman, Walter Oil & Gas Corp.

10

$1.08M

$3.8M

$7.3M

the communications director for the Harris County Democratic Party. Small donations are a way to partici- pate, in addition to or in place of volun- teering for a campaign, Jones said. “It’s about identication, deeper engagement with your values,” he said. “A lot of the money being donated is simply about just that. It’s not about swaying a candidate one way or another. Unless we’re talking about $1 million-plus gifts—that’s something else.” Where themoney goes Federal campaign nance law sets limits on how much can be given and where. For the 2020 races, donors can give up to $2,800 per election per candidate, with primary and general elections counted separately. But they can also give up to $35,500 per year to national party committees’ general funds and up to $106,500 to specic party funds, such as accounts used for the national convention. Another $10,000 can be given to local parties’ federal accounts per year and $5,000 to political action committees, or PACs. Donors have no limits when it comes to super PACs, but those groups are legally prohibited from coordinating directly with a campaign. “They tend to be more focused on attacking their candidate’s opponents rather than supporting them directly,” Jones said. These groups may also take an advo- cacy stance, such asWomen SpeakOut, an anti-abortion group that received $1 million from two donors in Houston last year. Another seven Houstonians contributed a total of $4million in 2019

610

45

$452K

N

610

45

Obama campaigns ... but since 2016 I have been more interested in local pol- itics as well.” She is one of the more than 70% of Houston donors who gave less than $500 to federal campaigns in 2019. These smaller but more widespread gifts were relevant to Democratic presidential contenders, for example, because eligibility for debates was based in part on the number of donors. Arenas gave to Julian Castro’s cam- paign in hopes of keeping him in the race even though she was not a die- hard supporter. “He has an important voice that needs to be heard. I felt he deserved a spot in the debate,” Arenas said. For party leaders in Harris County, the motivation behind many gifts can simply be party loyalty, but having via- ble and compelling candidates is key. “We have a great slate of candi- dates and a record number of women running for Congress,” Harris County Republican Party Chair Paul Simpson said. Local Democratic Party ocials said many smaller-dollar donors give as a way to make sure their voice is heard. “I think that because somany people feel so removed from the process, hav- ing people feel good about donating is really important,” said Nisha Randle,

$862K

10

$5.3M

$938K

$1.8M

69

N

$950K

$467K

“The Democrats were not competing in 2012 locally. Now they are,” he said. Whogives, andwhy For Kim Arenas, an Inner Loop res- ident, donating to campaigns has become as commonplace as voting. “Basically ever since I made a sal- ary, I have contributed to political candidates,” she said. “It started in the 1 Women Speak Out: $1M 2 Engage Texas: $750K 3 Republican National Committee: $743K 4 Trump Victory: $650K 5 National Republican Congressional Committee: $392K The top ve committees receiving donations from Heights, River Oaks and Montrose area: Supported locally

24324 Northwest Fwy Cypress Denise Buckley

Limitations apply. See Geico.com for more details. © GEICO & affiliates. © Washington, DC 20076 © 2019 Geico

12

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

Primary Election Guide 2020

PACs & caps

Of the more than $40 million contributed by Houstonians in 2019, about half went to political action committees and so-called super PACs. Federal laws place donor limits depending on the type of committee.

$40M contributed citywide in 2019

And unincorporated Harris County is as big as the city of Houston.” Of the more than 1,200 committees receiving support from Houstonians in 2019, half were aliated with Republi- can causes but represented about 66% of the dollars donated, FECdata shows. When it comes to targeting dierent areas of town, Houston’s vast and dis- persed diversity means no corner can be overlooked for either party. “There’s not one area that’s com- pletely reliably Republican or Dem- ocrat,” Randle said. “There are strongholds, but those strongholds are shrinking and shifting.” The changing perception of Hous- ton has attracted the attention of the party’s presidential hopefuls, with U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren launching an oce in January. “We’re seeing all the top candidates establish operations in Houston,” Ran- dle said. “It used to be like an ATM— they’d get their checks and y out. Now they’re sticking around.”

$15.1M

Political action committee: a committee that backs a group of candidates or an initiative

Cap: $5,000 per year

$12M

Candidate committee: committees that support a specic candidate for oce

Cap: $2,800 per election (primary and general have separate limits)

SOURCE: FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSIONCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER 66% of donations from Houston residents favored Republican candidates and causes.

$8.3M

National party committee: supports party eorts, with special accounts for designated uses, such as conventions State/local party committee: supports local party eorts Independent-expenditure-only political committees: called super PACs, they are barred from directly coordinating with a candidate

Cap: $10,000 per year

Cap: $35,500 per year; $106,500 per year, per special account

$5.5M

Cap: None

to the Engage Texas super PAC, focused on registering Republican voters. How the funds are spent varies by candidate and committee. Coun- ty-level parties, for example, can use funds to help turn out the vote or lever- age their resources to help less well- known candidates get started. “You have big-time candidates that can raise the funds and build that oper- ation, but we have that already year and year out,” Simpson said. “We have a team on the ground.” Data compiled by the Campaign

Finance Institute shows that the cost to win a U.S. House race has doubled since 1986, even when ination is fac- tored in, from about $787,000 to over $1.5 million. “It gets more expensive every year, but money alone doesn’t win elec- tions. Money allows you to compete. And you need a certain amount to be able to do things and to be able to respond,” Jones said. In Houston, U.S. Rep. Elizabeth Pan- nill Fletcher, DHouston, has raised over $1.8 million to defend her seat in

November, while her six challengers have raised a combined $1.3 million for the primary. Shiftingdemographics While Houston voters have leaned Democratic in recent federal elections, Republicans see opportunity inside the Loop. “As it changes and becomes more dense, we think there will denitely be people receptive to our message,” Simpson said. “But that said, there still are plenty of donors outside the Loop.

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13

HEIGHTS  RIVER OAKS  MONTROSE EDITION • FEBRUARY 2020

BUSINESS FEATURE

BY EMMA WHALEN

Dan Linscomb and PamKuhl-Linscomb opened their store in 2001. (Photos by EmmaWhalen/Community Impact Newspaper)

Shoppers nd respite in sprawling Upper Kirby department store Kuhl-Linscomb T here are many ways that shopping at Kuhl-Linscomb diers from shopping at a traditional department store, but one of the most notable is the opportu- nity to drink a margarita at the same time, co-owner Dan Linscomb said. “With the crazy world we live in, people can just sort of get away from everything and walk and see some nice things, and that’s what we’d like people to do,” Linscomb said. Linscomb and his wife, Pam Kuhl-Linscomb, approach running their business much in the same way another cou- ple might host a dinner party. Most hosts, however, do not have to hand out a map as the Kuhl-Linscomb owners do. The duo repurposed a 1960s apartment building into a home goods store in 2001 and have since expanded to three surrounding apartments attached by hallways lined with bamboo on the outside. For passersby, most of the buildings appear more residential than commercial. “We’re dog friendly, and it’s a neighborhood store, so people stop in while on a walk,” Kuhl-Linscomb said. On the inside, shoppers browse through a wide array of products in sections labeled by vintage signs. Under a “Beauty Shop” sign sit shelves of makeup and products from hard-to-nd lines to Drunk Elephant, a cult-favorite skin care brand. A men’s section boasts camping gear, leather goods and Yeti coolers, while the furniture depart- ment oers items to t any room. The variety of products, large footprint and welcoming decor all make the store a strong competitor for online retailers, Linscomb said. “If you make it dierent, if you make it interesting and if you make it an experience, then people will come back to it, whether you’re a smaller or a larger business,” Linscomb said.

Oerings at Kuhl-Linscomb range from clothing and gift items to homewares and furniture.

A GUIDE TOKUHLLINSCOMB Customers use a map as a guide though the store’s many buildings. 1: Furniture, lighting, bed linens, nursery items and decorative pieces 2: Garden items, outdoor furniture and bath linens 3: Gifts, kitchenware, table decor and holiday items 4: Women’s fashion, men’s shop, beauty and wellness 5: Toys, children’s clothing, stationary and books

Kuhl-Linscomb spans four buildings on two blocks.

KIPLING ST.

1

2

Kuhl-Linscomb 2424 W. Alabama St., Houston 713-526-6000 www.kuhl-linscomb.com Hours: Mon.-Fri. 10 a.m.- 6:30 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.- 6 p.m. Sun. 1-6 p.m.

STEEL ST.

5

3

4

W. ALABAMA ST.

N

14

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