Plano North October 2020

TRACKING SALES TAX

COMPARING THE BUDGET The city’s combined budget shows the expenditures for all service areas of the city. The scal year 2020-21 budget calls for $4.9 million more in water and sewer costs and a $400,000 cut in public safety expenditures. FY 2020-21 FY 2019-20

FY 2018-19 FY 2019-20 FY 2020-21

Sales tax collections in Plano were hit hard by the pandemic, though receipts have mostly leveled out in recent months.

$6.5M $6.1M $7.4M

$8.4M

$6.4M $6.5M $5.6M

$5.8M $6.3M $5.8M

$26.7 million $28 million

$159.2 million $157.3 million $156.9 million $164.1 million $111.8 million $108 million

Environmental Waste Services Building & Development

Water & Sewer

$8.0M $7.6M

+21.3%

-5.0%

-13.8%

-7.9%

$16.6 million $17.1 million $12.9 million $12.6 million

Public Safety

General government

Library

$6.9M $7.0M $7.0M

$9.1M

$6.4M $6.4M $6.3M

$8.5M $8.3M $8.4M

$51.9 million $56 million $49.9 million $44.7 million

$7.5 million $9.3 million $8 million $8.1 million

$7.1M $5.9M

Debt service

Drainage

-16.9%

-1.6%

0%

+1.2%

Parks & Recreation

Public Works

SOURCE: TEXAS COMPTROLLER OF PUBLIC ACCOUNTSCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER DISCLAIMER: MONTHLY ALLOCATIONS GENERALLY REFLECT PURCHASES MADE TWO MONTHS PRIOR.

SOURCE: CITY OF PLANOCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

are projected to total $84.9 million, which represents close to a quarter of the city’s general fund revenue. Costly expenses One of the largest increases Plano expects in FY 2020-21 is in the water and sewer fund, where expenses rose by close to $5 million year-over-year. These costs are part of the city’s enter- prise fund and are paid largely by resi- dents based on individual usage. Last scal year was the rst time in city history that water and sewer costs

outpaced those of public safety. The combined fund now totals roughly $7 million more than planned expendi- tures for public safety in FY 2020-21. “If you’re looking at the other expenditures, [for] most of the other funds, … there’s about a million-dol- lar increase, but the one that has the most impact is our water and sewer fund,” Israelson said. “And that’s due to wastewater costs from the North Texas Municipal Water District.” In late September, the water dis- trict adopted a budget that kept the

wholesale water rate the same as the year prior. This is the rst time the dis- trict has not increased that rate since FY 2006-07, Interim NTMWD Director Rodney Rhoades said in a recent news release. The city has contributed funds to minimize the impact of the water rate increases to residents in previous years and will continue to do so this year, Israelson said. However, the water district did increase wastewater treatment rates for two interceptors used by Plano by $0.13 per thousand gallons. Residents

will see that increase reected in their bills. The city of Plano, along with several other cities, has been involved in set- tlement negotiations as part of a rate disputewith thewater district formore than a year. Settlement discussions are condential at this point, according to Israelson, and the budget is based on rates recently set by the water district.

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PLANO NORTH EDITION • OCTOBER 2020

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