Plano North October 2020

PLANONORTH EDITION

VOLUME 7, ISSUE 1  OCT. 15NOV. 12, 2020

ONLINE AT

2020Voter Guide XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

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REGISTRATION BOOM

Turnout is expected to surge in Collin County due to an increase in the number of registered voters and interest in the election.

+19.1%

2016

2020

*as of Oct. 12

SOURCE: COLLIN COUNTYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

IMPACTS

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VOTER GUIDE 2020

Voters head to the polls in unprecedented numbers A projected surge in voter turnout has administrators and party leaders scrambling to prepare for an election that will look drastically dierent from those of years past. nearly 20% as well as Election Day vote centers by 40% com- pared with the 2016 presidential election, according to Collin County Elections Administrator Bruce Sherbet. BY MAKENZIE PLUSNICK League of Women Voters Richardson held a Sept. 26 drive to register Dallas County and Collin County voters ahead of the Nov. 3 election. (Makenzie Plusnick/Community Impact Newspaper)

CANDIDATE LISTINGS

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Plano’s budget for scal year 2020-21 reects a focus on its people, both sta and residents, according to city ocials. Totaling $605.1 million, the budget faced economic chal- lenges due to the coronavirus pandemic, including losses in sales taxes, permit and licensing fees, and hotel and motel CONTINUED ON 24 Plano budgets for increased costs, some losses in revenue BY LIESBETH POWERS But increased turnout is just one factor driving the coun- ty’s decision to add more polling places. Its leaders hope the changes will also lead to smaller crowds and increased social distancing. “Our biggest objective was to have a safe environment—as CONTINUED ON 18

Polls opened for early voting in Plano on Oct. 13. Already, election ocials are expecting a record number of voters due to an increase in registration in Collin County as well as high interest in some of this year’s races. To prepare, the county has upped the number of early voting locations by

BUDGET BREAKDOWN

PLANO SEWING CENTER 20

TOTAL: $605.1MILLION • General fund expenses cut by $6.4 million • Water and sewer costs up by $4.9 million • Same property tax rate as last year, with a slight decrease in payments for the average homeowner

SOURCE: CITY OF PLANOCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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Physicians provide clinical services as members of the medical staff at one of Baylor Scott & White Health’s subsidiary, community or affiliated medical centers and do not agents of those medical centers or Baylor Scott & White Health. Physicians are employees of Scott & White Clinic, an affiliate provide clinical services as employees or of Baylor Scott & White Health. ©2020 Baylor Scott & White Health. 99-PL-180674-PLNCancerAd20 AM

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

CONTENTS

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

IMPACTS

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Now Open, Coming Soon &more TODO LIST

MARKET TEAM GENERAL MANAGER Leanne Libby,

FROMOLIVIA: A crucial piece of our mission at Community Impact Newspaper is arming readers with the information they need to make informed decisions, and nowhere is that more important than in the voter’s booth. This year’s election will look quite dierent than those of years past due in part to the coronavirus but also because of changes to state law. Our cover story aims to give readers a heads-up on what they should expect before heading to the polls. We also include a listing of candidates, data on past turnout percentages and information on when and where to vote (see Page 15).

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Local events and things to do TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES 9 Projects across Plano

llibby@communityimpact.com EDITOR Olivia Lueckemeyer REPORTERS Makenzie Plusnick, Liesbeth Powers GRAPHIC DESIGNER Chase Autin ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Rebecca Anderson, Stephanie Burnett MANAGING EDITOR Valerie Wigglesworth ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Breanna Flores CORPORATE LEADERSHIP PUBLISHERS AND FOUNDERS John and Jennifer Garrett GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Warner METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Christal Howard John and Jennifer Garrett began Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 in Pugerville, Texas. The company’s mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Today, we operate across ve metropolitan areas, providing hyperlocal, nonpartisan news produced by our full-time journalists in each community we serve. BECOMEA#COMMUNITYPATRON Newspaper ’s legacy of local, reliable reporting by making a contribution. Together, we can continue to ensure citizens stay informed and keep businesses thriving. COMMUNITYIMPACT.COMCIPATRON CONTACT US CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES DIRECTOR Tess Coverman WHOWE ARE Please join your friends and neighbors in support of Community Impact SUPPORT LOCAL JOURNALISM

VoterGuide

CANDIDATE LISTINGS Who will appear on the ballot

15

Registered voters in Plano will have the opportunity to vote in a slew of national, state and county elections. There are no City Council or school district elections in Plano this year— those will be on the ballot in 2021. News about the upcoming election is always breaking, and there is only so much we can t in the print edition. For more information, please visit our special landing page at www.communityimpact.com/vote. Olivia Lueckemeyer, EDITOR

THIS ISSUE BY THE NUMBERS

BUSINESS FEATURE Plano Sewing Center DINING FEATURE

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New businesses Homes on the market Transportation updates 15 542 6

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PLANO NORTH EDITION • OCTOBER 2020

NORTH IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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Rise Nation

COURTESY RISE NATION

NOWOPEN 1 Bavette Grill began serving American fare for dine-in patrons July 23 at Granite Park, 8100 Dallas Parkway, Ste. 115, Plano. The restaurant also oers a full bar, wine and cocktails with names inspired by ‘80s music. Bavette Grill owners David Jeiel and Alex Nunes also own Brazil- ian EG Steak in Frisco. 469-287-2043. www.bavettegrill.com 2 Dosanko Ramen opened in mid-Sep- tember in Mitsuwa Marketplace. The restaurant serves a variety of ramen dish- es, including white miso ramen and soy sauce ramen. The menu also includes side dishes, such as pork fried rice and gyoza. The restaurant is located at 100 Legacy Drive, Ste. 110, Plano. 972-517-9144 3 Mac’s Boba Cafe opened in ear- ly August at 8420 Preston Road, Ste. 177, Plano, according to its Facebook page. The business oers a vari- ety of bubble teas. 469-294-0333. www.facebook.com/macsbobacafe 4 Rise Nation opened Oct. 5 at The Shops at Legacy, 7300 Lone Star Drive,

Ste. C103, Plano. The business spe- cializes in 30-minute, high-intensity climbing workouts. Rise Nation also has a location in Dallas. 469-298-0040. www.rise-nation.com 5 Scrambler Cafe opened for breakfast and brunch Oct. 7. The restaurant, located at 7000 Independence Parkway, Ste. 104B, Plano, specializes in classic American dishes with a modern twist. Breakfast options, such as corned beef hash, biscuits and gravy, and the namesake “scramblers,” with Tuscan, Western and Garden options, appear on the menu. The brunch menu includes sandwiches, paninis, burgers and country-style favorites, such as chicken-fried steak and chicken-fried chicken. 469-298-0313. www.facebook.com/scramblercafetx COMING SOON 6 Boomer Jack’s Grill & Bar will likely open in early 2021 at 5430 SH 121, Plano, according to a company representative. The business, which has locations across Dallas-Fort Worth, oers American

food and beverages in a setting primed for game watchers with wall-to-wall televisions and backyard-style patios. www.boomerjacks.com 7 Brasão Brazilian Steakhouse expects to open in the spring in The Shops at Leg- acy at 5741 Legacy Drive, Ste. 100, Plano. The steakhouse specializes in authentic, Rodizio-style dining for lunch and dinner. The menu consists of meat dishes that are slow-roasted over an open re. The restaurant will also be available for pri- vate events. www.brasaousa.com 8 Delucca Gaucho Pizza & Wine will open in mid-October at 8420 Preston Road, Ste. 100, Plano. The neighborhood pizzeria uses wood-red ovens to make its pizza. It also oers an extensive wine, beer and cocktail list. Delucca has three other locations in the Dallas-Fort Worth area. 469-888-4747. www.delucca.com 9 Protocol expects to open an upscale men’s resale store by the early Novem- ber at 6405 W. Parker Road, Ste. 320, Plano. The family-owned store will feature men’s designer clothing at resale prices. Updates on the store’s open-

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Scrambler Cafe

COURTESY SCRAMBLER CAFE

ing date as well as options for online shopping before the store opening can be found on Protocol’s Facebook and Instagram pages. It will take over the space formerly occupied by Kid to Kid.

www.protocolplano.com RELOCATIONS

10 Elite Educational Institute moved to a new location at 5345 Towne Square Drive., Ste. 250, Plano, on Oct. 1. The business oers test prep, tutoring, college consulting, for-credit courses and extracurriculars. 972-306-3200. www.eliteprep.com/plano

972.910.2426 Homeinstead.com/413

PERSONAL CARE | MEMORY CARE HOSPICE SUPPORT | MEALS & NUTRITION

Now, staying home isn’t just staying in the place they love. It’s staying safe. It’s essential.

Each Home Instead Senior Care Franchise is independently owned and operated. © 2020 Home Instead, Inc.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER, MAKENZIE PLUSNICK AND LIESBETH POWERS

Storms that bring hail, and high winds put your roof at risk for damage and installing impact-resistant shingles may be a worthwhile investment. Let us help determine if impact-resistant options, like Class 4 shingles, are the right choice for your home. HERE’S A ROOFING REALITY: ROOFINGMATERIAL YOU CHOOSE CANAFFECT YOUR INSURANCE PREMIUMS

972-731-7663 Call or go on-line for a FREE roof inspection. peakroofingconstruction.com

Thousands of gelato options will be available to customers.

2019 SUPER SERVICE AWARD

COURTESY OMGELATO

FEATURED IMPACT NOWOPEN OMGelato opened Oct. 10 at 3829 W. Spring Creek Parkway, Ste. 103, Plano. The business uses liquid nitrogen to create made-to-order, customizable gelato, said Reza Tabrizi, who runs the shop with his father, Mehrdad Tabrizi. “We don’t have any gelato ready—we make it as the customer orders it,” Reza said. “This allows us to add many avors to the gelato.” Gelato is an Italian dessert similar to ice cream, but it has less fat content and is made with less air, resulting in stronger avors, Reza said. Customers have the option of combining more than 60 base avors with 50 mix-ins, syrups and toppings, such as candies, nuts and fruits. “Choosing between these would allow you to make more avors than you can count,” Reza said. The Tabrizis emigrated to the United States four years ago. In Iran, Mehrdad

2020 C H E C K M Y G O O D S T A N D I N G A T HaagCertifiedInspector.com

2020 - MEMBER

FAMILY OWNED & OPERATED

was an agricultural engineer. After discovering similarly made gelato back home, the pair decided to create their own recipe. “It took a lot of tries and a lot of work to create the good gelato we have right now,” Reza said. “We have been working on this for the past two years.” The business also oers sorbets, milkshakes and coee. OMGelato is open daily from 11 a.m.-10 p.m. 469-395-0903 www.facebook.com/omgelatoplano

WE’RE OPEN, STOCKED AND READY TO SERVEYOU! COMEVISIT US TUESDAY - SATURDAY

HOURS TUESDAY - FRIDAY 10-6 SATURDAY 9-5

MOST PRODUCTS ARE AVAILABLE IN-STORE AT THE COUNTER

WE’VE GOTYOUR BBQ COVERED!

STONEWOOD DR.

FREE YOUR CHOICE OF 1LB OF ANY HIRSCH’S SHOP MADE SAUSAGES MUST PRESENT THIS OFFER IN STORE AT TIME OF VISIT. OFFER EXPIRES NOVEMBER 7, 2020.

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SAUSAGE - SMOKING WOODS 1301W. PARKER RD., SUITE #100, PLANO, TX | 972-633-5593

Boomer Jack’s Grill & Bar

Delucca Gaucho Pizza &Wine

COURTESY BOOMER JACK’S GRILL & BAR

COURTESY DELUCCA GAUCHO PIZZA & WINE

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PLANO NORTH EDITION • OCTOBER 2020

SOUTH IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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NOWOPEN 1 Five Below opened Sept. 25 at 1701 Preston Road, Ste. C1, Plano. The store offers a variety of items for children and teenagers, priced mostly under $5. 972-597-9939. www.fivebelow.com 2 Gentlemen’s Suit Outlet opened Sept. 26 at 2963 W. 15th St., Plano. The business offers customers a selec- tion of suits, including its signature brand Royal Suits, which is designed in California. The business also carries dress shoes, shirts and accessories and offers in-house, same-day tailor- ing and alterations. 214-945-8644. www.gentlemenssuitoutlet.com 3 Hance’s Uptown Collision Cen- ter opened a new location in Plano in September, according to a press release. The shop, located at 1201 E. Plano Park- way, Plano, offers auto body, collision and paintless dent-repair services. The center also has a location in Dallas. 214-225-8705. www.hanceauto.com 4 Kabayan Filipino Store & Cafe opened Sept. 23 on the border of Plano and Dallas at 19009 Preston Road, Ste. 209, Dallas. The restaurant and grocery store offers Filipino prod- ucts and comfort foods. It also has a

8 ZaLat Pizza opened a third Plano location Sept. 30 at 3909 W. Parker Road, Ste. 102, Plano. The business offers specialty and traditional pizzas made with homemade dough and sauce and all-beef pepperoni. Pizzas are cooked in old-school deck ovens rather than on conveyor belts. 469-821-0420. www.zalatpizza.com COMING SOON 9 Dutch Bros. Coffee plans to open a drive-thru location at 750 W. Spring Creek Parkway, Plano. The company, which is new to Texas, is in the midst of opening several stores statewide, a spokesperson said. The Plano loca- tion will be a teardown of an existing building and is expected to open next summer. The Dutch Bros. menu includes lattes, mochas, frozen coffees and teas. www.dutchbros.com 10 Park Wine & Spirits is expected to open in mid-October at 4101 E. Park Blvd., Ste, 160, Plano. The family-owned shop will offer the same products as big- box stores but with competitive prices and friendly faces, according to the own- er. www.facebook.com/parkwinespirits

location in Lewisville. 972-982-2133. www.facebook.com/kabayanfsc 5 Pehnava Boutique opened June 22 at 812 W. Spring Creek Parkway, Ste. 212, Plano. The store sells Indian clothing for women, such as sarees and shararas, as well as items for men and children. 214-971-5771. http://facebook.com/ pehnava-boutique-plano 6 Results Physiotherapy opened its first Plano location Oct. 5 at 1921 Preston Road, Ste. 2074, Plano. The business offers specialized physical therapy treatments for various conditions at clinics across Texas and the United States, but this is its first Dallas-area location. More locations are coming soon, according to a company representative. www.resultspt.com 7 Velvet Taco opened Oct. 12 at 5013 W. Park Blvd., Plano. The Dallas-based taqueria serves more than 20 kinds of tacos, such as the tikka chicken, the falafel and the raw tuna, with a vari- ety of international influences. It also serves elote-style corn and red curry coconut queso. The company has seven other locations in the Dallas-Fort Worth area, including one at Legacy Hall. www.velvettaco.com

Dutch Bros. Coffee

COURTESY DUTCH BROS. COFFEE

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Petals, A Florist

COURTESY PETALS, A FLORIST

RELOCATIONS 11 Petals, A Florist opened Sept. 1 in its new location at 2401 Preston Road, Ste. D, Plano. The business is a family-owned, full-service florist that offers floral arrangements and gifts. 972-781-0878. www.facebook.com/petalsafloristplano, www.petals-aflorist.com

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

Serving Plano for 27 Years! Please help us reach year 28.

BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER, MAKENZIE PLUSNICK AND LIESBETH POWERS

Authentic Bavarian food & fun!

FALL IS FOR Schnitzelfest! Enjoy any of our 25 different Schnitzel, including Schwammerl Schnitzel, and Bier brewed in Bavaria. Wednesday Dinner Specials through the end of October. Reservations required.

The bakery serves authentic, Caribbean-style rum cakes.

COURTESY RUM CAKES FACTORY

FEATURED IMPACT NOWOPEN Rum Cakes Factory is a Caribbean- style bakery that serves authentic rum cakes in 13 unique avors, according to owner Jorge Saab. The business opened Aug. 21 at 6101 Windhaven Parkway, Ste. 140, Plano. “You don’t nd dierent avors of rum cakes [like ours] anywhere,” Saab said. The bakery sells cakes and cupcakes in various avors, such as amaretto, Grand Marnier and coconut rum. Other desserts and cookies, such as rum balls and Choconutella Chip Cookies, are also on the menu. All the baked goods and cakes served at the business are made from scratch with fresh ingredients, including vanilla imported from the Caribbean, Saab said. “[It’s] just something way dierent and really, really homemade,” Saab said. Saab spent most of his life in Venezuela before moving to the United States in 12 What the Pho has closed its location at 131 Spring Creek Parkway, Plano, but is opening a new location at 221 W. Parker Road, Ste. 550, Plano, according to its website. An estimated opening date for that location has not been confirmed. The restaurant services a variety of spring rolls, pho, rice dishes, fried rice, vermi- celli, boba teas, smoothies and more. www.whatthephoplano.com ANNIVERSARIES 13 Thompson Family & Cosmetic Dentistry celebrated 25 years in business in August. The business, located at 2801 W. Parker Road, Ste. 8, Plano, offers a full range of dental services, including routine care and cleanings, oral cancer screenings, veneers, fillings, den- tures, crowns and more. 972-519-9212. www.thompsondds.com

2014, where he worked in his father’s bakery. When he moved to North Texas in 2016, he began planning to open a bakery of his own. Now, Saab owns two Rum Cakes Factory locations, one in Carrollton and another in Plano. “It was like a long process,” Saab said. “We’re trying to reach all the people in the area and are trying to make a really special bakery for everybody.” 972-330-9932. www.rumcakesfactory.com

Open Tuesday - Saturday: Lunch 11:00am - 3:45pm, Dinner 4:00 - 9:00pm 221W Parker Rd, Ste 527 • 972-881-0705 www.bavariangrill.com

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14 Friend & Foe Board Game Cafe celebrated its first-year anniversary in September at 2929 Custer Road, Ste. 312, Plano. The cafe offers a library of over 600 games and a bistro-style menu. Friend & Foe serves sandwich- es, salads, coffee, tea, soda, beer, ciders and wine. 469-443-0003. 15 Tesla Dentistry opened Sept. 30 at 2831 W. 15th St., Ste. 200, Plano. The practice was formerly known as 7 Day Dental but is under new ownership and management. Tesla Dentistry offers a range of dental services, including routine care, pediatric and emergen- cy dentistry, root canal treatments, extractions and more. 972-360-0805. www.tesladentistry.com www.friendandfoebgc.com NEWOWNERSHIP

THE

ACADEMY

Homework

Help

Classes

Tutoring

CALL

800-2- REVIEW .

*VISIT WEBSITE FOR FULL GUARANTEE TERMS AND CONDITIONS. THE PRINCETON REVIEW IS NOT AFFILIATED WITH PRINCETON UNIVERSITY.

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PLANO NORTH EDITION • OCTOBER 2020

TODO LIST

October & November events

There’s a lot to gain

without chronic pain.

OCT. 25

KIDSMONSTERMALLOWCLASS LEGACY HALL, PLANO

Join Legacy Hall and Mallow Box for a Halloween-themed marshmallow decorating class. A ticket includes ve to six large marshmallows, bags to decorate and bring home and a $15 gift card to Legacy Hall. 3-4 p.m. $35. Legacy Hall, 7800 Windrose Ave., Plano. www.eventbrite.com (Courtesy Mallow Box)

25 4THANNUAL ST. ANDREW CRUISE IN CAR SHOW Enjoy a socially distanced car show that benets the Storehouse of Collin County. The rst 50 participants will receive a goody bag. 1-5 p.m. Entry is a minimum $20 donation and two bags of canned goods. St. Andrew United Methodist Church, 5801 W. Plano Parkway, Plano. 972-965-1431. www.standrewcarshow.com 27 ADULT DISNEY VILLAIN TRIVIANIGHT Grab up to ve friends and dress up as a Disney villain at this trivia night. The top three teams will win Legacy Hall gift cards. 7-9 p.m. $30 per team. Legacy Hall, 7800 Windrose Ave., Plano. www.eventbrite.com NOVEMBER 07 TANGOTAB’S FEED THE CITY Participants at this event make meals for those in need. Each guest is asked to bring bread, peanut butter, jelly, sandwich bags or a combination of those items. 8:30-11 a.m. Free. Grace Church Plano, 3301 Preston Road, Plano. www.tangotab.com 12 PLANO TOWNHALL Join City Council at this town hall. In-person participants will be able to use the microphone to ask questions or add to the conversation, and virtual participants can call in. 7-8 p.m. Free. 1520 Ave. K, Plano. 972-941-7000. www.plano.gov

COMPILED BY MAKENZIE PLUSNICK OCTOBER 13 THROUGH 30 EARLY VOTING This year’s early voting period has been extended by six days and will therefore last 18 days. Visit www.collincountytx. gov/elections to nd polling locations and times. Election Day is Nov. 3. 17 FARMERS TABLE This four-course meal and silent auction supports the Plano ISD chapter of Future Farmers of America. Enjoy dishes made with locally sourced ingredients served by FFA students. Tables are available for two, four, six and eight people. 6-9 p.m. $75-$600. The Heritage Farmstead Museum, 1900 W. 15th St., Plano. 972-881-0140. www.heritagefarmstead.org/event-list/ farmers-table-2/ 21 VIRTUAL LIBRARY PROGRAM: SMALL TALK Participants who speak English as a second language can practice casual conversation in this online program. 2-3 p.m. Free. Virtual. 972-769-4208. www.plano.gov 23 DOWNTOWN PLANO OKTOBERFEST BIER GARTEN Celebrate Oktoberfest by tasting 20 dierent beers while browsing shops in downtown Plano. Participants can also preorder German cuisine to enjoy at the event. Noon-7 p.m. $30. Downtown Plano, 1037 E. 15th St., Plano. www.plano oktoberfestwalk.eventbrite.com

The Pain Relief & Wellness Center at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Plano.

From diagnosis to therapy and pain management to nutrition and rehabilitation, our integrated, multidisciplinary approach and individualized plans are rewriting care for all types of pain. And, as always, we have protocols in place designed around your safety. To learn more, go to TexasHealth.org/WithYou.

Texas Health is right there with you. Whatever comes.

Find your path to relief today. 972-544-0798 TexasHealthPainRelief.com

Doctors on the medical staffs practice independently and are not employees or agents of Texas Health hospitals or Texas Health Resources. © 2020

Find more or submit Plano events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES

PLANO

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LOS RIOS BLVD.

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Timeline: May 2020-March 2021 Cost: $1.5 million Funding source: city of Plano 4 Plano Parkway project

COMPILED BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER

ONGOING PROJECTS 1 Spring Creek Parkway project

4900 Preston Rd. | Suite 101 Frisco, TX 75034 972-377-8188 townandcountryroofingdfw.com

A new pavement repair project began in July on Spring Creek Parkway. Crews are expected to work on the Spring Creek lanes that stretch between US 75 and Alma Drive. The project is expected to last roughly through the end of October. One lane will remain closed at all times, with the potential of an additional lane closed Mon.-Sat. Timeline: July-October Cost: $800,000 Funding source: city of Plano 2 Coit Road project Crews are making pavement and sidewalk repairs on two stretches of sidewalk on Coit Road. One portion of the project is expected to be active between A Spring Creek Parkway and Legacy Drive, and another is be- tween B McDermott Road and Hedg- coxe Road. Northbound and southbound lanes will be affected on both stretches of road. One lane will remain closed at all times, with the potential of an additional lane closed Mon.-Sat. Timeline: January 2020-late 2021 Cost: $6.4 million Funding source: city of Plano 3 Parker Road pavement repair A section of Parker Road is being affected by a project that will ultimately stretch from Independence Parkway to Preston Road. Work will be primarily between Preston Meadow Drive and Preston Road until around the end of November. One lane will remain closed at all times, with the potential of an additional lane closed Mon.-Sat.

This pavement repair project will extend from Preston Road to the Dallas North Tollway. Crews are expected to focus on the portion of road between the bridge west of Shepton High School to the Dal- las North Tollway. One lane will remain closed at all times, with the potential of an additional lane closed Mon.-Sat. Timeline: June 2020-June 2021 Cost: $3.5 million Funding source: city of Plano 5 Jupiter Road project An extensive project to repair pavement and sidewalk on Jupiter Road will affect northbound and southbound lanes this month between Parker Road and Los Rios Boulevard. One lane will remain closed at all times, with the potential of an addi- tional lane closed Mon.-Sat. Timeline: January 2020-February 2021 Cost: $500,000 Funding source: city of Plano 6 Alma Drive project A project to repair pavement and sidewalk on Alma Drive began in early October. The project, which stretches be- tween Park Boulevard and 15th Street, is expected to last through mid-December. One lane will remain closed at all times, with the potential of an additional lane closed Mon.-Sat. Timeline: October-December Cost: $320,000 Funding source: city of Plano

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PLANO NORTH EDITION • OCTOBER 2020

PUBLIC SAFETY

Vote to keep your Collin County Judges, the candidates with the best knowledge & experience for our future. DO YOU THINK EXPERIENCE MATTERS? No more straight ticket voting. Vote from the White House to the Courthouse! EARLY VOTING: October 13 - October 30, 2020 ELECTION DAY: November 3, 2020

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Construction gets underway on $15million re training center The center will include several buildings where reghters can practice responding to real- life scenarios. (Rendering courtesy Plano Fire Department)

199th District Court Judge Angela Tucker JudgeAngelaTucker.com

468th District Court Judge Lindsey Wynne JudgeLindseyWynne.com

BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER

“We’ve tried to think of everything you can think of that would be a real-world scenario,” he said “It will be unlike any other re training center you’ve ever seen.” The need for the facility was precipitated not only by Plano’s growing population but also by evolving types of occupancies, Greif said. Sta formerly used the training center at Collin College in McKinney, but that option is no longer viable due to the time it takes reghters to get back to home base. “There is a reason why almost every city has its own re training center,” he said. “It would be great if you could share [this resource], but the reality is no one wants to be that far from their home and have that much diculty getting back.” An at-home training center will also make it easier for the depart- ment to maintain its Level 1 rating from the Insurance Services Oce, which determines property insur- ance costs, Greif said. Response times for emergencies are also expected to improve since sta will remain inside city limits rather than traveling to McKinney for training, he added. Above all, Greif said the training facility, which is expected to be up and running within 12 to 14 months, will equip reghters to handle any curve ball thrown their way. “You don’t want us pulling out a book when we get there trying to gure out what it is we are supposed to be doing or how we are going to aect that rescue,” he said. “We need to have that literally as muscle memory.”

The city of Plano broke ground on its new, state-of-the-art re training center Oct. 9. The $15 million center will be located at the northwest corner of McDermott and Robinson roads immediately south of the recently completed police department substation. Fireghters will use the facilities to practice responding to real-life scenarios, such as structure res, hazmat emergencies and rescue missions. “We have found ourselves doing things I never would have dreamed reghters would be doing when I got into this service back in the ’80s,” Plano Fire Department Chief Sam Greif told the Plano West Rotary Group at an Oct. 6 meeting. “These things happen, and we have to be prepared for them when they do.” Each level of a six-story tower will represent a dierent environment, such as a residential high-rise apartment, a corporate oce and a professional-grade kitchen, Greif said. Propane-powered res will be accompanied by articial smoke, he added. “It dissipates as soon as it hits the atmosphere, but when the windows are closed it gives us the occluded vision we need to simulate what we are going to be facing in a real-world situation,” he said. The tower will also house a base- ment and an elevator so reghters can train for extractions, he added. The model home built on the prop- erty will include dierent roof angles and internal oor plans that pose various challenges, Greif said.

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Pol. Adv. paid for by the represented judges. Not printed at taxpayer expense. No candidate in this ad endorses any other candidate herein.

10

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

EDUCATION More families inPlano ISDopt for in-person learning for students’ second nineweeks

BY MAKENZIE PLUSNICK

with nearly two-thirds of students returning to classrooms. Skaggs will have the lowest amount, at 26%. At the middle school level, Haggard will have the most students returning, with 66% of students choosing this method. At the other end of the spectrum is Rice, with 28% of students returning. Vines leads high school campuses, with 60% of students opting for in-person school. Jasper High School, with only 27% of students returning to classrooms, will now have the fewest in-person students. At the senior high level, Plano Senior has the highest percentage, and Plano East has the lowest.

Some parents who kept their students at home for the rst nine weeks of school are now choosing to send their children back to campuses, according to new PISD data. Families were given the option to change their child’s learning method at the end of September, per Texas Education Agency requirements. Just over half of students will now attend school in person, which is 4% higher than the rst nine weeks of the semester. The remaining 49% have chosen to attend virtually, according to the data. Barron and Hughston elementary schools will have the highest levels of face-to-face instruction at elementary campuses, both

Weatherford Elementary School welcomed students back to campus in September. (Liesbeth Powers/Community Impact Newspaper)

PISD released data for the second nine weeks Oct. 8. The chart below outlines the percentage of students who will attend class in person at each school.

INPERSON LEARNING BREAKDOWN BY CAMPUS

ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS

Human 61%

Pearson Early Childhood 55%

Daron 65%

Aldridge 57%

Hughston 74%

Rasor 57%

Davis 71%

Andrews 33% Barksdale 52%

Hunt 54%

Saigling 71%

Dooley 53%

Isaacs Early Childhood 53%

Schell 41%

Forman 66%

Barron 74%

Jackson 66%

Shepard 69%

Gulledge 28%

Beaty Early Childhood 45%

Mathews 60%

Sigler 61%

Bethany 63%

Haggar 56%

McCall 53%

Skaggs 26%

Harrington 59%

Beverly 51%

Stinson 36%

Haun 46%

Boggess 50%

Meadows 62%

Thomas 66%

Head Start Early Childhood 67%

Brinker 56%

Memorial 63%

Hedgcoxe 59%

Carlisle 53%

Mendenhall 70%

Weatherford 72%

Hickey 54%

Centennial 41%

Miller 59%

Wells 49%

Hightower 53%

Christie 62%

Mitchell 62%

Wyatt 39%

Vines 60% Williams 47%

Murphy 52%

HIGH SCHOOLS

MIDDLE SCHOOLS

Academy 41%

Otto 42%

Armstrong 55%

Clark 51%

Renner 51%

Bowman 54%

SENIORHIGH SCHOOOLS

Plano East 39%

Jasper 27%

Rice 28%

Carpenter 56%

Robinson 46%

Frankford 59%

Plano West 45%

McMillen 53%

Schimelpfenig 54%

Haggard 66%

Shepton 57%

Plano Senior 46%

Wilson 60%

Hendrick 55%

SOURCE: PLANO ISDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

11

PLANO NORTH EDITION • OCTOBER 2020

CITY& COUNTY

News from Plano

DART aims for stronger vote

Closures in place for projects at Arbor Hills Nature Preserve

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ARBOR HILLS NATURE PRESERVE

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BY LIESBETH POWERS

W. PARKER RD.

BY LIESBETH POWERS

PLANO As decisions loom for Dallas Area Rapid Transit’s bus network redesign, some staff and board members are calling for a two-thirds vote to decide on an approach. The transit agency’s board is set to vote on the balance between ridership and coverage across DART’s entire 13-city bus network. Cities with a desire for higher-fre- quency service would be less affected by a focus on ridership, Board Chair Paul Wageman said during an Oct. 6 committee meeting, adding that rep- resentatives from those cities hold the simple majority on the board. More suburban areas like Plano would be more adversely affected by a smaller percentage of coverage, he said. The board is expected to vote on the ratio at its Oct. 20 meeting.

PLANO Parking and pedestrian traffic will be limited in some areas of Arbor Hills Nature Preserve in Plano until spring 2021. Construction of a new restroom close to the existing bathrooms was expected to begin the week of Oct. 5. Once completed next spring, it will replace the existing restrooms, which will then be converted into a family restroom. During construction, some nearby parking will be limited, and the turnaround and drop-off point will be closed. The existing restroom, playground and pavilion will remain open. Another project, aimed at con- trolling and stabilizing areas with erosion or deterioration, began at

Access to trails and some parking will be limited in the coming months. (Liesbeth Powers/Community Impact Newspaper)

Certain trails and portions of the parking lot will be closed through- out these erosion projects, which are expected to be completed in early 2021. Areas undergoing erosion-control projects include Willow Creek, Arbor Hills Pedes- trian Bridge and the parking lot at Arbor Hills.

the preserve in September. The projects include the construction of walls made out of varying materials, a trail overlook area and an under-drain structure. These additions are meant to keep pedestrians safe and reduce maintenance costs, a release from the city of Plano stated.

City allocates last of CARES Act funding

DISTRIBUTION BREAKDOWN

in a very consistent manner the expenses that the city has incurred.” This decision exhausts the roughly $16 million in CARES funds the city received in May from Collin County. However, the county is still support- ing Plano residents and businesses through its small-business grant and housing and food assistance programs, Israelson said. “If there are other expenses that come up for COVID, we would respond to those as we would respond in any other situation with city funds to make sure that we are providing appropriate actions and responses,” Israelson said.

BY LIESBETH POWERS

Total: $16M*

Here is how the city allocated its CARES Act funds. $6M in direct city costs $4.5M in salary increases for civil service employees $4M in salary increases for COVID-19 responders

equipment and the allocation of the remainder of the $4.5 million to Plano civil service salaries were both given the go-ahead at a Sept. 28 City Council meeting. Lewisville ISD has also shown a need for additional PPE, and the city expects to provide the district with a grant when the exact amount of need is better known. “We feel very comfortable with this approach,” Israelson said. “Applying these funds to salaries allows the city to track and audit

PLANO Frisco ISD, Lewisville ISD and civil service staff will receive the remaining amount of Plano’s funding through the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act. At the recommendation of City Manager Mark Israelson, the city of Plano held roughly $4.5 million of its relief funds in reserve to monitor COVID-19-related changes over the summer. The allocation of a $14,000 grant to Frisco ISD for personal protective

$1M in small business grants $500,000 Plano ISD grant $14,000 Frisco ISD grant *This number has been rounded.

SOURCE: CITY OF PLANO/ COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY HIGHLIGHTS COLLINCOUNTY Collin County commissioners voted unanimously Oct. 5 to increase the budget for the court’s Collin CARES Small Business Grant Program up to more than $26 million through CARES Act funds originally distributed to Frisco, McKinney, Allen and Plano for housing assistance. The previous $30 million budget for the county’s housing assistance program was also reduced to $18.4 million Oct. 5. Businesses could apply for the grants through Sept. 25, and as of Sept. 30, applicants had requested more than $20 million. The city of Plano is returning $3.5 million. Plano City Council Meets at 7 p.m. on the second and fourth Mondays of the month. Meetings are held at 1520 K Ave., Plano, and can be streamed at www.plano.gov/210/plano-tv. Agendas are available at the city website. www.plano.gov MEETINGSWE COVER Plano ISD board of trustees Meets at 6 p.m. Oct. 20 and Nov. 4 in the Administration Building’s Board Room at 2700 W. 15th St., Plano. 469-752-8100. www.pisd.edu

Decision on backyard chickens inPlano delayed until next year

MORE HARMTHAN GOOD? Neighboring cities Frisco, Richard- son, Carrollton, Allen and Murphy allow hens in non-agricultural spaces with a range of regulations and fees. Council members agreed to delay any decision until next year, largely due to the budgetary impact of the pandemic.

BY LIESBETH POWERS

keeping of chickens from Plano residents, which would place any at-large animals in the city’s hands, according to Cantrell. Other options that surfaced during a June council discussion, such as using the specific permit process or getting neighbor approval to decide who can house hens on smaller properties, were not recommended by city staff. With approval from the city to house hens, the number of captured chickens and owner surrenders would likely go up, Cantrell said. Not responding to citizen complaints or refusing surrendered chickens could lead to feral chicken flocks or property damage, he said. Instead, staff recommended leaving the livestock ordinance as is for the time being, which allows for livestock on land that is 1.95 acres or more and zoned for agriculture or estate development.

PLANO A decision on whether owning backyard chickens will be allowed in Plano has been delayed until next budget season, June 2021. The push to delay any further action on an ordinance for hens on non-agricultural land stems from a staff funding request to hire an additional animal services officer and to purchase a city holding coop if backyard chickens were given the green light. Staff is already strained in the animal services department, Director Jamey Cantrell said during a Sept. 28 council meeting, and chicken captures take much more work than do those of typical domesticated animals. This is due to chickens’ ability to fly and their unresponsiveness to human calls, he said. Collin County has also said that it cannot help with the capture or

City staff is weighing the pros and cons of allowing backyard chickens.

Animal services captured 10 CHICKENS

If backyard chickens become legal, staff said, those numbers could double. 7 OWNER SURRENDERS in fiscal year 2018-19. and took in

SOURCE: CITY OF PLANO/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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PLANO NORTH EDITION • OCTOBER 2020

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If you believe you may be in a mental health crisis, please call our 24-hour Crisis Hotline at 877-422-5939 We are here to help you through emotional stress related to COVID-19.

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If you think that you or someone you care about is facing a life-threatening mental health emergency, including a threat of injury to him/herself or someone else, call 911 immediately.

14

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

GUIDE

Candidates and information for November elections

COMPILED BY MAKENZIE PLUSNICK

DATES TOKNOW

WHERE TOVOTE Collin County residents can vote at any countywide polling location during early voting and on Election Day. For a full list of polling locations, visit www.collincountytx.gov.

VOTER GUIDE 2020

OCT. 13 First day of early voting OCT. 23 Last day to apply for ballot by mail* OCT. 30 Last day of early voting NOV. 3 Election Day *DATE RECEIVED, NOT POSTMARKED

SAMPLE BALLOT

*Incumbent

D Democrat

G Green

I Independent

L Libertarian

R Republican

Supreme Court, Place 6 R Jane Bland* D Kathy Cheng Supreme Court, Place 7 R Je Boyd* D Staci Williams L William Bryan Strange III Supreme Court, Place 8 R Brett Busby* D Gisela D. Triana L Tom Oxford Court of Criminal Appeals, Place 3 R Bert Richardson* D Elizabeth Davis Frizell Court of Criminal Appeals, Place 4 R Kevin Patrick Yeary* D Tina Clinton Court of Criminal Appeals, Place 9 R David Newell* D Brandon Birmingham

Fifth Court of Appeals, Place 6 R John Browning* D Craig Smith Fifth Court of Appeals, Place 8 R Bill Whitehill* D Dennise Garcia COLLIN COUNTY 366th District judge R Tom Nowak* D Sam Johnson 380th District judge R Ben Smith* D Penny Robe 401st District judge R George Flint D Tonya Holt 416th District judge R Andrea Thompson* D Theresa Bui Creevy 468th District judge

469th District judge R Piper McCraw* D Dana Human

NATIONAL

TEXAS LEGISLATURE State representative, District 66

President R Donald J. Trump* D Joseph R. Biden L Jo Jorgensen G Howie Hawkins U.S. Senate R John Cornyn* D Mary “MJ” Hegar L Kerry Douglas McKennon G David B. Collins U.S. Representative, District 3 R Van Taylor* D Lulu Seikaly L Christopher J. Claytor STATEWIDE Texas Railroad Commission R James “Jim” Wright D Chrysta Castañeda L Matt Sterett G Katija “Kat” Gruene Supreme Court, chief justice R Nathan Hecht* D Amy Clark Meachum L Mark Ash

471st District judge R Andrea Bouressa* D Michael D. Payma Texas State Board of Education, District 14 R Sue Melton-Malone* D Greg Alvord Collin County tax assessor- collector R Kenneth L. Maun* D John Turner-McClelland Collin County commissioner, Precinct 1 R Susan Fletcher* D Courtney Brooks FRISCO ISD BOARD OF TRUSTEES Place 4 Sean Heatley**

R Matt Shaheen* D Sharon Hirsch L Shawn Jones State representative, District 67 R Je Leach* D Lorenzo Sanchez State representative, District 89

R Candy Noble* D Sugar Ray Ash L Ed Kless State representative, District 106 R Jared Patterson* D Jennifer Skidonenko MULTIPLE COUNTIES Fifth Court of Appeals, Place 3 R David Evans* D Bonnie Lee Goldstein

Muni Janagarajan Dynette A. Davis Amit Kalra

R Lindsey Wynne* D Christy Albano

**LISTED ON BALLOT BUT HAS DROPPED OUT OF RACE

VOTER TURNOUT

Collin County A look at how many registered voters both statewide and in Collin County cast ballots in previous elections. Texas Turnout 2012 presidential election 2012 presidential election Registered voters

Turnout

Registered voters

7.99M

13.65M

224,374

462,102

2014 gubernatorial election

2014 gubernatorial election

106,198

4.73M

14.03M

489,032

2016 presidential election

2016 presidential election

366,483

8.97M

15.1M

540,084

2018 gubernatorial election

2018 gubernatorial election

289,007

8.37M

15.79M

581,684

2020 primary election

2020 primary election

154,159

602,791

4.11M

16.21M

SOURCES: TEXAS SECRETARY OF STATE OFFICE’S WEBSITE, COLLIN COUNTYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

For more election information, visit communityimpact.com/vote .

15

PLANO NORTH EDITION • OCTOBER 2020

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