Richardson April 2021

RICHARDSON EDITION

VOLUME 3, ISSUE 8  APRIL 26MAY 23, 2021

ONLINE AT

CAMP GUIDE 2021

INSIDE

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IMPACTS

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City sta said nearly half of Richardson’s streets are more than 50 years old. Aging city streets

26% 40-49 years old

50+ years old 47%

DEVELOPMENT

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20-29 years old 11%

RISD looking to address student learning loss

0-9 years old 3%

30-39 years old 10%

10-19 years old 3%

SOURCE: CITY OF RICHARDSON COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

CITY & COUNTY

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Construction is currently underway on Greenville Avenue at its intersection with Main Street. Reconstruction of a dierent portion of Greenville Avenue is recommended for the city’s upcoming bond election. (William C. Wadsack/Community Impact Newspaper)

City looking atmultipleways to address aging infrastructure

BY WILLIAM C. WADSACK

25 or so years, and much of that infra- structure now is 40-50 years old.” A citywide analysis of Richardson streets conducted by Fugro USA Land Inc. in 2020 showed a nearly 12% decline in the condition of the city’s roadways compared to the previous analysis done in 2014. Assistant Director of Engineering Jim Dulac said the company drove every street in Richardson, including both directions of divided roadways, as part of its assessment. “It’s important that we remember that this is a snapshot of our roadways,”

Dulac told City Council during a March 15 brieng. “And it’s the best assess- ment that we have as a single citywide network on our overall conditions.” Richardson’s annual maintenance program has helped the city keep more streets in good and satisfactory condi- tion, Magner said. But the condition of streets categorized by the assessment as poor or fair have continued to decline since the 2014 analysis. Currently, more than 70%of the city’s streets are at least 40 years old. “[More than] two-thirds of the city CONTINUED ON 16

As part of ongoing work to main- tain its streets, Richardson is recom- mending nearly $98 million in street and alley reconstruction projects for its upcoming November bond packages. “The rst-ring [Dallas] suburbs, par- ticularly here in North Texas, all began to really develop approximately at the same time, so we all have the same issues,” Richardson Deputy City Man- ager Don Magner said. “If you look at Farmers Branch, Carrollton, Irving, Richardson—we’re all dealing with infrastructure that has a useful life of

BUSINESS FEATURE

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DINING FEATURE

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

Richardson's b ank for non-profits

We Non-Profits

Why are all these non-profit leaders smiling?

MELISS A VON GOERTZ President Canyon Creek Elementary PTA

BILL ALSUP President Richardson East Rotary Club

LOREE BIRKENBACK Head of School St. James Episcopal of Dallas

CHARLOTTE DONALDSON Financial and Administrative Assistant Northrich Baptist Church

KATIE PATTERSON Executive Director Richardson Adult Literacy Center

SUSAN STEPHENS Executive Director Exodus Ministries

KATE GROSS President Richardson Symphony League

SHARON ROBINSON President Richardson Women's Club

BILL RO D GERS President Richardson Citizen Police Academy Alumni

GINGER MAYO President Richardson Rotary Club

They are all experiencing

for their non-profit organization.

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UTD

W. Campbell

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RICHARDSON EDITION • APRIL 2021

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Richardson has a new name in health.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

ABOUT US

Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the rst edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and Pugerville, Texas. We have expanded our operations to include hundreds of employees, our own printing operation and over 30 hyperlocal editions across three states. Our circulation is over 2 million residential mailboxes, and it grows each month with new residents and developments.

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

FROMLEANNE: This edition is one of my favorites because it includes our annual Camp Guide (see Page 12). A lot of work goes into planning school breaks, and we hope this list of local options helps families connect to new and fun adventures across Richardson this summer. Leanne Libby, GENERALMANAGER

Community Impact Newspaper teams include general managers, editors, reporters, graphic designers, sales account executives and sales support, all immersed and invested in the communities they serve. Our mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Our core values are Faith, Passion, Quality, Innovation and Integrity.

FROMVALERIE: More than 70% of the streets in Richardson are at least 40 years old, according to the city’s latest analysis. This month’s front-page story by Senior Reporter William C. Wadsack looks at the city’s aging street network and the city’s plans to tackle repairs. A proposed bond election this fall is only part of the solution, city ocials say. Valerie Wigglesworth, EDITOR

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RICHARDSON EDITION • APRIL 2021

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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PLANO PKWY.

PGBT TOLL

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SHIRE BLVD.

RENNER RD.

BRECKINRIDGE BLVD.

RICHARDSON

TELECOM PKWY.

CAMPBELL RD.

Dunkin’

COURTESY DUNKIN’

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COLLINS BLVD.

12

ARAPAHO RD.

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BELT LINE RD.

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SPRING VALLEY RD.

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Quiznos Sub

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COURTESY NATE JARNAGIN

BUCKINGHAM RD.

COMING SOON 7 Dunkin’ plans to open a new

TM; © 2021 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER CO. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. MAP NOT TO SCALE N

restaurant at 1225 E. Belt Line Road, Richardson, this summer in the former location of Advanced Foot Center. The nationwide chain is known for its coffee and doughnuts and also offers bagels and all-breakfast sandwiches. The first Dunkin’ shop was opened in Quincy, Mas- sachusetts, in 1950. There are currently more than 170 Dunkin’ restaurants in Texas, according to a company press re- lease. A phone number for the Richardson location has not yet been announced. www.dunkindonuts.com 8 Salad and Go is expected to open its first Richardson location this spring. The drive-thru concept eatery will offer made-to-order salads, wraps, breakfast burritos, soups and drinks at 850 E. Campbell Road, Richardson. These items are priced at the same cost as fast food to further the company’s mission to make healthy food convenient and affordable, according to a release from Salad and

5 Crown Jewelry opened in March at 603 S. Central Expressway, Richardson. The store offers a variety of rings, brace- lets, earrings, watches, chains, pendants and more. Crown Jewelry is open daily from 10 a.m.-7 p.m. 972-803-5984. www.facebook.com/crownjewelrytx 6 A new Chick-fil-A location opened April 8 on the edge of Richardson at 7934 Arapaho Road, Dallas. The restaurant is located in the Spanish Village Shopping Center, which is on the southwest corner of the intersection of Arapaho and Coit roads. Chick-fil-A is known for its original chicken sandwich and waffle fries as well as its chicken nuggets, salads, lemonade and milkshakes. Inside dining is not cur- rently available at the Spanish Village lo- cation as it is only offering drive-thru and mobile curbside service. 469-617-1233. www.facebook.com/cfaspanishvillage

restaurateur Dale Wamstad, owner of the adjacent Texas chophouse and Two For the Money BBQ. 469-705-1665. www.roostertownwafflery.com 3 Lahla’s Plant Kitchen opened April 10 at 100 S. Central Expressway, Ste. 35, Richardson. The restaurant offers vege- tarian and vegan takes on classic comfort food dishes from around the world. Current menu items include soups, appe- tizers and entrees such as Cuban picadillo and nopales ala mexicana. 469-372-2477. www.facebook.com/lahlas.plantkitchen 4 Adda opened April 12 in the Rich- ardson Restaurant Park development, located at 744 S. Central Expressway, Ste. 230, Richardson. The eatery serves Indian and Pakistani street food with global influences. The owner of Adda also owns Plano restaurants Jimmy’s Burger Grill and Mama Pita Mediterra- nean Grill, among others. 214-272-9737. www.theadda.io

COMPILED BY WILLIAM C. WADSACK

NOWOPEN 1 The restaurant bb.q Chicken had its grand opening April 11 at 1312 E. Belt Line Road, Richardson. The business offers Ko- rean fried chicken in a variety of flavors, including golden original, hot spicy, hon- ey garlic, gang-jeong and more. Kimchi fried rice, french fries, cheese sticks and other side items are also on the menu. 972-373-4719. www.bbdotqchicken.com 2 Rooster Town Wafflery opened April 21 at 3613 Shire Blvd., Ste. 180, Richardson. The cafe is open daily from 7:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Its menu includes classic breakfast items as well as dishes such as avocado toast on sourdough and Belgian waffles with fried chicken. The restaurant’s lunch offerings include salads, sandwiches and more. Rooster Town is the latest culinary project by

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

Participants Needed for a Research Study

Network of Community Ministries held a ground-breaking ceremony March 30 for its new facility at 1500 International Parkway.

WILLIAM C. WADSACK/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Go. Menu items are also streamlined to allow for fast service, easy choices and low prices, the release said. Salad and Go was founded in Gilbert, Arizona, and is expanding to multiple locations in the Dallas-Fort Worth area this spring and summer. www.saladandgo.com/dallas 9 Jersey Mike’s Subs plans to open a new location at 205 S. Plano Road, Richardson, on April 28. The fast-ca- sual restaurant offers fresh-sliced and fresh-grilled subs on freshly baked bread along with vegetables such as onions, lettuce and tomatoes and what is called The Juice—a combination of red wine vinegar and olive oil. In addition to subs, the franchise offers wraps, salads and cheesesteaks. This will be the restaurant’s fourth Richardson location. 972-685-3994. www.jerseymikes.com RELOCATIONS 10 Lombardo Custom Apparel relocat- ed in January to 3613 Shire Blvd., Ste. 150, Richardson. The clothing store, which was formerly located at 17604 Dallas Parkway, Dallas, offers custom suits and a full range of apparel. 214-265-8488. https://lombardocustomapparel.com FEATURED IMPACT EXPANSION Network of Community Ministries held a ground breaking event March 30 for its new $5.5 million facility in Richardson. Network ocials said the new facility at 1500 International Parkway will allow the nonprot to expand services it currently oers, including food and clothing distribution, job search assistance, senior services and more. “The last 35 years have brought many challenges, opportunities and, of course, change,” Network President and CEO Cindy Shafer said. “But one thing that has remained consistent is our mission to serve the poor and vulnerable.” Following all the help Network has provided the city during all kinds of emergencies, City Manager Dan Johnson said Richardson considers the nonprot its partner. “When we heard about this amazing venture the Network is next

undertaking, we said we must be a part of that,” Johnson said. “And as many of you know, the city of Richardson has provided $1 million toward this particular eort today.” The new location will be four times the size of Network’s building at 741 S. Sherman St. The organization plans to utilize 40,000 square feet of its new facility and lease out the remaining 10,000 square feet to partners such as Richardson ISD. 972-234-8880. https://thenetwork.org

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RENOVATIONS 11 An expansion of Lamborghini Dallas , located at 601 S. Central Expressway, Richardson, is expected to be com- plete this summer. The construction, which is currently underway, will see the addition of an approximate- ly 18,000-square-foot showroom for the new Lamborghini and used ex- otic car dealership. 888-400-6950. www.lamborghinidallas.com CLOSINGS 12 Quiznos Sub closed its location at 1545 E. Belt Line Road, Richardson, in March. A sign in the window thanked cus- tomers for their support but confirmed the business was closed. The sub shop’s offerings included soups and salad for lunch and dinner as well as hot toasted subs all day. The closed shop, which has been removed from the Quiznos website, was the chain’s only location in Rich- ardson, though it does have locations in Plano and Dallas. www.quiznos.com

Endorsed by the Dallas Morning News and the Richardson Coalition Connecting Neighborhoods For Richardson

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Political advertising paid for by the Marilyn Frederick for Richardson Place 6 Campaign MARILYNFORRICHARDSON.COM

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RICHARDSON EDITION • APRIL 2021

TODO LIST

April & May events

3X COMMUNITY OF THE YEAR

LIVING

MAY 15

WILDFLOWER! ARTS &MUSIC FESTIVAL SALUTES ROCK ONLINE

In lieu of in-person concerts this year, Richardson’s Wildower! Arts & Music Festival is sponsoring a free livestream of a concert by AC/DC tribute band Back in Black. The show will be streamed live from the Eisemann Center, but in-person tickets will not be available. Tickets are free but required to view the concert. 7 p.m. Free. Virtual event. www.wildowerfestival.com/salutesrock (Courtesy city of Richardson)

AWARD-WINNING CLUB INSPIRATION

13 THE IQ BREWWITHARUN GUPTA As part of The IQ Brew, a networking and educational series presented by the Richardson Innovation Quarter, Arun Gupta will speak about his role as founder and CEO of Skyven Technologies, a Richardson IQ partner company focused on energy solutions. 9-10 a.m. Free. Virtual event. https://richardsoniq.com, www.meetup.com/richardsoniq 14 SPRING KIDS CONSIGNMENT SALES EVENT Just Between Friends Plano will host this pop-up sales event at which families can sell gently used and new kids clothing items and shop thousands of low-price articles. 10 a.m.-8 p.m. (Fri.), 9 a.m.-8 p.m. (Sat.), noon-5 p.m. (Sun.); view event listing for more detailed shopping schedule. Free (advance, Sat.-Sun. general admission); $5 (door, Sat. GA); $10 (advance, Fri. presale VIP); $15 (door, Fri. presale VIP). Net Results Sports Center, 2600 Research Drive, Plano. https://plano.jbfsale.com 20 BATH SALT AND SALT SCRUB WORKSHOP Attendees at this workshop organized by Sandy Palisch, the founder of Simply Organic Soap, will learn to make their own bath salts and salt scrubs and will go home with a jar of each. Drinks and snacks will be available from Fernando’s Mexican Cuisine. 6-7 p.m. $45 (per person; all supplies included). CityLine Plaza, 1150 State St., Richardson. https://citylinedfw.com 23 PAINT YOUR PET At this limited-space, BYOB event, guests will send a picture of their pet to Painting With a Twist, which staers will then sketch onto a canvas for the guest to paint. Open to ages 12 and up. 2-5 p.m. $58 (per person; supplies included). Pipe & Palette Richardson, 819 W. Arapaho Road, Richardson. 469-802-6333. www.paintingwithatwist.com/studio/ richardson

Club Inspiration at Inspiration is a one-of-a-kind community amenity complex that will keep you, your family, and guests entertained all year long!

BY BEN DICKERSON APRIL 27 ANDMAY 4, 11, 18, 25 AT GUITARS &GROWLERS Players, in teams or solo, see what they know and compete for prizes at this free general trivia event hosted by Guitars & Growlers. 7-9 p.m. Free (registration required but does not guarantee seating). Guitars & Growlers, 581 W. Campbell Road, Ste. 101, Richardson. 469-904-5165. www.guitarsandgrowlers.com/ richardson-location 30 ANDMAY 12 DALLAS INTERNATIONAL GUITARFESTIVAL The Dallas Market Hall will host the 2021 iteration of the Dallas International Guitar Festival, which will feature performances from more than 40 acts as well as expositions and a selling and trading event. Noon-7 p.m. (Fri.), 9 TRIVIA TUESDAY NIGHTS p.m. (Fri. concert), 10 a.m.-7 p.m. (Sat.), 8 p.m. (Sat. concert), 10 a.m.-6 p.m. (Sun.). Ticket prices vary (VIP, student and concert-only options available), free (age 10 and under). Dallas Market Hall, 2200 N. Stemmons Freeway, Dallas. 972-240-2206. www.guitarshow.com MAY 13 CITYLINE NIGHTMARKET BY THE BOHOMARKET More than 25 vendor booths featuring ethically sourced handmade and vintage goods will be present at this night shopping experience presented by CityLine and The Boho Market. Guests can enjoy to-go drinks from CityLine restaurants and live music from Mitchell Ferguson. 6-10 p.m. Free (entry). CityLine Plaza, 1150 State St., Richardson. 972-739-5080. https://citylinedfw.com

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Find more or submit events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES

COMPILED BY WILLIAM C. WADSACK

ONGOING PROJECTS 1 Franchise utility work at Spring Valley and Sherman

3 DART CityLine/Bush demolition work Routh West Drive between Pipeline Drive and West Cityline Drive ( just west of the Cityline/Bush DART station) will be closed to trac beginning April 21 and detoured to West Routh Creek Parkway at all times due to demolition work taking place to make room for the DART Silver Line and the construction of a new station. Timeline: April 2021-2023 Cost: $1.26 million Funding source: U.S. Department of Transportation 4 Lookout/Jupiter intersection project The right lane of eastbound Lookout Drive between Jupiter Road and North Spring Drive, and the right lane of south- bound Jupiter between Red Oak Lane and Lookout Drive, may be closed to trac from 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m. due to ber-optic work for the Richardson Lookout Lift Station Project. The work is expected to be complete in late April. Timeline: late-April completion Cost: unknown Funding source: unknown ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF APRIL 16. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT RICNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

PLANO PKWY.

PGBT TOLL

Telecommunications work and under- ground cable installation may close the right lane of westbound Spring Valley Road for 500 feet on both sides of Sherman Street as well as the right lane of eastbound Spring Valley between Sherman and Lingco Drive. This project is not being performed by the city, as it is managed by Spectrum-Charter after a right-of-way permit was obtained from Richardson. Timeline: late-May completion Cost: unavailable since privately funded Funding source: Spectrum-Charter 2 Arapaho Road lane closure TELECOM PKWY. The outside lane of eastbound Arapaho Road east of Custer Road, between the Richardson Library entrance drive and the Civic Center fountain plaza area, may be closed to trac at all times as a gas main is removed and relocated. This work is not being performed by the city and is managed by Atmos Energy after a right-of-way permit was obtained from Richardson. Timeline: late-May completion Cost: unavailable since privately funded Funding source: Atmos Energy BRECKINRIDGE BLVD.

RENNER RD.

RICHARDSON

RED OAK LN.

4

CAMPBELL RD.

PGBT TOLL

PIPELINE DR.

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2

ARAPAHO RD.

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W. CITYLINE DR.

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LINGCO DR.

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RICHARDSON EDITION • APRIL 2021

DEVELOPMENT Belt+Main development to bring housing, shopping to CoreDistrict

BY WILLIAM C. WADSACK

just to the north of the development, according to Richardson Deputy City Manager Don Magner. He said the project, which has been in develop- ment for “a number of years,” will help activate the Main Street Plaza and the Core District. “We feel like it’s going to be a signicant catalyst to the Core District by bringing residents that will actually be living in the Core District now,” Magner said. “It’s truly a partnership that we believe will be transformational down in that area.” The mixed-use buildings will be wrapped around a shared parking garage with open parking for the public as well as private and reserved parking for residents. Work on the project is slated to last 26 months, Rutherford said. The rst phase is scheduled to open in January 2023 and the nal phase will open in May 2023.

Work is currently underway on a new mixed-use development that will bring new housing and shopping options to Richardson’s downtown area. Catalyst Urban Development held a groundbreaking April 5 for its new Belt+Main development at the northwest corner of Belt Line Road and Interurban Street behind the Chase Bank building. The project will include 15,000 square feet of restaurant and retail space, 350 mul- tifamily units that will be available for lease and 7,000 square feet of resident amenities. “It’s a big project,” Catalyst principal Paris Rutherford said in a statement. “This will be one of the largest developments underway in north Texas.” There are also plans for around 100 townhomes that will be built

The Belt+Main development will include 15,000 square feet of restaurant and retail space, 350multifamily units and around 100 townhomes. (Rendering courtesy Catalyst Urban Development)

“We really appreciate the eort of the city here,” Rutherford said in a statement. “Without the city’s involvement or support, this wouldn’t be happening. These are very dicult projects to get done. We have old infrastructure that needs to be redone. Without the city’s support, this would not be as an exciting place as it’s going to be.”

W. BELT LINE RD.

E. MAIN ST.

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Jeng Chi Restaurant & Bakery

400 N. Greenville Ave. #11 Richardson, TX 75081 972/669-9094 www.jengchirestaurant.com

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY&SCHOOLS

News from Richardson, Richardson ISD & Plano ISD

Richardson City Council Will meet May 3, 10 and 17 at 6 p.m. at City Hall, 411 W. Arapaho Road, Richardson. The meetings are open to the public and are streamed live on the city’s website. www.cor.net Richardson ISD Will meet May 3 and 10 at 6 p.m. at the RISD Administration Building, 400 S. Greenville Ave., Richardson www.risd.org Plano ISD Will meet May 4 and 18 at 6 p.m. at the PISD Administration Center, 2700 W. 15th St., Plano www.pisd.edu MEETINGSWE COVER CITY HIGHLIGHTS RICHARDSON A special permit approved by Richardson City Council will allow for a Dutch Bros Coee shop in Richardson. The approval, given unanimously at a meeting March 29, was needed for the drive-thru service used at Dutch Bros Coee. The area had been previously zoned for commercial use. Plans for the Dutch Bros Coee include a 920-square- foot drive-thru only coee shop along West Arapaho Road and West Shore Drive in Richardson. PLANO ISD New principals for Plano Senior High School and McMillen High School were approved by the Plano ISD board of trustees April 6. Jerey Banner was named principal of Plano Senior High, and Todd Williams was chosen as the new principal for McMillen High. Banner is currently the principal at PISD’s Shepton High School, while Williams is currently associate principal at Plano West Senior High School. They will both take on their new positions for the 2021-22 school year.

Richardson ISD considering plan to address student learning loss

FUNDING TOADDRESS LEARNING LOSS The Texas Legislature is holding on to nearly $18 billion from the federal Elementary and Secondary School Emergency Relief Fund that is intended for public schools to use in addressing the eects of the COVID-19 pandemic. ESSER ROUND 1 $1.2 BILLION to state agency RISD’s share was used to fund hold-harmless guarantee ESSER ROUND 2 $5.5 BILLION to state agency $10M-$20M estimated for RISD ESSER ROUND 3 $12 BILLION to state agency $30M-$50M estimated for RISD

BY WILLIAM C. WADSACK

million and a two-year recurring cost of $28.22 million per year. The dis- trict’s plan includes funds for summer intervention and enrichment, an expansion of the district intervention team, student and teacher support and more. Superintendent Jeannie Stone said she is hopeful the district will receive the money from the third round of the Elementary and Secondary School Emergency Relief Fund, which is estimated to be $30 million-$50 million for RISD. However, she said the district is not banking on receiving anything from the second round of ESSER funding.

RICHARDSON ISD District sta presented the board of trustees with an academic acceleration plan April 19 that is designed to address student learning gaps due to the eects of the coronavirus pandemic. The plan is proposed for the scal year 2021-22 budget to use the $40 million-$70 million in federal funds the district estimates it could receive from the $1.3 billion in federal stimulus funds intended for public schools that are currently being held by the Texas Legislature. RISD’s academic acceleration plan includes one-time expenses of $4.1

SOURCE: RICHARDSON ISD COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

RISDapproves new pre-K curriculum

UTDallas to share spacewith city in The IQdevelopment

E. COLLINS BLVD.

BY WILLIAM C. WADSACK

RICHARDSON ISD The district’s pre-K program will have new instruc- tional materials during the 2021-22 school year following approval by the board of trustees April 5. The recommendation of the Frog Street Pre-K materials for the program came from the RISD Instruc- tional Material Allotment Committee, which was chaired by Monica Simonds, RISD director of advanced learning programs and services. District sta explained the Frog Street Pre-K program will be paid for through the instructional materials allotment in the current budget.

BY WILLIAM C. WADSACK

RICHARDSON Ocials announced the city and The

University of Texas at Dallas will share a space in the Richardson Innovation Quarter development. Richardson Innovation Quarter, or The IQ, is a 1,200-acre industrial area east of Central Expressway that, for the past several years, has been the subject of an in-depth, city-led revitalization eort. Richardson and UT Dallas plan to share the city-owned facility at 1302 E. Collins Blvd., Deputy City

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Manager Don Magner announced during Richardson City Council’s April 5 work session. Richardson will have some city personnel oce in the 27,500-square-foot facility, while UT Dallas plans to create a new Center for Emergent Novel Technology in its portion of the building.

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RICHARDSON EDITION • APRIL 2021

C A M P G U I D E GUIDE

A noncomprehensive list of camps in the area

COMPILED BY WILLIAM C. WADSACK & LIESBETH POWERS Parents looking for camps for their kids have a number of options to choose from in the Richardson area, including virtual options for families looking to socially distance during the pandemic. This list is not comprehensive.

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A+ Academics ART Arts DAY Day NIGHT Overnight SP Sports TECH Technology

4 Drama Kids International Camp LOL: Drama Kids summer camps are designed to help children develop self-condence, acting abilities and verbal communication skills. Ages 4-14. July 19-23. $175 ART DAY Heights Recreation Center 711 W. Arapaho Road 972-363-2369 www.dramakids.com/tx3 5 First United Methodist Church Richardson summer camps: The church is oering a hybrid Vacation Bible Camp with outdoor family worship and a take-home kit for a virtual family experience as well as a trio of half-day sports camps: soccer, summer games and tness. Age 4-sixth grade for Vacation Bible Camp, grades 1-6 for sports camps. June 1-24. $25-$100 SP First United Methodist Church Richardson 503 N. Central Expressway 972-235-8385 www.fumcr.com/children_camps 6 The Heights Church summer camps: The Heights Church oers a free, half-day Vacation Bible School camp for chil- dren as well as an overnight Kids Camp; Summer Music day camp; and a week of worship and thrilling activities at Carolina Creek Christian Camp in Riverside, Texas. Grades K-6. June 8-11, 16-24, July 14-17. Free-$400 ART DAY NIGHT The Heights Church 201 W. Renner Road 972-238-7243 www.theheights.org/summer/ 7 H.E.R.O.E.S. Summer Camp: The

INPERSON CAMPS 1 Camp Sa-Que-Sippi: This day camp includes activities that allow campers to experience nature/outdoor learning, performing arts, tness/conditioning, community service projects, o-site eld trips and more. Ages 5-12. June 1-Aug. 13. $135 per week (YMCA members), $170 per week (nonmembers), plus a $70 supply fee ART DAY SP Richardson Family YMCA 821 Custer Road www.ymcadallas.org/richardson-day-camps 2 Carpe Diem Private Preschool sum- mer camp: Carpe Diem Private Preschool will host 11 dierent camps this summer with subjects such as The Great Outdoors, Gardening, Marine Biology and more. Ages 5-11. June 1-July 23. $156-$285 A+ ART SP TECH Carpe Diem Private Preschool 271 Renner Parkway 972-362-8470 www.carpediempreschool.com 3 City of Richardson Parks & Recre- ation Day Camp Program: Camps oer a variety of activities for children including indoor/outdoor games, sports, arts and crafts, eld trips, swimming, volunteer op- portunities and visits from special guests. Ages 5-15. June 7-July 30. $100-$150 ART DAY SP Heights Recreation Center 711 W. Arapaho Road 972-744-7881 www.cor.net/departments/parks- recreation/summer-camps

City of Richardson Parks & Recreation

First United Methodist Church

COURTESY CITY OF RICHARDSON PARKS & RECREATION

COURTESY FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH

weeklong programs are oered to children, teens and adults. Campers participate in a variety of therapies and do team-building activities, vocational training and more. H.E.R.O.E.S. creates social, recreational and vocational pro- grams for individuals with disabilities. Ages 3 and older. June 14-July 23. $475 per week (scholarships available). A+ ART DAY SP First United Methodist Church Richardson 503 N. Central Expressway 469-750-0022 www.heroesdfw.org 8 Kids Montessori Academy summer camp: Kids Montessori Academy will begin hosting summer camps in the rst week of summer. Additional details on camps will be posted online soon. Ages TBA. Dates TBA. Cost TBA. A+ DAY Kids Montessori Academy 1521 E. Arapaho Road 972-235-6930 www.kidsrichardson.com 9 Kids R Kids Focus on Fun2 summer camp: Preschool to elementary-age children can enroll in these Focus on Fun2 themed camps, which oer a unique blend of weekly themes, includ- ing heroes and villains. Ages rising K-5.

June 1-Aug. 6. $200 ART DAY Kids R Kids Learning Academy 3521 North Star Road 972-235-5437 www.kidsrkids.com/richardson

10 Legendary Youth Sports summer camps: These weeklong camps include martial arts, hip-hop dance, parkour, outdoor sports, educational activities, arts and crafts and more. Ages 5-12. May 31-Aug. 18. $177 base rate. SP Legendary Youth Sports 1980 Nantucket Drive, Ste. 108 469-347-2494 www.richardsonsummercamp.com 11 Music So Simple summer camps: Music So Simple’s summer camps will cover singing, movement, dance and more. A beginner piano group class for kindergarten and rst-grade students will also be available. Age 6 months-grade 1. June 7-Aug. 13. $175-$250 ART Music So Simple 1144 N. Plano Road 469-778-2121 www.musicsosimple.com

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

2021

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12 Precision Gymnastics & Tumbling Camps: Precision camps include gym- nastics and tumbling instruction, games and free time. The gym has a full-size spring oor, in-ground pit, rod oor, two trampolines, a tumble track, rope climbs, gymnastic bars, beam and vault, among other skill practice areas. Ages 3 and up. June 1-Aug. 20. $30-$230 SP Precision Gymnastics & Tumbling 1144 N. Plano Road, Ste. 104 972-907-2248 www.rstgymnastics.com 13 Primrose School of North Rich- ardson at Lookout camps: Campers will be able to participate in activities such as photography, tness, yoga, arts and crafts, sign language and Spanish as a second language. Pre-K-12th grade. June 1-Aug. 16. $280 per week ART DAY SP Primrose School of North Richardson at Lookout 2425 N. Plano Road 469-514-2670 www.primroseschools.com/schools/ north-richardson-at-lookout 14 Primrose School Summer Adven- ture Club: This camp’s activities include cooking, sports, theater, engineering, deep-sea adventures, eld trips and weekly splash days. Kindergarten-fth grade. May 26-Aug. 13. $315 per week. ART DAY SP TECH Primrose School of Richardson 1100 Jonsson Blvd. 972-479-9888 www.primroserichardson.com

15 Repertory Community Theatre: Campers will learn the dierent aspects of putting on a show before performing on stage at the end of the camp. Sched- uled plays include “The Little Mermaid” and “The Wizard of Oz.” Ages 8-18. June 9-Aug. 28. $195-$395 per session. ART DAY RCT Driegert Theatre 770 N. Coit Road 972-690-5029 www.rcttheatre.com/workshops-classes- camps.html 16 Texas Ballet Theater summer dance classes: The Texas Ballet Theater oers one- or two-week summer dance class programs for children and teens. Camps feature professional instruction by skilled teachers and are aimed toward aspiring pre-professional dancers and budding ballerinas. Ages 3-18. June 7-Aug. 13. $200-$335 per week, $20 open classes ART DAY Texas Ballet Theater 300 N. Coit Road, Ste. 231 214-377-8576 www.texasballettheater.org/summer- program 17 Toby’s School of Dance summer camps: Camps include ballet, tap and tumbling classes as well as weekly themed camps such as Minions and more. Ages 3 and up. June 14-July 30. $90-$155 ART Toby’s School of Dance 635 W. Campbell Road, Ste. 224 972-235-0514 www.tobysdance.com/summer

VIRTUAL CAMPS

Kids R Kids Learning Academy

18 Could You Hug a Cactus Musical Camp: As part of its Take 2 Musical The- atre Program, Drama Kids International will host this virtual summer camp that will feature a virtual musical performance experience. Individual private coaching sessions will be scheduled as well as rehearsing and recording time at home. Ages 7-14. July 5-9. $175 ART Drama Kids International camp www.dramakids.com/tx3 19 First Strokes Multi-sensory hand- writing courses: The Handwriting Clinic will oer an online, self-paced handwrit- ing course for students this summer. All workbooks and supporting materials will be provided for the learning modules that are parent directed. Grades pre-K-5. $50-$160 A+ The Handwriting Clinic 972-633-1974 www.thehandwritingclinic.com 20 iD Tech Camp: The weeklong, virtual camps with live instructors blend instruction with fun activities. Programs include courses on how to code a mobile, app, design a video game, produce a viral video and more. Ages 7-17. $449 TECH iD Tech 888-709-8324 www.idtech.com/tech-camps

COURTESY KIDS R KIDS LEARNING ACADEMY

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UT Dallas summer camps

COURTESY UT DALLAS

21 UT Dallas summer camps: UT Dallas is oering more than 200 morning, after- noon and whole-day coding camps this summer online. Camps include but are not limited to website and game design, drawings and animation and creative cod- ing. Ages 7-18. May 24-Sept. 3. $75-$250

DAY TECH UT Dallas 214-924-2148 (text) https://k12.utdallas.edu/summer

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RICHARDSON EDITION • APRIL 2021

CHOOSING A CLOCK Promenade Clocks oers a wide variety of products for customers’ homes.

Cuckoo and novelty clocks are usually hung on the wall and often have eye-catching designs.

Mantle and desk clocks are often set above a replace or in a prominent spot in a room.

BUSINESS FEATURE

Fred Bartholomew has owned Promenade Clocks since 2009. (Photos by William C. Wadsack/Community Impact Newspaper)

Rhythm clocks usually have exposed gears and are hung on the wall.

Promenade Clocks Richardson shop has oered sales, repairs for nearly 50 years L ike an antique timepiece, Promenade Clocks has changed hands a few times since it opened in Richardson’s Promenade BY WILLIAM C. WADSACK

The business does all of its repair work in-house, Fred said, but while it is easy for a customer to bring in a watch and mantle clock needing repair, large grandfather clocks are not as easy to transport. “A big part of the business is going out to people’s homes and working on their grandfather clocks,” Fred said, noting that he regularly works on clocks that the shop sold in the past. “We might not see them for 10 or 15 years, but they [usually] come back to the place they bought it from.” In addition to perusing the wide selection of clocks oered at the business, customers that are in the shop on the hour can listen to the chimes, bells and even cuckoos that go o to mark the new time. However, because he works in the shop all day and has two grandfather clocks at home, Fred said he rarely even notices the sounds anymore. “When you’re waking up in the morning, and you’re listening for it and deciding if you should get out of the bed or not, that’s when you hear it,” he said. “It’s just a nice, gentle [push] that it’s time to get up.”

Grandfather clocks are tall, freestanding clocks that are usually placed on the oor.

Shopping Center in 1972. Owner Fred Bartholomew purchased the business from his aunt and uncle in 2009 after working for them for nearly a decade. He now operates the sales and repair shop with his brother, Mark, and his daughter, Anna. “I have a lot of family in the business—two brothers that are clock repairmen,” Fred said. “Dad is still working on clocks. I have a cousin that owns another clock shop in [the Dallas area].” While Promenade Clocks does sell clocks for walls, desks, mantles and practically anywhere else they can go, Fred said the repair services it oers are what have helped to make 2019 and 2020 the best years since he took over. “There are fewer repairmen out there,” he said. “We’ve done a quality job for less [and] quicker for so long that people keep coming back, and they keep telling their friends. Word of mouth is probably the biggest part of our business.”

SOURCE: PROMENADE CLOCKS COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER Promenade Clocks 300 N. Coit Road, Ste. 158, Richardson 972-644-3979 www.promenadeclocks.com Hours: Mon.-Sat. 10 a.m.-5 p.m., closed Sun.

W. ARAPAHO RD.

W. BELT LINE RD.

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Kitchens | Bathrooms Room Additions Roofing Windows Siding

972.669.7807 bryjo.com

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

DINING FEATURE

BY FRANCESCA D’ANNUNZIO

TREATS TO TRY

$1 per piece

$3.99 per slice

Customers can order a bite-size version of this cheesy pastry called kinafa.

$2.29 per slice

Asmaa Khattab and Kareem Alrefaai are the owners of Bigdash in Richardson. (Photos by Francesca D’Annunzio/Community Impact Newspaper)

Bigdash oers Turkish triangle baklava at its shops in Frisco and Richardson.

Bigdash Couple has a vision to make dessert called kinafa a household name

K areem Alrefaai and Asmaa Khattab have transformed their passion for food into an outlet for sharing their Syrian culture and cuisine. The husband and wife are owners of the Middle Eastern sweets shop Bigdash, which originated in Richardson and branched out last year to Frisco. The idea behind the business came from Khattab making Arabic ice cream and helawet el-jibn, a sweet cheese pastry, at home for friends and family. Little by little, her hobby grew, demanding more of her time and resources. She started selling treats from her home kitchen. But she had an ambitious goal,

Alrefaai said. “She would tell me, ‘Hey, I want to make kinafa so bad,’” Alrefaai said. “[But] kinafa is a very sensitive item, pretty traditional.” He described kinafa as a staple dessert of many cultures that varies by locality. After several attempts and some taste tests, Alrefaai said his wife settled on a recipe for the cheesy pastry that would suit most people, regardless of which culture they grew up in. He said he also encouraged her to rent a commercial kitchen as it became more and more dicult to keep up with demand, said Alrefaai, who, at the time, was working in a convenience store and owned a

couple of restaurants. “I quit my job and started working with her full-time,” Alrefaai said. They opened the Richardson shop in 2016 and followed that last Feb- ruary by opening a shop on Preston Road in Frisco. In addition to kinafa, the shop sells ice cream, cookies, baklava and other Middle Eastern treats. Bigdash also oers catering. Alrefaai said the couple’s goal is to make kinafa a household name for people who might not be familiar with the dessert. “I want [Bigdash] to be every- where,” Alrefaai said. “And I’m going to do whatever it takes to help [Khattab] get to that point because no one works as hard as she did. The world of kinafa is coming.”

Bigdash also sells warbat—lo dough pastries lled with cream and pistachios.

Bigdash 717 Lingco Drive, Ste. 210, Richardson 972-979-4098 www.bigdash.com Hours: Sun.-Thu. noon-10 p.m., Fri.-Sat. noon-11 p.m.

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