Franklin - Brentwood Edition - December 2020

FRANKLIN BRENTWOOD EDITION

VOLUME 2, ISSUE 10  DEC. 14, 2020JAN. 17, 2021

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Franklin AlderpersonPearl Bransford dies

VOLUNTEER GUIDE WAYS TO GIVE BACK BUILD HER A BRIDGE 2020

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IMPACTS

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Landowners around the Old Charlotte Pike historic corridor will begin work with the city in the coming months as developers seek to add a new neighborhood to the traditionally rural area, which will create the need for more roadways and infrastructure.

Franklin begins planning for futureWest HarpethArea

PROPOSED ROADWAYS

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City to start six-month process as development seeks annexation

PROPOSED NEIGHBORHOOD DEVELOPMENT

BY WENDY STURGES

farms—two historic working farms just west of Franklin—came before the city earlier this year with requests to be annexed, residents and city ocials renewed their debate over how the remaining rural land in the city and county should be preserved. Followingweeks of discussion and three deferrals on the matter, the Franklin Board of Mayor and Aldermen voted unanimously Nov. 24 to begin work on a six- month plan for how land west of the city, referred to as theWest Harpeth Area, can be developed in the future.

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Development in Franklin and Williamson County has long been a hot-button issue as residents and city ocials look to balance the area’s rural character and appearance with the demand of growth. In a 2019 cit- izen survey by the city of Franklin, more than 38% of residents expressed concern over growth and devel- opment, the most of any issue facing the city. When a 58-acre proposed development, Old Char- lotte Hamlet, located near the Gentry and Short

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City Administrator Eric Stuckey said the city will begin work in January to determine how infrastructure, such as roadways and sewer con- nections, may look as the area is developed. While much of the West Harpeth Area is not in the

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THIS ISSUE

CONTENTS

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

IMPACTS

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Now Open, Coming Soon &more TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES 6 News, data on local road projects

MARKET TEAM EDITOR Wendy Sturges

FROMLACY: We have all heard that the holiday season will look dierent this year, as many people are forgoing gatherings with loved ones. But this season is a good opportunity to help people in need during what has been a tough year for many in Williamson County. If you are looking to give back, check out our Volunteer Guide (see page 12) for ways you can help out in the community. Lacy Klasel, PUBLISHER

SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNER Lindsay Scott ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Maureen Sipperley METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Lacy Klasel, lklasel@communityimpact.com MANAGING EDITOR Matt Stephens ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Aubrey Galloway CORPORATE LEADERSHIP PUBLISHERS AND FOUNDERS John and Jennifer Garrett GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Warner CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES DIRECTOR Tess Coverman WHOWE ARE John and Jennifer Garrett began Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 in Pugerville, TX. The company’s mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Today, we operate across ve metropolitan areas, providing hyperlocal, nonpartisan news produced by our full-time journalists in each community we serve. BECOMEA#COMMUNITYPATRON

FROMWENDY: People who have lived in the Williamson County area for, really, any amount of time have likely seen multiple developments under construction throughout the county, which has led many to ask, “How much more is coming?” Our cover story this month takes a look at how the city of Franklin is working to balance incoming developments with the desire to preserve rural space. Wendy Sturges, EDITOR

DEVELOPMENT UPDATES

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Construction updates

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FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • DECEMBER 2020

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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CREEKSIDE CROSSING

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MARYLAND WAY

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See’s Candies

Tradehome Shoes

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NOWOPEN 1 See’s Candies opened a seasonal loca- tion in November on the upper level of the CoolSprings Galleria at 1800 Galleria Blvd., Franklin. The candy shop oers assorted chocolates, brittles, toees and more as well as gift boxes and holiday items. 615-719-0744. www.sees.com 2 A new ALDI location opened Nov. 12 at 1701 Mallory Lane, Brentwood. The loca- tion is the second to open in the Brent- wood area; the rst opened in October at 7117 Southpoint Parkway, Brentwood. The grocery chain oers a selection of pro- duce, pantry items, frozen foods and pet items and oers a beer and wine selection. www.aldi.us 3 Premier Fitness Source opened a new location in December at 101 Creekside Crossing, Ste. 700, Brentwood. The busi- ness oers home gym equipment, such as ellipticals, rowing machines, treadmills and more. 629-202-6998. www.premiertnesssource.com 4 Kids Kingdom Drop-in Daycare opened Nov. 27 at 600A Frazier Drive, Ste. 130, Franklin. The licensed day care oers drop-in child care for children ages 1-12. The center is cleaned in accordance with Centers for Disease Control and Pre- vention Guidelines, and play areas are set up to ensure social distancing, according to the business. 615-870-2184. www.facebook.com/kidskingdom20 5 Tradehome Shoes opened a new location in early November on the rst level of the CoolSprings Galleria at 1800 Galleria Blvd., Ste. 1244, Franklin. The business oers shoes for women, men

and children in a variety of brands and styles. This is the second Tennessee location for the company. 615-771-0438. www.tradehome.com 6 Go! Games and Calendars opened a kiosk in the mall at 1800 Galleria Blvd., Franklin, in mid-November. The seasonal retailer oers calendars as well as gifts 7 Mikey’s Motors and Golf Carts of Franklin held a grand opening Oct. 6 at 4410 Peytonsville Road, Franklin. The business, which also operates a location in Murfreesboro, sells recreational and industrial golf carts with low-speed and street-legal options. 615-962-9265. www.mikeysmotors.com 8 HomeWell Care Services held a grand opening Dec. 1 at 231 Public Square, Ste. 300, Franklin. The company, which oper- ates locations nationwide, oers live-in and hourly care for seniors to assist with activities such as cooking and running errands. 615-282-5055. www.homewellcares.com/franklin and games. 615-771-0434. www.goretailgroup.com 9 FYE opened in mid-November inside the CoolSprings Galleria at 1800 Galleria Blvd., Ste. 1120, Franklin. The shop, which specializes in pop culture items, oers albums on CD and vinyl, movies, toys and collectibles and more. 615-510-7687. www.fye.com COMING SOON 10 sek Sauna Studio will open in early 2021 at 1201 Liberty Pike Ste. 121, Franklin, in the Liberty Station Shopping Center.

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The studio oers infrared sauna sessions in pods and cabins as well as Pressotherapy, which aids lymphatic drainage. 615-241-0702. www.seksauna.com 11 Tamale Joe’s is slated to open in early 2021 at 2000 Mallory Lane, Ste. 310, Franklin, according to a social media post from the company. The eatery will oer fast-casual Mexican food, including its signature 100-year old tamale recipe. www.tamalejoes.com 12 Hattie Jane’s Creamery will open a new location in Franklin’s Camden Com- mons development near Herban Market in Franklin, according to a press release from the company. The ice cream shop operates two locations in Tennessee in Murfreesboro and Columbia and oers a wide selection of seasonal avors as well as year-round options such as toasted coconut, Mulekick made with Muletown Roasted Coee and Cookie Jar Supreme. The new location is slated to open in spring 2021. An exact address has not yet been announced. hattiejanescreamery.com RELOCATIONS 13 Big Frog Custom T-Shirts & More , which operates a location in Cool Springs at 9135 Carothers Parkway, Ste. 103, Franklin, announced in November it would merge its Franklin and Green Hills locations eective Dec. 2. The new loca- tion is 2016 Glen Echo Road, Nashville. 615-915-2373. www.bigfrog.com 14 Onyx and Alabaster is slated to relocate from 134 2nd Ave. N., Franklin, to 234 Public Square, Franklin—the for- mer location of It’s Vintage, Baby, which

closed in 2019. The store, which is slated to open in December, oers home design services as well as home decor and furni- ture. 615-628-8253.

The NOWMassage opened Dec. 7 in downtown Franklin at Harpeth Square.

COURTESY THE NOW MASSAGE

www.onyxandalabaster.com ANNIVERSARIES

FEATURED IMPACT NOWOPEN Massage studio The NOWMassage opened Dec. 7 in downtown Franklin at 125 First Ave. N., Franklin, in the Harpeth Square development. The boutique studio, operated by father and son Mark and Luke Cianciolo, oers therapeutic massage treatments, heat therapy and eye masks. Monthly and bimonthly memberships are available. “The NOW Franklin is a welcomed escape from the hustle of our day-to-day routines and [will] oer our community an oasis to rest and recharge,” Mark Cianciolo said in a release. The NOW Massage also carries a line of body oils, and balms, and it is slated to add two additional locations in the Nashville area in 2021. 615-229-7656. www.thenowmassage.com Urgent Team has a location at 509 Hills- boro Road, Franklin. 615-472-2139. www.urgentteam.com IN THE NEWS 19 The Williamson Medical Center announced in November that Phil Mazzuca will become the hospital’s chief executive ocer eective March 8, 2021. Mazzuca will replace longtime CEO Donald Webb,

15 The Harpeth Hotel in downtown Franklin marked its rst anniversary at 130 Second Ave. N., Franklin, in Novem- ber. The boutique hotel, which is a Curio by Hilton property, has 119 rooms. It is home to 1799 Kitchen & Cocktails and to McGavocks Coee Bar and Provisions. 615-206-7510. www.harpethhotel.com 16 Owners Jenn and PJ Mineo celebrat- ed the 15th anniversary of their restau- rant, Mineo’s , in September. The eatery, located at 330 Mayeld Drive, Ste. A-11, Franklin oers specialty pizzas, calzones, wings, pasta and sandwiches. 615-771-7911. www.mineosonline.com 17 Downtown Franklin orist The Merry Stem celebrated its rst anni- versary in November at 117A 5th Ave., N., Franklin. The shop oers oral arrangements with seasonal blooms and greenery. Delivery in Franklin and the surrounding areas is available. 615-807-2394. www.themerrystem.com MERGER 18 Ocials with Ascension Saint Thomas and Urgent Team announced Nov. 5 the two have signed a joint ven- ture partnership, which will lead to the rebrand of 14 urgent care loca- tions across Middle Tennessee, including one in Franklin. Beginning in January, Urgent Team locations will be renamed Ascension Saint Thomas Urgent Care .

COURTESY THE NOW MASSAGE

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FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • DECEMBER 2020

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES

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ONGOING PROJECTS

signalization work near New Hwy. 96 West and the new portion of the roadway. Drivers will notice construction work along the roadway as crews create turn lanes onto the new extension. Phase 1, which will create a two-lane road, is expected to be complete in late 2021. Phase 2 will see the roadway widened to two lanes in each direction. A timeline for that phase has not been scheduled. Timeline: 2019-2021 (Phase 1) Cost: $45.1 million (Phase 1) Funding sources: Tennessee Department of Transportation, city of Franklin RECENTLY COMPLETED 3 Fifth Avenue parking lot The city of Franklin held a dedication cer- emony for a new parking lot in November in the downtown area on Fifth Avenue between Third Avenue and Margin Street. According to City Administrator Eric Stuckey, the new lot was constructed for less than half of the original budgeted amount of $500,000. Timeline: June-November Cost: $180,000 Funding source: city of Franklin

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1 Franklin Road improvements Work began earlier this year to widen a portion of Franklin Road—from the Har- peth bridge to Harpeth Industrial Court— from two to three lanes with sidewalks on both sides of the roadway. The project also includes new signals at Liberty Pike, new street lighting and more room for bike travel. Timeline: July 2020-December 2021 Cost: $18.1 million Funding source: city of Franklin 2 Mack C. Hatcher Parkway extension Construction continues on the north- west extension of the Mack C. Hatcher Parkway in Franklin. Work has begun on

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DEVELOPMENT UPDATES

Developments underway in the Franklin & Brentwood area

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WEST AMENITY PARK Westhaven’s new West Amenity Park is slated to be complete in spring near the Westhaven Golf Club, according to the neighborhood’s developer, Southern Land Co. The new park will feature recreation and social spaces as well as a competition swimming pool, bocce courts and an event lawn. Also under construction in Westhaven is FIT2, a new fitness center located near Front Street in the neighborhood’s Town Center.

FRANKLIN FIRE STATION Work is nearing completion on a new fire station on Long Lane and Peytonsville Road near I-65 in Franklin. The station is expected to be architecturally similar to Fire Station No. 8 and will serve the growing Goose Creek and Berry Farms areas, according to the city of Franklin. The city-funded project is estimated to cost about $7 million and is slated to be complete in late 2020 or early 2021.

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AC HOTELS BYMARRIOTT A new AC Hotels by Marriott location is under construction at Hill Center Brentwood along Maryland Way. The 90,900-square-foot hotel will feature 148 rooms, according to co-developers H.G. Hill Realty Co. and Doradus Partners. The hotel is slated to open in spring 2021. The hotel joins a number of new retailers as part of Hill Center Brentwood’s Phase 2 of development, including Pet People; Peace, Love and Little Donuts; Mooyah Burgers, Fries and Shakes; and Scissors and Scotch.

WILLIAMSON COUNTY ANIMAL SHELTER

TRU BY HILTON Construction is ongoing at the site of a new Tru by Hilton hotel at Knoll Top Lane near the Columbia State Community College Williamson campus in Franklin. The hotel will begin accepting reservations for March 1 and later, according to the company website. The hotel is expected to have more than 130 rooms as well as business and fitness centers. This is the 10th Tru by Hilton location in Tennessee for the company.

Work is underway at the new Williamson County Animal Shelter located on Old Charlotte Pike in Franklin. The $15.4 million facility is slated to be complete in late 2021 and will feature training spaces, exercise trails, a medical wing and an education center. The majority of the facility will be funded through the county, with a $1.4 million donation from the Friends of the Williamson County Animal Shelter, a local nonprofit.

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FRANKLIN - BRENTWOOD EDITION • DECEMBER 2020

CITY& COUNTY

News from Franklin, Brentwood & Williamson County

City alderperson, former FSSDboardmember Pearl Bransford dies FRANKLIN Longtime Franklin Alderperson Pearl Bransford died Nov. 27, according to the city of Franklin. The city recognized Bransford’s time with the city with a remembrance during its Dec. 8 Board of Mayor and Aldermen meeting. “She just had a great heart for the community mayor and aldermen in 2007, according to the city. She served on the city’s Beer Board as well as the Budget and Finance Board, and was involved in a number of community initiatives, including the creation of Natchez Place Inc. “Anyone who knew her couldn’t help but respect “She was willing to share sage wisdom and [was] generous in investing her time as a public servant with FSSD, the city of Franklin and other organizations.” As of press time Dec. 8,

her. She genuinely cared for the community,” Stuckey said. “She brought a great perspective.” Bransford also served on the Franklin Special School District board of edu- cation and worked as a health care professional at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. ”Alderman Pearl Bransford was a gift to our Williamson County community,” FSSD board member Allena Bell said in a social media post.

Pearl Bransford

and cared deeply,” City Administrator Eric Stuckey said in a statement. “She was an eective leader and brought a great spirit to the work. She managed to have fun at it, take it seriously and take on issues that were important to the community with care and collaboration.” Bransford was a 30-year resident of the city of Franklin. She was rst elected to the board of

the city of Franklin had not announced how Bransford’s seat on the BOMA would be lled.

According to the city charter, the city can either appoint an individual to serve the remainder of her term with a majority vote from the board, or the city can hold a special election. The city will decide on which method with a majority vote from BOMA.

Middle Tennessee hospital leaders urge residents to understand capacity issues as COVID19 case counts rise

RISING CASES The number of active coronavirus cases rose signicantly in November, peaking at 1,723 cases. This marks the highest number of cases in Williamson County since March.

500 1,000 1,500 Number of county cases

WILLIAMSON COUNTY Hospital leaders in the Greater Nashville area are urging residents to forgo holiday gatherings that could further the spread of the coronavirus as case numbers and hospitalizations rise. CEOs with Williamson Medical Cen- ter, Ascension Saint Thomas, Meharry Medical College, Vanderbilt Univer- sity Medical Center, Maury Regional Health, Nashville General Hospital, TriStar Health and NorthCrest Health issued an open letter to Tennesseans on Nov. 24 in which they announced that daily cases, transmission rates and hospitalization due to corona- virus have surpassed levels seen in July. Hospitalizations have increased by 72% since Nov. 1, according to the letter.

Dr. Andy Russell, chief medical ocer for WMC, said hospital capacity is calculated based on a set of factors that goes beyond just the number of coronavirus patients in the hospital. “It is imperative that the commu- nity understands that capacity is not only tied to the number of available hospital beds; it also encompasses the health care providers and support sta required to care for patients and the access to supplies,” Russell said. “Stang continues to be strained due to virus exposure, and the availability of some supplies has again become a challenge.” Local hospital ocials are echoing guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and

calling for residents to limit the number of people who gather for the holidays to eight or fewer—or to consider hosting a virtual celebration instead. As of early December, active coro- navirus cases in Williamson County numbered more than 1,000. Russell said that should case numbers continue to rise, access to care for other emergent needs, such as heart attacks, strokes and injuries, could be limited. “We must act, and act now, to pro- tect hospital capacity and to support those who have been on the front lines of this ght for months—our medical personnel, rst responders and essential workers,” the letter stated.

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Brentwood planning for futurememorial wall, statue at newpolice headquarters BRENTWOOD Planning work is underway for a memorial wall to be included in the city of Brent- wood’s new police headquarters, which is under construction along Heritage Way. which is estimated to be $29 million, he said. The wall, which will be about 20 feet wide, will also include the names of department retirees. The Brentwood Police Department has

The memorial will include an outdoor memorial wall made of granite to honor those killed in the line of duty, including Destin Legieza, who was killed in a car accident with a drunk driver earlier this year. City Manager Kirk Bednar said the wall will be funded by the city. The cost is expected to be lumped in to the total cost of the headquarters,

announced plans for a bronze lion sculpture near the memorial wall, inspired by the statues at the National Law Enforcement Ocers Memorial in Washington, D.C., according to the city. The cost of the statue, estimated to be $45,000, is separate from that of the memorial wall, which will be funded by the city.

The Brentwood Police Department is raising funds to place a bronze statue at the new police headquarters. (Courtesy city of Brentwood)

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CITY HIGHLIGHT BRENTWOOD Brian Collins took over as deputy chief of the Brentwood Fire & Rescue Department following the Dec. 6 retirement of former Deputy Chief David Windrow. FRANKLIN The city of Franklin announced Dec. 3 it has named two deputy police chiefs: Former Captain J.P. Taylor will become deputy chief of the administrative division, public aairs and criminal investigations, and Kenneth Winslow, from Springeld, Illinois, will become deputy chief of eld operations and special operations. In accordance with an executive order from Gov. Bill Lee, municipal meetings may be held virtually until at least Dec. 27. Franklin Board of Mayor and Aldermen Meets Nov. 24 and Dec. 8 at 7 p.m. Workshop meetings are always held two hours prior. 615-791-3217. www.franklintn.gov Brentwood City Commission Meets Nov. 12 and 26 at 7 p.m. 615-371-0060. www.brentwoodtn.gov MEETINGSWE COVER

HolidayMagic onMain events to run throughDec. 31 in downtown Franklin

FRANKLIN In partnership with the city of Franklin and Visit Franklin, the Heritage Foundation of Williamson County and the Downtown Franklin Association announced Nov. 11 that Holiday Magic on Main will kick o the holiday season with new events in downtown Franklin. Although the annual Dickens of a Christmas Festival was canceled earlier this year due to coronavirus- related concerns, the foundation has announced that holiday displays and decorations will still be in place this year. “There’s no doubt the pandemic has aected everything about how we work, how we interact and even how we celebrate,” Heritage Foundation CEO Bari Beasley said in a release. “Our Holiday Magic on Main promotion oers residents and visitors the chance to celebrate the winter holidays

by spending time with their loved ones in our beautiful downtown district, making memories at our unique restaurants and shopping for distinctive gifts at our locally owned shops.” Downtown shops will be deco- rated for the season and will oer special discounts and promotions. Through Dec. 31, the program will also feature pop-up perfor- mances from Dickensian characters as well as live musicians. Schedules of events will be promoted on @downtownfranklin on Instagram. Additionally, the DFA has part- nered with the TMA Group to oer a free shuttle service from The Factory at Franklin to downtown. “With the road work going on along Franklin [Road], we want to do everything possible to make the shopping experience easier,” DFA Main Street Director Jill Burgin said in the release.

The center is located in Franklin. (Courtesy Williamson County Animal Shelter)

Williamson County Animal Center sets newstray policies WILLIAMSON COUNTY Starting Nov. 30, the Williamson County Animal Center began only accepting stray dogs and owner surrenders on an emergency basis, per an announcement from the center. The measure, which is expected to be temporary, is meant to limit the amount of people at the center at a given time. Residents who nd stray dogs should report them to the shelter immediately by calling 615-790-5590.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

EDUCATION BRIEFS

News fromWilliamson County Schools

COMPILED BY WENDY STURGES

Upcoming projects Williamson County Schools approved a five-year capital plan with several projects to expand capacity and improve facilities. Projects are expected to be completed over the next six to seven years. New schools Total: $305 million high school 1 in land purchases $31.5M middle schools 3 elementary schools 6

5-year projects plan approved to add school capacity, facilities

2021-22 academic calendar approved WILLIAMSON COUNTY SCHOOLS Ahead of the second semester of the 2020-21 school year, Williamson County Schools has already approved its academic calendar for the next school year. The WCS board unanimously approved the calendar during its Nov. 16 meeting. The approved calendar includes 85 instructional days in the fall semester and 92 instructional days in the spring semester. The calendar also has a full week for fall break and spring break. WILLIAMSON COUNTY SCHOOLS As the county popula- tion continues to grow, Williamson County Schools is planning for how it will expand capacity over the next several years. During the WCS board meeting Nov. 16, the board unanimously approved a five-year plan for funding requests through 2026. The 2020-26 plan includes $429.35 million in funding requests for projects that will be completed from 2021-27. “Every year we present to the county commission our five-year projection of what we believe we need to do to address growth. It includes new building construction, building expansions, buses maintenance,

those big-cost items as we grow,” WCS Superintendent Jason Golden said. The majority of the plan includes $305 million in funding for new schools to add capacity for future students throughout the district. Additions and renovations for existing schools are also included in the plan. Projects to be funded this school year include additions to Summit and Ravenwood high schools, which will add 22 classrooms and an expansion of the cafeteria at each school. Those projects are slated to be complete in fall 2022. The district will request funding from the county as part of its annual budget process.

Additions and renovations • Additions for Fairview, Nolensville, Centennial and Ravenwood high schools • New synthetic turf for Ravenwood, Centennial, Fairview, Summit and Independent high schools • Transportation building addition • Hillsboro School renovation • Renovations for Bethesda Elementary School, Grassland Middle School and Page High School Total: $77.9 million

Facility upgrades Roof, asphalt, and heating and cooling upgrades

Total: $35.5 million

Transportation Replacements for school buses

Total: $10.9 million

Grand total: $429.3 million

SOURCE: WILLIAMSON COUNTY SCHOOLS/ COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

MEETINGSWE COVER

Pay raised forWCS substitute teachers WILLIAMSON COUNTY SCHOOLS To help address a substitute teacher shortage in the area, the Williamson County Schools board approved a pay raise during its Nov. 16 meeting to help attract more teachers to the district. The district will raise the daily pay for uncertified substitutes to $100—a $15-$30 increase. Certified substitutes will receive $120—an increase of $30. WCS Superintendent Jason Golden said many of the substitute teachers who usually teach in the district have not returned this year.

KEY DATES The 2021-22 academic calendar includes a full week for fall break and spring break each. Start of school for grades 1-12: Aug. 6 (half day) First full day for kindergarten students: Aug. 16 Fall break (students): Oct. 11-15 Veterans Day: Nov. 11 Thanksgiving break: Nov. 22-26 Winter break: Dec. 20-31 Start of second semester: Jan. 5 Spring break: March 14-18 Last day of school for students: May 25 SOURCE: WILLIAMSON COUNTY SCHOOLS/ COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Gov. Bill Lee has issued an executive order that allows governmental bodies to meet virtually through at least Dec. 27. The Williamson County Schools Board of Education will not meet in December and will hold its next meeting Jan. 19 at 6:30 p.m. Meetings can be livestreamed via the school’s website. A board work session will be held Jan. 14 at 6 p.m. 615-472-4000. www.wcs.edu The Franklin Special School District will not meet in December and will hold its next meeting Jan. 11 at 6:30 p.m. at Johnson Elementary School, 815 Glass Lane, Franklin. 615-794-6624. www.fssd.org

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FRANKLIN - BRENTWOOD EDITION • DECEMBER 2020

WAYS TOGIVE BACK Volunteer opportunities in the Franklin & Brentwood area 2020 V O L U N T E E R G U I D E

Help out the Franklin and Brentwood communities in a number of ways throughout the year by volunteering with local nonprot groups. Volunteer opportunities included in this guide range from mentoring children to helping feed families in need.

VOLUNTEER REQUIREMENTS

Application

Background check

Orientation

Under age 18 allowed

COMPILED BY WENDY STURGES

EMPOWER CHILDREN MY FRIEND’S HOUSE This Williamson County nonprot oers a place to live for at-risk boys while oer- ing therapies and support while working to transition to foster or adoptive homes. Volunteer opportunities are available on an as-needed basis for home repairs and household work. Sample activities: cooking, housework and organizing 626 Eastview Circle, Franklin 615-790-8553 https://myfriendshousetn.org/volunteers 1 RAISE YOUR HAND This United Way of Greater Nashville Program oers after-school tutoring for students in Williamson County Schools and Franklin Special School District. Vol- unteers help teachers with rst through fourth grade students who are working to improve math and reading skills. Volun- teers must be able to commit one hour a week for up to 10 weeks. Sample activities: Tutoring individual- ly and in small groups, donations also needed ryh@unitedwaygn.org www.unitedwaygreaternashville.org/ raise-your-hand-volunteers 1 1 1 1 BUILD HER A BRIDGE This Williamson County-based nonprot works to provide girls ages 12-18 a sense of community and a place to talk with peers and local mental health experts. Beginning in January, the group will

launch counseling and mentor programs to help provide mental health services for young girls struggling with anxiety and depression. Mentors must be able to commit for at least 12 months. Sample activities: One-on-one meetings via Zoom or in-person, journaling

Williamson County Animal Shelter

GiGi’s Playhouse

WENDY STURGESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

WENDY STURGESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

buildherabridge@gmail.com www.buildherabridge.com 1 WILLIAMSON COUNTY CASA

cleaning, grooming 106 Claude Yates Drive, Franklin 615-790-5590 volunteer@williamsoncounty-tn.gov www.adoptwcac.org 1 1 1 FEED THE HUNGRY ONE GENERATION AWAY This Franklin nonprot distributes meals to families in need and also oers a mobile food pantry. Volunteers are needed during mobile food pantry events and group vol- unteer opportunities are also available. Sample activities: organizing, packaging and delivering food 104 Southeast Parkway, Ste. 300, Franklin 615-538-7413 www.onegenaway.com/volunteer HELP IN THE COMMUNITY GIGI’S PLAYHOUSE This Brentwood chapter of the nonprot organization oers free educational and therapeutic programs for individuals with Down syndrome from birth through adulthood. Volunteers are needed to help with in-person and virtual programming. Sample activities: tutoring, cleaning, repairs, help with events, technical help

1724 Carothers Parkway, Ste. 400, Brentwood 615-370-1500 www.gigisplayhouse.org/nashville 1 1 1 TUCKER’S HOUSE This Franklin-based nonprot works with families with children with disabilities to retrot homes with special equipment, such as wheelchair ramps, lifts and other adaptive equipment to make homes more accessible. The nonprot serves a 12-county area in Middle Tennessee. While construction work is done by licensed workers, volunteers with and without construction skills can assist with work. Sample activities: demolition, painting, additional work based on skill sets and

This local chapter of Court Appointed Special Advocates helps children who are abused or neglected by speaking for them in court hearings, helping them nd safe places to live and provide mentoring. Volunteers typically commit 10-20 hours a month per case until the case is resolved. Volunteers must be age 21 or older. Sample activities: mentoring, providing written reports to court ocials 1205 Columbia Ave., Franklin 615-591-2699 www.williamsoncountycasa.org 1 1 1 HELP ANIMALS

qualications 615-310-5224 www.tuckershouse.org 1 BRIGHTSTONE

WILLIAMSON COUNTY ANIMAL CENTER

The county shelter provides care to dogs, cats, rabbits and other small animals while working to nd them new homes. Volun- teer programs help provide human interac- tion with animals to help with socialization, training, grooming and playing. Fosters are also needed to care for animals in-home while they are waiting to be adopted. Sample activities: walking with animals,

This Franklin-based nonprot organiza- tion provides day programs for adults with developmental disabilities. Volun- teers are needed to help in classrooms, service projects on their new campus and with events and projects. Sample activities: assisting with student programming, improvement projects

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

For those not able to volunteer or give large amounts this year, here are a few low- or no-cost ways to give back. 1. DONATE BLOOD With many blood drives canceled this year, local hospitals are in need of blood donations. Blood Assurance, which provides blood supplies to Williamson Medical Center, is holding weekly blood drives each Tuesday from noon-5 p.m. at the Bone and Joint Institute of Tennessee at 3000 Edward Curd Lane, Franklin. Donors must be 17 or older, weigh more than 110 pounds and be in good health. 800-962-0628. www.bloodassurance.org 2. BECOME A SUBSTITUTE TEACHER With Tennessee facing a statewide shortage of substitute teachers, schools in Williamson County are having trouble lling vacancies when a teacher is out sick or in quarantine. Substitute teachers need to have a high school diploma and must pass a background check. www.wcs.edu 3. FEEDA FAMILY Second Harvest collects food donations throughout the year to help feed families facing hunger in Middle Tennessee. Nonperishable food donations can be dropped o at Kroger locations throughout the county or at the organization’s distribution center at 331 Great Circle Road, Nashville. www.secondharvestmidtn.org/act/ donate-food 3 ways TOHELP

Brightstone

WENDY STURGESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

140 Southeast Parkway Court, Franklin 615-790-4888 elaine.farmer@brightstone.org HANDS ON NASHVILLE In Partnership with the United Way of Greater Nashville, Hands On Nashville is a hub where residents can nd volunteer opportunities in the Greater Nashville area. Hands On features a monthly cal- endar with volunteer opportunities in the area for any given day. Sample activities: packing supply boxes, helping students with online learning 615-298-1108 www.hon.org WAVES INC. This nonprot provides early learning programs and adult programs for individ- uals with developmental disabilities, as well as an adult residential program with live-in support sta. Volunteers help with home maintenance and helping during day program activities. Sample activities: lawn maintenance, household repairs, oce support 615-794-7955 www.wavesinc.com This list is not comprehensive of all volunteer opportunities in Williamson County.

Graceworks Ministries Inc. operates a food pantry and thrift store.

COURTESY GRACEWORKS MINISTRIES INC.

FEATUREDNONPROFIT HELP IN THE COMMUNITY Graceworks Ministries Inc. oers assistance in providing food and nancial assistance to those in need in Williamson County as well as education programs and guidance. In 2020, the organization has served more than 4,000 families through mobile food pantries. Due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, older volunteers in the community are now more at risk of contracting the virus and are choosing to stay home, causing a more than 70% drop in weekly volunteers at Graceworks Ministries Inc.’s food pantry and its thrift store, the prots of which funds about half of all programs, according to the nonprot.

Volunteers are needed at the center, located at 104 Southeast Parkway, Ste. 100, Franklin, to help sort food donations, stock shelves and tag items in the store. Volunteers must be 16 years old or older and can volunteer from Monday through Friday in the food pantry and Monday through Saturday in the thrift store. To learn more about becoming a volunteer, individuals can contact Volunteer Relations Manager Erin Saurers at esaurers@graceworksministries.net or by calling 615-794-9055.

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“Graceworks’ volunteers are the lifeblood of the organization,” CEO Valencia A. Breckenridge said in a release.

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FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • DECEMBER 2020

NONPROFIT

BY WENDY STURGES

The group made signs to post at the Natchez Trace Bridge. (Photos courtesy Build Her a Bridge)

HOWTOHELP Build Her a Bridge is a 501(c)(3) nonprot that works with young girls in the Williamson County area. DONATE

Build Her a Bridge helps Williamson County girls ages 12- 18 to nd resources for mental health and provides a safe space to talk.

Tax-deductible donations go to help fund counseling costs as well as supplies and other expenses for the nonprot. www.buildherabridge.com/donate VOLUNTEER The nonprot is launching a mentor program to help provide young girls with guidance and someone to talk to. Mentors must pass a background check and be able to commit for at least one year. To learn more about the mentorship, email buildherabridge@gmail.com.

BuildHer a Bridge Nonprot provides counseling, mentorship to young girls I n a year that has been tough for mental health, Build Her a Bridge is working to make 2021 a year in which girls in Williamson County can access more mental health services and build condence in their futures.

openly discussing depression and mental health. “She was the sweetest teenage girl, and people have talked so positively about her, and yet she was struggling with a mental health issue,” she said. “So it goes to show that anyone can walk around here as if they have it all together, and they really, really don’t because they have the ideation of suicide.” DeGrasse, who has a background in education, said this inspired her to start two new programs that will be launched in January. The rst, a coun- seling program, will help connect girls to licensed therapists and will help fund sessions to bring costs for families down from $50-$55 a session to around $15-$20 per session. The group has two counselors signed on but needs more based on demand. The nonprot will also launch a mentorship program, which DeGrasse said has already attracted a number of diverse female mentors in a variety of backgrounds. The mentors go through a back- ground check process and commit for a minimum of one year, she said. Looking forward, DeGrasse said she hopes the organization will help build up the next generation of girls to become leaders in the community. “They’re going to be our teachers; they’re going to be our law enforcement; they’re going to be our aldermen; ... and we want them to be successful, but we don’t want them to have the mental health [issues] and the anxiety and depression anymore because I believe that you can, with resources, be free from that or have tools to help you,” she said.

RESOURCES There are a number of local and national resources for those who may be

struggling with a mental health crisis. TENNESSEE STATEWIDE CRISIS LINE This hotline is operated by trained mental health professionals and is available 24/7. 855-274-7471 CRISIS TEXT LINE Individuals can text TN to 741741 to be connected to a trained counselor. NATIONAL SUICIDE PREVENTIONHOTLINE This free, 24/7 hotline is available in English and Spanish for anyone in emotional distress. 800-273-8255 • 888-628-9454 (Spanish) TENNESSEE SUICIDE PREVENTIONNETWORK This Nashville-based network oers resources for individuals experiencing mental health issues and for their families. Families can learn about warning signs to look for as well as where to nd mental health screenings and training to help prevent suicide. 615-297-1077 • www.tspn.org

The nonprot, which serves girls in Williamson County ages 12-18, began in October 2018 when founder Samantha DeGrasse’s daughter, Sophia, and her friends would meet at their home to talk about everything from relationship issues to faith and how dierent families may look. When the group grew to more than 15 girls, DeGrasse said she and her daughter began plans to formalize the group, adding monthly meetings with guest speakers and activities. “That was when I started thinking, ‘Maybe there’s something here—maybe having a girls group that’s outside of school or church or outside of sports, but just a place where girls can really feel comfortable gathering together to talk,” she said. The group, which has now grown to 24 girls, has also placed signs of encouragement and hope along the Natchez Trace Bridge, which has been a site of suicides in the area. During 2020, the group has held virtual meetings with speakers covering how to deal with stress and anxiety. DeGrasse said she also hopes to launch Build Him a Bridge, a similar program with mentors for teen boys, in spring or summer. In October 2019, when one of the group’s members lost a sibling to suicide, DeGrasse met with parents and learned about the stigma around

BuildHer a Bridge 678-634-2263 www.buildherabridge.com www.facebook.com/buildherabridge

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

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