Pearland - Friendswood Edition | July 2020

PEARLAND FRIENDSWOOD EDITION

VOLUME 6, ISSUE 8 | JULY 17 - AUG. 13, 2020

ONLINE AT

Pearland, Friendswood discuss steps toward equality

COMMUNITY VOICES

SUPPORT LOCAL JOURNALISM

“The ideal is that we should be part of the community. We need to cooperate and get along with each other.” Charles Wagner, Brazoria County sheri ff “If we are to be equal, we can’t beat our citizens in the street.” Eugene Howard, Brazoria County NAACP president “Overwhelmingly, the majority of peace o ffi cers in Texas are good people.” Henry Trochesset, Galveston County sheri ff “[Adults] have to be very careful how we handle this. We have to be careful with how we position this in front our children.” Felicha Jones, Smart Scholars Foundation owner

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A few protests and town halls have been hosted in Pearland and Friendswood to honor George Floyd and to demand racial equality. (Haley Morrison/Community Impact Newspaper)

Residents, community leaders, police aim to eliminate police brutality in U.S.

of o ff enses do not happen locally. The Brazoria County chapter of the NAACP held a town hall in June to discuss changes that need to be made and how the community can come together. The event featured speakers from several municipalities and police departments in the county. The orga- nization also hosted a prayer service in

Pearland shortly after Floyd’s death. “Prayer resolves every situation. We wanted to bring our community together to assure that in our county and our community, people want to sit at the table and have those conversa- tions,” said Eugene Howard, the pres- ident of the Brazoria County chapter of

BY HALEY MORRISON

George Floyd’s death in Minneapolis police custody in late May sparked a wave of protests in Houston, Pearland and Friendswood, calling for an end to police brutality and systemic racism. While the protests are dying down, work is still being done in Pearland and Friendswood to make sure these types

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CONTINUED ON 24

2020 EDI T ION REAL ESTATE

“EVERY BUYER I HAVE HAD IS READY ANDWANTS TO BUY IN THE NEXT FEWWEEKS. IF WE ARE GOING TO GO OUT AND SHOW A HOUSE, THEY ARE READY TO MAKE AN OFFER RIGHT AWAY.” Alina Rogers, Sparrow Realty Agent

TRANSPORTATION

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Pearland, Manvel see real estate growth as COVID - 19 con fi nes residents to homes

+12.67% FROM 2019 While real estate in the Houston region has su ff ered due to COVID-19, ZIP 77578 in Manvel has listed and sold more homes in spring 2020 than spring 2019. 107 homes sold between March- May ZIP CODE SPOTLIGHT: 77578 homes listed for sale between March-May 658 SOURCE: SPARROW REALTY / COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER +9.18% FROM 2019

2020 EDI T ION REAL ESTATE

BY HALEY MORRISON

Manager Russell Bynum thought the real estate market needed to brace itself for a fi nancial hit. “In our minds, if people aren’t showing up, they aren’t going to buy. So, we thought, ‘OK, we will see sales CONTINUED ON 20

When the coronavirus hit and began to shut down schools and the econ- omy this spring, home sales began to drop across Houston. When sales dipped in March and April, Hillwood Communities General

MARKET DATA

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PEARLAND - FRIENDSWOOD EDITION • JULY 2020

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THIS ISSUE

CONTENTS

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MARKET TEAM GENERAL MANAGER Papar Faircloth, pfaircloth@communityimpact.com EDITOR Haley Morrison GRAPHIC DESIGNER Elyssa Turner ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Teresa Votaw

FROMPAPAR: The last few months have been challenging for our readers in so many ways. Local businesses are struggling and residents are losing jobs, all of which has taken an emotional toll. We continue to work for you to cover the news in a balanced way. Community Impact Newspaper is 100% advertiser funded, so we encourage you to support our advertisers next time you need a service and to help your local businesses thrive. Papar Faircloth, GENERALMANAGER

METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Jason Culpepper ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Kristina Shackelford MANAGING EDITOR Marie Leonard ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Tessa Hoe fl e CORPORATE LEADERSHIP PUBLISHERS AND FOUNDERS John and Jennifer Garrett GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Warner CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES DIRECTOR Tess Coverman WHOWE ARE John and Jennifer Garrett began Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 in P fl ugerville, TX. The company’s mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Today, we operate across six metropolitan areas, providing hyperlocal, nonpartisan news produced by our full-time journalists in each community we serve. BECOMEA#COMMUNITYPATRON Please join your friends and neighbors in support of Community Impact Newspaper’s legacy

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FROMHALEY: July brings with it our annual real estate edition. This year’s top real estate story shows the local market thriving despite COVID-19. Our other top story focuses on the Pearland and Friendswood communities and police departments working together to fi ght against racial injustice. Haley Morrison, EDITOR

Now Open, Coming Soon &more TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES 9

Completed and future projects INSIDE INFORMATION Talking to children about race

13

Real EstateEdition

THIS ISSUE BY THE NUMBERS

MARKET SNAPSHOT

15

Local sources 30

Business openings 3

Transportation updates 5

homes sold in Pearland and Friendswood in the last year 3,623

Local real estate data GUIDE

16 Home improvement and maintenance HOUSING AFFORDABILITY 17 Home costs in Harris County rise HURRICANE HARVEY 18 Friendswood real estate market fl ourishes despite fl ooding

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PEARLAND - FRIENDSWOOD EDITION • JULY 2020

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Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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NOWOPEN 1 Pearwood Driving School began o ff ering driving lessons to teenagers and adults June 22, said Roger Burkhalter, a U.S. Army Veteran and Pearland resident who co-owns the business with Heather McMinn. Located at 2530 E. Broadway St., Ste. A, Pearwood Driving School o ff ers both in-person and virtual courses. 281-741-1421. www.pearwooddrivingschool.com 2 Sweet Paris Creperie & Cafe opened a new location mid-March at Baybrook Mall overlooking the lawn at 700 Baybrook Mall Drive, Ste. H105, Friendswood, said Ludo Legall, the location’s franchisee and manager. Guests can dine-in or order meals to-go. The two-story location has an events space upstairs with room for 48 people, and it is the fi rst Sweet Paris

and snacks, including popcorn chicken, French fries and fresh fruit. 281-372- 6750. http://teahousebeverage.com/ RELOCATIONS 7 Lollipop Boutique will move to 9330 Broadway St., Ste. 216. Pearland, from 5730 Broadway St., Ste. 116, Pearland July 10, owner Cindy Bryson said. The consignment store, which has been open in Pearland for over 10 years, o ff ers ma- ternity, baby, children and teen clothing as well as accessories and furniture. Lol- lipop o ff ers in-store pickup and delivery for some items. 281-412-9440. www.lollipoppearland.myshopify.com EXPANSIONS 8 Stadia Sports Grill , located at 1853 Pearland Parkway, Ste. 135, Pearland, added a new patio area June 30. The

location to have two stories, Legall said. Sweet Paris o ff ers a menu of breakfast, savory and sweet crepes along with wa ffl es, soup, salad, sandwiches and specialty beverages. There are fi ve other Greater Houston locations of Sweet Paris. 346-230-8090. www.sweetparis.com 3 Boiling Dragon opened June 3 at 11625 W. Broadway Blvd., Ste. 135, Pearland. The restaurant o ff ers a menu that includes boiled shrimp, oysters, clam chowder and bao sandwiches, such as Peking chicken. Craw fi sh is also available. 832-328-5123. www.facebook.com/ boilingdragon REOPENINGS 4 Studio Movie Grill reopened its Pearland location June 26. The movie theater, located at 8440 S. Sam Houston Parkway E, Houston, is one of several

locations the company reopened June 26 as part of its Phase 2 of opening after closing for COVID-19. 346-299-6453. www.studiomoviegrill.com COMING SOON 5 Yummy Pho & Bo Ne Pearland has postponed its grand opened at 15718 Hwy. 288, Ste. 140, Pearland, due to COVID-19. The business was originally supposed to open July 6. The restaurant will o ff er a menu with Vietnamese dishes, including pho, banh mi and vermicelli bowls. The store’s temporary phone number is 832-977-3588. www.facebook.com/yummyphopearland 6 The Teahouse Tapioca and Tea is coming to Center at Pearland Parkway at the end of August or early September. Located at 2470 Pearland Parkway, Ste. 120, Pearland, the business sells boba tea

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY HALEY MORRISON

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FEATURED IMPACT IN THE NEWS While COVID-19 changed the end of the school year, the beginning of the 2019-20 year started o ff with its own challenges, said Shumaila Kahn, communications director for the Pearland Horizon Montessori location. “It was tough in the beginning,” Kahn said. Horizon Montessori in Pearland, which celebrated its fi rst graduation at the end of the 2019-20 school year, fi nished constructing a new building in October at 2319 N. Grand Blvd. However, the school had support from the community throughout the process, Kahn said. For the fi rst year, the school had kindergarten through fourth grade, but it will be adding grades fi fth through eighth for the 2020-21 school year. Advanced placement classes will be available for junior high students. The school plans on being open for the 2020-21 school year with classes

A

COURTESY GULF COAST COMMERCIAL GROUP

FEATURED IMPACT COMING SOON Gulf Coast Commercial Group has almost fi nished constructing its 17,500-square- foot strip center at the corner of Pearland Parkway and Barry Rose. The center has eight retail spaces, two of which are spoken for by Nails of America and Lin Asian Cafe. Both businesses are expected to open in the

160, Pearland, was May 31, owner Emily McAdams said. Social distancing guide- lines made it di ffi cult to hold art classes at the location. McAdams said a National Guard recruiting o ffi ce will take over the space, but Community Impact Newspaper was unable to reach a representative as of June 15 to con fi rm. There is one other AR Workshop location in the Greater Houston area in Cypress. 346-291-5331. www.arworkshop.com 11 Family-owned Green Event Center closed in late June. The business, located at 2000 W. Parkwood Ave., Friendswood, was an event center that hosted meet- ings, weddings and parties. 12 National fi tness chain 24 Hour Fitness announced it fi led for bankruptcy June 15. The company is permanently closing 100 of its gyms, including the one at 130 W. Parkwood Ave., Friendswood. CEO Tony Ueber said in a press release capped to no more than 20 children per class. However, teachers are prepared in the event they have to have online classes, Kahn said. “We try to keep our class sizes really low,” Kahn said. Horizon Montessori focuses on children learning at their own pace through an interactive model. 281-485-2500. www.hmps.net

center by the end of the year, according to a press release from Gulf Coast Commercial Group. The center is connected to the property that is expected to house a Kroger. However, no progress has been made on the Kroger, according to Gulf Coast representatives. www.gulfcoastcg.com

area permits dogs and cigars, and the restaurant hopes to host live music in the future. The patio allows space for social distancing, according to Stadia Sports Grill’s social media. This is one of two Sta- dia locations in Pearland. 832-486-9611.

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www.stadiasportsgrill.com ANNIVERSARIES

9 Texas Art Supply , located at 1507 Baybrook Mall Drive, Friendswood, is celebrating 35 years of business in Au- gust. The locally owned business sells art supplies and o ff ers discounts for teachers and students. The store sells goods for artists who paint, draw, craft or sculpt. 281-486-9320.www.texasart.com CLOSINGS 10 AR Workshop Pearland’s last day of business at 9430 Broadway St., Ste.

Sweet Paris Creperie & Cafe COURTESY SWEET PARIS CREPERIE & CAFE

Pearwood Driving School COURTESY PEARWOOD DRIVING SCHOOL

property in The Woodlands. Plans to open a permanent pop-up barbecue pit at the location are undecided. This will be Killen’s second barbecue restaurant; his fi rst is located at 3613 E. Broadway St., Pearland. www.killensbarbecue.com

that 24 Hour Fitness is fi ling for bank- ruptcy due to COVID-19. IN THE NEWS 13 Pearland’s Ronnie Killen, owner of Killen’s Barbecue , purchased a second

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PEARLAND - FRIENDSWOOD EDITION • JULY 2020

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES Brazoria County Expressway is completed The Brazoria County Tollway

COMPILED BY HALEY MORRISON

Texas Department of Transportation, is set to open Sept. 3, Hanks said. “It’s really nice to be where we’re at. It’s been a long time,” Hanks said. “I will be very pleased when it opens this fall.” When the toll road project began in 2017, it was expected to be completed in late 2019. Instead, it was com- pleted in June 2020. Despite running over its timeline, the project has managed to stay on budget, Hanks said. The county had $80 million allocated for the con- struction of the toll lanes. “We are pretty much right on budget. I am really pleased about that,” he said.

is completed and will open when the Harris County portion is ready to open as well, Brazoria County Engineer Matt Hanks said. The only remaining portions of the project are minor, so Brazoria County drivers are able to drive on the main lanes without being rerouted, Hanks said. The project began in July 2017 when the county started construct- ing toll lanes that would stretch 5 miles across the county from the Harris-Brazoria County line to Croix Road. The toll road will connect to a toll road in the Harris County portion of Hwy. 288. The Harris County por- tion of the project, overseen by the

Courtesy Brazoria County

The Harris County portion of the toll road is 10.3 miles long and will run from the Brazoria-Harris County line into Hwy. 288 and Hwy. 59. The Harris County portion was originally supposed to be fi nished in late 2019. Other portions of the project include widening Broadway Street at the intersection of Broadway and Hwy. 288. This is set to be completed in July, Hanks said.

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McHard Road extension The city of Pearland awarded the McHard Road extension to James Construction Group at the June 22 meeting. The proj- ect will extend McHard Road from Cullen Boulevard to Mykawa Road. Timeline: August 2020-summer 2022 Cost: $33.63 million Funding sources: city of Pearland, Houston-Galveston Area Council’s Transportation Improvement Program

Broadway Street widening The Broadway Street project received en- vironmental clearance in April. The Texas Department of Transportation is doing right of way mapping and design for the portion of the project that stretches from Hwy. 288 to Cullen Boulevard. The right of way will remain 150 feet. This portion of the project is expected to go to bid in August 2024. The project will widen Broadway Street from four lanes to six lanes with a raised median. Timeline: TBD Cost: $35 million Funding source: TxDOT

Hwy 288 frontage construction The Hwy. 288 frontage road construction is set to begin in October. The project will construct a three-lane frontage road northbound from Magnolia Parkway to Broadway Street, with a U-turn under the Magnolia Parkway underpass. Timeline: October 2020-February 2021 Cost: $7.1 million Funding sources: city of Pearland, Brazoria County

Friendswood Lakes Boulevard construction

The Friendswood Lakes Boulevard proj- ect is set to go out to bid this summer, with construction slated to begin in the fall. The project will begin where Friendswood Lakes Boulevard converts from four lanes to two in Friendswood and extend the road to West Boulevard in League City. Timeline: fall 2020-TBD Cost: $5.5 million Funding sources: city of Friendswood, developers, Galveston County

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF JUNE 18. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT PLFNEWS @ COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

As the COVID-19 outbreak continues to evolve, we remain committed to serving our clients through volatility and uncertainty and, we are taking steps to protect the health and well-being of our communities. Please Wear Your Mask & Stay Safe!

Richard Lambert 832-243-4180 12234 Shadow Creek Pkwy

Building 4 Ste 100 Pearland, TX 77584 www.edwardjones.com/richard-lambert

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We are focusing our resources on the number one priority–looking after people.

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PEARLAND - FRIENDSWOOD EDITION • JULY 2020

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CORONAVIRUS Brazoria County reports spike in COVID - 19 cases as Texas reopens

George Floyd at the hands of a police o ffi cer in Minneapolis, resulting in protests nationwide bringing large groups of people together. In Galveston County, a group of Friendswood ISD alumni held a Black Lives Matter march in honor of Floyd. Despite the protests, Sbrusch said she did not believe they were the cause for the recent spike in cases. “In Brazoria County, the recent increase in the past 10 days [since June 13] has not been attributed to any large outbreaks,” Sbrusch wrote. “We have not seen any increase in cases attributed to the ongoing protests.” COVID-19 cases in Brazoria County are continuing at a steeper increase since the second reopening phase began on May 18, the county’s data shows. On May 1, the county reported fi ve new cases that day. By May 18, that had increased to 16 new cases per day. By June 22, that number had increased to 26 new cases per day. What is important to consider is that Brazoria County no longer

reports Texas Department of Criminal Justice inmate case information on its COVID-19 dashboard, as of June 8, according to recent reports. That includes COVID case information on a nearly 8,000-inmate population within Brazoria County, among six correctional facility units, according to the TDCJ. According to Jeremy Desel, director of communications for the TDCJ, the department is required to report inmate COVID-19 numbers to the Texas Department of State Health Services. As of June 22, Brazoria County reported 1,762 COVID-19 cases, according to the state health department data, leaving 521 cases— including deaths, recoveries and probable cases—unaccounted for when comparing the state and county data. The criminal justice department reports on June 22 that among the six correctional units within Brazoria County, there are 43 active COVID-19 cases among inmates, with 554 total recoveries.

BY HUNTER MARROW

An uptick NEW COVID - 19 CASES

Brazoria County has experienced a spike in COVID-19 cases and is now reporting 1,467 total con fi rmed cases of the virus as of July 9, according to data collected by the county’s health department. That compares to 367 cases the county had seen up until May 1, when Gov. Greg Abbott’s fi rst phase of reopening Texas initiated. This would soon follow with a second phase of reopening, which began May 18. According to Cathy Sbrusch, director of public health services for Brazoria County, those reopenings have caused that spike in cases. “The recent spike appears to be from increased community move- ment,” Sbrusch wrote in a statement. “As places have reopened and activ- ities have resumed, individuals now have signi fi cantly more contact with others than they were previously.” The state’s second phase of reopen- ing coincided with the death of

Brazoria County has seen new daily COVID-19 cases increase substantially as time has gone on.

“The recent spike appears to be from increased community movement.” Cathy Sbrusch, director of public health services for Brazoria County NUMBER OF REPORTED CASES JUNE 1,181 TOTAL CASES JULY 905 CASES AS OF JULY 9

MAY 290 TOTAL CASES

SOURCE: BRAZORIA COUNTY / COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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INSIDE INFORMATION

Starting a conversation with children about race

BY HALEY MORRISON

After George Floyd’s death and in the midst of protests around the country, Americans are hearing more about racism. Some parents may wonder how to explain current events to children. Community TALKING TO CHILDREN ABOUT RACE

STICK WITH FACTS Miles suggested with younger children in particular, it is important to acknowledge as human beings, we are biologically more alike than we are di ff erent. Using those facts resonates with children and shapes their perception on race from a young age, she said.

CONVERSATIONS CHANGE AS CHILDREN GET OLDER Along with being an educator, Miles is a mother of a 16-year- old and 12-year-old twins. The conversations she has with her twins on race are di ff erent than the conversations she has with her 16-year-old due to age. Older children have seen and experienced more of the world, shaping the conversation, she said. “I think because older kids view some of [racism], they see it a little di ff erently. Kids only behave a certain way if they are taught it, but realistically, as children get older, they view things di ff erently.”

“Especially with younger children, we have to be very careful of what is said in the home because younger children tend to mimic what they hear.”

Impact Newspaper spoke with Dana Miles, who is the Pearland Junior High West principal and a chair for Pearland ISD’s Culturally Responsive Committee, about how adults can talk about race with children.

DANA MILES

RACISM CAN BE ADDRESSED IN SCHOOLS While discussions on racism may look di ff erent in every household, educators need to be especially mindful of how they address racism, Miles said.

PARENTS SHOULD BE MINDFUL OF LANGUAGE USED Children’s opinions are formed when they are younger by what they hear at home, Miles said. Because of this

parents should speak carefully about race. Conversations about racism might di ff er in every home, she said.

“I’m a Black woman, and some of the conversations I have had with my own children are di ff erent from what some other parents may talk about with their children.”

“For educators, I think it is somewhat of a responsibility to be mindful of the things we say. It is not our responsibility to talk about racism, but if we shy away from it, it becomes this thing that fl oats in the background of what we say as educators.”

HAVE EMPATHY In all conversations about race and experience, empathy is key, Miles said. Alongside that, Miles encourages children to use both their head and their heart when thinking about race.

“If your heart is in direct con fl ict with what your brain is thinking, then we may need to talk it out.”

“We have to sift through perception because unfortunately, we don’t get to choose how people feel about a situation. I believe until we are willing to walk to the other side and see the perception, we are not really ready to get to the bottom of it.”

HOW DID WE GET HERE? RESTORATIVE ACTION HELPS Miles is a chairperson of the district’s Culturally Responsive Committee. While the committee does not speci fi cally deal with matters of

TALK TO THE OTHER SIDE An important part in overcoming racial di ff erences is being able to see the perspective of the other side, Miles said.

“We are fi nding restorative practices give us the results we like. We now have to have hard conversations about what really got us here.”

race, Miles thinks it could get to that point, as restorative action looks at what things in a person’s environment cause misconduct and then seeks to restore justice.

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PEARLAND - FRIENDSWOOD EDITION • JULY 2020

delbellolakes.com From downtown Houston, take Highway 288 south. Exit Highway 6 and U-turn. Then exit Del Bello Boulevard and follow the signs to our model homes.

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14

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

SILVER SPONSOR

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER IS PROUD TO SAY THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS 2020 EDI T ION REAL ESTATE

Friendswood Excel Center Outpatient Behavioral Health provided through TELEHEALTH. If you or someone you know are in a mental health crisis please call 281-648-1200. Most insurances accepted and the assessments are at no-cost.

SILVER SPONSOR

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Meridiana is an expertly planned community minutes south of Pearland featuring new homes, parks and trails, onsite schools and the waterfront Oasis Village o ff ering year-round fi tness and entertainment.

Providing extraordinary emergency care 24/7/365 for all adult and pediatric emergencies in Pearland. We have no wait, private rooms, and accept Medicare.

COMPILED BY HALEY MORRISON

DAYS ON THEMARKET AVERAGE June 2018-May 2019

June 2019-May 2020

2019 - 20 PEARLAND | FRIENDSWOOD REAL ESTATE MARKET AT A GLANCE

77089

77581 7.7% 77089 7.7%

77546 4.5% 77584 9.5%

77578 10%

46

52

56

44

70

77

45

77581

521

All Pearland and Friendswood ZIP codes saw decreases in the number of homes sold year over year. However, all but one ZIP code in Pearland and Friendswood saw an increase in the average home sale price.

518

288

39

42

42

46

77584

35

77578

77546

Brazoria County

Galveston County

6

51

59 +15.7%

55

57 +3.6%

N

HOMES SOLD NUMBER OF

HOME SALES PRICE AVERAGE

June 2018-May 2019

June 2019-May 2020

June 2018-May 2019

June 2019-May 2020

$303,000 $311,000 +2.6% $318,695 $318,000 -0.2% $288,000 $291,000 +1.6%

$344,000 $353,000 +2.6% $273,000 $279,000 +2.2%

554

858

-11.7%

-4.1%

489 439

823 642

-0.07%

-0.9%

436

636

1,335

-7.2%

1,239

Brazoria County

Galveston County

SOURCES: HOUSTON ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS, BETTER HOMES AND GARDENS REAL ESTATE GARY GREENE / COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

$254,000 $258,000 +1.7%

$278,000 $292,000 +5%

15

PEARLAND - FRIENDSWOOD EDITION • JULY 2020

REAL ESTATE 2020EDITION

GUIDE

A guide to home and garden projects with advice from local businesses

Home Evolution is a locally owned business in Pearland specializing in all types of home renovations, owner Samuel Cortez said. The business does renovations for the interior and exterior of homes. Home Evolution has operated in Pearland since August 2017. HOME IMPROVEMENT &MAINTENANCE 2020 Pearland | Friendswood

COMPILED BY HALEY MORRISON

3

4 HOME IMPROVEMENT TRENDS

1

1 Outdoor renovations The summer is a popular time to renovate a backyard, Cortez said. The most common outdoor renovation Home Evolution sees is customers wanting a deck. Many customers also want a deck to have a roof or pergola, Cortez said. A pergola is a structure of four posts that hold up a structure typically made of open lattice work. 2 Remodeling the kitchen Cortez said full remodels of kitchens are one of the most common things he sees. Typically, the full remodel includes new cabinets and countertops. While tastes vary between customers, most customers choose white wood for their cabinets, Cortez said. 3 Remodeling bathrooms Kitchen and bathroom remodels are two

of the most frequent, as well as the most expensive, jobs Home Evolution does, Cortez said. The most common project he sees in bathrooms is ripping out a bathtub to

2

4

replace it with a larger shower. Even if customers keep the bathtub, many still call to get the shower updated to a frameless glass shower. 4 Flooring One of the few projects Cortez sees customers do on their own is put in laminate fl oors; otherwise, they come to a professional. Some fl ooring projects, such as laying carpet in the living room, are not as expensive as a full renovation. The biggest trend in fl ooring Cortez sees is homeowners opting for tile that looks like wood throughout the house.

Home Evolution 5517 Broadway St., Ste. H, Pearland 832-788-9396 www.homeevolution.org

35

N

Summer time is o ffi cially here and Meridiana is o ff ering $3,000 OFF selected homesites. Now is the time to find your perfect NEW home from the low $200s to $600s. VISIT MERIDIANATEXAS.COM to learn more.

*Reduced price o ff er of $3,000 is the responsibility of the participating builder. For the promotion to be applied, participants must initially present the flyer at a participating builder’s model home. Purchaser must sign the initial earnest money contract between 7/1/2020 – 7/31/2020 and close by 8/31/2020 for completed inventory homes, or close 30 days after completion for a planned inventory home. One o ff er is allowed per contract. O ff er is on select homesites, as identified by the participating builder. Participants must be 18 years of age or older. Participants acknowledge that the contact and other information provided on any promotion form may be used by Meridiana and shared with the homebuilders who are constructing homes within Meridiana’s community, and by entering such information consents to Meridiana so using such contact and other information. All contact and other information collected by Meridiana as part of the promotion is subject to Meridiana’s privacy policy. (07/20)

16

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

HOUSING Report: Harris County is losing its grip on a ff ordability as costs rise

BY MATT DULIN

American Community Survey as well as the Houston Association of Realtors, the Kinder report noted the increasing trend toward renting as home owner- ship pulled further out of economic reach, with 45% of Harris County residents renting as of 2018. A household earning the median income in 2018, $60,146, could a ff ord a home priced at around $186,000, but the median market price was $220,000 that year. “The a ff ordability gap is even worse for renters, making it nearly impossi- ble for the average renter to purchase a home without signi fi cant subsidy,” the report notes.

Renters are also increasingly unable to build the savings needed to work toward a home purchase, with 47% paying over 30% of their income on rent and 25% paying more than 50%, according to the report. Homeowners do not see the same challenges, the report found. “Renters are stretched and can’t keep up, and so you can see a cycle where they are stuck where they are,” Shelton said. This is particularly troubling, he said, with home ownership declining among Black households and income tied up in higher-rent properties. “Housing dollars are dollars spent you can’t spend on something else. ... They aren’t paying for education or health care, and they aren’t building generational wealth,” Shelton said. The report also noted a mismatch between supply- and income-based demand, with more multifamily units being built to serve the higher end of the market, for example. “The next step I would really think about is setting some targets, ... really thinking about production targets by income band,” Cunningham said. “Supporting a ff ordable housing in your neighborhood is a great place to start.” Advocates also called for longer- term strategies rather than responding to natural and economic disasters as they come. “We keep working on a knee-jerk reaction,” said Allison Hay, the exec- utive director of Houston Habitat for Humanity. “We don’t have a plan that goes far enough along to help families for generations and help Houston grow as a city.”

County, which was released June 23. Inspired by Harvard University’s “State of the Nation’s Housing” annual report, the Kinder Institute hopes to o ff er this annual snapshot as a benchmark for informing housing and policy decisions, though the institute did not advocate for any approaches in its fi rst year, Shelton said. “We’ve done a great job at describ- ing the problems ... but more and more we want to think about, ‘What are the solutions?’” said Mary Cunningham, the vice president for metropolitan housing and community policies at the Urban Institute. Using aggregated data from the

Even before the pandemic, fi nding an a ff ordable place to live was becom- ing increasingly di ffi cult in Harris County, with prices outpacing incomes and more people at risk of being overly burdened by housing costs, accord- ing to data compiled by the Kinder Institute for Urban Research. “The sense is, with COVID-19 ... a ff ordability is only going to get worse,” said Kyle Shelton, one of the authors of the institute’s fi rst com- prehensive look at housing in Harris

STATE OF HOUSING REPORT K E Y F I N D I N G S

Here are some of the data points noted by the Kinder Institute report.

HOMES AT RISK

AFFORDABILITY GAP

falls in a 500-year fl ood plain in Harris County. This could increase as fl ood maps are redrawn. 1 IN 4 HOMES

The median home sales price in 2018 was $220,000 , but a person at the median income level could a ff ord only $186,256 .

of renter households 23%

of homeowner households 9.6%

Residents paying more than 50% of income toward housing:

RENTING ON THE RISE

IN HARRIS COUNTY:

57% of Houston residents compared to 53% in 2010 45% of Harris County residents are renting compared to 42% in 2010

of all new housing units permitted in 2018 were multifamily 50%

On average, Harris County residents spend 47% of their income on housing and transportation.

Renter-occupied units by gross rent

2010 2018

50K 100K 150K 200K 250K 300K 0

26% 6%

of residents live alone live with nonfamily occupants

Less than $800

$1,000 to $1,249

$1,250 to $1,499

$1,500 or more

$800 to $900

SOURCE: KINDER INSTITUTE FOR URBAN RESEARCH STATE OF HOUSING REPORT / COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

GROSS RENT

MARTINEZ LANDING 4637 DAGG ROAD | $1,470,000 | 281.486.1900

NORTHFIELD ESTATES 504 NORTHVIEW DRIVE | $695,000 | 281.607.1990

SUNMEADOW 210 W CASTLE HARBOUR | $364,500 | 281.486.1900

©2019 Better Homes and Gardens Real Estate LLC. Better Homes and Gardens® is a registered trademark of Meredith Corporation licensed to Better Homes and Gardens Real Estate LLC. Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Each Franchise is Independently Owned and Operated. If your property is currently listed with a real estate broker, please disregard. It is not our intention to solicit the offerings of other real estate brokers.

GaryGreene.com

17

PEARLAND - FRIENDSWOOD EDITION • JULY 2020

45

1,787

Home sales after Harvey Hurricane Harvey did not negatively a ff ect real estate in Friendswood after 2017. In fact, more homes were sold in 2018 than in 2016, pre-Harvey. Roughly 16% of the homes sold that year were sold “as-is,” or gutted. SOURCES: STANFIELD PROPERTIES, HOUSTON ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS / COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Flooded homes sell Homes that have been gutted are referred to as homes sold “as is,” and they are still selling, Caballero said. Here is the amount of Stan fi eld Properties has sold.

518

FRIENDSWOOD

77546

permits fi led in Friendswood in 2017 for home repairs related to Hurricane Harvey

N

35

Number of homes sold "as is"

Total single-family residences sold in 77546

“We still have buyers in Friendswood ask if the house did fl ood. It does a ff ect them in that it takes them longer to sell, but it does still sell.” Frances Caballero, Stan fi eld Properties operations manager

65

2017

868 907 782 798

2016

145

2018

2017

25

2019

2018

3

2020

2019

RESIDENTIAL REAL ESTATE Friendswood real estate fl ourishes despiteHarvey’s toll on homes

BY HALEY MORRISON

Caballero is also a real estate agent who has sold in Friendswood for years. She was concerned Harvey would a ff ect the real estate market long term, but 2018 ended up being the best year the company had seen, she said. According to data from the Houston Association of Realtors, 907 homes were sold in 2018 in ZIP code 77546, more than the number of homes sold in 2016 or 2017. While 2018 was the best year the company had in sales, Caballero already considers 2020 a defeat due to the coronavirus pandemic, she said. “To me, COVID[-19] is a way bigger deal. People are going to lose jobs, and jobs are what sell homes,” Caballero said. Caballero said job loss or a lack of fl ood insurance during the storm can be reasons homes are left un fi nished after Harvey. “Things victims have as far as resources is what is probably

extending this [process],” Rouane said. “Some cases may be that people didn’t have fl ood insurance, so this would have been out of pocket.” Neighborhoods with un fi nished homes on the block are not a ff ected adversely on the real estate market, Caballero said. Several buyers even sell gutted homes, which sometimes sell faster than complete homes and even result in a bidding war, she said. In 2018 alone, Caballero estimates Stan fi eld Properties sold 146 homes gutted, or “as is,” she said. “If they are selling for $130,000, they end up selling for $155,000. It’s an interesting trend in Friendswood,” Caballero said. In Friendswood, many buyers are familiar with the term “ fi rst-time fl ood” to describe a property that fl ooded for its fi rst time during Harvey, Caballero said. These homes are often purchased quickly, as they were recently

renovated, Caballero said. But even homes that have fl ooded multiple times are still purchased quickly. “We still have buyers in Friend- swood ask if the house did fl ood. It does a ff ect them in that it takes them longer to sell, but it does still sell,” Caballero said. Caballero said the reaction after Harvey was unexpected for her. “I was scared,” she said. “I thought, ‘Six months from now we are going to have this huge glut of remodeled homes because everyone wants to bail out of Friendswood,’ and it simply did not happen.” Friendswood has four characteris- tics that make it attractive to buyers and homeowners, Caballero said: geography, high-performing school districts, low tax rates and a small- town feeling. “Friendswood is still trying hard to keep that small-town feel, and we are really the only suburb that has that,” Caballero said.

In 2017, Hurricane Harvey deci- mated thousands of homes in Friend- swood. Nearly three years later, there are some homes that have never been completely fi xed. The city of Friendswood issued 1,787 permits for Harvey repairs in 2017, an inundation that caused the city to bring in additional help, Chief Building O ffi cial Brian Rouane said. Some of those permits are still open, meaning the work on the homes has not been completed. However, this is not unusual for the type of permit, especially after a storm such as Harvey, which required the city to work with the Federal Emergency Management Agency to process permits, Rouane said. However, the number of un fi nished homes in a neighborhood has not negatively a ff ected Friendswood real estate at all, at least not after 2017, Stan fi eld Properties Operations Manager Frances Caballero said.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

REAL ESTATE 2020EDITION

INSIDE INFORMATION

COMPILED BY ANNA LOTZ

When interest rates are low, homeowners may look to save money by re fi nancing, which involves getting a new mortgage with a better term or interest rate to lower payments. Mortgage rates have steadily declined since November 2018, according to weekly data from Freddie Mac, also known as the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. Matt Frankel, a certi fi ed fi nancial planner and mortgage analyst at The Ascent by Motley Fool—a general personal fi nance advice resource—shared advantages and disadvantages of the re fi nancing process. REFINANCING U N D E R S T A N D I N G WHAT TOCONSIDER 1. 2. Is the current market rate at least 1% lower than your existing mortgage rate? Are you planning to stay in the same home for at least 5 more years ?

HOWTO START

• Always consult multiple lenders to fi nd the best mortgage rate. Start with a current lender. • Multiple inquiries from mortgage lenders a ff ect an individual’s credit score no more than a single inquiry , Frankel said.

Re fi nancing isn’t free. … It becomes amath problemof whether the savings you’re going to get fromyourmortgage payment are going to bemore than you’re paying.

MATT FRANKEL, MORTGAGE ANALYST AT THE ASCENT

Pros • Can lower monthly mortgage payments • May eliminate private mortgage insurance Cons • Can be costly, as homeowners must pay lender and closing fees again • Paperwork THE INS ANDOUTS OF REFINANCING

TRACKINGMORTGAGE RATES

Although the U.S. weekly average rate for a 30-year mortgage is trending downward, mortgage rates vary by credit score, Frankel said.

0 3.1% 3.2% 3.3% 3.4% 3.5% 3.6% 3.7% 3.8% 3.9% 4%

3.82%

3.73%

3.56%

3.13%

ANOTHER OPTION

3.36%

A homeowner can also choose cash-out re fi nancing, meaning an existing mortgage is replaced with a new home loan totaling more than the remaining debt. The di ff erence is paid in cash and can be helpful in paying other debts, as a mortgage is often the lowest-interest loan available, Frankel said.

March 12, 2020 Dec. 12, 2019

June 25, 2020

June 13, 2019 Sept. 12, 2019

SOURCE: FREDDIE MAC / COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

OU T PA T I EN T B EHAV I ORAL HEAL T H S E RV I CE S

The Excel Center Friendswood continues its commitment to meeting the behavioral health needs of the community. Telehealth services available at this time. • No-cost assessments • Assessments available within 24 hours Monday through Friday • Licensed treatment team including physicians • Most insurances accepted • Serving children, adolescents, and adults. If you or someone you know is struggling, we are here for you. Call 281-648-1200 or for more information, visit westoakshospital.com/outpatient.

111 E. Edgewood, Friendswood, TX 77546 281-648-1200

For language assistance, disability accommodations and the non-discrimination notice, visit our website. With limited exceptions, physicians are not employees or agents of this hospital. Model representations of real patients are shown. Actual patients cannot be divulged due to HIPAA regulations. 202727-3605 6/20

19

PEARLAND - FRIENDSWOOD EDITION • JULY 2020

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