Gilbert Edition - April 2020

GILBERT EDITION

VOLUME 2, ISSUE 8  APRIL 29MAY 26, 2020

ONLINE AT

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CHOICES TOMAKE Gilbert’s council ballot came into focus after the April 6 nominating petition deadline.

Copingwith COVID Businesses, schools, residents persevere

INSIDE

12

The normally congested Heritage District had little weekday trac.

AUG. 4 Primary and town elections NOV. 3 General election and possible runo

BALLOT MAYOR • Lynne King Smith • Gary Livacari

• Matt Nielsen • Brigette Peterson

FOURYEAR COUNCIL SEATS TWO • Scott Anderson • Tyler Hudgins • Busola Obayomi • Kathy Tilque TWOYEAR COUNCIL SEAT • Laurin Hendrix • Bill Spence

SOURCE: TOWN OF GILBERTCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Resignations, pandemic shape ballot, campaigns

BY TOM BLODGETT

Having already aected who is on the ballot for Gilbert’s August town elections, the coronavirus pan- demic is shaping the earliest stages of campaigns— and perhaps for longer. While social distancing is the order of the day in town and around the nation, social media has become the platform of choice in a year when Gil- bert could see as many as six of seven council seats change hands, the candidates said. Messaging, however, can be tricky, according to the candidates, when people are cooped up in their homes, worrying about their jobs or businesses and how to put food on the table. Mayoral candidateMatt Nielsen said since elections will not be delayed, candidates have to nd a way CONTINUED ON 14

Businesses temporarily closed in an environment of economic uncertainty.

Crowds thinned at Gilbert’s Farmers Market, and many took to wearing masks.

PHOTOS BY ISABELLA SHORTCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

CORONAVIRUS COVERAGE

All content in this print publication, both editorial and advertisements, was up to date as of the press deadline. Due to the fast-changing nature of this event, editorial and advertising information may have changed. Please visit communityimpact.com and advertiser websites for more information. Thanks for your support.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

CONTENTS RESTAURANT LISTINGS Delivery and pickup options TRANSPORTATION Local road projects TOWN& EDUCATION

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

4

PUBLISHERS AND FOUNDERS John and Jennifer Garrett PUBLISHERPHOENIXMETRO Amy Ellsworth aellsworth@communityimpact.com EDITORIAL EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Lanane MANAGING EDITOR Krista Wadsworth EDITOR Tom Blodgett COPY CHIEF Andy Comer COPY EDITORS Ben Dickerson, Kasey Salisbury STAFFWRITERS Alexa D'Angelo, Wendy Sturges ADVERTISING SALES DIRECTOR Tess Coverman ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Michelle Gavagan DESIGN CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Aubrey Galloway GRAPHIC DESIGNER Isabella Short STAFF DESIGNER Damien Hernandez BUSINESS GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER Claire Love ABOUT US John and Jennifer Garrett began Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 in Pugerville, Texas. The company’s mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. CONTACT US 610 N. Gilbert Road, Ste. 205 Gilbert, AZ 85234 • 4804824880 communityimpact.com PRESS RELEASES gilnews@communityimpact.com SUBSCRIPTIONS communityimpact.com/subscriptions © 2020 Community Impact Newspaper Co. All Rights Reserved. No reproduction of any portion of this issue is allowed without written permission from the publisher.

6

FROMAMY: This month you’ll see some great coverage related to how our community has come together during COVID-19. What you won’t see in these pages are several other articles that our team has compiled for our website. There you will nd even more updates on how we have responded— stories of kindness and resiliency, as well as updates you need to know each day. You may also sign up for our daily newsletters while you’re on the website.

7

Gilbert and local school district news

Amy Ellsworth, PUBLISHER

FROMTOM: This issue will be a little dierent than what you are used to, just as life is dierent. This month, you will not see our traditional package of “Impacts”— businesses that are now open or coming soon, etc. Instead, we have Gilbert restaurant listings and how to get their food during Arizona’s stay-at-home period. That switch seemed the best way for now to carry out our mission to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses. As public gatherings have been suspended, we also will not have our To-Do List calendar listings.

TRAILS GUIDE

8

Nearby spots to hike, bike

BUSINESS FEATURE

10

Sarouja Pharmacy

Tom Blodgett, EDITOR

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Read live updates and nd out what's happening in your town and nearby areas. communityimpact.com LIVE UPDATES

Our mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team.

DINING FEATURE

11

Dragon Wok

REAL ESTATE

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Residential market data IMPACT DEALS

DAILY INBOX

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1907 E Williams Field Rd, Suite 108, Gilbert, AZ 480-272-8226

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3

GILBERT EDITION • APRIL 2020

DINING

A noncomprehensive list of restaurants in Gilbert oering food to go

Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey ordered Arizonans to stay at home beginning 5 p.m. March 31, but listed restaurants as essential businesses that could remain open for people to get pickup or delivery orders. Here is how Gilbert’s restaurants have responded. FOOD&DRINKDELIVERYOPTIONS

25 Einstein Bros. Bagels 1447 E. Williams Field Road 899 N. Val Vista Drive 480-857-0486 (Williams Field) 480-632-8196 (Val Vista) www.einsteinbros.com H C $ 26 Firebirds Wood Fired Grill 1930 E. Williams Field Road 480-912-8970 https://gilbert.firebirdsrestaurants.com H C $ A 27 Firehouse Subs 2894 S. Santan Village Parkway, Ste. 101 4764 S. Higley Road, Ste. 106, Gilbert. 480-855-0900 (Santan Village Parkway) 480-867-1916 (Higley Road) www.firehousesubs.com H C $ 28 Five Guys 1877 E. Williams Field Road 480-307-8603 www.fiveguys.com H C 29 Flancer’s 610 N. Gilbert Road 480-926-9077 https://flancers.com H C $ A 30 Floridino’s Pizza & Pasta 50 E. Guadalupe Road, Ste. 107 480-539-1079 www.floridinospizzapasta.com H C A 31 Frankie’s Famous Pizza 1561 N. Cooper Road 480-507-7777 www.frankiesfamouspizza.com H C 32 Fresh Millions 1515 N. Gilbert Road, Ste. 105 480-462-1000 www.freshmillions.com/location/gilbert H 33 Genuine Fresche 1686 N. Higley Road, Ste. 105 480-654-5959 https://mkt.com/freschegilbert C $ 34 Grill N Chop 2401 E. Baseline Road, Ste. 103 480-632-0977 www.grillnchop.com H C 35 Henhouse Café 3244 E. Guadalupe Road 480-219-7379 www.henhouse-cafe.com C 36 HG Roastery and Café 2556 S. Val Vista Drive, Ste. 101 480-821-7020 www.hgroastery.com H C $ 37 Hundred North Bar Kitchen 100 N. Gilbert Road, 480-361-3536 https://hundrednorthbar.com H C A

https://mexicanfoodgilbert.com H C $ A 39 JC’s Steakhouse 25 E. Ray Road 480-306-4545 www.jcssteakhouse.com H C $ A 40 Joyride Taco House East 302 N. Gilbert Road 480-632-8226 https://joyridetacohouse.com H C $ A 41 Kaleidoscope Juice 60 W. Vaughn Ave., Ste. 105 480-553-7143 https://kaleidoscope.love/gilbert C $ 42 La Calabria Ristorante 2540 S. Val Vista Drive, Ste. 107 480-756-3537 www.lacalabriaristorante.com C $ A 43 La Ristra New Mexican Kitchen 638 E. Warner Road 480-545-2880 http://laristraaz.com H C $ A 44 Level 1 Arcade Bar 60 W. Vaughn Ave., Ste. 107 480-687-1192 www.level1arcade.bar C $ A 45 Michael’s Pizza 857 E. Warner Road, Ste. 101 480-633-2255 www.michaelspizzagilbert.com H C $ 46 Mugsy Dogs 3160 E. Queen Creek Road, Ste. 101 480-719-6088 https://mugsydogs.com C 47 Native Grill & Wings 4341 E. Baseline Road, Ste. 108 480-256-0654 https://nativegrillandwings.com H C $ A 48 New Mexican Grill 3107 S. Lindsay Road 480-899-0773 www.facebook.com/new-mexican- grill-131115090288041 H C 49 Nicantoni’s Pizza 323 S. Gilbert Road, Ste. 111 480-892-2234 www.nicantonis.com H C $ A 50 Not Your Typical Deli 1166 S. Gilbert Road, Ste. 101 480-794-1116 http://nytdeli.com C $ 51 O.H.S.O. Brewery 335 N. Gilbert Road 602-900-9004 https://ohsobrewery.com/gilbert C $ A 52 Oregano’s Pizza Bistro 328 N. Gilbert Road 480-882-9336

H Home delivery C Curbside pickup D Drive-thru $ Special deals A Alcohol available

1 American Poutine Co. 1395 E. Warner Road, Ste. 100 480-434-3982 www.americanpoutine.com H C $ A 2 Arizona BBQ Co. 1534 E. Ray Road, Ste. 110 480-361-4180 https://azbbqcompany.com H C $ A 3 Arizona Wilderness Gilbert BrewPub 721 N. Arizona Ave. 480-497-2739 https://azwbeer.com H C $ A 4 Backyard Taco 1420 S. Higley Road 480-247-2775 https://backyardtaco.com H C D $ 5 Barrio Queen 388 N. Gilbert Road 480-634-5025 https://barrioqueen.com H C $ A 6 Bergies Coffee Roast House 309 N. Gilbert Road 480-497-3913 www.bergiescoffee.com H C $ 7 Blue 32 Sports Grill 1524 E. Williams Field Road 6348 S. Higley Road 480-963-0032 (Williams Field) 480-248-7002 (Higley) www.blue32sportsgrill.com H C $ A 8 Blue Wasabi Sushi & Martini Bar 2080 E. Williams Field Road, Ste. 101 480-722-9250 http://bluewasabi.com H C $ A 9 Boca Taqueria 1674 N. Higley Road, Ste. 101 480-306-8690 http://bocataqueria.com H C $ 10 Bongiorno Bagels 3107 S. Gilbert Road, Ste. 101 480-588-8222 www.bongiornobagels.com C 11 Brio Tuscan Grill 2150 E. Williams Field Road 480-917-9177 www.brioitalian.com H C $ A 12 Brooklyn Mike’s Subs 78 N. Cooper Road, Ste. 101 480-497-0777 https://brooklynmikessubs.business.site H

13 Brooklyn V’s Pizza 894 E. Warner Road, Ste. 101 480-207-7295 http://brooklynvspizza.com H C $ A

14 Buddyz, A Chicago Pizzeria 3611 E. Baseline Road, Ste. 102 480-503-4444 www.buddyzpizza.com H C A 15 Buffalo Wild Wings 970 S. Gilbert Road 480-632-9464 www.buffalowildwings.com/en/ locations/detail/3184 H C $ A 16 Caldwell County BBQ 18324 E. Nunneley Road 480-892-0512 www.caldwellcountybbq.com C $ 17 Casanova Brothers Pizza 959 N. Val Vista Drive 480-539-6200 https://casanovabrospizza.com H C A 18 Clay Dawgs 546 N. Gilbert Road 480-813-3727 www.claydawgs.com D 19 Copper & Logs 832 S. Greenfield Road 480-590-4260 www.copperandlogs.com H C $ A 20 Copper Still Moonshine Grill 2531 S. Gilbert Road, Ste. 101 480-656-1476 http://copperstillmoonshinegrill.com H C $ A 21 Cuisine and Wine Bistro 1422 W. Warner Road, Ste. A100 480-497-1422 https://cuisineandwinebistro.com H C $ A 22 Culinary Dropout 383 N. Gilbert Road 480-418-3980 www.culinarydropout.com/locations/ gilbert-az H C $ A 23 Dog Haus Biergarten 2224 E. Williams Field Road, Ste. 107 602-584-7156 https://santanvillage.doghaus.com H C $ A 24 Dragon Wok 727 W. Ray Road, Ste. B1 480-782-6889 https://dragonwok.biz H C $

38 Jalisience Mexican Food 743 S. Lindsay Road, Ste. C101 480-615-0331

4

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

1

57

63

68

American Poutine Co.

Postino East

Rusty Taco

Shake Shack

PHOTOS BY AMY ELLSWORTH/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

75 Union Grill and Tap 1686 N. Higley Road, Ste. 101 480-935-5800 www.uniongrilltap.com H C $ A 76 The Whining Pig Beer & Bottle Bar 2512 S. Val Vista Drive, Ste. 112 480-696-4004 www.thewhiningpig.com H C A

http://oreganos.com/locations/gilbert H C $ A 53 Panda Libre Infused Restaurant 748 N. Gilbert Road 480-507-0713 https://pandalibre.com C D $ 54 Petersen’s Ice Cream & Cafe 366 N. Gilbert Road 480-651-4670 www.facebook.com/gilberticecream H C 55 Planet Sub 2475 S. Val Vista, Ste. A 480-245-6040 H C $ 56 Phoenicia Mediterranean Grill 1150 S. Gilbert Road, Ste. 104 480-503-4976 https://phoeniciacafe.com H C $ 57 Postino East 302 N. Gilbert Road, Ste. 102 480-632-6363 www.postinowinecafe.com/p/east.html H C $ A 58 Rancho de Tia Rosa 891 N. Higley Road 480-396-8787 www.ranchodetiarosa.com H C $ A 59 Rio Rico Mexican Grill 929 N. Val Vista Drive, Ste. 101 480-539-4491 H $ A 60 Romeo’s Euro Café 207 N. Gilbert Road, Ste. 105 480-962-4224

www.eurocafe.com H C $ A 61 Rosati’s 53 N. Val Vista Drive 480-633-3000 https://myrosatis.com/gilbert H C $ 62 Rudy’s Country Store and Bar-B-Q 1733 N. Higley Road 623-232-3506 https://rudysbbq.com/location/detail/ gilbert-az C $ A 63 Rusty Taco 1907 E. Williams Field Road, Ste. 108 480-272-8226 https://rustytaco.com H C $ A

gilbert-rivulon H C $ A 68 Shake Shack 2024 E. Williams Field Road 480-561-4875 www.shakeshack.com/location/ santan-village-gilbert-az H C $

69 Slate Bistro & Bar 4415 E. Village Parkway 480-988-5956 www.slatebistro.com C $ A 70 Snooze, an A.M. Eatery 310 N. Gilbert Road 480-664-4488 www.snoozeeatery.com/branches/1661/ snooze-gilbert H C $ A 71 SoCal Fish Taco Company 219 N. Gilbert Road 480-807-6225 www.socalfishtacos.com H C $ A 72 Sushi Brokers 350 N. Gilbert Road, Ste. 101 480-515-5000 https://sushibrokers.com C A 73 Ta Lew Thai Bistro 1493 S. Higley Road, Ste. 102 480-279-5553 www.talewthai.com C $ 74 Tosinos Mexican Grill 263 E. Warner Road, Ste. 105 480-718-5278 H

77 XJ’s Casa Reynoso 1661 S. Val Vista Drive 480-534-8403 https://xjscasareynoso.com H C $ A

78 Zappone’s Italian Bistro 1652 N. Higley Road, Ste. 103 480-218-2338 www.zapponesbistro.com H A 79 Zella’s Pizza and Cheesesteaks 1464 E. Williams Field Road 4984 S. Power Road 480-783-8234 (Williams Field) 480-812-8000 (Power) www.zellaspizza.com H C $ 80 Zinburger 344 N. Gilbert Road 480-387-5000 https://zinburgeraz.com/locations/ gilbert-az H C $ A

64 Salad and Go 743 N. Gilbert Road 910 S. Cooper Road 3299 E. Williams Field Road http://saladandgo.com D $ 65 Salerno’s 1150 S. Gilbert Road 480-892-0040 http://salernosaz.com H C $ A

66 Sal’s Gilbert Pizza 3921 E. Guadalupe Road 480-633-2226 https://gilbertpizzaaz.com H C $ A 67 Sauce 75 E. Rivulon Blvd. 480-550-4000 www.saucepizzaandwine.com/locations/

For the most up-to-date listing of takeout options, visit communityimpact.com .

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GILBERT EDITION • APRIL 2020

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES

COMPILED BY TOM BLODGETT

License expiration, Real IDdeadline delayed amid coronavirus outbreak

ONGOING PROJECTS

E. QUEEN CREEK RD.

W. ELLIOT RD.

E. ABBLEBY RD.

.

Drivers who have not yet applied for a Real ID will have a while longer to get one following a deadline extension from the federal government. The initial deadline for Real ID—a new identication card with a small circle and star in the corner of the card—was Oct. 1. After that time, U.S. residents would not be allowed to y domestically without it, unless they had another accepted form of identi- cation, such as a passport. Ocials with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security announced March 26 the new deadline for U.S. residents to get a Real ID is now Oct. 1, 2021, a year past the previous deadline. “Due to circumstances resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic and the national emergency declaration, the Department of Homeland Security, as directed by President Donald J. Trump, is extending the Real ID enforcement deadline beyond the BY ALEXA D’ANGELO AND WENDY STURGES

current October 1, 2020 deadline,” DHS Secretary ChadWolf said in a statement. “I have determined that states require a twelve-month delay and that the new deadline for Real ID enforcement is October 1, 2021. DHS will publish a notice of the new deadline in the Federal Register in the coming days.” Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey announced, additionally, that the state will delay expiration dates on Arizona driver licenses ensuring residents over the age of 65 do not need to visit motor vehicle division oces to renew their driver’s licenses during the emergency.

W. HACKAMORE AVE.

E. CHANDLER HEIGHTS RD.

W. WARNER RD.

E. RIGGS RD.

N

N

Val Vista Drive widening The town is widening Val Vista Drive from Appleby Road—about where Val Vista narrows to one lane in each direc- tion—to Riggs Road. Status: Construction has started at Appleby, and crews will work their way south. Medians are being removed to accommodate additional trac with the goal of having two lanes of trac when possible, but drivers should expect one through lane at certain times. Timeline: March 2020-July 2021 Cost: $25.96 million Funding sources: bonds, town and regional funds

Candlewood lift station and force main Gilbert is replacing the Candlewood Lift Station, which is a facility designed to move wastewater from lower to higher elevation, and about 5,000 feet of force main, which is pipeline to convey waste- water, from the Hackamore Avenue alignment to the force main at Gilbert Road. Status: The contractor is working on pipeline tie-ins that aect the inter- section of Hackamore and Gilbert Road through early May. Substantial pave- ment restoration is underway. Timeline: Sept. 24-May Cost: $10.16 million Funding source: town of Gilbert funds

ARIZONA REAL ID DEADLINE From Oct. 1, 2020

to Oct. 1, 2021

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF APRIL 20. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT GILNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

SOURCE: ARIZONA GOVERNOR’S OFFICE COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TOWN&EDUCATION

News from Gilbert, Gilbert Public Schools, Higley USD and Chandler USD

COMPILED BY TOM BLODGETT

MEETINGSWE COVER Gilbert Town Council May 5, 6:30 p.m. May 19, 6:30 p.m. 50 E. Civic Center Drive, Gilbert 480-503-6871 • www.gilbertaz.gov Gilbert Public Schools Board May 5, 6:30 p.m. (work study/brief business) May 26, 6:30 p.m. 140 S. Gilbert Road, Gilbert 480-497-3300 www.gilbertschools.net Higley USD Board April 29, 10 a.m. May 13, 5:30 p.m. 2935 S. Recker Road, Gilbert 480-279-7000 • www.husd.org Chandler USD Board May 6, 7 p.m. 1525 W. Frye Road, Chandler 480-812-7000 • www.cusd80.com Follow us on Twitter: @impactnews_gil Proposition 301, an education sales tax that voters approved in 2000 and was extended by the Arizona Legislature in 2018. CHANDLERUSD The governing board approved on March 25 the funding for Phase 2 of the district’s new high school. The contract is with Core Construction for $65,875,110, according to the district. SCHOOL HIGHLIGHTS GILBERTPUBLICSCHOOLS The district’s nal audit report March 31 showed a “clean” or unmodied report. Auditors found one signicant deciency in cash reconciliation. That nding has been ongoing over a few years, but Business Services Assistant Superintendent Bonnie Betz said district ocials anticipate that it will be o next year’s audit. Three ndings from the previous audit were cleaned up by this audit. HIGLEYUSD The board approved on March 25 an additional $200 in performance pay to teachers who meet requirements under

Governing board approves 5% raises for all of district’s jobs

Divided Town Council approves apartments replacing retail space

GILBERT PUBLIC SCHOOLS District employees will get a minimum 5% pay increase for the coming school year after the governing board approved the increases at its March 31 meeting. Teachers are getting a pre- viously approved 5% increase funded primarily through additional money coming to the district from Gov. Doug Ducey’s 20 by ’20 plan to increase salaries by 20% from the 2016-17 state average over three years. Fiscal year 2020-21 is the nal year of that commitment. Support sta will get bumps from new salary grade mini- mums meant to address the district’s competitiveness in

attracting workers. The district is also making “equity adjust- ments” to the base to address salary compression issues. The minimum increase for sta will be 5%. Administration and other edu- cational professionals also will be getting new minimum salaries and an increase of at least 5%. The board also unanimously approved medical insurance rates for the coming year. Employees will pay an additional 3% on the premiums coming from their paychecks, and the district also will contrib- ute an extra 3%. The premium increase is the smallest in several years, Super- intendent Shane McCord said.

GILBERT The Town Council on March 24 approved

E. BASELINE RD.

converting part of a struggling retail plaza to apartments. The proposal for the Shoppes at Gilbert Commons on the southwest corner of Baseline and Cooper roads sharply divided interested parties at the meeting. While the Gilbert Planning Commission unanimously approved it and plaza businesses supported it, town sta recommended disapproval. The Gilbert Chamber of Commerce and most neigh- bors opposed it. Council voted 5-2 to approve the changes with Bill Spence and Scott Anderson in dissent. N

First look at budget shows small surplus GILBERT PUBLIC SCHOOLS An initial budget projection March 31, based on the Legislature’s baseline budget passed as House Bill 2902, showed the district with an available budget balance of $470,000. Business Services Assistant Superintendent Bonnie Betz, however, outlined a number of risks in the projection, including the eect the coronavirus may have on projected revenue. The projection showed anticipated budget capacity to increase to $19.36 million, with $11.74 million coming from November’s successful 15% maintenance and operations budget override and the unanticipated increase in the number of students in the district this year. Another $4.97 million is expected with a budget capacity increase from the state, guring an ination adjustment of 1.74% but an estimated loss of 400 students in the district.

INITIAL PROJECTION Gilbert Public Schools’ rst budget look shows new budget revenues slightly exceeding increased spending.

BUDGET SPENDING INCREASES Total revenue increase INCLUDES $1M CREDIT FOR LOSS OF STUDENTS

$20.36M

AMOUNT

$0.55M

Teacher sick leave buy-back (two days for $100/day) Nondiscretionary increases Class size reduction and social-emotional supports* Teacher compensation increase* Admin, other professional and classied hourly increases* TOTAL SPENDING INCREASE

$1.33M $3.81M

$6.7M $7.50M

$19.89M

*COMMITMENT FROM SUCCESSFUL 2019 MAINTENANCE AND OPERATIONS OVERRIDE SOURCE: GILBERT PUBLIC SCHOOLSCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

The Annual Memorial Day Event at HD SOUTH is cancelled. While we are saddened we are unable to host this annual gathering, we realize it is the most prudent decision to make at this time. We encourage our community to recognize Memorial Day in the safety of your own homes with your close family. This year it should be an especially significant day of reflection and remembrance. Thank you for your continued support!

7

GILBERT EDITION • APRIL 2020

GUIDE

A noncomprehensive guide to trails in and around Chandler and Gilbert

Trails Guide

Chandler and Gilbert residents have access to many local trails for hiking, biking, horseback riding and more. Here are some of the closest ones. Some restrictions may be placed on trails because of the coronavirus.

COMPILED BY TOM BLODGETT DESIGNED BY ISABELLA SHORT

AMY ELLSWORTHCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

SAN TANMOUNTAIN REGIONAL PARK

1 Dynamite Trail The trail runs along Goldmine Moun- tain, connecting between the Gold- mine and San Tan trails. Length: 2.4 miles Trail rating: moderate Surface: desert Wheelchair accessible: no Activities: biking, horseback riding, walking 2 Goldmine Trail The trail runs between the San Tan trailhead near the Visitors Center and the Goldmine trailhead near Skyline Drive and reaches 2,300 feet in eleva- tion on Goldmine Mountain. Length: 2.5 miles Trail rating: dicult Surface: desert Wheelchair accessible: no Activities: biking, horseback riding, walking 3 Hedgehog Trail The trail runs between two points on the San Tan Trail and is named for the array of hedgehog cacti along it. Length: 0.9 miles Trail rating: moderate Surface: desert Wheelchair accessible: no Activities: biking, horseback riding, walking 4 Littleleaf Trail The trail runs from north of the San Tan trailhead to a connection on the Goldmine Trail and is named after the littleleaf palo verde trees. Length: 0.7 miles Trail rating: easy Surface: desert Wheelchair accessible: no Activities: biking, horseback riding, walking 5 Malpais Trail The trail runs along the base of the Malpais Hills between two points of the San Tan Trail in the southwest area of the park.

Length: 4.2 miles Trail rating: moderate-dicult Surface: desert Wheelchair accessible: no Activities : biking, horseback riding, walking 6 Moonlight Trail The trail runs along the base of a mountain in the central valley of the park between the San Tan trailhead and another point on the San Tan Trail. Length: 1.3 miles Trail rating: moderate Surface: desert Wheelchair accessible: no Activities: biking, horseback riding, walking 7 Rock Peak Wash Trail The trailhead is near Brenner Pass Road and follows a wash at the base of Rock Peak, ending at a connection to the San Tan Trail on the north end. Length: 0.9 miles Trail rating: moderate Surface: desert Wheelchair accessible: no Activities: biking, horseback riding, walking 8 San Tan Trail The trailhead is near the park’s visitor’s center, and the trail runs through much of the park, connecting with several of the other park trails. Length: 6.4 miles Trail rating: moderate-dicult Surface: desert Wheelchair accessible: no Activities: biking, horseback riding, walking 9 Stargazer Trail The trail runs through the central valley of the park between points on the Moonlight and San Tan trails. Length: 0.8 miles Trail rating: easy Surface: desert Wheelchair accessible: no Activities: biking, horseback riding, walking

The park is part of the Maricopa County parks system. It has a gate fee of $7 per vehicle or $2 per person entering by foot, bike or horse.

KEY

Rock Peak Wash Trail San Tan Trail Stargazer Trail Parking Restrooms

Dynamite Trail Goldmine Trail Hedgehog Trail Littleleaf Trail Malpais Trail Moonlight Trail

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SAN TAN MOUNTAIN REGIONAL PARK

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

RIPARIANPRESERVE Gilbert’s Riparian Preserve oers a dierent walking setting from canal banks in town and desert trails outside.

E. GUADALUPE RD.

N

Water Ranch Trail The trail runs through the Riparian Preserve at Water Ranch in Gilbert, which has seven ponds that serve as water recharge stations for the town and are home to wildlife. Length: 1.9 miles Surface: crushed gravel, concrete Wheelchair accessible: yes Activities: bird watching, shing, walking WORTH THE DRIVE Two trails in nearby Queen Creek provide variety for residents.

The Consolidated Canal in Mesa, Gilbert and Chandler dates to 1891. (Isabella Short/Community Impact Newspaper)

CANALS

The Valley’s canal system dates to the prehistoric Hohokam Indians. The canal banks have long been a recreational spot for residents.

202

E. BROWN RD. E. MCKELLIPS RD.

202

10

17

101

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60

E. BASELINE RD.

B

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W. DOBBINS RD.

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S. ELLSWORTH RD.

E . O

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SOUTH MOUNTAIN PARK AND PRESERVE

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KEY

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Baseline Road to Eastern Canal Consolidated Canal

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Queen Creek Wash Trail This trail starts near the Gilbert/Queen Creek border at Power and Queen Creek roads and runs past the A Manuel Carter Oasis and B Desert Mountain parks in Queen Creek. Length: 5.6 miles Surface: asphalt, concrete Wheelchair accessible: yes Activities: biking, horseback riding, inline skating, walking

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Eastern Canal Kyrene Canal Western Canal

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BASELINEROADTOEASTERNCANAL A greenbelt past residential communities runs from Baseline Road in Gilbert to the Eastern Canal at A Crossroads Park.

Length: 19.6 miles Surface: asphalt, gravel Wheelchair accessible: yes Activities: biking, inline skating, walking KYRENE CANAL The path runs from the C Ken McDonald Golf Course in Tempe to south of West Loredo Street in Chandler. Length: 3.8 miles Surface: concrete, crushed stone, gravel Wheelchair accessible: yes Activities: biking, inline skating, walking WESTERNCANAL The canal bank runs from Phoenix through Tempe, Chandler and Mesa and ends in Gilbert at the Consolidated Canal bank adjacent to D Freestone Park. It also connects with the Kyrene Canal Path and through E McQueen Park in Gilbert. Length: 21.9 miles

E. OCOTILLO RD.

Length: 3.3 miles Surface: concrete Wheelchair accessible: yes Activities: biking, inline skating, walking CONSOLIDATEDCANAL

GHTS RD.

A

E. RIGGS RD.

The canal bank path runs from Mesa through Gilbert (as the Heritage Trail) to Chandler (as the Paseo Trail), ending at the intersection of the Hunt Highway and Hwy. 87. Length: 18.9 miles Surface: concrete, gravel Wheelchair accessible: yes Activities: biking, shing, horseback riding, inline skating, walking EASTERNCANAL The trail runs along the entire canal from Mesa through Gilbert, where it runs along the eastern border of the B Riparian Preserve to Riggs Road in Chandler.

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Sonoqui Wash Trail The trail in Queen Creek runs from Power Road, south of Ocotillo Road, to the A Horseshoe Park and Equestrian Center, 20464 E. Riggs Road, and connects with the Queen Creek Wash Trail.

Length: 5.8 miles Surface: asphalt Wheelchair accessible: no Activities: biking, horseback riding, walking

Surface: concrete, gravel Wheelchair accessible: yes Activities: biking, inline skating, walking

9

GILBERT EDITION • APRIL 2020

BUSINESS FEATURE

BY TOM BLODGETT

“THERE’S A LOT OF MATH INVOLVED IN IT, ANDYOU’RE JUST

CONSTANTLY LEARNING ANDALOTOF PROBLEM SOLVING, TOO.” KYNSI HAMILTON, PHARMACIST

During the pandemic, Sarouja Pharmacy is closed inside but has delivery and curbside pickup.

MEDICATION YOURWAY Many customers seek compounded medicines to address needs, such as an unusual dosage or dierent form, pharmacist Kynsi Hamilton said. Compoundedmedications, often not covered by insurance, are not prohibitively expensive when compared to out-of- pocket costs for commercial medications.

Technician David Lutrick works on compounding medicine.

Kynsi Hamilton, the pharmacist in charge at Sarouja Pharmacy, said she nds compounding to be stimulating work. (Photos courtesy Sarouja Pharmacy)

Sarouja Pharmacy Pharmacist’s compounding skills help meet patients’ particular needs F rom the beginning, when she rst interviewed to get into pharmacy school, Kynsi compounding pharmacy. Dr. Sam Alnajjar opened Sarouja— the name comes from a market in Damascus, Syria—in 2015. Alnajjar

AVERAGE COMPOUNDED PRESCRIPTION COSTS:

Pets $35 per month

People $45-$60 per month

That can mean dosages adjusted for children or pets. Veterinary prescriptions make up about 30% of the compounding, Hamilton said. Delivery from refrigerated trucks is another way Sarouja has distin- guished itself since it rst opened. As opposed to mailed medicine, Sarouja usually can deliver a med- icine the same day it is available within a 10-mile radius. Thus, when coronavirus came, Sarouja already was set up to help. Being a smaller independent pharmacy that compounds, Sarouja also builds relationships with patients and doctors, Hamilton said. “I wanted to serve the community I live in,” she said. “That was really important to me.”

Sarouja Pharmacy 3570 S. Val Vista Drive, Ste. 108, Gilbert 480-887-0244 http://saroujapharmacy.com Hours: Mon.-Fri. 10 a.m.-4 p.m., closed Sat.-Sun.

Hamilton had an interest in the compounding end of the profession. “That’s where pharmacists started—making everything from scratch,” she said. “If you look back to the early 1900s, that’s what everyone was doing. You come in with some kind of tonic and they would make it for you right there. It was before any commercial drugs were really available. So I always really was interested from that perspective.” Today, Hamilton is more than just interested in the subject. She is the pharmacist in charge at Sarouja Pharmacy, an independent

is a critical care doctor at Abrazo Central Campus in Phoenix, and some friends encouraged him to branch out, Hamilton said. Compounding pharmacies can make medicines from scratch, using FDA-approved chemicals, that meet particular needs, such as being in a certain strength or form. While compounding is a small portion of Sarouja’s business, it is an important one, Hamilton said. “We’re basically serving people who couldn’t get medication other- wise,” she said. “This is medication that’s not commercially available.”

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10

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

DINING FEATURE

DragonWok Restaurateur aims for authentic Chinese taste

BY TOM BLODGETT

the quality,” he said. “My beef, we use choice and fresh, and the quality is much higher. We pay $7, $8, $10 a pound. You could pay $2 or $3 a pound, and you still call it beef broccoli, Mongolian beef.” Szeto said he likes educating peo- ple about how high quality Chinese food can be. He recalls one time when his son brought a friend over. “’Mr. Szeto, do you make Chinese like Panda Express?’” Szeto said. “’I said, ‘No, I make it like me.’ ‘Well, I like Panda Express.’ Then he tried it, and he was like, ‘Wow, why is yours so much better?’” About 60% of the restaurant’s

Sam Szeto already had a back- ground in running a takeout and delivery restaurant. He had run a takeout and delivery-only restaurant from 1990-2004 before selling and taking a year o. But he did something dierent when he opened Dragon Wok in Gilbert in 2005. Some friends asked him what kind of restaurant he would open next. “I joked with them, ‘Look at me. Do I look Mexican?’” he said. “’I’m Chinese. I’m going to do a Chinese restaurant.’” He then

The tough times from the coronavirus inspired Dragon Wok to oer a family meal with a choice of four entrees among 16 oered for $39.95. (Photos courtesy Dragon Wok)

“WHENYOU TALKABOUT THE NAMES OF THE DISHES, YOUDON’T TALK ABOUT THE QUALITY.” SAM SZETO, DRAGON WOK OWNER

asked those friends what they thought of Chinese food. The only thing they could come up with was

TheWalnut Shrimp ($16.99) is served with a sweet glazed mayonnaise sauce.

Shrimpwith Broccoli ($15.99) is served with steamed rice.

business was dine-in before coronavirus and the rest takeout and delivery, which

DragonWok 727 W. Ray Road, Ste. B1, Gilbert 480-782-6889 http://dragonwok.biz Hours: Mon.-Thu. 11 a.m.-9 p.m., Fri. 11 a.m.-10 p.m., Sat. noon-10 p.m., Sun. noon-9 p.m. He says Arizona is friendly, and he has gotten involved locally as a member of the Gilbert and Chandler chambers of commerce. “I have a lot of [government] ocial friends here,” he said. “They still welcome me. They love me.” AT HOME INARIZONA Sam Szeto was born in the Chinese province of Canton (now Ghuangzhou), near Hong Kong, but left for America at age 12.

“cheap.” To them Chinese food was inexpensive and served at hole-in- the-wall locations. Szeto said he took notes and came up with what he thought would be most appealing: authentic taste with a classy presentation. “So that’s been my slogan all these years,” he said. Szeto said he gets about 70% of his cooking from his father, 20% from the top students in the world and 10% his own innovations. The dish names may be familiar, but Szeto said the quality is higher than most places. “When you talk about the names of the dishes, you don’t talk about

the restaurant does itself. With the rise of third-party delivery platforms in recent years, Szeto said much of the delivery has gone away. The services’ cuts on each order are too large for him to use them. Szeto said he likely will need lines of credit to get through this period, something he and his wife have sought to avoid over the years. “I’ve been doing this for 30 years,” he said. “I started in 1990, and that was the rst recession, did the 2001, 2008,” he said. “This one is a little tougher, but that’s why I say I need to nd some way to get credit lines. If I can get some access to credit, I can make it even stronger.”

Sam Szeto ran a Chinese takeout place before moving into ne dining.

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11

GILBERT EDITION • APRIL 2020

Day by day Here is how the coronavirus pandemic unfolded in Arizona, Maricopa County and the town of Gilbert.

MARCH 21 • Gilbert limits hiring, spending to only what is needed to keep essential services running

Arizona

Schools

Maricopa County

Gilbert

MARCH 13 • Gilbert Public Schools closes until further notice

MARCH 16 • Mayor Jenn Daniels declares state of emergency in Gilbert • Arizona recommends canceling gatherings of more than 10 people

MARCH 15 • Arizona announces

rst statewide school closure

JANUARY MARCH 26 1 27 2

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15

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MARCH 23 • Higley USD starts free

JAN. 27 • Arizona activates the health emergency operations center MARCH 2 • Started testing for coronavirus at the state lab JAN. 26 • Arizona conrms rst case of coronavirus

MARCH 12 • Gilbert cancels special events through April 10 • Park University moves in-person classes online MARCH 11 • Arizona declares public health emergency

MARCH 17 • Gilbert Public Schools begins free meal service MARCH 18

MARCH 19 • Arizona National Guard is activated • Arizona ocials announce all restaurants in counties with coronavirus cases would have to close dining rooms and oer only takeout, delivery or curbside; the governor also closes bars and gyms

MARCH 20 • Arizona extends school closures through April 10 • First coronavirus death in Arizona reported in Maricopa County

meal service

MARCH 24 • Gov. Doug Ducey announces eviction orders delayed

• Maricopa County declares a local emergency; the proclamation of a local emergency grants the county access to additional resources, according to the county • Chandler USD begins free meal service

Education

Switch to remote learning represents big change for Gilbert-area teachers, students

professional development phase from March 23-27. The district made use of classroom teachers designated as technology integration educators, who led webinars to train thousands of teachers, GPS Technology Executive Director Jon Castelhano said. The district also helped teachers set up classroom websites if they did not have them already, and teachers reached out to their students in preparation for the nal phase: implementation. Remote learning started March 30. “It was amazing how everyone trusted at rst that this is the plan, and this is the way we’re going,” Newman said. Jessica Silashki, a third-grade been awesome in letting us do what we need to do while providing us with a basic skeleton of what’s expected,” she said. “I feel the district realizes and our school realizes that we know our kids.” Challenges at home District ocials said they knew that not every home has Wi-Fi or enough computers. Families also may not know how to use the platforms on which the learning is presented. “Just being tech-savvy in general, I’ve been able to gure it out,” Silashki said. “But that doesn’t erase the challenges that the parents are facing or the students are facing or just how dicult this is for them to learn this way.” teacher at Coronado Elementary School in Higley USD, said communication from the district to her has been helpful. “Higley has really

With campuses shuttered for the remainder of the academic year because of the coronavirus pandemic, schools have pivoted to remote learning to continue students’ educations. The shift required sudden, wholesale changes to the way curriculum is presented, education ocials said, touching everything from grading to course workloads as educators considered the varied circumstances in students’ homes. Despite the numerous changes, the transition has been less chaotic than what it might have been, some parents said. “To have to shift School is now a mixed bag of online lessons, teleconferencing and independent projects. It can be taxing in time and resources at home, families said, but the work is getting done. The experience from the situation could aect how much technology is incorporated into future lessons, educators said. But it also underscored nothing replaces a teacher with students or the social aspect of school. Implementing large changes The run-up to remote learning unfolded in three phases, said Barbara Newman, the teaching and learning executive director for Gilbert Public Schools. The rst was a planning phase that lasted March 16-20, followed by the that quickly on such a large scale, I feel like it’s been pretty seamless from our perspective,” Gilbert Public Schools parent Lisa Van Loo said.

Third-grade teacher Jessica Silashki’s classroom has moved from Coronado Elementary School to her home. (Courtesy Jessica Silashki)

Even for those comfortable with a digital world, there is a noticeable transition. “It’s not that hard,” said Nileah Bruce, an eighth-grader at Greeneld Junior High School. “It’s just dierent, going from hands-on learning in school to online.” Her mother, Niane Bruce, has one other child, Jace, who is in kindergarten at Sonoma Ranch Elementary School. While Nileah manages her own work load, Bruce said she has to sit with Jace and explain lessons and show him how to do them. “We’re getting creative in other ways, with trading games that are math problems and making up songs that have sight words in them, dierent things like that,” she said. Time is one commodity the districts factored in when considering how much they could put on families, school ocials said. “We knew that we needed to establish something that the kids are not bombarded with six assignments every single day,” Newman said. Lessons learned Educators said they can see how this experience will change learning in the future, though perhaps not drastically.

Even as a tech coach, Silashki said she has been reluctant at times to incorporate technology in the classroom because it is typically unreliable, but the greater experience across the state is now easing her fears about the technical aspects. “I think it’s opened eyes to the benets of being able to do something digitally, meaning like a worksheet versus a digital worksheet,” Silashki said. “But instruction-wise, I think it’s conrming even more that nothing can replace face- to-face instruction for kids.” Newman reiterated the teachers are an important distinction in online versus remote learning. “Our teachers are still the instructional avenue for our students,” she said. “They’re just using dierent tools because they have to do it virtually.” What is missing is the social aspect. Silashki uses live online time to ll that gap. She lets students talk to one another, reads to them and has held a show-and-tell. For Nileah Bruce, the biggest issue was losing out on her nal days with friends before heading to high school. “I wasn’t expecting that [last day before spring break] to be our last day,” she said.

“OUR TEACHERS ARE STILL THE INSTRUCTIONALAVENUE FOROUR STUDENTS.” BARBARA NEWMAN, GILBERT PUBLIC SCHOOLS

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

APRIL 12 • New localized data shows ZIP codes in Gilbert have 125 cases

MARCH 26 • Ducey announces Arizona will waive emissions testing for up to one year for those 65 and older to reduce coronavirus risk

MARCH 28 • Town of

APRIL 6 • President Donald Trump approves Arizona major disaster area declaration • Ducey halts small- business, nonprot evictions through May 31

Gilbert closes public parks’ amenities

APRIL 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

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MARCH 25 • Ducey issues an executive order requiring health care insurance

MARCH 30 • Arizona extends school closures through the end of the academic year • Governor issues an executive order directing Arizonans to “Stay Home, Stay Healthy, Stay Connected” • Gilbert’s school districts begin remote learning

APRIL 8 • Gilbert implements additional park restrictions for Easter weekend APRIL 9 • Daniels announces faith-based communities’ resource website HELPR

APRIL 16 • Gilbert sta recommends delaying street bonds vote one year

APRIL 1 • Grand Canyon closes APRIL 3

• The number of coronavirus cases in Maricopa County is now 1,050, according to Maricopa County Public Health • Barbers, hair salons, massage parlors and other businesses previously considered essential are ordered to close

companies to expand telemedicine coverage for all services that would normally be covered for an in- person visit

SOURCES: STATE OF ARIZONA, MARICOPA COUNTY, TOWN OF GILBERT COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Government

Business

As with much of the nation, Gilbert business owners are struggling to stay aoat while their customers hunker down at home during the coronavirus pandemic. Many have had to lay o sta, such as Dave Rindeisch of International Minute Press of Gilbert, where business is down 50%. His ve workers can make more money staying at home from government assistance than they can from working. He has only kept on a graphic designer who works remotely. “I am a fortunate owner where I can run all the machinery,” he said. “I am doing it myself.” Kim Yonda-Lead closed her store, Wrapped With Ribbon, and moved online for now. “We did not have a strong online presence before, and people are still nding us,” she said. “It’s denitely been a time of change and the time for us to adapt.” Like many restaurants, she has moved to curbside pickup and contactless delivery. Companies adapt to stay solvent

Some businesses have pivoted within the realm of what they do to help the community. For example, Panda Libre, an Asian- Mexican “fusion” fast-casual restaurant, tried meal prep packages, then turned to oering wholesale goods to customers. O.H.S.O. Brewery in the Heritage District was forced to lay o 75 percent of its workforce. But Banner Health approached Operations Manager Adam Davis about using its distilling capabilities to make hand sanitizer for Banner’s medical facilities. “It really wasn’t a question of should we or shouldn’t we,” Davis said. “It was an answer of let’s get it done.” Networking also became important to businesses as they looked for resources, information and ways to stay aoat through the pandemic. The Gilbert Chamber of Commerce opened a series of social media pages, got in contact with elected leaders and organized conference calls for small businesses to spread information. “We realized we needed to turn on a dime, stop everything we were doing before and really be the resource for the business community,” Chamber President and CEO Kathy Tilque said. “And that’s what we’ve done.”

Gilbert closed amenities such as basketball courts at town parks March 28. (Isabella Short/Community Impact Newspaper)

Town, in state of emergency, alters path

in May, we haven’t made any permanent stang decisions,” Banger said in an April 15 email to Community Impact Newspaper . “We are committed to keeping all lines of service operational at this point, and we have reassigned some personnel to areas of critical need.” In his March 21 internal email, Banger encouraged sta to purchase from vendors in Gilbert and the local area. “Your focus on purchasing only essential items needed to continue operations and supporting local businesses will help Gilbert recover more quickly when this pandemic passes,” Banger wrote. With Daniels’ emergency declaration, the town closed its municipal buildings to the public at 4 p.m. March 17. Additionally, many town staers began working from home. However, Daniels said town essential services, such as police, re and utilities, were to be unaected. The town later closed amenities, such as play structures and sports courts in its public parks, plus all of Gilbert Regional Park, on March 28.

Mayor Jenn Daniels declared a state of emergency in Gilbert on March 16 to ramp up eorts to stem the spread of coronavirus. Daniels said the move gives the town, by Arizona statute, better access to cleaning and medical supplies as well as the ability to close municipal buildings to the public. Five days later, the town cut hiring and spending to only what is needed to run essential services. According to an email Town Manager Patrick Banger sent to sta March 21, “All hiring and spending through the end of the scal year will be focused solely on essential items and personnel needed to keep critical operations running.” Gilbert’s scal year runs through June 30. The change was eective immediately. Gilbert was not making any immediate moves to furlough or lay o sta. “We are having conversations about what the appropriate actions we need to take as an organization are, but, until we get data for March, which will come

With many businesses closing, parking lots, like this one at Esporta Fitness at Rivulon, emptied out. (Amy Ellsworth/Community Impact Newspaper)

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GILBERT EDITION • APRIL 2020

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