Richardson - March 2020

RICHARDSON EDITION

VOLUME 2, ISSUE 7  MARCH 18APRIL 22, 2020

ONLINE AT

“OURREQUESTWAS MADE AFTERWORKING FORMORE THANA DECADE TOGET RELIEF FOROUR TAXPAYERS.” RICHARDSON, PLANO, GARLAND AND MESQUITE OFFICIALS

Impacts

Government

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Unifyin COLLEGE Use of the death penalty for criminals in Texas has seen a precipitous decline in recent years. In Collin County, capital punishment was practically obsolete—at least until Feb. 27, when a jury handed down a death sen- tence for the rst time in 11 years. Brandon McCall was found guilty and sen- tenced to death for the murders of his friend Rene Gamez II and Richardson Police Ocer David Sherrard. The death penalty forMcCall signaled that while the practice is far less common, juries will still impose it for crimes they deem to be the most egregious. Themorality of the death penalty has been debated for years, but what sometimes gets forgotten is the toll capital punishment can Death penalty costs explained Sherrard’s killer sentenced BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER CONTINUED ON 18

EXAMINING THE COST Each county in Texas pays for its trials and appeals in death penalty cases, which are longer and more expensive to carry out. These gures are based on a 1992 study and are adjusted for ination.

$1.3M Average cost of life without parole

LOCAL DEFENDANTS ON DEATH ROW

There are inmates awaiting execution in Texas. 213

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SOURCES: LAW OFFICE OF TEXAS DEFENSE ATTORNEY FRED DAHR, 2015; TEXAS COALITION TO ABOLISH THE DEATH PENALTY; TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

$3.8M Average cost of death penalty

sentenced in Collin County.

sentenced in Tarrant County. 16

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Brandon McCall was sentenced to death Feb. 27 for the 2018 murder of David Sherrard, the rst Richardson police ocer to be killed in the line of duty.

sentenced in Dallas County.

DallasCommunityCollegeDistrict seeks change toboost student graduation rates

By seeking a single accreditation from the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, Dallas County Community College District hopes to increase its graduation rates. 25% To graduate, students must receive at least of their credits from one college. 1,356 students have been unable to graduate due to this policy.

BY MAKENZIE PLUSNICK

institution. This has created issues for so-called “swirl students,” or those who take courses at more than one of the district’s seven campuses. “About 13% of our entire student population [is swirl students],” said Kay Eggleston, president of Richland College, the DCCCD campus closest to Richardson. Over the years, the 25% rule has rendered more than 1,300 students

Students in the Dallas County Com- munity College District who were previously deemed ineligible to grad- uate could soon benet from a new accreditation initiative. The decision to seek a single accred- itation for the district’s seven college is due in part to a policy administered by Southern Association of Colleges and Schools that requires students to take 25% of their credit hours at one

Richland is one of seven DCCCD schools. (Makenzie Plusnick/Community Impact Newspaper)

CONTINUED ON 20

SOURCE: DALLAS COUNTY COMMUNITY COLLEGE DISTRICTCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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RICHARDSON EDITION • MARCH 2020

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

CONTENTS IMPACTS

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

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Now Open, Coming Soon &more TODO LIST Local events and things to do

PUBLISHERS AND FOUNDERS John and Jennifer Garrett PUBLISHERDFWMETRO Christal Howard GENERAL MANAGER Leanne Libby, llibby@communityimpact.com EDITORIAL EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Lanane MANAGING EDITOR Valerie Wigglesworth SENIOR EDITOR Olivia Lueckemeyer REPORTER Makenzie Plusnick STAFFWRITERS Daniel Houston, Liesbeth Powers, Gavin Pugh, Elizabeth Uclés COPY CHIEF Andy Comer COPY EDITORS Ben Dickerson, Kasey Salisbury ADVERTISING SALES DIRECTOR Tess Coverman ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Tracy Ruckel DESIGN CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Aubrey Galloway ASSOCIATE ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Breanna Flores GRAPHIC DESIGNER Chelsea Peters STAFF DESIGNERS Chase Autin, Shelby Savage BUSINESS GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER Claire Love ABOUT US John and Jennifer Garrett began Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 in Pugerville, Texas. The company’s mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. CONTACT US

FROMLEANNE: This month, we’ve compiled a list of Richardson private schools (see Page 15). As families work to choose the best schools for their children, we hope this guide is helpful in providing information about various local options. Each September, we publish a comprehensive guide to the local public schools, so make sure to watch for that as well. Leanne Libby, GENERALMANAGER

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FROMOLIVIA: Two years ago, Richardson Police Ocer David Sherrard was shot and killed while responding to an apartment disturbance. The man found guilty of the crime was sentenced to death Feb. 27. Our story (see Page 18) explores the nancial impact of capital punishment on county taxpayers.

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES 9 Road projects in Richardson CITY& COUNTY 13 Latest local news

Olivia Lueckemeyer, EDITOR

THIS ISSUE BY THE NUMBERS

New businesses 7

Community events 8

Road projects 3

Private schools 10

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Tacos Y Mas REAL ESTATE

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Residential market data IMPACT DEALS

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RICHARDSON EDITION • MARCH 2020

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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PGBT TOLL

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BRECKINRIDGE BLVD.

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HARTFORD DR.

TELECOM PKWY.

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Abu Omar Halal

MAKENZIE PLUSNICK/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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expanding its DFW presence by opening a call center at 930 E. Campbell, Road, Richardson, according to a representa- tive with JAH Realty. The business will take up the majority of the space in the 72,000-square-foot building that is not already occupied by retail tenants, the representative said. The online store offers food, treats and supplies for dogs, cats and other small pets. 800-672-4399. www.chewy.com 9 Platinum Storage is opening a location at 350 E. Buckingham Road, Richardson. Construction on the project is set to begin April 1 and be completed by December, according to the Texas Department of Licensing and Regulation. Platinum Storage is a commercial real es- tate investment group and specializes in self-storage. www.platinumstorage.com RENOVATIONS 10 German Motor Works will reopen in mid-March or early April at 1352 S. Plano Road, Richardson. The business sustained significant damage during the Oct. 20 tornado, forcing it to undergo a complete remodel. The updated space will include a new lobby and lounge, among other items. German Motor Works is an auto repair shop made up of expert mechanics specializing in BMW, Mercedes, Audi and Volkswagen cars. 972-690-6623. www.facebook.com/germanmotor worksdallas 11 Methodist Richardson Medical Cen- ter , located at 2831 E. President George Bush Hwy., Richardson, is renovating its radiology department to make room for a new CT scanner, set to debut by early April. The new scanner will improve imaging and is a major upgrade from the

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3 Upscale craft cocktail bar Brizo opened Feb. 29 in The Shops at Prom- enade, 300 N. Coit Road, Ste. 255, Richardson. The business offers a variety of cocktails and wines as well as flatbread pizzas. Guests can enjoy half-off wine every Wednesday. 469-571-7350. www.facebook.com/brizobartx 4 La Casita Bakeshop opened Feb. 8 at 580 W. Arapaho Road, Richardson. The business, which opens at 9 a.m. on Sat- urdays and remains open until products are sold out, offers a menu that changes weekly. La Casita specializes in baked goods, such as cakes, pies and croissants. It also supplies pastries to coffee shops throughout the Dallas area. 214-908-0804. www.lacasitabakeshop. wordpress.com 5 Lohas Teriyaki opened its doors Jan. 28 at 1401 E. Arapaho Road, Ste. F, Richardson. The Asian fusion restaurant offers fresh food options in a convenient, fast-food setting. The restaurant also has

a location in Irving. 214-272-3635. www.lohasteriyaki.com

COMPILED BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER AND MAKENZIE PLUSNICK

6 Mario’s Pizza opened Feb. 10 at 4251 E. Renner Road, Ste. 122, Richardson. The delivery-only business serves specialty and customizable pizzas as well as pastas, subs, salads, appetizers, desserts and more. 469-317-3111 7 A new Starbucks location opened March 16 at 800 Synergy Park Blvd., Ste. 101, Richardson, in the Northside mixed- use development at the University of Texas at Dallas. The coffee shop features lounge seating as well as study tables and a patio, which includes a walk-up order window. In addition to traditional coffees and teas, the business also offers food and snacks for lunch and dinner as well as pastries and other sweet treats. www.starbucks.com COMING SOON 8 Online pet supply retailer Chewy is

NOWOPEN 1 Abu Omar Halal opened its first brick- and-mortar location Feb. 20 at 800 E. Arapaho Road, Ste. 120, Richardson. The restaurant specializes in shawarma but also serves other Mediterranean classics, such as kebabs, falafel and gyros. Abu Omar operates food trucks across the Dal- las, Houston and Austin areas. 469-580- 7240. www.abuomarhalal.com 2 Athletico Physical Therapy opened Feb. 24 at 7989 Belt Line Road, Dallas. The business offers a wide range of phys- ical therapy and orthopedic rehabilitation services, such as occupational therapy, concussion and vestibular rehabilitation, recovery from work injuries and more. Athletico services 10 states and has over 380 clinics. 972-942-2475. www.athletico.com

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Hexa Coworking offers various workspace options. (Courtesy Hexa Coworking)

hospital’s current machine, according to a spokesperson for Methodist Richardson. Renovations in the gastrointestinal de- partment will begin next month. Improve- ments include upgraded endoscopy rooms and the addition of fluoroscopy technol- ogy. Construction is expected to wrap up by the end of July, the spokesperson said. 469-204-1000. www.methodisthealthsystem.org/ methodist-richardson-medical-center 12 The Richardson Senior Center at 820 W. Arapaho Road, Ste. 100, Richard- son, closed temporarily for renovations March 16. By no later than March 30, an interim senior center will open at Methodist Campus for Continuing Care, 403 W. Campbell Road, Richardson. Con- struction is expected to last 12 months, weather permitting. The city expects the renovated senior center to reopen in Wyndsor Park , located at 3106 Hartford Drive, Richardson, and B Crowley Park , located at 2700 N. Spring Drive, Richard- son. According to a spokesperson from the city’s Parks and Recreation Depart- ment, both parks will be equipped with new playground equipment. Additionally, walkways and ramps in Wyndsor Park will be upgraded to comply with the state’s ac- cessibility standards. Construction began March 1 on both parks. Wyndsor Park is spring 2021. 972-744-7800. www.cor.net/departments/ parks-recreation/senior-center 13 Construction has begun on ren- ovations at two Richardson parks: A FEATURED IMPACT NOWOPEN Hexa Coworking opened its shared office space Jan. 31 at 2100 N. Greenville Ave., Richardson. The business has several membership options ranging from $80 to $750 a month for short-term and long-term needs as well as customizable memberships. Options include virtual offices, shared offices and dedicated desks. Members have access to support and productivity services, including receptionist services, social media marketing support and IT support. There are also weekly networking events. “We furnished it with the latest and greatest, both with furniture and technology,” founder Maan Hamdan said.

Amenities at Hexa include a break room stocked with complimentary snacks, coffee and tea. A coffee shop is located on-site, as is a made-to-order commercial kitchen. The space also includes a gym and nap rooms. Richardson was an ideal location for Hexa because of its technological roots, Hamdan said. His vision for Hexa is that it transcends coworking and becomes a hub for innovation. 469-751-4392. www.hexatx.com

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expected to be complete by early summer, while renovations to Crowley Park should

be complete by the end of July. 972-744-4100. www.cor.net/ departments/parks-recreation CLOSINGS

CITYLINE - 1251 State Street | Richardson | abacusjaspers.com Reservations: 214.716.2612 Enjoy passed appetizers as you savor these special wines from Spain. Featured wines and/or dinner available at a special reduced price. Saturday, March 26 | 6 - 7:30 pm | $35 per person, does not include sales tax or gratuity WINE TASTING EVENT

14 CrossFit Sirius announced Feb. 17 on its Facebook page that it has closed. The gym, located at 580 W. Arapaho Road, Ste. 154, Richardson, special- ized in compound functional training for all ages. www.facebook.com/siri- us-420710364696733/ 15 Sun’s Kitchen closed Jan. 28 at 800 E. Arapaho Road, Ste. 120, Richardson. The Vietnamese and Asian fusion restau- rant’s menu included rice dishes, noodle dishes, soups, appetizers and more. www.facebook.com/sunskitchen

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RICHARDSON EDITION • MARCH 2020

TODO LIST

EXTRAORDINARY, EXCEPTIONAL & INSPIRING Watch for the 2020-2021 Season Announcement coming soon. Become a Member and attend the Season Preview Party May 7, 2020

March-April events

Keyboard Conversations Fascinatin’ Rhythms! Mon, Apr. 20, 7:30 pm

Asleep at the Wheel 50th Anniversary Tour Sat, Mar. 28, 7:30 pm

Family Theatre Series Dog Man: The Musical Sun, Apr. 19, 2:30 pm

MARCH 21

RICHARDSONKICKBALLKICKOFF TOURNAMENT&PARTY HUFFHINES PARK

Take a Peek Behind the Curtain. Become a “Friend” today to support Community Outreach through Eisemann Educates and receive invitations to our Eisemann Center Presents Meet the Artist receptions and the 2019-2020 Season Preview Party May 7, 2020

Join Dallas Sport & Social Club as it kicks o its new adult kickball league with a tournament in Richardson. Teams can have between 10-15 members, and players must be 21 or older to participate. This event is the start of a 6-7 game regular season that is followed by playos. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. $175 per team (includes team shirts, a three-game minimum and free drinks at an after-party). Huines Park, 300 N. Plano Road, Richardson. 972-900-0151. www.dallassocialclub.com (Courtesy Dallas Sport & Social Club)

Editor's note: These events were still on as of press time March 11, but may change due to coronavirus concerns. Check the website or call before attending.

11   ADULT EASTEREGGHUNT Join an adult Easter egg hunt and win wine prizes. Participants can also enjoy happy hour prices on all wines by the glass. 5-11:30 p.m., 7 p.m. (hunt begins). Free. The Wine Authority, 508 W. Lookout Drive, Ste. 24. 972-998-8364. thewineauthorityonline.com 17   CITYLINEMOVIENIGHTS Enjoy an outdoor screening of “Clueless” at CityLine Plaza. The event is BYOB. Guests are encouraged to bring a picnic blanket. 8:45 p.m. Free. CityLine Plaza, 1150 State St., Richardson. www.citylinedfw.com 19   EISEMANNEXTRAS:  STARKMAGIC Former America’s Got Talent contestant Landon Stark will perform at the Eisemann Center. The magic show is high- energy and incorporates circus elements. 1:30 p.m. $10. Eisemann Center for Performing Arts, 2351 Performance Drive. 972-744-4650. www.eisemanncenter.com 24   THROUGH 25 FOODAS   MEDICINE SUMMIT&EXPO This expo, hosted by TS Wellness, focuses on evidence-based nutrition education with the ultimate goal of using food as medicine in the prevention and reduction of chronic disease. 8 a.m.-6:30 p.m. (Fri.), 11 a.m.-6:30 p.m. (Sat.). $229 (priority registration), $279 (general admission). Richardson Civic Center, 411 W. Arapaho Road, Ste. 102, Richardson. www.foodasmedicinesummittx.com

www.eisemanncenter.com/Friends

COMPILED BY MAKENZIE PLUSNICK

MARCH 28 DALLASMOMS’ SIXTH  ANNUAL EGGHUNT

Shows • Concerts • Corporate Presentations & Celebrations • Benefits Graduations • Multi-Media Presentations • Awards Ceremonies Private Functions • Press Conferences • Product Launches • Annual Meetings CHARLES W. EISEMANN CENTER

CityLine is partnering with Dallas Moms and Collin County Moms to host its annual egg hunt. Hunts will be split up by age group. There will also be face painting, a balloon artist and photos with the Easter Bunny. 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. CityLine Plaza, 1150 State St., Richardson. www.citylinedfw.com APRIL 04 RICHARDSONDISC GOLF  TOURNAMENT Enjoy a round of disc golf at this temporary course in Breckinridge Park. The tournament will include recreational, intermediate and advanced divisions and will oer payout prizes for rst, second and third place. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. $20 per player. Breckinridge Park, 3555 Brand Road, Richardson. 972-744-4585. www.cor.net/parksonline 04 WRITINGCOMEDY TECHNIQUE&STYLE Attend a workshop on the art of writing jokes, taught by comic novelist Josh Hickman. Guests will learn techniques to add humor to their writing. 1-4 p.m. $65. Writing Workshops Dallas, 1900 Jay Ell Drive, Richardson. 214-592-5008. writingworkshopsdallas.com

972.744.4600 eisemanncenter.com

• Prime location off North Central Expressway, south of President George Bush Turnpike at 2351 Performance Drive in Richardson • Readily adjacent to DART Rail’s Galatyn Park Station

Find more or submit Richardson events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES

COMPILED BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER

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ONEWAY

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Crews work on sidewalks in the project area. (Makenzie Plusnick/Community Impact Newspaper)

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3 Duck Creek Trail extension Work to extend Duck Creek Trail is ongo- ing. Crews are working on preparing the trail for installation of concrete just south of Arapaho Road. In addition, demolition of the west side of the bridge over Plano Road is taking place. The next area to be aected by construction will be the bridge on Plano Road just south of Arapa- ho Road, according to the city’s parks and recreation department. The west side of the bridge is undergoing improvements, including the installation of a cantile- vered bridge section for the new trail. The right southbound lane of trac on Plano Road will be aected for the next four to ve weeks as trail construction proceeds southward to Apollo Road. Timeline: January-November Cost: $3.18 million Funding source: city of Richardson

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF FEB. 25. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT RICNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM. SOURCES: TEXAS TRANSPORTATION CODE, TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY, MCKINNEY POLICE DEPARTMENT Transportation Code, drivers are allowed to turn left at red lights when two one-way streets intersect. HOW ITWORKS Turning left at a red light Texas drivers are likely familiar with the law that allows right turns at red lights, but many are unfamiliar with the ability to take left turns at red lights. According to the Texas

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RECENT PROJECTS 1 Yale Boulevard street rehabilitation This project involves removing and replacing the most damaged sections of concrete along the northbound and southbound lanes of Yale Boulevard between Campbell and Buckingham roads. The sections of concrete in good condition will remain in place. The project began in February near Buckingham and will continue just north of Campbell. Timeline: February-April Cost: $375,000 (estimated) Funding source: city of Richardson

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2 East Renner Road paving and pedestrian improvements This project added a westbound lane to East Renner Road between Mackenzie Lane and North Star Road. Crews also made improvements to the trac signal and curb ramps and replaced the brick pavers and repaired sidewalk ramps at Renner and Mackenzie. Timeline: June 2019-March 2020 Cost: $780,000 Funding source: city of Richardson

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RICHARDSON EDITION • MARCH 2020

GOVERNMENT Nearly 1million voters across DFW showed up to cast primary ballots More than 877,000 voters turned out for the 2020 primary elections in Collin, Dallas, Denton and Tarrant counties. That total is the third-highest turnout for a presidential primary election in the last 20 years. The first- and second-highest primary election turnouts in North Texas were in 2016 and 2008, respectively. North Texas Democratic turnout in the 2020 primary elections was 536,021, while Republican turnout was 341,863, according to county reports. Statewide turnout in the 2020 pri- mary election was about 4.06 million, representing about 25% of registered Texas voters, according to records from the office of the Texas secretary of state. BY GAVIN PUGH

BALLOT BREAKDOWN Dallas Denton Tarrant Collin

Here is a snapshot of combined presidential primary votes across Collin, Dallas, Denton and Tarrant counties.

This primary pitted then-Sen. Barack Obama, D-Illinois, against eight competitors, including then-Sen. Hillary Clinton, D-New York.

300K 250K

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50K

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Year

2000

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250K

This primary pitted then-businessman Donald Trump against eight opponents, including Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas.

200K

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2004

2008

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2020

SOURCES: COLLIN, DALLAS, DENTON AND TARRANT COUNTIES/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

SENIOR Over the years, the city has adjusted its over-65 property tax exemption to maintain a goal of providing annual tax savings that

property tax savings

$100K $150K $200K $250K $300K $350K

Average senior home market value Senior exemption

equates to 30% of a senior’s average home value.

$0 $50K

SOURCE: CITY OF RICHARDSON COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

2019 8,328 $5.1M

2020 8,495 $5.3M

2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

Number of senior accounts Cost incurred by the city

7,273 $2.5M

7,431 $2.6M

7,597 $2.9M

7,700 $2.9M

7,883 $3.4M

8,013 $4M

8,227 $4.3M

GOVERNMENT Finance sta recommends no change to senior tax exemption

Thousands of Richardson homes are eligible for the exemption. (Olivia Lueckemeyer/Community Impact Newspaper)

the city looks at tax breaks, Dagen said. Any increase to an exemption or to the number of qualifying taxpayers will not only constrain revenue but also reduce the 3.5% revenue growth limit enforced by SB 2, he said. SB 2, signed into law by Gov. Greg Abbott on June 12, limits funding for municipalities by requiring voters to sign o on annual property tax revenue growth exceeding 3.5%. Prior to SB 2, cities could budget up to 8% property tax growth for operational costs, above which voters had to petition for an election to roll back the increase. Keeping the exemption where it is would roll the city’s revenue growth limit back from 3.5% to 3.3%, Dagen said. If the city were to increase the exemption to $105,000, that would lower its allowable revenue growth to 3.07%. Exempted taxes will total $5.3 million in 2020, which is up from $5.1 million last year due to the growth in the number of senior accounts, Dagen said. The incremental cost to the city of Richardson is $179,911, most of which is paid for through its general fund.

“Notice: There are no changes in the exemption amount, but with more participants, we still have downward pressure,” City Manager Dan Johnson said. Mayor Paul Voelker recommended further analysis of how adjustments to other exemptions might inuence the 3.5% cap. “We have knobs we can continue to turn, and we will do an eective job at turning those because we are com- mitted to the nancial management we’ve been so proud of,” he said. Richardson’s tax break for seniors rivals those of neighboring cities. By comparison, Garland’s over-65 exemption reduces a home’s market value by $51,000. Plano’s exemption reduces a home’s taxable market value by $40,000. City exemptions are not the only tax breaks available to seniors. In Dallas County, a property tax ceiling automatically freezes the amount of school district taxes paid during the year a resident turns 65. Seniors in Collin County can add an additional $10,000 to the $25,000 exemption available to all county homeowners.

BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER

about $31.26 of savings in property taxes. That amounts to about $625 in annual savings per $100,000 exemp- tion, Dagen said. Each year, council reviews the exemption to make sure it meets the city’s goal of providing a tax benet of approximately 30% of the average senior home value. Last year, City Council voted to increase the exemp- tion from $85,000 to $100,000. After reviewing last year’s certied values, Dagen said the average senior is actually receiving a 33% benet, which gives the city some exibility to keep the current exemption while also maintaining its policy goal. The nance team recommended keeping the exemption where it is, noting that the average market value would need to increase by 11% for the $100,000 exemption to produce results below the city’s 30% goal. Senate Bill 2 has changed the way

Sta in Richardson is recommend- ing no change to the city’s senior property tax exemption, pointing to funding limitations imposed by the state as the driving force behind the decision. If council votes to maintain the current exemption, it will be the rst time in ve years it has decided against an increase. A decision on the tax break must be made by July 1. The estimated market value of a senior’s home in Richardson is about $316,662, which is up 5% year over year, Richardson Finance Director Keith Dagen said. The city estimates that nearly 8,500 accounts, or 30% of all homes in Richardson, will be eligible for the senior exemption in 2020, Dagen said. Under the current exemption, each $5,000 increment of the average senior’s home value translates to

11

RICHARDSON EDITION • MARCH 2020

GOVERNMENT

UtilitycommissionsideswithRichardson andothers inwater ratedispute

$275MILLION

BY DANIEL HOUSTON

better serves the Region’s long-term interests,” the four cities said Feb. 27 in a joint statement. The water district’s other nine member cities are Allen, Farmersville, Forney, Frisco, McKinney, Princeton, Rockwall, Royse City andWylie. “We are reviewing the Commission’s actions but are concerned with its implications,” McKinney City Manager Paul Grimes said. “It ignores the longstanding principle of the sanctity of contracts and has wide-reaching implications for water contracts across the state that may increase the amount of litigation of these matters, which only means more cost to our citizens.” Grimes added his city would work with the others to try to address long- term concerns about the contract. The four cities challenging the con- tract said in a statement that they have paid a combined $275 million in recent years for unused water. Under the

A state arbiter said the North Texas Municipal Water District’s rate structure was adverse to the public interest, a decision that could have a ripple eect on consumer water bills throughout the growing region. The Public Utility Commission of Texas voted Feb. 27 to move toward a review of the North Texas Municipal Water District’s rate structure for its 13 member cities. That structure had been challenged by the cities of Plano, Richardson, Garland and Mesquite. Those cities argued that under the existing contract, they have paid hundreds of millions of dollars in recent years for water their residents and businesses did not use. “We are hopeful that this next step in the process will bring us closer to establishing a new rate methodology that is fair and equitable to all mem- bers, encourages conservation and

the combined total of payments made for unused water in Richardson, Plano, Mesquite and Garland

The Public Utility Commission of Texas voted Feb. 27 to move toward a review of the North Texas Municipal Water District’s rate structure for its 13 member cities. (Cassidy Ritter/Community Impact Newspaper)

existing water contract, each city pays for the amount of water it consumed in its highest-usage year. As the water district has raised rates to fund infrastructure expansions in a quickly growing region, cities like Richardson have seen payments creep upward as a percentage of their total costs even as residential water usage has gone down. In Richardson’s case, those city costs are largely passed on

to consumers. The city’s rate has increased each year since FY 2010-11, city documents show. “Our request was made after working for more than a decade to get relief for our ratepayers,” the state- ment from Plano, Richardson, Garland and Mesquite read. “Due to our lack of bargaining power, all parties remained at an impasse, and our most viable option was to request the PUC review of our rates.”

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12

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY& COUNTY

News from Richardson & Plano ISD

COMPILED BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER

NUMBER TOKNOW Commission of Texas approved adoption of 945 as an additional area code, according to a March 3 press release. This move should accommodate the area’s growing population, the release said. The 945 area code is expected to meet the region’s numbering needs for 13 years, the release stated. 945 CITY HIGHLIGHTS PLANO ISD Cody Moore, the newly named Plano ISD Senior High School athletic director and head football coach, has vacated his position, the district announced March 4. Moore apologized for the timing but said he has decided to continue coaching in Denton. COLLINCOLLEGE The community college district’s board approved its 2020-21 academic calendar Feb. 25. It will follow similar patterns as last year, with a start date of Aug. 24 for the fall semester, Jan. 19 for the 2021 spring semester and June 7 for the 2021 summer semester. CORONAVIRUS UPDATES For the latest on coronavirus news in Dallas and Collin counties, visit communityimpact.com/ric. The greater Dallas area is on track to get a new area code in 2021. The Public Utility Richardson City Council Meets March 23 and 30 and April 6, 13 and 20 at 6 p.m. at City Hall, 411 W. Arapaho Road, Richardson www.cor.net Richardson ISD Meets March 30 and April 6 and 20 at the RISD Administration Building, 400 S. Greenville Ave., Richardson www.risd.org Plano ISD Meets March 24 and April 7 and 21 at 7 p.m. at the PISD Administration Center, 2700 W. 15th St., Plano www.pisd.edu MEETINGSWE COVER

President GeorgeW. Bush visits annual chambermeeting Former President George W. Bush (right) visited the Richardson Chamber of Commerce’s annual meeting Feb. 21 to speak about his time in the White House. In a conversation moderated by chamber CEO and President Bill Sproull, Bush spoke candidly about the legacy of his parents, the dangers of isolationism and the joy that painting has brought him in his retirement years. (Courtesy Grant Miller)

Incumbent clinches Democratic bid DALLAS COUNTY Incumbent Dallas County Commissioner Theresa Daniel was the winner of the March 3 Democratic primary. Daniel maintained a signicant lead over opponent Zachariah Manning throughout the night. In the end, she won 31,609 votes, or 76% of the total. Elected in 2012 to represent Dis- trict 1, Daniel is looking at a third four-year term in oce if she is successful in November. District 1 includes parts of Dallas, Mesquite, Garland and Richardson. Daniel will go on to face Republican challenger Patrick Harden in the general election. His campaign is focused on protection of taxpayer dollars as well as com- bating crime and homelessness, according to his website.

Council voteshuttersmotorcycle training facility

RICHARDSON An outdoor motor- cycle safety training facility will be forced to shutter in Richardson after City Council voted Feb. 24 to deny a special permit for the business. Motorcycle Training Center, or MTC, had been operating in the parking lot behind the Lowe’s Home Improvement Center at 501 S. Plano Road, Richardson, for more than 10 years, according to owner Chris Liftin. The purpose of the business is to teach safe and responsible riding techniques, he said. Code enforcement ocers became aware of the operation only after noticing trac cones set up in the parking lot, according to city doc- uments. This was not an approved use for the site, thus prompting the requirement for a special permit. If approved, the permit would have allowed the business to con- tinue holding two courses per week

MTC had been operating in Richardson for10years.(CourtesycityofRichardson)

between March and October. Each session was ve hours long, and some began as early as 7 a.m., according to Liftin. At a Richardson City Planning Commission meeting in December, eight residents turned out to oppose the permit. Noise was cited as a con- cern; however, Development Director Michael Spicer was unable to say for sure whether MTC had ever received a noise complaint. In the end, council voted 5-2 to deny the permit, with Council Member Janet DePuy and Mayor Paul Voelker opposed.

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RICHARDSON EDITION • MARCH 2020

EDUCATION

KEEPING YOU

ON THE MOVE.

17TH ST.

N

Members of the Plano ISD board of trustees were given a tour of Williams High School at a work session Sept. 17. (Liesbeth Powers/Community Impact Newspaper)

Plano ISDweighs possible $14M project forWilliams High School

BY LIESBETH POWERS

the building. An art suite would take the place of those oces, and a new classroom pod would be established to the side of the art suite, according to PBK’s plan. A new special education suite would be constructed next to the relocated administration suite. An estimated three parking spots would be taken away from the parking lot under the new plan. Trac patterns for parent drop-o and buses would remain as they are, the presentation detailed. “These are great rst steps,” Super- intendent Sara Bonser said. Roughly $4 million of the 2016 bond had been previously desig- nated toward Williams High School, PISD Chief Financial Ocer Randy McDowell said at the meeting. The additional $10 million would come from interest income and savings from other projects in the bond, he said. “We’re getting a free project here, essentially, which is unheard of in public nance,” trustee David Stolle said. A transition from the rst phase to further steps in the master reno- vation would line up well if more funding for Williams High School were to be included in the next bond, he said. More information will be pre- sented to the board once design and construction documents are com- pleted, McDowell said.

Plano ISD is considering a $14 mil- lion construction project at Williams High School that would move the school’s main entrance, expand class- room space and add a new special education suite. While the plan has yet to be approved, it calls for the 10-month construction project to begin in March 2021. The Plano ISD board of trustees began discussing multiple renovation options for Williams High School in September; those ranged from proj- ects costing under $7 million to ones that would require constructing a new building. District trustees continued conceptual discussions with PBK, an architectural and engineering design solutions company, at a work session in November, where this $14 million plan was rst formally introduced. In PBK’s most recent report at a work session Feb. 18, the renovation plans were presented as the rst phase of a master-plan renovation. This rst phase would include moving the school’s entrance from the south to the north side of the building, remodeling the existing building to create larger classrooms and creating clear sight lines along select corridors for safety and secu- rity, the presentation said. Moving the entrance would include relocating administration and counseling oces to the new front of

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14

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

EDUCATION BRIEFS GUIDE

Private school guide 2020 Private Scho l Guide 2 2

A noncomprehensive guide t RIchardson private schools

News from Round Rock, Pugerville & Hutto ISDs

Guide 2020 PrivateSchool Private schools around Richardson oer a variety of specialized instruction, from religious-based to Montessori. This guide features schools with grade levels ranging from pre-K through 12th grade.

www.myqca.org R T Grades served: 612 Enrollment: 51 Tuition: $6,000 per year 8 Saint Paul Catholic Classical School 720 S. Floyd Road 9722353263 www.spsdfw.org R T Grades served: pre-K8 Enrollment: 175 Tuition: $7,964 per year (parishioner), $9,151 per year (nonparishioner) 9 Salam Academy 735 N. Plano Road, Ste. 100 9727044373 www.salamfoundation.us/academy R T Grades served: pre-K12 Enrollment: 200 Tuition: $350 per month 10 St. Joseph Catholic School 600 S. Jupiter Road 9722344679 www.stjosephccschool.net R T Grades served: K8 Enrollment: 251 Tuition: $7,600 per year (Catholic), $8,600 per year (non-Catholic)

3

Dallas International School

COURTESYDALLAS INTERNATIONALSCHOOL

COMPILED BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER ANDMAKENZIE PLUSNICK

school) 5 IANT Quranic Academy 840 Abrams Road 9722318451 www.myiqa.org R T Grades served: K12 Enrollment: 194 Tuition: $6,500 per year 6 North Dallas Adventist Academy 2800 Custer Parkway 9722346322 www.ndaacademy.org R T Grades served: pre-K12 Enrollment: 270 Tuition: $7,850-$9,950 per year 7 Qalam Collegiate Academy 1111 Digital Drive, Ste. 101 9724372526

Enrollment: 32 Tuition: $12,500-$35,000 per year 3 Dallas International School 17811 Waterview Parkway 4692500001 www.dallasinternationalschool.org I Grades served: 512 Enrollment: 268 Tuition: $20,050-$24,450 per year 4 Dallas Learning Center 1021 Newberry Drive 9722313723 www.dallaslearningcenter.com L T Grades served: 612 Enrollment: 50 Tuition: $4,000 per semester (middle school), $6,500 per semester (high

KEY

International

Learning dierences

Traditional Montessori

Religion-based

1 Breckinridge Montessori School 3900 Breckinridge Blvd. 9726641177 www.breckinridgemontessori.com M Grades served: pre-K5 Enrollment: 200 Tuition: not available 2 Bridge Builder Academy 1221 W. Campbell Road 9725168844 www.bridgebuilderacademy.com L T Grades served: K12

WHAT QUESTIONS TO ASK WHEN CHOOSING A PRIVATE SCHOOL Texas has more than 1,400 accredited private schools, of which more than 850 are also nonprots. To help parents choose the right school for their children, Laura Colangelo, executive director of the Texas Private Schools Association and a commissioner with the Texas Private School Accreditation Commission, oers a few tips and suggestions.

Parents should gure out what type of school they are interested in, such as religion-based, Montessori, Waldorf or college prep. Parents should research the mission of the school and make sure it aligns with what they want. They should ask about the tuition costs and fees as well as whether the school oers nancial aid, as many do. Parents should ask what tests the school administers. Most private schools do not administer the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness, or STAAR, but may have students take some sort of norm-reference test that compares themwith other students of their age group nationally.

Parents should nd out the school’s calendar, which may dier from area public school districts. Some schools may also go year-round with longer breaks. Parents should encourage the entire family to visit the school to get a feel for the atmosphere and to see if they can envision their children in that setting. Other questions to consider:

• Is the school accredited? • What is a typical day like?

• Howmuch homework do students have? • What are the extracurricular activities? • Howmuch time do students get to spend outdoors? • How are the teachers hired? • Are there any volunteer opportunities?

SOURCE: TEXAS PRIVATE SCHOOLS ASSOCIATION COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

15

RICHARDSON EDITION • MARCH 2020

BUSINESS FEATURE

The business, which opened in the 1980s, is home to LESSON HORSES and provides instruction to more than 80 14 STUDENTS.

Windmill Stables Richardson horse barn brings a slice of country to the city N estled inside a Richardson neighborhood, just minutes away from the hustle and bustle of commercial development CityLine, is Windmill Stables. The business, which opened in the 1980s, is home to 14 lesson horses and provides riding instruction to more than 80 students. Barn manager, trainer and instructor Kori Delcambre said students at Windmill Stables learn all aspects of horsemanship, from riding to handling the animals. The business oers private and group lessons; however, all students begin with one-on-one instruction. Windmill Stables also holds annual competitions for its students in the spring and fall, and plans are in the works to add a third event, Delcambre said. The business has primarily oered English-style lessons but recently expanded to include the instruction in the Western discipline. At Windmill Stables, English jumping lessons are the most popular, Delcambre said. Lesson horses come from a variety of back- grounds. April, a student favorite, was previously used for mounted shooting competitions. Students range in age from 7-55 years old, Delcambre said. Spending time with the horses makes a noticeable impact on riders, she added. “It’s made a lot of dierence to them, just being around horses: ... their attitude, their behavior, their mental health,” she said. The stable also oers a working student vol- unteer program, which allows riders to help with chores around the barn in exchange for volunteer hours or credits toward lessons. Matt and Sandy Seaton have owned the stable for the past three years, but in late February, Tyler and Erin Hufstetler bought the facility. Accord- ing to Delcambre, the family plans to continue expanding the stable’s riding program. BY MAKENZIE PLUSNICK

Riley Conlin takes a jumping lesson on horse Setesh. (Photos byMakenzie Plusnick/Community Impact Newspaper)

SCHOOLS OF Western-style riding. The disciplines vary in terms of gear and activity. RIDING Windmill Stables oers lessons for English- and

Helmets

English saddle

Jumping

ENGLISH

Barnmanager Kori Delcambre (left) and instructor Anna Lowell teach lessons atWindmill Stables.

Cowboy hats

Windmill Stables 2029 N. Clie Road, Richardson 972-238-9820

Western saddle

Roping/rodeo

CAMPBELL RD.

www.windmillstables.com Hours: 9 a.m.-9 p.m. daily

WESTERN

N

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