Lake Highlands - Lakewood | August 2022

VOLUME XX, ISSUE XX  XXXXXXXXXX, 2022 2022 LAKE HIGHLANDS LAKEWOOD EDITION

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EDUCATION EDITION

VOLUME 1, ISSUE 5  AUG. 11SEPT. 8, 2022

EDUCATION EDITION 2022

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IMPACTS

LITTLE THINGS

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Dallas ISD working to increase college admission rates for grads

“WE ALL HAVE TO WORK TOGETHER TO MAKE SURE OUR SCHOOLS CONTINUE TO REMAIN SAFE.” STEPHANIE ELIZALDE, DISD SUPERINTENDENT

BY ERICK PIRAYESH

recent years with a signicant drop in students seeking attendance at two-year or community colleges. But the total number of students heading to four-year colleges and universities is going up, accord- ing to a presentation during the May 12 board of trustees meeting. CONTINUED ON 17

Dallas ISD is expanding its Col- lege and Career Advising Program in an eort to encourage more students to seek higher education opportunities. The number of DISD high school graduates immediately seeking higher education has declined in

The total percentage of Dallas ISD students graduating from high school has steadily increased since 2018. But the percentage of students enrolling in college after graduating has declined. Dallas ISD ocials said a variety of factors have led to the declining college enrollment gures. Students seeking higher education

Some of the Dallas ISD Police Department’s nearly 200 ocers help welcome students back on the rst day at one of the district’s 228 campuses. (Courtesy Dallas ISD)

Local school districts monitoring security, safety as school year begins

COLLEGE ENROLLMENT AFTER GRADUATION

78% 82% 83% 87%

50%

40%

1% increase since 2018

Two-year college enrollment Four-year college enrollment Graduation rates for each year

BY JACKSON KING

data, there have been over 30 mass shootings in Texas this year. The organi- zation denes a mass shooting as a sin- gle incident where at least four people are injured or killed by a bullet. To increase security, DISD ocials announced July 18 the district will require the use of clear or mesh backpacks for CONTINUED ON 14

30%

Dallas ISD and Richardson ISD are prioritizing school safety across the Lake Highlands and Lakewood areas in response to concerns following mass shootings, such as the one in Uvalde, Texas, on May 24. According to Gun Vio- lence Archive, a national nonprot that provides public access to gun violence

20%

12% decrease since 2018

10%

0

SOURCE: DALLAS ISD COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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THIS ISSUE

ABOUT US

Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the rst edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and Pugerville, Texas. Now in 2022, CI is still locally owned. We have expanded to include hundreds of employees, our own software platform and printing facility, and over 30 hyperlocal editions across the state with circulation to more than 2.4 million residential mailboxes.

HIGHLIGHTS FROM THIS MONTH

FROM BARB: It is hard to believe that the new school year begins this month. In our August Education Edition, community members and parents will nd on Pages 10-11 district-level data and district changes for K-12 schools in Lake Highlands-Lakewood. We hope you nd the information helpful and wish everyone a successful year ahead. Barb Delk, GENERAL MANAGER

Community Impact Newspaper teams include general managers, editors, reporters, graphic designers, sales account executives and sales support, all immersed and invested in the communities they serve. Our mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Our core values are Faith, Passion, Quality, Innovation and Integrity.

FROM ERICK: In this issue, my team and I have worked hard to gather Dallas ISD and Richardson ISD information regarding school demographics, state funding and the latest school projects. We take a deep dive into local school safety initiatives and how Dallas ISD ocials are working to encourage students to attend college. Erick Pirayesh, EDITOR

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LAKE HIGHLANDS  LAKEWOOD EDITION • AUGUST 2022

IMPACTS

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Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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Greenville Avenue Pizza Co.

Little Kitchen Academy COURTESY LITTLE KITCHEN ACADEMY

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COURTESY GREENVILLE AVENUE PIZZA CO.

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COMING SOON 4 Mattison Avenue Salon Suites & Spa announced it will be coming to the Lakeside Village Shopping Center in Dallas later this year. It will be located at 9667 N. Central Expressway, Ste. 130, according to an Aug. 1 release. “We are excited to build another new best-in-class property at Lakeside Village,” said Jason Madden, the company’s chief operating ocer, in a prepared statement. An ocial grand opening date has not yet been announced. The business has 17 other locations in the Dallas-Fort Worth area, including properties in Richardson and Lincoln Park. 214-074-3052 (Richardson location). www.mattisonsalonsuites.com. 5 A new Chili’s concept is planning to open in October o Mockingbird Lane in Dallas. The restaurant will be located at 3036 Mockingbird Lane in the former Starbucks restaurant. No grand opening date has been announced. With a smaller oor plan than other locations, this new Chili’s concept would serve delivery and to-go only, designed to cater to SMU students. Chili’s to-go menu includes a variety of dinner meals, including burg- ers, steaks and fajitas. 214-321-9485 (Casa Linda location). www.chilis.com 6 Golden Chick is scheduled to open another location later this year in the Lake Highlands area of Dallas. The new restaurant will be located at 11915 Abrams Road at the southwest corner of Abrams Road and I-635. No grand opening date has been announced. Golden Chick’s menu features fried chicken, grilled chicken, catsh, sandwiches and more. The chicken restaurant chain has more than 50 loca- tions throughout the Dallas-Fort Worth

area. 214-421-6000 (Fair Park location). www.goldenchick.com 7 Alchemy 43 is planning to come to the Hillside Village in Dallas later this year. The beauty bar based out of New York will be located at 6465 E. Mock- ingbird Lane, Dallas. The Dallas store marks the rst of two planned openings in Texas, as Alchemy 43 also plans to expand to Houston. No grand opening date has been announced, but a Texas Department of Licensing and Regulation ling said construction is scheduled to end Oct. 11. According to its website, Alchemy 43 is an aesthetics beauty bar that specializes in cosmetic micro treat- ments, oering procedures to produce well-rounded cheeks and high-prole jawline. www.alchemy43.com 8 Fortune House Chinese Cuisine is planning to open a second location in the Lower Greenville area of Dallas later this year. The dumpling restaurant, which is currently located in Irving, will be opening at 2010 Greenville Ave., Dallas, next to the HG Sply Co. No grand opening date has been announced. Fortune House oers a variety of dumpling dishes, including soup, and steamed and fried dumplings as well as chicken and beef entrees and a kids menu. 972-831-9888 (Irving location). www.fortunehousecuisine.com RELOCATIONS 9 Great American Hero is moving to the Timber Creek Crossing Center in Dal- las. The 75-year-old restaurant located o Lemmon Avenue is scheduled to be relocated to 6216 Retail Road after new ownership bought the restaurant in Jan- uary. No grand opening date has been

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NOW OPEN 1 Sushi Mocki recently opened on East Mockingbird Lane in the Lakewood area of Dallas. The sushi restaurant opened July 7 at 5321 E. Mockingbird Lane, Ste. 130. According to its website, Sushi Mocki is a modern Pan-Asian sushi bar that oers a variety of dishes, including edamame, tempura and sashimi. It oers dine-in or takeout across its menu. 469-654-3760. www.sushimocki.com 2 Mixtitos Kitchen opened July 28 in the Lakewood area of Dallas. The Mexi- can-fusion restaurant is located at 2706 Samuell Blvd., Dallas, near Samuell Grand Park. Mixtitos’ menu includes a

blend of American, Mexican and French cuisine that is keto-friendly. Dishes on the menu include Mixtitos Potato, Chila Kiles, Mix Saron Rice, A La Burger Mixtitos and Mix Croque Monsieur. 972-803-6127. www.mixtitoskitchen.com 3 Body 2.0 Beauty Bar opened in lower Greenville on July 17. The beauty salon is located at 1904 Greenville Ave., Dallas. Services oered at the salon will include brow styling, body waxing, lashes and hair work. Booking for the Lakewood area location is available online and can be found on the Body 2.0 Beauty Bar website. 972-685-3000. www.body20beautybar.com

A Lakewood and Lake Highlands Local Independent Agent since 2007.

Reed Wilcox 214-340-7333 | rwilcox@twfg.com 10233 E. Northwest Hwy., Ste. #516B, Dallas, TX 75238

10233 E. Northwest Hwy Ste 516 Dallas TX 75238 jennifer@jenniferwilcox.com

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY JACKSON KING

The Rodeo Goat's new location serves burgers, salads, desserts and more.

COURTESY THE RODEO GOAT

FEATURED IMPACT NOW OPEN The Rodeo Goat Ice House opened an East Dallas location at the Casa Linda Plaza on July 14. The East Dallas restaurant is the seventh location for the concept, which debuted the Rodeo Goat in Fort Worth in 2012. Other locations are located in Dallas, Houston, Plano, The Harbor in Rockwall and The Sound at Cypress Waters. Rodeo Goat Ice House is located at 1200 N. Buckner Blvd. in the Casa Linda Plaza, which is one of the oldest shopping centers in Dallas after being built in 1945. According to a press release, Rodeo Goat Ice House serves fresh grass-fed beef burgers that are ground in house as well as salads, sides and desserts. announced. Great American Hero oers a variety of sandwich options, serving cold cuts that include ham, turkey and roast beef as well as oering made-to-order classics, such as the Philly cheesesteak and Italian meatball sub. 214-521-2070 (Lemmon Avenue location). www.greatamericanhero.com EXPANSIONS 10 Greenville Avenue Pizza Co. is planning to expand to a new to-go order location, according to a Texas Depart- ment of Licensing and Regulation ling. The new to-go store would be located next to its agship branch at 1925 Green- ville Ave, Dallas, and will feature a kitch- en and a to-go counter for orders. No grand opening date has been announced, but the TDLR ling said construction was scheduled to end July 1. GAPCo oers made-from-scratch pizzas with a thin, crispy crust and homemade sauce. 214-826-5404. www.gapc.co ANNIVERSARIES 11 Half Price Books celebrated its 50- year anniversary in July. The bookstore chain’s headquarters and agship store

The menu features over 20 playfully named burger selections titled after local personalities, including the popular Hola Señorita and Brad Sham burgers. All burgers on the menu can be served with chicken, turkey, vegan or Impossible patties. The extensive drink menu oers domestic and imported brews as well as a diverse cocktail menu, according to the press release. 469-966-4628. www.rodeogoat.com

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is located at 5803 E. Northwest Hwy., Dallas. Half Price Books rst opened July 27, 1972, when co-founders Ken Gjemre and Pat Anderson turned an old laundromat in Dallas into a neighbor- hood bookstore. The chain now has over 120 locations, including 41 in Texas. Half Price Books is oering a 50th anniversa- ry coupon calendar free with an order of $25 or more. For more information, call 214-379-8000 or visit www.hpb.com IN THE NEWS Little Kitchen Academy will be expand- ing into Texas with 75 locations across the state planned for the next decade, according to a news release from Fran- chise Elevator PR. The cooking acade- my,which is headquartered in Vancou- ver, British Columbia, will partner with Wonderful Chaos Kitchen LLC to make the move to Texas. Little Kitchen Acad- emy oers cooking classes for children age 3 and older. New franchise locations will appear in Dallas, Fort Worth, Hous- ton and San Antonio with the rst Texas school planned to open in Austin by the end of the year. https://littlekitchenacademy.com

      

        

     EXPIRES 9/15/22



EXPIRES 9/15/22

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LAKE HIGHLANDS  LAKEWOOD EDITION • AUGUST 2022

TODO LIST

August & September events

COMPILED BY JACKSON KING

AUGUST 13 JAM WITH THE DALLAS FOLK MUSIC SOCIETY Dallas Public Libraries partners with the Dallas Folk Music Society for an afternoon of fun, camaraderie and learning, according to an event release. The Folk Music Society will be playing tunes from long ago as well as modern contemporary favorites, the release stated. Residents can bring instruments to play along or share a song. 1:30-5:30 p.m. Free. Audelia Road Library, 10045 Audelia Road, Dallas. 214-670-1350. https://dallaslibrary.librarymarket.com 14 VISIT BIRDS AT THE DALLAS ARBORETUM Window to the Wild returns to the Dallas Arboretum for a two-hour outdoor meet and greet with birds and trainers. According to the event’s description, those in attendance will get up close and learn all about beautiful birds of prey that can be found right in their own backyard. Noon-2 p.m. $3-$20. Cost included with garden admission or membership. Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Garden, 8525 Garland Road, Dallas. 214-515-6615. www.dallasarboretum.org 19 LISTEN TO FOUR LOCAL ROCK AND INDIE BANDS A special anniversary concert takes place at the Granada Theater with four bands scheduled to perform: The Vanished, Miser, Forty Percent and Space Cadet. Tickets are available online. 7:30 p.m. $25. Granada Theater, 3524 Greenville Ave., Dallas. 214-824-9933. www.granadatheater.com 20 PARTICIPATE IN A MONTHLY ANIME DISCUSSION The Audelia Road Branch Library and Dallas Anime Meetup partner to provide a monthly book club-style meeting where attendees discuss an anime series with questions and trivia. Each month will feature a new topic or anime, which is a Japanese term for animation. Those who wish to register can do so at www.meetupdallas.com/ DallasAnimeMeetup. 1:30-5:30 p.m. Free. Audelia Road Library, 10045

AUG. 1221

ENJOY PEPPERINSPIRED DISHES THE DALLAS ARBORETUM AND BOTANICAL GARDENS

COURTESY THE DALLAS ARBORETUM

The Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Gardens holds its second annual Pepper Palooza event Aug. 12-21. All throughout the A Tasteful Place garden, peppers take center stage, according to the event description. The Dallas Arboretum hosts cooking demonstrations at A Tasteful Place to “showcase how to harvest, grow, prepare and enjoy delicious and healthy produce,” according to the Arboretum’s website. The event will include up to 20 vendors with pepper-inuenced products, including jams, salsas, edamame beans and peppers. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Festival cost included with garden admission or membership. Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Garden, 8525 Garland Road, Dallas. 214-515-6615. www.dallasarboretum.org

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ELVIS GOSPEL AND BEYOND 2022

COURTESY KRAIG PARKER

WORTH THE TRIP Listen to music by Elvis Stardom Entertainment brings its “Elvis Gospel and Beyond 2022” production to the Lewisville Grand Theater on Aug. 20. The show features songs, stories and the history of Elvis Presley. It also features Southern gospel group The Blackwood Quartet performing some of Presley’s personal favorites. The show also showcases Kraig Parker, an Elvis tribute artist from Dallas. 7:30 p.m. Tickets start at $25. Lewisville Grand Theater, 100 N. Charles St., Lewisville 972-219-8446 www.showtix4u.com

Audelia Road, Dallas. 214-670-1350. https://dallaslibrary.librarymarket.com 25 LISTEN TO A NEW ARTIST AT THE GRANADA THEATER Singer-songwriter Nate Frederic performs at the Granada Theater. Frederic is a country music artist from Nashville who just released his debut album, “Dierent Shade of Blue.” According to the Granada theater website, his sound is similar to Sturgill Simpson, Tyler Childers, Nathaniel Ratli and Van Morrison. Tickets are available online. 8:30 p.m. $12. Granada Theater, 3524 Greenville Ave., Dallas. 214-824-9933. www.granadatheater.com SEPTEMBER 03 ENJOY MUSIC AND DINNER AT O’RILEY’S Beyond Destiny performs at O’Riley’s bar and grill. According to the band’s website, Beyond Destiny is a rock, soul, R&B, and contemporary Christian band out of Dallas that has performed all

over the United States. The band has opened up for country and rock artists, including Daron Norwood, John Michael Montgomery, Coey Anderson and Falling Up. 8 p.m. (doors), 9 p.m. (band starts). $10 (cover). O’Riley’s Bar and Grill, 8989 Forest Lane, Dallas. 972-235-2781. www.orileys.com 02 THROUGH 04 WATCH A MOVIE WITH AN ORCHESTRA The Dallas Symphony Orchestra performs alongside the Steven Spielberg movie “E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial” at the Morton H. Meyerson Symphony Center. According to the Dallas Symphony, audiences can experience the classic movie while the orchestra performs John Williams’ award- winning score in sync with the lm. Tickets can be purchased online. 7:30 p.m. (Fri.-Sat.), 3 p.m. (Sun.). $40-$137. Morton H. Meyerson Symphony Center, 2301 Flora St., Dallas. 214-670-3600. www.dallassymphony.org

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Find more or submit Lake Highlands and Lakewood events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

LAKE HIGHLANDS

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TRANSPORTATION UPDATES Dallas improving bike trails near Lakewood

WALNUT HILL LN. COMPILED BY ERICK PIRAYESH & JACKSON KING

UPCOMING PROJECTS

1 Fisher Road from Abrams Road to West Lawther Drive 2 Kenwood Avenue from Greenville Avenue to Sperry Street 3 Santa Barbara Drive from Fisher Road to Sperry Street 4 Sperry from Kenwood to Santa Barbara

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The city of Dallas is using public input to improve its biking infrastructure across the city. The Dallas Transportation Department is taking feed- back from an online survey posted this July to update the city’s bike master plan. City ocials said creating the updated plan is important for “creating a safe and reliable bike network.” Biking infrastructure in the Lakewood/Lake Highlands area of Dallas includes the Cottonwood Creek Trail, the White Rock Creek Trail, the White Rock Lake Trail and the Santa Fe Trail. According to a July 27 pub- lic meeting, Dallas is planning multiple bike improvement projects for later this summer

near White Rock Lake that will add several shared biking lanes. According to the city’s website, shared lanes are pavement markings that are placed within the vehicular travel lane of the roadway. Shared lanes are planned to be added on Fisher Road from Abrams Road to West Lawther Drive, Kenwood Avenue from Greenville Avenue to Sperry Street, Santa Barbara Drive from Fisher Road to Sperry Street and Sperry from Kenwood to Santa Barbara. This project is an update to the 2011 Dallas Bike Plan that will establish bicycle infrastructure improvements needed over the next 10 years, according to the city’s website. The city is hoping to identify a core bicycle

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West Shore Drive reconstruction A project to reconstruct parts of West Shore Drive in the Lakewood area is set to begin early next year, according to an update from ocials with the city of Dallas. The project will take place between Casa Loma Avenue and Santa Fe Trail. It will include various street and sidewalk repairs and has been in the design phase since 2019. Timeline: February 2023- February 2024 Cost: $169,986 Funding source: 2017 bond program

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RICHMOND AVE. network for residents to ride. Other goals of the update include ensuring bicycle route feasibility based on city trac and public input; updating design standards for facilities based upon best prac- tices; and establishing priorities for future capital improvement programs with plans

78 to start building new infrastructure within the next ve years. The city plans to update the bike master plan by summer 2023. City Council is expected to approve $2 million in funding per year for new bicycle infrastructure projects across Dallas, according to city ocials.

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF JULY 29. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT LHLNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

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LAKE HIGHLANDS  LAKEWOOD EDITION • AUGUST 2022

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY & SCHOOLS

News from Dallas, Dallas County & Richardson ISD

Dallas City Council meets Aug. 24 at 9 a.m. at Dallas City Hall, 1500 Marilla St., Dallas. www.dallascityhall.com Dallas ISD board of trustees meets Aug. 25 at 6 p.m. at 5151 Samuell Blvd., Dallas. www.dallasisd.org Richardson ISD board of trustees meets Aug. 25 at 6 p.m. at the RISD Administration Building, 400 S. Greenville Ave., Richardson. www.risd.org Dallas County Commissioners Court meets Aug. 15 and Sept. 6 at 9 a.m. in the Allen Clemson Courtroom of the Dallas County Administration Building, 411 Elm St., Dallas. www.dallascounty.org MEETINGS WE COVER CITY HIGHLIGHTS DALLAS Following a rise of cases in the city, Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins signed an emergency declaration Aug. 5 to receive more doses of the monkeypox vaccine. During a press conference, Jenkins said Dallas County has received 5,000 doses of the vaccine and has 224 conrmed cases. The virus is primarily transmitted through direct skin-to-skin contact, and having close contact with a large number of people is a major risk factor, according to the county’s Health and Human Services Department website. DALLAS After a mosquito sample tested positive for the West Nile virus in late-July, city ocials are urging residents to take precautions against mosquito bites by reducing outdoor activity during the evening and nighttime hours. Dallas-area residents who are outside during these times are advised to cover their arms and legs, and use a mosquito repellent. DALLAS Eligible residents could qualify to receive a $30 subsidy to help with internet bills, according to an Aug. 1 city press release. The subsidy will be provided through a Federal Communications Commission initiative called the Aordable Connectivity Program. In addition to the subsidy, the program also provides up to a $100 discount per household toward a one-time purchase of a computer, laptop or tablet, according to the city’s press release. TEXAS The state has received approval to extend emergency Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program benets for August, a move ocials said will help around 1.5 million households. The Texas Health and Human Services Commission will provide over $305.5 million in August SNAP benets, and each eligible household will receive at least $95 in emergency aid, according to a news release.

Richardson ISD selects lone nalist for new superintendent

BY JACKSON KING

Ocials advise awareness of heat- related illnesses after accepting Stone’s resignation. During the July meeting, the board voted unanimously in support of Branum for the position, citing her past experience with the district. She joined RISD eight years ago as assis- tant superintendent before becoming the district’s deputy superintendent. “Tabitha Branum demonstrated that her unique leadership capabil- ities and track record of success in RISD were exactly what the commu- nity was looking for,” Board President Regina Harris said. “Ms. Branum can relate to RISD, has shown leadership in building community consensus, is transformative and has a strong academic conviction.” With her appointment, Branum will become RISD’s 10th full-time

superintendent since 1946. According to district ocials, Branum has been a Texas educator

RICHARDSON ISD The board of trustees named interim Superinten- dent Tabitha Branum the lone nalist to become the district’s next super- intendent during its July 18 meeting. Branum could not be ocially hired as superintendent by the district until 21 days after being named lone nalist, according to Texas state law. As of press time on Aug. 8, the board planned to approve Branum’s hire at an Aug. 9 meeting. Richardson ISD has been in need of a permanent superintendent since December when the board of trustees accepted the resignation of former Superintendent Jeannie Stone. The board then named Branum as the district’s interim superintendent

for 25 years and has served as a classroom teacher, assistant principal, technology leader, principal and curriculum leader. “I am honored and humbled to continue my service to RISD as superintendent,” Branum said in a statement. “I’m grateful for the trust that our board has placed in me, and I accept this responsibility with great excitement for the future of Richard- son ISD, our students, our sta and our community.” Tabitha Branum SAFETY TIPS County ocials stated residents could follow a few tips to help prevent heat-related illness. • Stay in an air-conditioned place as much as possible. If a home does not have air conditioning residents may qualify for an emergency AC window unit by calling 214-819-1976. Heat-related illnesses may occur when the body is unable to properly cool itself, according to the release. These illnesses include heat rash, heat exhaustion and heat stroke, which can be fatal. • Consider exercising early in the morning or later in the evening. Stay in shaded areas to allow your body to cool down and recover. • Check local news for extreme heat alerts and safety tips. SOURCE: DALLAS COUNTY HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Mayor shares new public safety initiatives

BY MATT PAYNE

DALLAS Mayor Eric Johnson has laid out a series of new public safety initiatives. Johnson’s oce sent a statement July 5 outlining initiatives that build upon Police Chief Eddie Garcia’s violent crime reduction plan. The statement follows a June 15 presen- tation given by Garcia and other police sta sharing updated statistics related to crime in Dallas. A new policy on removing blight in the city is in the works, according to the mayor’s statement. Johnson and the city attorney’s oce are working together “to take the city’s blight remediation eorts to the next level” by modeling it o a program imple- mented in Philadelphia.

BY JACKSON KING

DALLAS COUNTY Ocials with Dallas County Health and Human Services are advising residents to be aware of rising temperatures after reporting a heat-related death July 21. According to a county release, the patient was a 66-year- old Dallas resident who had underlying health conditions. “We are experiencing extreme heat this season, and this again reminds us how important it is to take every possible precaution,” DCHHS Director Dr. Philip Huang said in the release. “Hydrate con- stantly and limit your time outdoors to protect against the intense heat.”

City of Dallas warns residents of fraudulent water disconnection calls

BY MATT PAYNE

214-651-1441, which is deceptively labeled as Dallas Water, a July 7 news release from the city stated. The calls advise residents to make a payment to avoid disconnection. Customers are not called by Dallas Water Utilities before service discon- nections, the release states, despite

the phone number being the actual customer service number. Disconnec- tion notices are sent by mail. Those who suspect they have made payments through the fraudulent calls are encouraged to send an email to forgery-dpd@dallascityhall.com and to contact their nancial institution.

DALLAS Customers of Dallas Water Utilities should beware of fraudulent phone calls and text messages from a phone number demanding payment, according to the city. Calls and messages in both English and Spanish are coming from

9

LAKE HIGHLANDS  LAKEWOOD EDITION • AUGUST 2022

Data and information from local school districts DISTRICT DATA 2022 EDUCATION EDITION

COMPILED BY ERICK PIRAYESH

SOURCES: TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY, DALLAS ISD, RICHARDSON ISD COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

RICHARDSON ISD

DALLAS ISD

Lake Highlands is primarily served by Richardson ISD. RISD operates Lake Highlands High School, Lake Highlands Junior High School and a number of elementary schools in the area. The district has experienced a decline in enrollment partially due to COVID-19, RISD ocials said.

Dallas ISD operates 240 schools, including a high school, a junior high school and a number of elementary schools in and around the Lakewood area. The district has experienced a decline in enrollment since 2019-20, but DISD ocials project numbers to increase slightly for the 2022-23 school year.

202122 STUDENT STATISTICS

STUDENT ENROLLMENT

Economically disadvantaged students 55.91%

English learners

Special education students

Percentage change from 2019-20:

27.98% 13.40%

4.23%

85.09% 47.56% 9.99%

6.63%

Statewide

60.61% 21.66%

11.7%

2019-20

2020-21

2021-22

2022-23*

*PROJECTED

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CAMPUS DATA

2022 EDUCATION EDITION

A closer look at campus-level standardized test scores and other data COMPARING CAMPUS SCORES COMPILED BY ERICK PIRAYESH

Understanding the table The following tables reveal test results from the 2021-22 State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness, or STAAR, exam. Tables also include enrollment data, feeder school campuses and the percent of students considered economically disadvantaged. STAAR RESULTS Results show the percentage of

SOURCES: RICHARDSON ISD, DALLAS ISD, TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY, TEXAS LEGISLATURE COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED These students are eligible for free or reduced-price meals, come from a family with an income below the poverty line, or are eligible for other specic benets.

RICHARDSON ISD

students within the district and each campus who are approaching the grade level, which is considered passing.

Richardson ISD covers the city of Richardson and parts of Dallas. This list is noncomprehensive. It focuses on schools in and around the Lake Highlands area.

202122 STAAR PASSING RESULTS BY GRADE

202122 STAAR PASSING RESULTS BY GRADE

ENROLLMENT

ENROLLMENT

3RD

4TH

5TH

6TH

HIGH SCHOOLS State average District average

ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS

N/A N/A 74% 82% 63% 71% 89% N/A N/A N/A 67% 82% 61% 70% 89% N/A 2,394 -1.44% 28% 78% 53% 53% 84% 58.19% 2,831 1.83% 52% 79% 60% 60% 91% 51.75% 2,432 1.50% 62% 88% 62% 62% 90% 35.44%

State average District average

N/A N/A 77% 70% 77% 69% 80% 75% 60% 69% 72% N/A N/A N/A 74% 67% 76% 70% 76% 73% 63% 71% 77% N/A 504 -19.48% 45% 44% 63% 48% 62% 67% 52% 54% 54% 89.88% 575 -0.86% 43% 36% 49% 38% 47% 32% 24% 53% 47% 88.35% 372 5.08% 55% 45% 76% 73% 81% 64% 50% 77% 88% 43.10% 625 0.80% 69% 60% 56% 81% 64% 58% 28% 42% 60% 93.28% 363 -1.89% 91% 91% 84% 58% 85% 69% 54% 84% 87% 47.93% 346 -8.46% N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 85.84% 616 -3.29% 55% 41% 51% 40% 54% 49% 41% 50% 70% 98.05% 557 -3.46% 71% 48% 65% 45% 74% 74% 74% 46% 57% 83.03% 625 -4.87% 70% 52% 77% 68% 75% 79% 77% 77% 86% 65.76% 392 2.08% 86% 74% 73% 62% 84% 84% 70% 64% 75% 64.03% 725 -1.76% 88% 77% 90% 76% 89% 89% 80% 86% 92% 29.24% 544 7.29% 63% 51% 63% 58% 79% 71% 52% 63% 68% 97.98% 586 1.55% 88% 89% 92% 90% 90% 94% 84% 88% 94% 51.71% 532 2.30% 79% 72% 90% 78% 81% 76% 79% 79% 82% 39.47% 512 2.81% 77% 71% 91% 87% 85% 81% 72% 82% 92% 22.66% 568 3.46% 71% 68% 84% 64% 75% 70% 55% 68% 78% 73.24% 476 -4.60% 78% 71% 74% 63% 85% 77% 65% 75% 84% 82.14% 520 1.51% 84% 67% 86% 75% 77% 72% 67% 71% 70% 74.81% 654 7.38% 77% 73% 73% 63% 60% 47% 33% 55% 56% 65.90% 709 0.28% 56% 44% 58% 49% 70% 65% 48% 64% 58% 90.83% 313 -4.57% 72% 63% 77% 69% 77% 77% 50% 80% 89% 62.62% 632 2.93% 46% 60% 70% 53% 57% 40% 37% 66% 76% 80.85% 489 -1.80% 57% 51% 71% 63% 76% 72% 61% 59% 70% 80.37% 590 -12.72% 81% 69% 76% 70% 80% 79% 58% 69% 75% 59.83% 1,020 5.48% 90% 86% 82% 83% 93% 93% 90% 90% 91% 25.49% 415 8.07% 79% 74% 88% 84% 78% 70% 56% 71% 81% 40.24%

31 Berkner

32 Lake Highlands

1 Aikin

33 Pearce

2 Audelia Creek 3 Big Springs

DALLAS ISD

4 Bukhair

5 Dartmouth

Dallas ISD is the second largest school district in the state. This list focuses on schools near the Lakewood and Lake Highlands areas.

6 Dobie

7 Forest Lane 8 Forestridge 9 Hamilton Park

202122 STAAR PASSING RESULTS BY GRADE

ENROLLMENT

3RD

4TH

5TH

10 Harben

11 Lake Highlands

ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS

12 Marshall

13 Math/Science/Tech

State average District average 1 Hotchkiss 2 Lakewood 3 Lipscomb 4 McShan Jr. 5 Mockingbird

N/A N/A 77% 70% 77% 69% 80% 75% 60% N/A N/A N/A 70% 66% 72% 66% 77% 75% 60% N/A 500 -23.19% 53% 70% 50% 47% 67% 68% 20% 89.60% 916 -2.86% 99% 100% 100% 94% 99% 97% 95% 5.89% 412 2.49% 74% 71% 73% 56% 81% 74% 62% 72.57% 534 -4.64% 59% 59% 52% 58% 62% 81% 56% 97.00% 657 -1.50% 83% 81% 81% 81% 80% 89% 72% 19.48% 460 -6.88% 79% 85% 86% 82% 91% 88% 88% 74.78% 399 64.19% 58% 44% 54% 42% 72% 70% 34% 98.20%

14 Merriman Park 15 Moss Haven

16 Northlake 17 O. Henry

18 Richardson Terrace

19 Richland 20 Skyview

6 Rogers 7 Stone

21 Springridge 22 Stults Road

202122 STAAR PASSING RESULTS BY GRADE

ENROLLMENT

6TH

7TH

8TH

23 Twain 24 Wallace

MIDDLE SCHOOLS State average District average

25 White Rock

26 Yale

N/A N/A 69% 72% 78% 59% 82% 70% 73% 73% N/A N/A N/A 61% 66% 70% 34% 76% 66% 61% 49% N/A 1,196 -8.63% 68% 69% 70% 39% 86% 76% 69% 64% 65.21% 771 -9.72% 40% 64% 55% N/A 60% 67% 57% 31% 96.50%

202122 STAAR PASSING RESULTS BY GRADE

ENROLLMENT

8 Long 9 Tasby

7TH

8TH

202122 STAAR PASSING RESULTS BY GRADE

MIDDLE SCHOOLS State average District average

ENROLLMENT

N/A N/A N/A N/A

78% 59% 82% 70% 73% 73% N/A 76% 30% 77% 60% 72% 62% N/A

HIGH SCHOOLS State average District average

27 Apollo

646 -0.76% 72% N/A

75% 51% 69% 57% 62.85%

N/A N/A 74% 82% 63% 71% 89% N/A N/A N/A 67% 76% 50% 58% 84% N/A

28 Forest Meadow 29 Lake Highlands

761 1.19% 71% 27% 69% 69% 68% 56% 68.46% 831 -2.12% 78% 20% 81% 65% 76% 61% 51.26%

10 Conrad 11 Wilson

1,311

2.90% 75% 77% 48% 55% 77% 92.14%

30 Liberty

641

0.31% 67% N/A

67% 34% 59% 46% 79.25%

1,897 -0.10% 79% 83% 62% 65% 92% 53.40%

11

LAKE HIGHLANDS  LAKEWOOD EDITION • AUGUST 2022

EDUCATION 2022 statewide STAAR scores recover since start of pandemic

STAAR STUDENT PARTICIPATION BY YEARS The number of students taking the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness rose from 2021-22. Testing was not held in 2020 due to the pandemic.

96%

2019

87%

2021

BY HANNAH NORTON

from both 2021 and 2019. “The investments that the state is making in reading academies and accelerated instruction are clearly paying dividends for our students, and the results are a testament to the hard work of teachers across our state,” TEA Commissioner Mike Mor- ath said in a news release. “While we still have much work to do to recover from COVID[-19]-related learning loss in [math], the improvements our students have made in reading are clear.” House Bill 4545 was adopted in 2021 to provide support for students who do not pass the STAAR tests and requires that students have the opportunity to receive 30 hours of targeted instruction for any STAAR subjects they failed. The STAAR exams will be entirely online by spring 2023, as required by House Bill 3906.

Following a drop in standardized test scores during the height of the COVID-19 pandemic, Texas students are beginning to improve in subjects across the board, according to new data released by the Texas Education Agency on July 1. The data breaks down the perfor- mance of students in grades 3-12 who took the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness this spring. Students improved from 2021 in nearly all areas, but test performance was still below prepandemic levels in some subjects. In math, 40% of students met or exceeded the expectations for their grade level in 2022, compared to 35% the previous year. However, 50% of students met or exceeded expectations in 2019. In reading and language arts, 52% of students met or exceeded expec- tations, which was an improvement

98%

2022

CATCHING UP Reading and language arts recovered ahead of math after the peak of the pandemic. Below is a collective comparison of data for grades 3-12.

Percent of students that met grade level or above

MATH Down 10% from prepandemic gures

2019 50%

2021 35%

2022 40%

READING Up 5% from prepandemic gures

2019 47%

2021 43%

2022 52%

SOURCE: TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

INSIDE INFORMATION

2022 EDUCATION EDITION

HOW A LOCAL SCHOOL BOARD

GETTING INVOLVED

II. ADOPT POLICIES AND REVIEW FOR EFFECTIVENESS

STATE BOARD DUTIES The Texas Open Meetings Act requires government entities to conduct public business responsibly, transparently and in compliance with the law. ATTEND A PUBLIC MEETING Residents can attend school board meetings except when policy permits trustees to meet in closed session. SPEAK BEFORE THE BOARD Most school boards dedicate time in their public meeting agendas to hear input from community members. REQUEST PUBLIC RECORDS SOURCES: TEXAS ASSOCIATION OF SCHOOL BOARDS, TEXAS ATTORNEY GENERAL’S OFFICECOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER Citizens have access to information about government activity through the Texas Public Information Act. The State Board of Education includes 15 individuals elected to four-year terms. This board sets policies and standards for public schools statewide. THE STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION: • establishes curriculum standards; • reviews and adopts instructional materials; • determines graduation requirements; • oversees the Texas Permanent School Fund; and • reviews and potentially vetoes the commissioner’s proposed award of new charter schools.

Trustees adopt local policies that guide district operations, such as citizen participation at public meetings and the board’s evaluation of the superintendent. State and federal law also regulate policies, such as campaign ethics and when closed meetings can take place.

FUNCTIONS

DESIGNED BY TAYLOR WHITE

COMPILED BY DANICA LLOYD

III. HIRE AND EVALUATE THE SUPERINTENDENT

Public school board members in Texas are unpaid volunteers elected to their positions by voters living in the communities they serve. School boards provide local governance of their school districts and can only take action by a majority vote at public meetings. ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES School boards oversee management, policymaking, planning and evaluation while the superintendent implements these matters and manages the district’s day-to-day operations, according to the Texas Association of School Boards.

School boards are responsible for hiring and evaluating the superintendent, who manages the district’s day-to-day operations and advises the board on governance decisions. The superintendent also ensures the board’s policies are implemented appropriately.

IV. ADOPT A BUDGET AND SET A TAX RATE

The board adopts the district’s budget and tax rate each year. Trustees ensure the administration’s budget proposal aligns with their goals and priorities, amend the budget throughout the year as needed and approve an annual nancial report by an independent auditor.

SOURCE: TEXAS ASSOCIATION OF SCHOOL BOARDS COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

I. ADOPT GOALS AND MONITOR SUCCESS

V. COMMUNICATE WITH THE COMMUNITY

One of the functions of a local school board is to develop goals and priorities for the district. Administration regularly presents reports on district

According to the TASB, school boards serve as the link between the district and the community. Trustees inform residents, students, sta, parents and the media about district plans, actions and accomplishments.

operations and progress toward those goals. State data can also help trustees compare performance to other districts.

SOURCE: TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

MEET THE BOARDS Each of the nine board members in Dallas ISD and seven board members in Richardson ISD are elected to 3-year terms. Texas law does not dictate term limits for local school board members. Information about the board’s meetings can be found online at www.dallasisd.org and www.risd.org. SOURCES: DALLAS ISD, RICHARDSON ISD, TEXAS ELECTION CODECOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

The board meets on the second and fourth Thursdays of every month at 5151 Samuell Blvd., Dallas. Meetings are also streamed live at www.dallasisd.org. DALLAS ISD

The board meets on the second and fourth Thursdays of every month at 400 S. Greenville Ave., Richardson. Meetings are also streamed live at www.risd.org. RICHARDSON ISD

Dallas ISD

Joyce Foreman District 6 Elected 2014 joyceforeman@ dallasisd.org Dustin Marshall District 2 Elected 2016 dustinmarshall@ dallasisd.org

Edwin Flores District 1 Elected 2015 edwinores@dallasisd.org

Justin Henry Board president, District 9 Elected 2018 justinhenry@dallasisd.org

Joe Carreon District 8 Elected 2020 joecarreon@dallasisd.org Ben Mackey District 7 Elected 2019 benmackey@dallasisd.org Dan Micchie District 3 Elected 2012 danmicciche@dallasisd.org

Camile D. White District 4 Elected 2022 camilewhite@ dallasisd.org

Maxie Johnson District 5 Elected 2019 maxiejohnson@ dallasisd.org

Richardson ISD

Regina Harris Board president, District 4 Elected 2019 regina.harris@risd.org

Megan Timme District 1 Elected 2021 megan.timme@risd.org

Vanessa Pacheco District 2 Elected 2021 vanessa.pacheco@risd.org

Eric Eager At large Elected 2020 eric.eager@risd.org

Chris Poteet At large Elected 2021 chris.poteet@risd.org

Rachel McGowan District 5 Elected 2022 rachel.mcgowan@risd.org

Debbie Renteria District 3 Elected 2020 debbie.renteria@risd.org

13

LAKE HIGHLANDS  LAKEWOOD EDITION • AUGUST 2022

CONTINUED FROM 1

RICHARDSON ISD

RICHARDSON ISD

RICHARDSON ISD

richardson isd spending

existing security measures A number of safety measures are in place at RISD schools thanks to various district funding measures.

officers on site RISD maintains a Safety & Security Department that provides campus- wide support.

efforts to improve security By the start of the 2022-23 school year, RISD will fully assess its security and safety protocols. RISD is undergoing a third-party security audit to ensure best practices are in place at all campuses. Approved for safety and security upgrades as part of the 2021 bond election. $12.7M The district has released a security-specic video for parents and the community to help demonstrate dierent safety measures.

As it did for the 202122 school year, Richardson ISD plans to spend about $2.6 million from its operating fund on security and safety.

2022-23 $2.58M of $391.4M operating fund* 2021-22 $2.59M of $382.16M operating fund*

0.66%

School entrances have double-door security, camera coverage and remote monitors.

Multiple full-time ocers are assigned at each high school. Full-time ocer is assigned at each junior high. RISD elementary campuses are assigned a part-time o cer. Additional full-time ocer rotates between other elementary campuses.

1 12

Doors have keyless, automatic locks with electronic monitoring at all entrances. Interior surveillance cameras cover school corridors. Campuses have exterior cameras and outdoor perimeter lighting. Handheld and entry-way metal detectors are at some campuses.

0.68%

1

*RISD ALSO FUNDS SCHOOL SECURITY COSTS THROUGH GRANT FUNDS AND COST SHARING AGREEMENTS WITH POLICE DEPARTMENTS.

SOURCE: RICHARDSON ISD COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

SOURCE: RICHARDSON ISD COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

students in sixth through 12th grade starting in the 2022-23 school year. The DISD website states that being new backpacks will allow campus personnel to better prevent prohib- ited items from entering schools. “We all have to work together to make sure our schools continue to remain safe,” DISD Superintendent Stephanie Elizalde said. “We want to be proactive, not reactive.” Through the use of funds from the 2021 bond election and 2018 tax rati- cation election, RISD schools have received security upgrades, Assistant Superintendent Sandra Hayes said. For both districts, a strive toward improving overall security has led to implementing new security equip- ment and training ahead of the 2022- 23 school year. Along with a complete analysis of the eectiveness of their security programs, DISD and RISD

implemented in RISD are doors with double-buzz entry pads, keyless automatic locking doors with elec- tronic monitoring, handheld metal detectors and more. District ocials said bond funds have also been used to increase security camera footage both inside and outside of campuses. “[RISD] schools are well-equipped with safety and security in mind, with funding for updates and improvements provided each bond cycle,” Hayes said. Additional security improvements being implemented for the 2022-23 school year include improved exterior campus and parking lot lighting; addi- tional cameras; and more. DISD ocials said the district also uses bond funds to improve security equipment. Dallas residents approved a propo- sition during the 2020 bond that pro- vides $114.7 million toward safety and

McGough stated he believes RISD ocials should perform safety audits; establish early warning and red ag systems through anonymous reporting; monitor social media for warning signs; and move polling locations when school is in session. In June, the RISD board of trust- ees requested the Texas Legislature modify primary election days to pro- mote safety on campus. On the day of the mass shooting in Uvalde that left 19 students and two teachers dead, several RISD campuses were open to the public for the Dallas County primary runo election. “We ... know that during that time our buildings are vulnerable,” Bra- num said during the June 13 meeting. Adding to security Among the safety and secu- rity upgrades that have been

ocials said they are working to ensure safety across all campuses. “Creating a safe environment for teaching and learning has been RISD’s No. 1 priority since the Columbine

tragedy in 1999,” Hayes said. Calls for increasing measures

Dallas City Council Member Adam McGough has pushed RISD to improve its security. He represents the city’s District 10, which is located in RISD’s school boundaries. In a June 6 memo to Dallas City Man- ager T.C. Broadnax and RISD interim Superintendent Tabitha Branum, McGough recommended stronger security. “It is time for action,” McGough said in the memo. “We cannot accept the pain and fear that permeates our communities with the inltration of violence and evil in our schools.”

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