Bellaire - Meyerland - West University Edition | August 2021

BELLAIRE MEYERLAND WEST UNIVERSITY EDITION

2021 P U B L I C E D U C A T I O N E D I T I O N Anewchapter

ONLINE AT

VOLUME 3, ISSUE 4  AUG. 5SEPT. 3, 2021

New Houston ISD superintendent takes over ahead of crucial year

Ahead of the new school year, new Houston ISD Superintendent Millard House II faces several key challenges.

Delivering classroom instruction 100% in person

Reversing learning loss

Working through an ongoing equity study SOURCE: HISD COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

BY SHAWN ARRAJJ

Houston ISD has a new superintendent, and in his rst year he will face an unprecedented test of leadership. As the 2021-22 school year approaches, new district Superintendent Millard House II must balance the urgency of returning to in-person instruction—and reversing the pandemic-related learning loss that took place last year—with the need to keep students safe from the coronavirus, new cases of which have been on the rise this summer. In a July 7 news conference, House called for hav- ing 100% of instruction taking place in person to start the new school year, arguing the pandemic demon- strated the crucial importance of students being able to learn in person. The position is also in line with recommendations from the U.S. Centers for Disease

MillardHouse II took over as Houston ISD’s superintendent July 1. (Shawn Arrajj/Community Impact Newspaper)

CONTINUED ON 14

A STARK CONTRAST Texas has maintained a minimum wage

Restaurants grapplewith pandemic stang shortages BY HUNTER MARROW

that has not increased since 2009, lagging behind the national average.

“Everyone was in a lull last year,” said Lyons, who owns six restaurants in the Greater Houston area, includ- ing one in Bellaire. “There was so much inconsistency with operations. Nobody knew if we were even going to be open at 50% next week, 100% or 25% the next, or any of those things.” Some area road rehab projects hit delays

Restaurants are facing a new prob- lem in 2021: Sales are up, but many eateries do not have the sta to sup- port the increased volume. “What that causes is not the great- est experience for the customer and also not the greatest experience for CONTINUED ON 18

$9.21

Aaron Lyons, founder of the local eatery Dish Society, sawrsthand how stang shortages in the restaurant industry intensied when the COVID- 19 pandemic came to Houston. Those challenges have continued, he said.

$7.42 $7.25

SOURCE: U.S. BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER 2010 2020 MINIMUMWAGE

National average

Texas

2021

PUBLIC EDUCATION EDITION

DISTRICT DATA

9

CAMPUS DEEP DIVE

12

IMPACTS

4

TRANSPORTATION

DINING FEATURE

7

17

SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL J OURNALISTS

COMMUNITY IMPACT PATRON PROGRAM

Want to learn more? Scan the QR code to watch our video.

DONATE TODAY! COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM CIPATRON

THERE’S A BETTER APPROACH TO CANCER CARE in the Texas Medical Center

At Houston Methodist Cancer Center, we treat every aspect of your cancer. Leading oncologists work with our specialists across disciplines to minimize cancer’s effects on major organs. One comprehensive team — dedicated to your individual care — uses the latest research, treatments and technology to stop your cancer. From infusion and clinical trials to surgery and reconstruction, our innovative care is available in the Texas Medical Center.

The Woodlands

Willowbrook

West Houston-Katy

Texas Medical Center Baytown

That’s the difference between practicing medicine and leading it.

Clear Lake

Sugar Land

713.790.2700 houstonmethodist.org/cancer-tmc

2

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

ABOUT US

Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the rst edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and Pugerville, Texas. We have expanded our operations to include hundreds of employees, our own printing operation and over 30 hyperlocal editions across three states. Our circulation is over 2 million residential mailboxes, and it grows each month with new residents and developments.

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

FROM JAY: The summer heat and what seems to be endless rain means August is here, and the 2021-22 academic year is getting underway. Our annual Public Education Edition delivers a close look into key district data (see Page 9) as well as a deep dive into area campus statistics (see Page 12). Don’t forget to stay up to date on new businesses in our Impacts section and support them by shopping local. Jay McMahon, GENERALMANAGER

Community Impact Newspaper teams include general managers, editors, reporters, graphic designers, sales account executives and sales support, all immersed and invested in the communities they serve. Our mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Our core values are Faith, Passion, Quality, Innovation and Integrity.

FROMSHAWN: The new school year starts o with the promise of fresh leadership at Houston ISD, where new Superintendent Millard House II is preparing for a year that will likely bring many challenges. Our front-page story introduces readers to House and provides an overview of what his plans are to make up for pandemic-spurred learning losses while keeping children safe. Meanwhile, students and parents can check out photos of the new Bellaire High School (see Page 11). Shawn Arrajj, SENIOR EDITOR

Our purpose is to be a light for our readers, customers, partners and each other.

WHATWE COVER

Sign up for our daily newsletter to receive the latest headlines direct to your inbox. communityimpact.com/ newsletter DAILY INBOX Visit our website for free access to the latest news, photos and infographics about your community and nearby cities. communityimpact.com LIVE UPDATES

MARKET TEAM GENERAL MANAGER Jay McMahon SENIOR EDITOR Shawn Arrajj SENIOR CITY HALL REPORTER Emma Whalen REPORTER Hunter Marrow SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNER Anya Gallant METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Jason Culpepper ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Kristina Shackelford MANAGING EDITOR Kelly Schaer ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Kaitlin Schmidt CORPORATE LEADERSHIP GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Warner CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES &MARKETING DIRECTOR Tess Coverman CONTACT US

BUSINESS &DINING Local business development news that aects you

TRANSPORTATION &DEVELOPMENT Regular updates on area projects to keep you in the know

SCHOOL, CITY & COUNTY We attend area meetings to keep you informed

HOWWE’RE FUNDED

Join your neighbors today by giving any amount to the CI Patron program. Funds support our PATRON PROGRAM

ADVERTISING

Our local teams customize advertising

campaigns for all business sizes and industries wanting to reach their customer base and accomplish their goals. A third-party Readex survey proved 78% of paper recipients read three of the last four editions, and from what they read, 83% “took action” of some kind. We ask our readers to thank our advertisers by shopping locally.

$20 average donation choose to give monthly 35% edition newsletter called The InCIder and occasionally reach out with other opportunities to directly engage. hyperlocal, unbiased journalism and help build informed communities. As a thank you, we’ll include you in a special Saturday

245 Commerce Green Blvd., Ste. 200 Sugar Land, TX 77478 • 3463682555 PRESS RELEASES bmwnews@communityimpact.com SUBSCRIPTIONS communityimpact.com/subscriptions

communityimpact.com

facebook.com/impactnewsbmw

@impactnews_bmw

© 2021 Community Impact Newspaper Co. All rights reserved. No reproduction of any portion of this issue is allowed without written permission from the publisher.

Proudly printed by

COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM ADVERTISING

COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM CIPATRON

FAMILY MEDICINE • BIOIDENTICAL HORMONES • ACUPUNCTURE • INFUSION THERAPY • FOOD SENSITIVITY

We utilize functional medicine to help patients find extraordinary health naturally. Dr. Nellie Grose, MD and Dr. Miiko Rowley, MD Holistic Primary and Pediatric Care

Proudly serving Houston for 30 years. Schedule your appointment today! 230 Westcott, #208, Houston 77007 | tchh.net | 713-660-6620

3

BELLAIRE  MEYERLAND  WEST UNIVERSITY EDITION • AUGUST 2021

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

1

8

WESTHEIMER RD.

R I C H M O

69

W

1

59

288

WEST UNIVERSITY PLACE

7

610

YogaSix

HERMANN PARK DR.

COURTESY YOGASIX

HERMANN PARK

in the Greater Houston area with other lo- cations in the Bay Area, Friendswood and Pearland. 832-203-8867. www.facebook. com/citrisnailspabellairecenter 5 A new oce of Vascular Institute of Houston opened July 6 in the Texas Med- ical Center area at 7515 Main St., Ste. 100, Houston. Run by Dr. Mehrzad Zarghouni, the oce provides a range of services, including one-on-one consultations, diagnostic screenings, angioplasty, sclero- therapy and stent placement, without requiring hospital stays. 281-767-2580. www.myvascular.com 6 With its fourth location in the Houston area, Burn Smoke Shop opened a store in Rice Village, 2519 Rice Blvd., Houston, in early July. The store, rst established in 2003, oers a selection of vaporizers, e-cigarettes, e-juice, smoking accessories and local hand-blown glass. 281-501-8102. www.burnsmokeshophouston.com 7 Dr. Susan Hardwick-Smith celebrated the grand opening of Complete Midlife Wellness Center on July 15 at 1200 Binz St., Houston, in the city’s Museum District. A board certied gynecology, Hardwich-Smith will oer services geared around women’s midlife wellness. Services range from life coaching and hormone treatment to annual wellness experiences, which are designed to improve sexual, spiritual, relational and emotional health. 713-497-9458. www.completemidlife wellnesscenter.com COMING SOON 8 Premium Swiss chocolatier Läderach will bring its sweet oerings to the Galleria area this fall at 5085 Westheimer

DRYDEN RD.

14

W. HOLCOMBE BLVD.

11

288

3 4

FANNIN ST

2

BELLAIRE

5

RICE BLVD.

PINE ST.

6 12

TIMES BLVD.

BEECHNUT ST.

10

9

MEYERLAND

AMHERST ST.

BRAYS BAYOU

UNIVERSITY BLVD.

610

MAP NOT TO SCALE N TM; © 2021 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER CO. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

S. POST OAK RD.

F O

13

WILLOWBEND BLVD.

NOWOPEN 1 July 17 marked the rst day of classes for yoga studio YogaSix , which opened its West University Place location at 5170 Bualo Speedway, Houston. The studio is locally owned and operated by a franchi- see, and it oers six dierent core classes that target exercises ranging from hot and fast to slow and mindful. 713-309-6757. www.yogasix.com 2 Palace Social , a 27,000-square-foot bowling and entertainment concept,

opened July 12 at 4191 Bellaire Blvd., Ste. 150, Houston. The venue features eight bowling lanes, a 159-seat restau- rant and a 3,900-square-foot arcade, among other oerings. In addition, Palace Social also features a 600-square-foot esports lounge, virtual reality games, two multisport simulators and three event rooms equipped with oversized at-screen TVs that can also be equipped with karaoke systems. 713-913-4955. www.palacesocial.com 3 The Toasted Yolk Cafe brought its full-service neighborhood eatery with

traditional breakfast to Bellaire Town Center on July 12, opening at 5103 Bel- laire Blvd., Ste. 160, Bellaire. The restau- rant chain, known for oering breakfast, lunch and brunch items as well as beer and wine, had originally planned a March opening but was delayed because of the COVID-19 pandemic. 713-239-0607. www.thetoastedyolk.com 4 Citris Nail Spa opened a location in June in Bellaire Town Center, 5101 Bellaire Blvd., Ste. 175, Bellaire. The spa, which specializes in manicures, pedicures, waxing and articial nails, now has ve locations

Now is the perfect time to take care of all your child’s health and wellness needs! Tomake an appointment, call (832) 548 5000 or visit LegacyCommunityHealth.org Our Board-Cer�fied Pediatricians focus on a child’s whole health, ge�ng to know each child and family, and answering all your ques�ons. • Annual wellness exams (free book with visit) • School & sports physicals • Sick child visits • In-person & video visits • 12 convenient loca�ons • Southwest Pediatric Walk-In Clinic (Open every day to all families) • Vaccina�ons & immuniza�ons (including COVID-19) • Care for newborns to young adults • TeenWell™, health program for adolescents • Pediatric dental & vision

Now is also the perfect �me to visit the Houston Zoo &meet the baby elephants! Legacy and the Zoo have come together to offer a 25% discount on general admission �ckets! Get your �ckets at HoustonZoo.org using promo code SUMMER2021 before September 30, 2021. Offer only available online and only valid for general admission.

Legacy accepts most HMO/PPOs, CHIP, Medicaid and Medicare. Eligibility Specialists are available to discuss sliding scale fees and poten�al programs to help reduce the cost of services.

PEDIATRICS

4

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY HUNTER MARROW

2

10

Palace Social

The Rice Box

COURTESY PALACE SOCIAL

COURTESY THE RICE BOX

Road, Houston. The chocolatier will open the location as part of a 15-store opening nationwide in locations owned by real estate investment trust Simon Property Group. Each store will feature more than 85 varieties of chocolate directly from Switzerland as well as a dedicated fresh chocolate counter, where customers can select multiple varieties of hand-broken chocolate bark. https://us.laderach.com 9 Houston-based jewelry brand Chris- tina Greene will be opening its rst true retail store in Rice Village, 2528 Amherst St., Houston, on Sept. 1. The location will serve as the agship of the jewelry brand, known for showcasing semiprecious stones and 18-karat gold-plated settings. The store will showcase clothing, acces- sories and gifts that compliment Christina Greene designs as well as serving as the company’s wholesale and direct-to- consumer headquarters. www.christina-greene.com 10 The Rice Box , a chain of retro-in- spired Chinese/American takeout restau- rants housed in glass and neon with an edgy ambiance, will open a location in Rice Village at 5504 Morningside Drive, Houston, in the fall, according to Rice Village Management, which manages the property where the location will open. The chain serves classic dishes such as General Tso’s chicken, sesame chicken, and sweet and sour chicken along with noodles and rice, street bites, and nitro tea. www.riceboxed.com EXPANSIONS 11 On July 26, Texas Children’s Pavilion for Women announced plans for a $201

million expansion in the Texas Medical Center. The expansion includes trans- forming the former Baylor clinic building at 6620 Main St., Houston, into part of the Texas Children’s campus in the Texas Medical Center. The new expansion will be named Main Tower. Additionally, the building will be connected to the Pavilion for Women by a new sky bridge and will provide the hospital system an additional 190,000 square feet of usable space. The multi-year expansion will occur over three phases, the rst of which is expected to be completed in the spring of 2022. The full expansion is expected to be completed in 2024. 832-826-3000. www.women.texaschildrens.org IN THE NEWS 12 The Houston-themed life-size game board, Houstonopoly , is extending its venue dates at 2501 Rice Blvd., Houston, and will now be open through Aug. 29. The 10,000-square-foot summer pop-up was originally slated to close July 31 but extended the dates due to high demand and limiting indoor capacity to 50% for safety. Visitors are able to become the game pieces, and with a roll of oversized dice, collect their Houstonopoly money and travel around the giant Houston- themed board. 832-568-3770. www.houstonopoly.com 13 Bellfort Park Apartments —near the Willowbend, Braeswood, and Wil- low Meadows communities at 4135 W. Bellfort Blvd., Houston—celebrated its grand re-opening on July 28. The 64-unit apartment complex, which oers homes to families of low and moderate incomes from a variety of backgrounds, is the rst

ZOA Moroccan Kitchen will open Aug. 9 in Bellaire.

COURTESY ZOA MOROCCAN KITCHEN

FEATURED IMPACT COMING SOON Fast-casual eatery ZOA Moroccan Kitchen is bringing its authentic Moroccan cuisine to Bellaire. The restaurant will have its grand opening Aug. 9 at 6700 S. Rice Ave., Bellaire. It will be the second concept of its kind by Houston chef Youssef Nafaa, also the creator of Coco Crepes Waes & Coee and Mia Bella Trattoria. ZOA will serve locally sourced food with organic ingredients. “I have been fortunate to travel to many fascinating places around the world and have enjoyed the most exotic development completed through the city of Houston’s Harvey Multifamily Program. The renovations involved updating the apartments with modern appliances, security features and amenities. Designed to replace homes damaged by Harvey, as well as expand the supply of homes available to low- and moderate-income renters, the program paid for $3.5 million out of the $14.1 million project cost. The program was funded through Commu- nity Development Block Grant-Disaster Recovery funds, funneled through the Texas General Land Oce from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Devel- opment. 713-668-1621.

foods prepared and served at the nest restaurants,” Nafaa said. “But in my travels, I get as much pleasure from eating what the locals eat every day— perhaps even more pleasure from these

experiences, I would say.” www.zoamoroccan.com

610

N

CLOSINGS 14 Antone’s Famous Po’ Boys has closed its brick-and-mortar location in the Texas Medical Center. The sandwich shop’s last day at 6618 Fannin St., Hous- ton, was June 25. Antone’s made the move after it reopened the store Nov. 2 following its closure due to COVID-19; the store rst opened in December 2019. The closure comes after the chain decided to take its sandwiches to cus- tomers through its delivery and catering programs, and area grocers, instead of through a brick-and-mortar location. www.antones1962.com

WALK IN OR REGISTER ONLINE

2280 Holcombe Blvd., Houston, TX 77030 713-357-7391 www.ascentemc.com Corner of Holcombe & Almeda

WE TREAT ALL EMERGENCIES ADULTS AND KIDS.

Emergency Covid-19 Evaluations Available 24/7

5

BELLAIRE  MEYERLAND  WEST UNIVERSITY EDITION • AUGUST 2021

TODO LIST

August events

COMPILED BY SHAWN ARRAJJ

07 LEARNABOUT THE JAPANESE STAR FESTIVAL Children’s Museum Houston invites the public to make a wish at the Tanabata Japanese Star Festival, which celebrates the Japanese legend of two star-crossed lovers separated by the Milky Way. The children’s event, hosted in partnership with the Consulate General of Japan in Houston, will include an interactive storytelling experience, origami class, and a chance to make a wish and hang it on a bonobo tree. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. $12 (includes admission to museum). Children’s Museum Houston, 1500 Binz St., Houston. 713-522-1138. www.cmhouston.org 12 HEAR FROMPHOTOGRAPHER VIKMUNIZ The Museum of Fine Arts Houston will host a virtual conversation between Vik Muniz, a Brazilian photographer and mixed-media artist, and photography curator Malcolm Daniel. Muniz is known for repurposing everyday materials into recreations of iconic artworks, including “Sigmund,” a photographic portrait of Sigmund Freud made with chocolate syrup, which is on display on the third oor of the museum’s Kinder Building. 6:30-7:30 p.m. Free. 713-639-7300. www.mfah.org 25 GET GARDENING TIPS FROMAN EXPERT Jean Fefer, Harris County master gardener and former 16-year chemistry teacher with the University of Houston, will teach a gardening class on propagation techniques and barriers to germination. Space is limited, and registration is required to attend. 6 p.m. Free. McGovern Centennial Gardens, 1500 Hermann Park Drive, Houston. 713-524-5876. www.hermannpark.org

Indian Performing Arts Samskriti comes to Miller Outdoor Theatre on Aug. 20.

COURTESY MILLER OUTDOOR THEATRE

LIVE PERFORMANCES MILLER OUTDOOR THEATRE

AUG. 06

CELEBRATE HERMANN’S BIRTHDAY KINDER STATION, HERMANN PARK

All listed events are free to attend. 6000 Hermann Park Drive, Houston 281-373-3386 • www.milleroutdoortheatre.com AUGUST 05 Shakespeare Night at the Movies: “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” 8:30 p.m. 06 Shakespeare Night at the Movies: “Much Ado About Nothing,” 8:30 p.m. 07 Shakespeare Night at the Movies: “Romeo and Juliet,” 8:30 p.m. 13 Silambam Houston presents Sharing Stories, 8:30 p.m. 14 The Diaz Music Institute presents Oscar Hernandez with Noche Caliente, 8:30 p.m. 20 Indian Performing Arts Samskriti presents “Incredible India—Bhoomi,” 8:30 p.m. 21 Classic Albums Live presents Fleetwood Mac “Rumors,” 8:30 p.m. 28 The Selena Experience, 8:30 p.m.

The Hermann Park Conservancy will celebrate the 178th birthday of the man who gifted the parkland to the city of Houston. Children age 12 and under can ride the park’s railroad for $1.78, and $1.78 food specials will be available at some venues. 10 a.m.- noon. Free. Kinder Station, 6100 Hermann Park Drive, Houston. 713-524-5876. www.hermannpark.org

COURTESY HERMANN PARK CONSERVANCY

AUGUST 06 SEE THE FAB 5 LIVE IN CONCERT The ‘80s cover band the Fab 5 will play a live show hosted by Patrons for Bellaire Parks and the city of Bellaire. Orleans Seafood Kitchen Food Truck will be on- site. Personal coolers are allowed. 7-9 p.m. Free. Bellaire Town Square, 7008 S. Rice Ave., Bellaire. 713-662-8222. www.bellairetx.gov

Find more or submit Bellaire-Meyerland-West University events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

Student banking that fits you to a

Make the grade with Trustmark’s Student Checking account. You’ll have quick and easy access to your money with online and mobile banking, and there’s no monthly service fee. Our account just for students is banking that fits you to a T. Learn more at trustmark.com.

6

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES

COMPILED BY HUNTER MARROW & EMMA WHALEN

Concrete supply, delays stunt street rehab initiative

COMPLETED PROJECTS

Some City Council districts saw higher numbers of miles of street repairs in scal year 2020-21, which ocials said is because older projects rolled over from the previous year and because some projects were delayed. ROADWAY TO PROGRESS

0 20 40 60 80 100 Work planned for FY 2020-21 Work completed or under construction in FY 2020-21 Number of lane miles

BELLAIRE BLVD.

A B C D

LINDEN ST.

BY EMMA WHALEN

City Council district map

In the inaugural address for his second term in January 2020, Mayor Sylvester Turner promised Houstonians would see “noticeable improvements” in the quality of city streets by the end of 2023. By the end of his rst year, however, many of the street rehabilitation projects planned throughout the city had been delayed. “There were contractor stang shortages and supply shortages, and in the districts where projects did get completed, it was because they were already underway,” Houston Public Works spokesperson Erin Jones said. Project design also took longer than anticipated because the public works department began following a new standard that requires the department to repair sidewalks along street repairs, Houston

N

610

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF JULY 21. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT BMWNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM. Bellaire Boulevard and South Rice Avenue panel replacement As part of the city of Bellaire’s regular road maintenance program, contrac- tors with the city replaced failing asphalt driving surface and the failing concrete below it at the intersection of Bellaire Boulevard and South Rice Avenue, extending south to Linden Street. Subgrade material was fully replaced in locations where it was in poor condition and reused elsewhere. Timeline: June-early July Cost: $25,000 Funding source: City of Bellaire Met- ropolitan Transit Authority of Harris County fund

45

E

0.6 lane miles completed out of 28

B

H

F G H I J K

A

C

G

10

J

F

I

D

K

E

59

288

SOURCE: CITY OF HOUSTON COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

N

Transportation and Drainage Director Veronica O. Davis told City Council

4 lane miles to prioritize for safety improvements in scal year 2020-21. As the city moves forward with the initiative, incomplete projects were rolled over to FY 2021-22, which began July 1, in addition to new projects, Jones said.

members at a transportation committee meeting in June.

Under the mayor’s street rehabil- itation initiative, each district City Council member was able to choose

Meyerland’s Most Trusted Choice in Assisted Living & Memory Care

Continue a life of dignity and purpose where neighbors become friends and staff becomes family.

Active Events Calendar Landscaped Park Housekeeping & Laundry Transportation Services

Pet Friendly Licensed Nurses In-House Physicians Therapy Services

Spacious Apartment Homes Chef-Prepared Dining

Outdoor Terraces Concierge Service

Assisted Living & Memory Care

Schedule a Tour Today (346) 800-4549

4141 N. Braeswood, Houston, TX 77025 www.villageofmeyerland.com

FIN105335

7

BELLAIRE  MEYERLAND  WEST UNIVERSITY EDITION • AUGUST 2021

CITY NOTES

News from Houston & West University Place

COMPILED BY HUNTER MARROW

Bellaire City Council will meet at 7 p.m. Aug. 16 at 7008 S. Rice Ave., Bellaire. Meetings are streamed at www.bellairetx.gov. West University Place City Council will meet at 6:30 p.m. Aug. 9 at 3800 University Blvd., Houston. Meetings are available via teleconference. Find details at www.westutx.gov. Houston City Council will meet at 1:30 p.m. Aug. 10 for public comment and 9 a.m. Aug. 11 for regular business at 901 Bagby St., Houston. Meetings are streamed at www.houstontx.gov/htv. Harris County Commissioners Court will meet at 10 a.m. Aug. 10 at 1001 Preston St., Ste. 934, Houston. MEETINGSWE COVER CITY HIGHLIGHTS HOUSTON Houston’s new 311 system launched July 21 with new features and a mobile app. The system aims to give residents more options for the ways they can report nonemergency issues. It also allows sta to update the status of a request on a public-facing dashboard.

Phase 2 ofWest UniversityVirtual Gate camera systemnowunderway

West University council approves goals, priorities

WEST UNIVERSITY PLACE Installation of a camera system that uses license plate readers and live-feed cameras to cover lanes of trac and alert police of stolen vehicles in West University Place has ocially entered the second of two phases. The Virtual Gate Project-Phase 2 began in mid-July. It will eventually include readers and cameras at 25 locations within West University Place when completed by the end of 2021, the city announced July 14. The license plate cameras will be equipped with similar technology used in police patrol vehicles that can detect and alert the police department of stolen vehicles, vehicles associated with Amber of Silver alerts, and more. The rst phase of the project remains delayed as West University Place waits for the city of Houston to approve permits for the eight

WEST UNIVERSITY PLACE Upgrading city facilities, improv- ing the Poor Farm Ditch drainage channel, and identifying stormwater detention sites were just a few of the priorities and goals approved by the West University Place City Council during its July 26 meeting. These topics were formed by the city of West University Place’s strategic vision process, performed annually by the council that identies short, mid-, and long-term goals for the city and specic priorities for the upcoming year, according to a July 26 agenda report brought to the council. There were ve broad goals approved by the council as well as over a dozen priorities divided by policy and management agendas and whether they are a top priority or high priority. Every priority and goal will be addressed by the city council in upcoming meetings.

28 number of live- feed cameras the city of West University Place will install as part of its ongoing Virtual Gate program

COMMUNITY IMPACT STAFF

remaining locations. That phase of the project was originally slated for completion in December 2020 but now has an anticipated completion of December 2021. Once done, the city will have 28 live-feed cameras and 76 plate readers. The total cost for both phases of the project is $4.5 million, which will be paid for through a certicate of obligation bond to be paid back by the city over the next 15 years.

Meetings are streamed at www.harriscountytx.gov.

A lot. Even small steps can make a big difference. Start with a visit to a primary care doctor at a Harris Health community health center near you. As your partner in good health, we can help you lower your blood pressure, lose extra weight, prevent diabetes or even learn to cope with stress and anxiety. get healthier? What can I do to

Visit our website or call us today at 713-526-4243 for an appointment.

harrishealth.org

8

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

2021

PUBL I C EDUCAT ION EDI T ION

DISTRICT DATA

COMPILED BY SHAWN ARRAJJ

The district will begin the 2021-22 school year with 100% of instruction taking place in person, the opposite of this time last year, when 100% of learning was virtual. HOUSTON ISD

280 schools

196,171 students

11,254 teachers

1924 year founded

SOURCES: TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY, HOUSTON ISD COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Student enrollment *PROJECTED

202021 stang, salaries and substitutes

Total number of teachers*

Starting teacher salary**

Percent change from 2018-19

2018-19

2019-20

2020-21

2021-22*

11,254

$56,869

210,061

209,772

197,000

Superintendent salary

Associate teacher hourly pay

-6.1%*

196,171

$345,060

$14$16.34

*TOTAL IS THE FULLTIME EQUIVALENT AND MAY INCLUDE PARTTIME POSITIONS. **SALARY IS FOR 202122.

202021 student statistics English learners

COVID19’s eects on education In-person vs. remote fall enrollment

*PROJECTED

Economically disadvantaged students 78.45%

Special education students

Spring 2020-21

Fall 2020-21

Fall 2021-22*

33.33% 8.25%

In person

In person

In person

43%

0%

100%

Remote

Remote 100%

Remote

57%

0%

Statewide

Student safety strategies for 2021-22

60.19% 20.64%

11.26%

• Face masks strongly encouraged but not required • Visitation will be limited to essential visitors with scheduled appointments

• Buildings and buses will be cleaned and disinfected daily • Plexiglass dividers will remain in place

Howmuch do homeowners pay in school taxes? This chart displays the amount of school district taxes the average homeowner has paid annually over the last three years based on the average taxable value of property within HISD. Homeowner exemptions may vary depending on the situation of each individual taxpayer.

Revenue sources

2019 20

2020 21

2021 22

2019-20

2020-21

2021-22*

$250K $300K $200K

Figuring out the formula

$2.7B TOTAL REVENUE:

$2.39B TOTAL REVENUE:

$2.081B TOTAL REVENUE:

$2,859.37

$2,730.77

Home value 100

$2,639.42

$100K $150K $50K $0 TAX RATE PER $100 VALUATION

$2.096B LOCAL $169.7M STATE $124.6M FEDERAL

$1.895B LOCAL $157.2M STATE $17.2M FEDERAL

$2.099B LOCAL $248.3M STATE $352.6M FEDERAL

X Tax rate ÷

= Amount paid

$1.1367

$1.1331

$1.1284

9

BELLAIRE  MEYERLAND  WEST UNIVERSITY EDITION • AUGUST 2021

PUBLIC SAFETY Advocates continue calls for HISDpolice department reform

Pete Lopez, the chief of the Houston ISD Police Department, provided department data to ocials at a police reform workshop in November 2020. Department at a glance

BY SHAWN ARRAJJ

also emphasized the important role police serve for HISD. On June 9, ocers responded quickly to an incident at North Forest High School when a student was shot in the hand by a driver who ed the area. “As a parent and a grandparent, I would rather wash pepper spray out of my child’s eye than go to the cemetery,” she said. Other HISD board members have spoken publicly about the need to take a closer look at policing. At the November workshop, HISD Police Chief Pete Lopez said his priorities include reducing the number of arrests and implementing programs that provide decision-making skills to students. The ght for reform will carry on into the new school year, Millet said. “Overall, we look forward to working with the next administra- tion and the board to implement policies to reduce police practices that physically and mentally harm students,” he said.

has changed, and more systemic changes are still needed. “Small procedural changes do not address the structural changes needed to make students feel safer in today’s HISD schools,” he said. The coalition of advocacy groups, of which One Houston is part, has called for four key changes that would prohibit police from pep- per-spraying students, using zip ties on students as handcus, arresting students on campus for nonviolent oenses, and questioning students about alleged crimes without a parent or guardian present. “Changing policies to end the use of force and pepper spray puts a higher focus on [social-emotional learning] and restorative discipline practices, which benet the whole student,” Millet said. At the June school board meet- ing, Blueford-Daniels claried ocers do not use pepper spray, instead using a gel she said allows them to be more direct in use. She

More than one year after a band of advocacy groups and Houston ISD students united to call on the district to reform the way it uses police on school campuses, some advocates said few changes have been made but are hopeful the conversation will continue into the new year. The district formed a police procedures committee last sum- mer and hosted a work session in November with members of advocacy groups such as One Hous- ton and Disability Rights Texas. After the HISD board adopted the district’s 2021-22 budget at a June 10 meeting, Trustee Kathy Blueford-Daniels, who chairs the police committee, said some police procedures had been revised, including that all ocers are now wearing body cameras. However, Ashton Millet, an orga- nizer with One Houston, said there has been little transparency in what

ocers 106 7 +

Assigned to campuses:

sergeants

ocers 62 12 +

Assigned to investigations and patrol:

sergeants

sta members 32

Administrative:

Number of arrests

Total Use of force

1,219

1,123

1,200

1,049

949

936

900

600

300

56 43 24 47 21

2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 0

SOURCE: HOUSTON ISD POLICE DEPARTMENT COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

• Home to Pomona Elementary • Zoned to Alvin ISD #5 Most Diverse District in Texas #9 Best Athletes in Texas #2 Best District in Brazoria County

• Minutes from Pearland • Resort-Style Amenities

• 4 Award-Winning Builders • Lake Front Views Open!

www.pomonabyhillwood.com

10

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CLOSEUP NewBellaireHigh School opens to students this fall

2 0 2 1 P U B L I C E D U C A T I O N E D I T I O N

610

MAPLE ST.

BY HUNTER MARROW

A $141.5 million construction project to build a new facility for Bellaire High School is 80% through its construction. The school is being built on the same lot as the former campus and will utilize an existing science wing, ocials said. Various elements of the project’s rst phase were completed in early 2021 and will be open to students during the 2021-22 school year, which will begin Aug. 23. A new academic wing features multi- ple exible learning areas; a ne arts wing includes a 900-seat auditorium and black box theater; and a physical education wing features two gyms, an eight-lane natatorium and a diving well. “Those are areas that every kid has to interact with at some point in high school,” Bellaire High School Principal Michael McDonough said. “Every kid has to take a year of ne arts, so every kid’s going to touch those areas, and every kid has to take a year of [physical education], so the kids are going to touch those areas.” Construction on the second and nal phase of the project will not be nished until August 2022. By the time the new school year starts, key elements of the project left to tackle will include a front entrance, a one-story administration wing, a ve-level parking garage, a new courtyard and a turf football eld that McDonough said will also be used for soccer and track. The new nearly 400,000-square-foot high school incorporates several key design elements requested in the 2012 bond referendum, including shared space collaboration, more ecient use of space and more natural light, McDonough said. “I think people will be very pleased with the nal product,” McDonough said. “We’re a strong school, and I think that this is going to make us even stronger.”

N

Bellaire High School will still need a front entrance by the time classes start Aug. 23; by August 2022, this entrance and other features will be completed. (Photos by Hunter Marrow/Community Impact Newspaper)

1

1 Houston ISDmade shared-space collaboration a design goal in its 2012 school bond projects. These rooms can hold a lecture hall-style class or have the chairs pushed back for a more interactive space. 2 The school features both a new practice gym and main gym for practice and games. 3 The new auditorium seats 900 people, making it one of the biggest auditoriums in Houston ISD. STATEOFTHEART FACILITIES

2

3

STAYCATION MODE

�� MONTHS – KINDERGARTEN

Thinking about the 2021-2022 school year? Goldberg Montessori School offers a Judaic studies curriculum with motivational Montessori guidelines in a nurturing environment that facilitates learning. TOUR Schedule your

www.gmshouston.org | ���.���.���� HONORING THE PATH OF THE CHILD

WholeEarthProvision.com

11

BELLAIRE  MEYERLAND  WEST UNIVERSITY EDITION • AUGUST 2021

CAMPUS DATA

A closer look at campus-level data from local districts CAMPUS DEEP DIVE

HOUSTON ISD

Roughly 25,000 students attend classes at the 22 Houston ISD schools that serve the Bellaire, Meyerland and West University area. Eight of those elementary schools are also magnet schools, as are all four of the middle schools and all three of the high schools.

COMPILED BY SHAWN ARRAJJ

SOURCES: HOUSTON ISD, TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Understanding the table The tables below compare campuses within their districts across a variety of categories dened by the Texas Education Agency.

ENROLLMENT 202021 STUDENT POPULATION

ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS

Feeder schools

ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED Students who are eligible for free or reduced-price meals, come from a family with an income below the poverty line or are eligible for other specic assistance or benets ENGLISH LEARNER Identied by the Language Prociency Assessment Committee, students who have another primary language and are learning English DYSLEXIC Students identied as having dyslexia or other related disorders education program or another program using special education support services, aids or other special arrangements SPECIAL EDUCATION Students participating in a special

AT RISK Students identied as at risk of dropping out of school based on state-dened criteria, which can include performance, alternative education enrollment, expulsion and homelessness, among other factors TITLE I Students in Title I programs under the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, which provide funding for students of low-income families CTE Students enrolled in a state-approved career and technical education course as electives or in a district’s CTE program; percent shown is for 2019-20, the most recent year available

1 Condit 2 Elrod* 3 Herod*

1909 1964 1965 1945 1960 1955 1958 1959 1928 1957 1936 1954 2001 1950 1925

727 -7.4% 37.3% 26.7% 10.6% 2.2% 32% 19.4% 17 716 -8.2% 98.2% 59.8% 6.3% 2.1% 71.8% 100% 16 813 0.2% 53.1% 25.3% 6.9% 3% 35.7% 100% 16 754 -8.3% 14.2% 17.9% 6.4% 2.9% 22.5% N/A 17 726 5.7% 24.7% 11.8% 9.6% 2.9% 18.6% N/A 18 670 -8.6% 67.2% 16.3% 8.7% 3% 35.7% 100% 17 634 -5.5% 31.7% 12.6% 10.9% 6.3% 21.9% 0% 16 870 -4.6% 40.8% 27.8% 8.4% 4.4% 35.5% 100% 18 776 -8.1% 27.2% 22.6% 6.4% 2.6% 28.9% 0% 18 610 -4.7% 70% 30% 14.3% 2.8% 45.6% 100% 18 689 -8% 11.8% 18.3% 6.5% 2% 22.5% 0% 17 481 -16.9% 96% 59.9% 3.5% N/A 71.9% 100% 17 580 -14.7% 98.9% 83.1% 5.5% N/A 88.1% 100% 16 859 -5.9% 14.9% 16.8% 5.7% 3.4% 22.2% 0% 17

4 Horn

5 Kolter*

6 Longfellow*

7 Lovett* 8 Parker*

9 Poe* 10 Red*

11 Roberts 12 Shearn 13 Tinsley 14 Twain

15 West University

1,141

-11.1% 3.5% 3% 7.8% 3.1% 7.5% 0% 19

ENROLLMENT 202021 STUDENT POPULATION

SOURCES: TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY, TEXAS LEGISLATURECOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

MIDDLE SCHOOLS 16 Fondren* 17 Lanier* 18 Meyerland* 19 Pershing*

Feeder schools

1966 1,082 3% 92.5% 49% 7.4% 1.9% 60.4% 100% 22

Texas school districts and individual campuses will not receive accountability ratings for 2020-21 from the Texas Education Agency due to the pandemic, according to the TEA. It is unknown if accountability ratings will return for 2021-22. WHERE ARE THE ACCOUNTABILITY RATINGS?

1926 1959 1928

1,411 -3.4% 22.7% 7.4% 4.6% 3.8% 10.3% N/A 21 1,341 -9.1% 64.2% 21% 9% 3.7% 28.1% 100% 20, 22 1,714 -4% 49.7% 13.9% 8.4% 5.5% 45.2% 100% 20

ENROLLMENT

202021 STUDENT POPULATION

SCHOOL STATS

HIGH SCHOOLS

OF CAMPUSES IN THE BELLAIRE, MEYERLAND AND WEST UNIVERSITY AREA

SAW DROPS IN ENROLLMENT FROM THE PREVIOUS YEAR. 81%

20 Bellaire* 21 Lamar* 22 Westbury*

1955

3,218 -6.7% 44.7% 13.6% 7.1% 3.8% 38.9% 100% 45.7%

1937 2,849 1.5% 49.4% 7.8% 6.4% 3% 31.8% 100% 86.9%

OF STUDENTS ARE ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED AT 41% OF BELLAIREMEYERLANDWEST UNIVERSITYAREA CAMPUSES

1961

2,393 -0.4% 91.3% 31.8% 9.2% 2.3% 62.1% 100% 88.1%

At least 50%

*ALSO A MAGNET SCHOOL

3642 University - Suite 103

floatbaby.com

12

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

2 0 2 1 P U B L I C E D U C A T I O N E D I T I O N

MAGNET SCHOOLS As a district of choice, HISD oers dozens of programs oering specialized opportunities, Many have lottery-style selection processes; others require additional qualications.

ENROLLMENT 202021 STUDENT POPULATION

MONTESSORI ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS Garden Oaks

1937 1925

WHAT IS THE SELECTION PROCESS?

814 -4.1% 42.3% 22% 10.7% 7.4% 31% 100% E/E 590 -2% 34.6% 22.9% 11.7% 6.6% 36.9% N/A E/E

Wilson

A threshold based on test scores must be met. All students who apply are considered qualied.

AR: Academic rating OE: Open enrollment

ENROLLMENT 202021 STUDENT POPULATION

AUD: Audition Students must submit a portfolio or performance. E/E: Examor experience Students must pass an exam or have previous experience.

COLLEGECAREER

ENROLLMENT 202021 STUDENT POPULATION

MIDDLE SCHOOLS Mickey Leland Young Women’s HIGH SCHOOLS Austin

2011 2011

458 -4.4% 63.3% 7.9% 3.5% N/A 24.7% 100% OE 2.1% 67.1% 5.4% N/A 1.8% 16.3% 100% AR 541 1,520 -6.4% 95.8% 32.8% 11.8% 2.1% 78% 100% OE 486 2.7% 72.4% 6.8% N/A N/A 23% 100% AR 939 7.8% 42.9% 2.2% N/A N/A 16.1% 100% AR 446 -2.4% 82.5% 7.8% N/A N/A 34.5% 100% AR 488 4.5% 84% 5.1% N/A N/A 34.4% 100% AR 489 0.6% 87.1% 13.9% N/A N/A 41.5% 100% AR 1,431 -3.3% 93.4% 25% 12.0% 2.9% 62.6% 100% AR 0% 83.1% 9.4% N/A N/A 32.3% 100% AR 427

1937 2003 1972 2006 1978 2008 1968 2005

Challenge Early College

STEMFUTURES ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS Berry

DeBakey

East Early College

1910 1960 1990 1954 1898 1992 1916 1962 1952 1912 1924 1992 1959 1952 1996 1962 1939 1960 2012 1902 1979 1929 1954 1926 1957 1980

764 -7.4% 97.9% 54.2% 9.4% 5.4% 71.7% 100% OE 804 -7.4% 92.3% 48% 3.7% 1.4% 60.9% 100% OE 404 -9.8% 94.6% 46% 9.2% N/A 63.6% 100% OE 362 -14.2% 99.2% 3% 7.7% N/A 37.6% 100% OE 647 -1.2% 15.3% 5.1% 5.4% 4.8% 12.1% N/A OE 818 -8.7% 99.5% 44.5% 6.7% 2.8% 54.6% 100% OE 620 -11.3% 82.3% 28.9% 7.7% 2.6% 45% 100% OE 481 -16.8% 88.1% 0% 6.9% 2.3% 31.2% 100% OE 370 -6.3% 95.9% 41.9% 10.5% 3.5% 62.4% 100% OE 1,135 0.9% 61.1% 21.6% 7.1% 2.8% 25.6% 100% OE 295 -14.2% 95.9% 30.2% 7.5% N/A 43.7% 100% OE 484 -25% 75% 11.8% 7% N/A 28.5% 93.8% OE 0.3% 31.5% 4.7% 9.5% 3.2% 14.7% 100% OE 545 -17.3% 89.9% 47% 8.4% 2.9% 59.6% 100% OE 736 -13.0% 92.7% 43.6% 8.4% 2% 56% 100% OE 402 -23.1% 92.5% 43.6% 16.2% N/A 55.7% 100% OE 262 -33.2% 97.3% 5.3% 5.7% N/A 4.3% 100% OE 434 -13.9% 91.5% 14.3% 6.9% N/A 36.4% 100% OE 591 621 -1.7% 77.1% 8.2% 5% 1.8% 14% 100% OE 428 2.4% 77.8% 19.6% 5.6% 3.3% 26.2% 100% OE 564 -9.3% 99.1% 41.1% 9% 2.8% 76.4% 100% OE 648 -7.6% 96.8% 54.5% 11.6% 3.4% 62.3% 100% OE 1,168 -7.3% 97.2% 39.4% 8.8% 2.7% 51.6% 100% OE 1,030 -0.2% 50.4% 14% 10% 7.1% 50.8% 100% OE -3.1% 98.6%60.3% 6.5% 2.2% 68.8% 100% OE 1,115 -11.5% 85.6% 41.5% 9.8% 2.6% 47.4% 100% OE 921

School for Law and Justice North Early College

Cornelius

Davila

Northside

Hartseld Harvard Herrera Lantrip Lockhart

South Early College

1965 1,644 6.9% 91.8% 23.1% 14.5% 3.6% 69% 100% AR 822 1% 93% 4.3% 17.4% 1.9% 60.3% 100% AR 1926

Sterling

Yates

Pugh

ENROLLMENT 202021 STUDENT POPULATION

Rice School

Ross

Shawdowbriar

Sinclair Stevens

FINE ARTS

Valley West Wainwright

ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS Atherton

Wesley Whidby

1927 1920 1927 1899 1977 2006 1992 1912 1931 1966 1949 1921 1968 1968 1968 1913

486 -14.6% 100% 9.3% 8% N/A 30.5% 100% OE 395 -9.2% 96.2% 12.2% 6.8% N/A 34.2% 99.5% OE 843 -7.5% 97.9% 52% 6.5% 48.8%68.6% 100% OE -16.6% 98.7% 11.9% 9% N/A 41.2% 100% OE 358 -10.7% 90.5% 2.8% 11.2% 2.8% 26% 100% OE 520 -20.4% 97.7% 23.7% 8.3% 2.1% 46.2% 100% OE 637 -12.7% 95.4% 74.3% 7.1% N/A 82.4% 100% OE 556 -1.1% 67.8% 27% 7.7% N/A 39.4% 100% OE 503 -16.3% 90.5% 38.8% 5.6% N/A 50.1% 100% OE 311 665 -7.4% 89.2% 14.9% 7.5% 1.8% 28.9% 100% AUD 432 -9.4% 98.6% 9.7% 9% N/A 46.5% 100% OE -3.7% 78.2% 12% 3.4% N/A 32.3% 100% OE 398 -8.9% 94.2% 48% 9.3% 3% 70.4% 100% OE 501 412 -5.9% 94.4% 19.7% 13.6% 3.4% 77.7% 100% OE 1,383 4% 95.9% 33.4% 14.5% 4% 50.1% 100% AUD 682 -9.1% 96.2% 35.3% 11.4% 3.7% 50% 100% AUD

Bruce

MIDDLE SCHOOLS Baylor at Ryan Baylor at Rusk

Burbank Burrus Codwell Cook Crespo Crockett

Clifton Deady

Hartman

Hogg

Garden Villas Gregory-Lincoln Kashmere Gardens

Long Academy

Revere

1994 1,400 -3.6% 90.9% 37.9% 8.3% 3.4% 60.3% 100% OE 6.5% 98.8% 34.4% 13.8% 3.7% 47.7% 100% OE 1962 491

Stevenson Williams

MacGregor Scroggins

HIGH SCHOOLS Chavez Energy Institute

MIDDLE SCHOOLS Fleming

2000 2,560 -8% 91.4% 27.7% 8% 1.8% 67.3% 100% AR

2013 1961 1966 1957 1926 1968 1959 1893

764 3.1% 50.4% 4.5% 6.4% 4.2% 30.2% 100% AR 1,113 -1.1% 96.2% 27.8% 11.8% 3.1% 62.4% 100% AR 342 -4.7% 92.7% 17.8% 6.7% N/A 55.8% 100% AR 830 0% 95.1% 17% 15.3% 3% 63% 100% OE 2,154 4.6% 93.2% 22.9% 8.5% 2.5% 62.7% 100% OE 731 -2.8% 94.8% 27.8% 13.1% 3% 57.3% 100% AR 1,853 -3.2% 73% 18.6% 10.9% 3.5% 51% 100% AR 760 -7.2% 95.3% 25.9% 12.6% 3.3% 68.3% 100% OE

Lawson Marshall

Furr

1904 2,450 6.9% 65.8% 9.6% 6.7% 3.3% 40.6% 100% AR

Heights (Technology)

2002 1,022 -7.7% 96.3% 45.2% 10.3% 2.4% 69.8% 100% AUD 682 4.9% 98.2% 4% 10.4% 3.4% 92.5% 100% AUD 1979

Ortiz Welch

Jones

Kashmere

HIGH SCHOOLS Kinder HSPVA

Milby

1971

797 0.4% 17.1% N/A N/A 1.4% 9.9% 0% AUD

Scarborough

Waltrip (Technology)

Washington Westside

ENROLLMENT 202021 STUDENT POPULATION

2000 2,868 0.4% 60.4% 12.9% 6% 1.8% 41.9% 100% AR

ENROLLMENT 202021 STUDENT POPULATION

VANGUARD

ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS Askew

1977 1993 1929 1949 1929 1962 1929 1903 1960 1957 1927 1919

827 -11.8% 65.4% 29% 7% 2.3% 38.3% 100% E/E 434 -18.6% 79% 48.6% 9% N/A 59.7% 100% E/E 519 -9.1% 96.7% 48.4% 7.3% N/A 61.3% 100% E/E 864 -2.9% 15.9% 3.4% 5.9% 3.4% 9.7% N/A E/E 616 -3.1% 11.7% 8.6% 4.9% 2.3% 13.5% 0% E/E 999 -1.6% 22% 6.3% 13.2% N/A 13% 0% E/E 507 -15.9% 84.6% 37.3% 7.5% N/A 56.2% 100% E/E 694 -2.8% 14.3% 3.3% 7.1% 6.3% 9.7% 0% E/E 685 -6.4% 92.6% 41.9% 5.1% N/A 5.9% 100% E/E 1,359 4.4% 50.8% 18.5% 9.2% 5.5% 25.3% 100% E/E 1,504 -2.2% 93.7% 40.2% 8.4% 4.7% 58.8% 100% E/E 1,057 -12.6% 81.2% 23.3% 7.9% 3.8% 33.6% 100% E/E

INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGES

Carrillo De Zavala Oak Forest River Oaks T.H. Rogers Roosevelt

ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS Arabic Immersion

2015 1968 1918 1957 2012 1929

481 18.2% 52.2% 26% 5.4% N/A 36.6% 100% OE 565 -9.7% 62.8% 32.9% 5.8% 3% 50.3% 100% OE 482 -1% 55.4% 41.1% 10.9% N/A 51.7% 100% OE 875 -5.4% 93.4% 52.1% 6.6% 1.7% 64.6% 100% OE 726 3.4% 27.4% 12.4% 3.4% N/A 21.2% 0% E/E 610 1.7% 42.8% 45.2% 3.8% 2% 56.1% 100% E/E

Durham Helms Patterson

Travis

Mandarin Immersion

Windsor Village MIDDLE SCHOOLS Black

Wharton

MIDDLE SCHOOLS Pin Oak

2002 1,272 1.4% 31.2% 12.4% 5% 2.8% 14.9% 0% OE 1968 1,268 1.4% 95% 24.8% 6% 1% 44.1% 100% OE

Burbank Hamilton

Sharpstown International

HIGH SCHOOLS Academy for International Studies 2006

HIGH SCHOOLS Carnegie Vanguard

499 0.4% 67.9% 3% N/A N/A 15.8% 100% AR

2002

925 8.3% 32.9% N/A N/A N/A 12.3% 0% E/E

13

BELLAIRE  MEYERLAND  WEST UNIVERSITY EDITION • AUGUST 2021

Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8 Page 9 Page 10 Page 11 Page 12 Page 13 Page 14 Page 15 Page 16 Page 17 Page 18 Page 19 Page 20 Page 21 Page 22 Page 23 Page 24

communityimpact.com

Powered by