Lewisville - Flower Mound - Highland Village | Sept. 2021

LEWISVILLE FLOWERMOUND HIGHLAND VILLAGE EDITION

VOLUME 4, ISSUE 11  SEPT. 15OCT. 12, 2021

ONLINE AT

Newpublic safety complex on ballot Lewisville voters will decide Nov. 2

$95 Million

$0

116,000

whether to fund new buildings for police and re. A conceptual rendering shows one possible design for the police station.

bond measure proposed

increase to property tax rate

square feet to be built on Main Street and Valley Parkway

INSIDE 14 SOURCE: CITY OF LEWISVILLECOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

IMPACTS

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HIGHER EDUCATION GUIDE 2021

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RENDERING COURTESY CITY OF LEWISVILLE

Colleges design plans to helpworking adults BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER 2 0 2 1 H I G H E R E D U C A T I O N G U I D E

BURROWS LAWGROUP

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Completion Program after speaking with an adviser at Midwestern State University. Within 18 months of enroll- ing, she had her degree and a job as administrative assistant in the school’s Oce of the Registrar. “[The program] has changed my life in so many ways,” Crosley said. “I have such a grateful heart. [It has CONTINUED ON 12

Leslie grandmother instilled in her the value of educa- tion. Crosley knew a bachelor’s degree would allow her to better provide for her daughter with disabilities. But after years of trying to balance her work life, home life and education, that goal began to feel further out of reach. Crosley then discovered the Adult Crosley’s

JOB LISTINGS

Delores Jackson, director of the BAAS Adult Completion ProgramatMSU, congratulates Leslie Crosley on her graduation.

EMPLOYMENT

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COURTESY LESLIE CROSLEY

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E V E N I N G F O R E D U C A T I O N

Live Music * Local Food * Student Showcase * Silent Auction

October 10, 2021 | 6:00 - 9:00 PM The Stage @ Grandscape in The Colony

Support LISD schools and students by attending our fall fundraiser!

bit.ly/lefweek Purchase Tickets at

$104,000 awarded to 64 Teacher Grants across 40 LISD schools!

TICKETS AVAILABLE NOW In addition to a phenomenal speaker series, and events by our talented resident companies, this coming year will feature a selection of eight shows that will entertain all ages!

Buy tickets at CoppellArtsCenter.org today!

505 Travis Street, Coppell TX

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FROMBARB: With all the uncertainty in today’s workplace, many individuals are seeking options to further their education. This month Senior Editor Olivia Lueckemeyer delves into options available for those looking at a career change or wanting to learn a new skill set (Pages 12-13). Olivia also provides information on how employers are investing in their employees by partnering with colleges or universities. Barb Delk, GENERALMANAGER

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FROMVALERIE: Voters in Lewisville will be asked in November whether to approve a $95 million bond measure so the city may build a new public safety complex for its police and reghters. We lay out the details for the city’s proposal as well as the need for the new facilities (see Pages 14-15). What is most important is that you exercise your right to vote. Early voting starts Oct. 18. The election is Nov. 2. Valerie Wigglesworth, MANAGING EDITOR

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CORRECTION: Volume 4, Issue 10 In the August to-do list, it should have stated that a dance class on Sept. 14 was at the Flower Mound Senior Center at 2701 W. Windsor Drive and that the class was for members only with a $5 fee.

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LEWISVILLE  FLOWER MOUND  HIGHLAND VILLAGE EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2021

IMPACTS

COMPILED BY SAMANTHA VAN DYKE, WILLIAM C. WADSACK & VALERIE WIGGLESWORTH

Businesses that have recently opened, coming soon, relocating or closing

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BARTON CREEK

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CHERRY CREEK

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COMING SOON 7 Wu Wei Din Chinese Cuisine is opening a second location at the end of September at 2505 S. Stemmons Freeway in Lewisville. The original restaurant has been open in Plano since 2016. The restaurant serves Taiwanese and Chinese dishes such as wontons, dumplings and noodles. 469-968-8001. www.wuweidinchinesecuisine.com 8 A new La Madeleine Express grab- and-go restaurant is slated to open by October inside the Walmart Supercenter at 190 E. Round Grove Road, Lewisville. La Madeleine Express’ menu will feature popular items as well as new items creat- ed specically for its Walmart locations, according to the brand’s website. In addi- tion, the location will have a small retail area. Renovation work is slated to wrap up by the end of September, according to the Texas Department of Licensing and Regulation website. 972-315-3398 (Walmart). www.lamadeleine.com 9 Smoothie King is opening at 801 International Parkway, Ste. 500, Flower Mound. This will be the franchise’s third location in Flower Mound. The shop oers a variety of fruit and vegetable smoothies with the option of adding nut butters and nutritional enhancers. An opening date has not been set. 800-577-4200. www.smoothieking.com 10 My Eyelab is opening a new store- front at 2550 Cross Timbers Road, Ste. 116, Flower Mound. The store provides

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NOWOPEN 1 4Thirteen Kitchen & Sports Lounge combines an in-house branded kitchen, sports lounge and live music venue all in one place. The restaurant and bar opened in Lewisville in mid-August. The concept plan from owner Angela Germany details a menu designed “for an upscale palate” as well as craft cocktails that provide “a whole experience in a glass.” The busi- ness is located at 755 SH 121, Ste. B-100. 972-855-8339. www.4thirteendallas.com 2 Lewisville Comics is open at 2417 S. Stemmons Freeway, Ste. 106, just south of Round Grove Road. The shop, which held its grand opening May 29, sells new and vintage comics, graphic novels, sports cards, toys and more. Lewisville Comics

5 Athletico Physical Therapy opened in late July in Flower Mound Towne Crossing at 2704 Cross Timbers Road, Unit 90. Ser- vices include free assessments, physical therapy, work assessments to improve safety and treat work injuries, COVID-19 recovery and rehabilitation, and home therapy. Telehealth virtual treatment op- tions are also available. 469-830-9400. www.athletico.com/locations/ ower-mound-tx 6 La Myrrah is now open at 1501 Cot- tonwood Creek, Ste. 150, in The Shops at Highland Village. The specialty lingerie shop features Latin American designs in a variety of styles, labels and sizes. It will soon be adding shapewear, swimwear and specialty jewelry. 972-318-1900. www.theshopsathighlandvillage.com/ La-Myrrah A new website is coming soon.

also oers free in-store appraisals. 972-315-3664. www.lewisvillecomics.com 3 Island Snow Café opened Sept. 9 at 2930 Justin Road, Ste. 100, in Highland Village. A grand opening is scheduled for Sept. 17-18. The cafe specializes in shaved ice desserts, acai bowls and bowls featuring pitaya, also known as 4 Premier Martial Arts opened a new franchise location on Aug. 2 at 2608 Flower Mound Road, Ste. 100, Flower Mound. In addition to martial arts classes, Premier Martial Arts also hosts birth- day parties and events. 972-798-8923. https://premiermartialarts.com/ owermound/ dragon fruit. 469-456-5549. https://islandsnowcafe.com

     

           

          

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Worth the Pour owners Michael and Brenda Reyes said they will oer personal service and highlight some of the lesser known brands in addition to the popular labels. VALERIE WIGGLESWORTHCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

FREE FRAMES on 2nd PAIR OF GLASSES! *See office for details

FEATURED IMPACT NOWOPEN Neighborhood liquor store Worth the Pour is set to open in mid-September as of press time Sept. 10 at 3517 Windhaven Parkway, Ste. 100, as part of The Realm at Castle Hills development in Lewisville. Worth the Pour sells beer, wine, spirits and cigars and has a mobile app for deliveries in a 12-mile radius. Owners Michael and Brenda Reyes said they oer a more personal approach to liquor sales. They also have a tasting license so they can host events and oer samples. eye exams for customers, and sells eyeglasses and contact lenses for men, women and children. My Eyelab does not yet have an opening date or phone num- ber for its Flower Mound location. www.myeyelab.com 11 Knockout Sports Bar will open a location at 1640 S. Stemmons Freeway in Lewisville in September. The location will have wall-to-wall at screen TVs and of- fer over 20 types of beer, including daily drinks specials. Known for its wings, the bar will also oer burgers and pizza as well as some main dishes. A phone num- ber is not yet available for this location. 12 Painting with a Twist moved on May 28 from Music City Mall Lewisville to 420 E. Round Grove Road, Ste. 110, Lewis- ville. The art studio oers art classes for students of all ages and experience levels. Professional artists guide students through the painting process during regular classes, parties, family gather- ings and team-building events. Patrons can bring their own beer or wine to drink while painting. 469-316-1940. www.paintingwithatwist.com/studio/ lewisville https://kosportsbar.com RELOCATIONS 13 Frenzel Consulting and Tax Services opened its new oce on Aug. 25 in High- land Village. It relocated from Denton to 2100 Village Parkway, Ste. 103, in

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Michael Reyes said his goal is to ensure the store does “everything possible to make sure that bottle [purchased] is worth the pour.” 972-410-0324. www.worththepour.com

CASTLE HILLS DR.

4401 Long Prairie Road Suite 400 • Flower Mound (940) 800-2020 www.visionpartnerstexas.com

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Highland Village. The company provides help with tax returns, bookkeeping, ac- counting, business formations and other nancial services. 940-382-4311. www.frenzelcpa.com 14 Smiles Family Dental is relocating within Flower Mound from 4001 Long Prairie Road, Ste. 110, to 811 International Parkway, Ste. 420. The practice oers routine dental care for all ages as well as oral surgeries, dental implant services and sedated dentistry. Smiles Family Den- tal is also an Invisalign provider. The new oce will open in late September or early October. 972-737-5942. www.smiles-family-dental.com CLOSINGS 15 Sukoon Coee & Ice Cream , located at 1288 W. Main St., Ste. 142, Lewisville, has permanently closed. The shop sold organic coee drinks, homemade ice cream, bubble teas and sandwiches. The phone number and website are no longer available. 16 Yellow Rose Steak & Chop House owners Svetlana and Sky Schoggins an- nounced Aug. 30 that their restaurant has closed over a dispute with their landlord. The restaurant at 890 Parker Square Road, Flower Mound, served prime steak and cocktails. Svetlana said they hope to reopen at another location in the future. https://yellowrosesteakhouse.com

Cowboys Smoothie NEW

AVAILABLE AT DFW AND SAN ANTONIO AREA SMOOTHIE KING STORES FOR LIMITED TIME ONLY

Buy 1Smoothie, Get 1 Free (2 nd smoothie must be of equal or lesser value)

FREE EXTRA OR ENHANCER (with purchase of a smoothie)

FLOWER MOUND,TX 75028 3701 Justin Rd. Suite 110 (214) 513–9491

Some restrictions may apply. Valid only at particpating locations. Excludes Extras and Enhancers. Not valid with any other offer. Not valid on 32oz smoothies on Fridays. Must surrender original coupon to receive offer. Photocopied or altered coupons will not be honored. limit one per person. No cash value. Sales tax extra. ©2020 Smoothie King Franchisees, Inc. FLOWER MOUND 3701 Justin Rd. Ste 110

Some restrictions may apply. Valid only at particpating locations. Excludes Extras and Enhancers. Not valid with any other offer. Not valid on 32oz smoothies on Fridays. Must surrender original coupon to receive offer. Photocopied or altered coupons will not be honored. limit one per person. No cash value. Sales tax extra. ©2020 Smoothie King Franchisees, Inc. FLOWER MOUND 3701 Justin Rd. Ste 110

EXPIRES: 10/31/21

EXPIRES: 10/31/21

© 2021 Smoothie King Franchises, Inc.

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LEWISVILLE  FLOWER MOUND  HIGHLAND VILLAGE EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2021

TODO LIST

September-November events

COMPILED BY VALERIE WIGGLESWORTH

SEPTEMBER 15 THROUGHNOV. 12 REGISTER TEAMNOW FOR TRITOWNAMAZING RACE Registration is being accepted through Nov. 12 for teams participating in the Tri- Town Amazing Race. The event includes 10 challenges (both mental and physical) in Lewisville, Flower Mound and Highland Village to encourage team bonding. The event is open to ages 8 and up. Teams of 2-6 people will be eligible. Check-in is at 8 a.m. Nov. 20. Race begins at 9 a.m. $40 per team of two with $5 for each additional person. Doubletree Ranch Park, 310 Highland Village Road, Highland Village. 972-317-7430. http://hvparks.com 18 HEAD TOMAIN STREET FOR CATTLE DRIVE PARADE The Hunes Auto Dealerships Cattle Drive Parade will travel along Main Street in Lewisville from Cowan Avenue to Mill Street, then go north on Mill Street to the Bill Weaver Arena. Arena events include a petting zoo, pony rides, an antique trailer display, food trucks and live music. 2-6 p.m. Free (admission). 972-219-3401. https://tinyurl.com/s6u8fyy9 18 LET YOUR DOGMAKE A SPLASH Flower Mound’s outdoor pool will be open for the annual Doggie Dive,

which includes contests for best trick, fastest swimming and best costume. Dogs must have proof of rabies vaccine. Free. 1-4:30 p.m. Preregistration required. Flower Mound Community Activity Center Outdoor Water Park, 1200 Gerault Road. 972-874-7275. https://tinyurl.com/23ms339w 27 LEARNHOWTOMAKE A TRADITIONAL INDIANDISH Flower Mound Public Library staer Supriya Srinivasa will talk about one of the world’s most popular dishes, chicken tikka masala. This Cuisines Around the World event will include a demonstration on making the traditional Indian dish. 7 p.m. Free. To register, contact fmpl@ower-mound.com or call 972-874-6165. Flower Mound Public Library, 3030 Broadmoor Lane, Flower Mound. https://tinyurl.com/2e2y9du2 OCTOBER 02 ROCK THE NIGHT AWAY Reputation (A Taylor Swift Experience) will perform at Concerts in the Park. Concessions will be for sale. Overow parking is available at Copperas Branch Park. 7 p.m. Free. Doubletree Ranch Park, 310 Highland Village Road, Highland Village. www.highlandvillage.org/ 534/Concerts-in-the-Park

SEPT. 2425

WESTERNDAYS FESTIVAL LEWISVILLE

Enjoy live music, a Western Market, a craft beer pavilion, a blacksmith, a mechanical bull, pony rides, a car show, a world tamale eating championship and more. 5-11:30 p.m. (Sept. 24), 10 a.m.-11:30 p.m. (Sept. 25). Free (admission before 7 p.m.), $15 (admission after 7 p.m. for those 13 years old and older). Wayne Ferguson Plaza, 150 W. Church St., Lewisville. https://tinyurl.com/34rrsd4u (Courtesy city of Lewisville)

08 DRESS UP YOUR DOG, CELEBRATE HALLOWEEN This annual Woof-O-Ween dog costume event includes several award categories. There will also be a photo area. 5:30-7:30 p.m. Free. Hound Mound Dog Park, 1202 S. Garden Ridge Blvd., Flower Mound. https://tinyurl.com/23ms339w

16 SAMPLE SOME BREWSWITH LIVEMUSIC, FOOD TRUCKS Best Little Brewfest features more than 70 craft breweries plus some wine and ciders. The event also includes live music and food trucks. 1:30-7 p.m. $10-$65. Wayne Ferguson Plaza, 150 W. Church St., Lewisville. https://tinyurl.com/acfmcrxf

Find more or submit Lewisville, Flower Mound and Highland Village events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES SPAN contract

COMPILED BY LINDSEY JUAREZ MONSIVAIS & VALERIE WIGGLESWORTH

UPCOMING PROJECTS

CATCHINGARIDE SPAN Inc. offers demand response transit service for eligible Flower Mound residents.

SCENIC DR.

N. CLEARWATER DR. HIGHLAND VILLAGE RD.

in FlowerMound extends services

LAKE RIDGE DR.

MEMORI

Oct. 1, 2019-Sept. 30, 2020 Average ridership per month

POST OAK DR.

THE COLONY

HICKORY RIDGE DR.

144

Oct. 1, 2020-June 30, 2021*

LEWISVILLE

BY MIKE GRAHAM

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S. CLEARWATER DR. ROCKLAND DR.

Flower Mound Town Council voted unanimously Aug. 23 to approve a new contract with Denton-based SPAN Inc. that expands demand response transit service for those age 65 and older as well as those who cannot drive due to a disability. New to the town’s contract with SPAN is the ability for qualified Flower Mound residents to travel to Denton for essential services such as medical and dental appointments, essential shopping, travel to and from work, support programs for adults with special needs, and senior citizen events. Rides are already allowed for eligible town residents throughout Flower Mound, Lewis- ville and Highland Village. Under the SPAN contract, the town of Flower Mound will be charged $28.52 per one-way trip in fiscal year

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*PARTIAL YEAR SOURCE: SPAN INC./COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Standridge Drive traffic signal installation

Highland Village Phase 4 street improvements Highland Village City Council voted Aug. 10 to award a contract to Reynolds Asphalt and Construction Co. for Phase 4 of the city’s Street Improvements Project. The streets being improved are North Clearwater Drive, South Clear- water Drive, Scenic Drive, Rockland Drive, Hickory Ridge Drive, Springway Drive and Pecan Street. Some streets require restoration, while others in better shape will get an asphalt overlay, according to city documents. Timeline: 200 days once started in mid to late September Cost: $1.05 million for construction Funding source: city of Highland Village

2021-22. Riders pay $5 per one-way trip. Town Council approved a budget not to exceed $49,625 to subsidize travel for in-need residents. That allows for 145 one-way trips per month. Any unused trips are rolled over into the next month, according to the contract that goes into effect Oct. 1. In addition, a grant from the Fed- eral Transit Authority could provide as much as $34,220, which would allow for 100 extra one-way trips per month, according to a town memo. According to town staff, there are no other viable public transit options for users of the SPAN service. Eligible residents may visit http://span-transit.org to apply.

Lewisville City Council approved an agreement with The Colony for a new traffic signal at Standridge Drive where it intersects with Lakeridge Drive in Lewisville and Memorial Drive in The Colony. According to the agreement, The Colony is responsible for design, construction and ongoing maintenance of the traffic light. Traffic is expected to “significantly increase” with construction of a multi-building warehouse development called Live Oaks Logistics Park at the northeast corner of the intersection. Timeline: Sept. 20, 2021-June 2022 Cost: $350,000 Funding source: city of The Colony

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF AUG. 30. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT LFHNEWS@COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

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LEWISVILLE - FLOWER MOUND - HIGHLAND VILLAGE EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2021

CITY& SCHOOLS

News from Lewisville, Flower Mound & Highland Village

CITY HIGHLIGHT LEWISVILLE The rodeo arena is being renamed in honor of former Mayor Bill Weaver, who played a key role in the venue’s creation. Lewisville City Council voted 4-0 on Aug. 16 to rename the city-owned venue after Weaver, who was first elected mayor in 1963 and served for six years. The venue will be renamed the Bill Weaver Arena. According to a staff memo, Weaver was instrumental in working with groups to construct the arena on city-owned land in 1964. Lewisville City Council meets at 7 p.m. Sept. 20 and Oct. 4 at 151 W. Church St. www.cityoflewisville.com Lewisville ISD board of trustees meets at 6 p.m. Oct. 4 and 18 at 1565A W. Main St., Lewisville. www.lisd.net Flower Mound Town Council meets at 6 p.m. Sept. 20 and Oct. 4 at 2121 Cross Timbers Road. www.flower-mound.com Highland Village City Council meets at 7 p.m. Sept. 28 and Oct. 12 at 1000 Highland Village Road. www.highlandvillage.org MEETINGSWE COVER

Townwill study ruleson lighting

TAXRATECHANGE

The Lewisville ISD board of trustees approved a new property tax rate for fiscal year 2021-22.

Maintenance and operations - Decreased

Interest and sinking - Remained the same

$0.9664 per $100 valuation

$0.9276

$0.3809 per $100 valuation

SOURCE: LEWISVILLE ISD/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER per $100 valuation

BY MIKE GRAHAM

FLOWERMOUND Skies could become more peaceful in spite of a growing population following the Town Council’s unanimous vote Aug. 23 on a resolution stating its intent to join the International Dark- Sky Association. If the council subsequently votes to join the association, new develop- ments would eventually be limited to the association’s standards on howmuch light they could emit into the night sky. Town officials plan to further research the designation. The association has an application process that takes one to three years, according to a staffmemo posted with the meeting agenda. According to the association’s website, its standards include discouraging the use of unshielded streetlights and making sports field lighting less invasive to make the night sky more visible.

Lewisville ISDapproves lower tax rate formaintenance, operations

BY SAMANTHA VAN DYKE

rate of $0.3809. This brings the combined property tax rate for FY 2021-22 to $1.3085 per $100 valuation, a decrease of $0.0388. Based on this decrease, the owner of a house valued at $300,000 can expect to pay $116.40 less in taxes per year to Lewisville ISD. The board of trustees also unan- imously approved a budget for FY 2021-22, which begins Oct. 1. The dis- trict expects to earn $552.49 million in revenue and will spend $579.11 million. Officials plan to spend $17.5 million from federal relief funds and use $9.5 million from its fund balance to make up the remaining difference.

LEWISVILLE ISD Trustees voted to lower the district’s property tax rate for fiscal year 2021-22 at an Aug. 30 meeting and amended that rate Sept. 13 after an error was discovered. The rate is split into two parts: maintenance and operations—which funds daily operations—and interest and sinking, which funds debt payments on capital projects, such as new schools. The M&O tax rate will be reduced from $0.9664 per $100 valuation to $0.9276, according to information presented to the board. The I&S rate will remain at its fiscal year 2020-21

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

DEVELOPMENT Lewisville approves TIRZ changes to spur CastleHills development

City renes nancing tool

Lewisville City Council approved changes in August for the Tax Increment Reinvestment Zone that could help fund development within two mixed-use projects, Crown Centre and The Realm.

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Castle Hills TIRZ boundary A Crown Centre B The Realm

BY VALERIE WIGGLESWORTH

Centre and The Realm. Both develop- ments include a mix of oce, retail and multi-family residential uses, according to the city. The Crown Centre also has plans for a hotel. The revised TIRZ agreements, according to the city, will facilitate projects “that will further develop the property and take full advantage of the opportunity to bring to the city, the county and the region additional quality development.” According to a memo from Lewisville City Manager Donna Barron, Bright Realty would pay for the public infrastructure up front. It would then be reimbursed once revenue is generated through the TIRZ, the memo stated. Bright Realty must submit its fund- ing requests to the city for approval. Among the projects eligible for nancing are a structured parking garage and park fee waivers as well as infrastructure, such as roads, utilities and drainage. The annexation of Castle Hills dates back to a 1996 agreement between the Bright family and the city. That agreement declared the mutual goal for the 2,900 acres in Castle Hills to eventually become part of the city of Lewisville. Annexation hinged in part on approval from the boards of eight separate fresh water supply districts that operate in Castle Hills. According to the city, all eight boards voted during meetings in July and August to approve the agreement and proceed with annexation.

Several key approvals in August are helping to pave the way for the annexation of Castle Hills. A council vote to extend the city limits of Lewisville to include the master-planned community of Castle Hills is set for Nov. 15. But there are a lot of logistics still to be covered before that City Council vote can occur. On Aug. 16, Lewisville City Council agreed to transfer 83 parcels of parkland and open space in Castle Hills to city ownership. The transfer of those 44.89 acres will occur once Castle Hills is annexed into Lewisville. Council also approved two amend- ments to Tax Increment Reinvest- ment Zone No. 3, which encompasses 708 acres within Castle Hills. A TIRZ is a special taxing district that captures growth in property tax value and puts the money into a separate fund for specic uses. According to a feasibility study, the total revenue generated through the TIRZ over a 30-year period is esti- mated at more than $194.3 million. The Aug. 16 changes approved by City Council will allow that TIRZ revenue to be used to reimburse developer Bright Realty for infra- structure improvements within the zone. That TIRZ revenue can also now be used on economic incentive grants, according to city documents. An Aug. 17 news release from the city of Lewisville states the funds could help with the development of two mixed-use projects, Crown

121

R D .

A

SRT TOLL

N

Y.

How it works

Projected funds

A feasibility study projected how much money could be generated with TIRZ No. 3 over 30 years.

Who is involved? The city of Lewisville and Denton County agreed to be part of a Tax Increment Tax Increment Reinvestment Zone SEARCH

$2.18 billion Net taxable value of TIRZ projected by 2047 $194.3 million Total revenues generated through 2047

Reinvestment Zone for a specic geographic area of Castle Hills. What is a TIRZ?

As development occurs within the TIRZ boundaries, property values are expected to increase. The TIRZ collects the property tax revenue generated by that increased value each year and sets it aside in a separate fund. What happens to the money? The money generated through a TIRZ can be used to pay debt issued to fund infrastructure costs within the zone. The money can also be used for development within the zone. What are the plans with this TIRZ? Developer Bright Realty may be reimbursed for the costs of infrastructure improvements within the zone. Money may also be used for economic incentive grants for development within the zone.

What’s next

Lewisville must hold two public hearings on the proposed Castle Hills annexation before the City Council may vote. Those dates have not yet been announced. Two public hearings

Dates to be announced Lewisville City Council Vote set for Nov. 15

SOURCE: CITY OF LEWISVILLECOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

9

LEWISVILLE  FLOWER MOUND  HIGHLAND VILLAGE EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2021

10

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

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White

African American

Hispanic

Other

International

Cross Timbers Rd.

Fiscal year ending Aug. 31, 2019 Degrees/certicates

MIDWESTERN STATE UNIVERSITY 1,452 Degrees/certicates issued in scal year 2018-19 5,500 Total enrolled at university in fall 2019

Fall 2019

Bridlewood Blvd.

Student enrollment

N

54.8%

49%

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13.4%

16.5%

16.9%

20.4%

7%

8.6%

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7.9%

5.5%

Fiscal year ending Aug. 31, 2019 Degrees/certicates

NORTH CENTRAL TEXAS COLLEGE

Fall 2019

Student enrollment

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9,382 Total enrolled at university in fall 2019 1,178 Degrees/certicates issued in scal year 2018-19

61.1%

56%

9.7%

8.7%

23.3%

26.3%

4.8%

7.5%

1.2%

1.5%

K–5 CAMPUS CALL OR STOP BY 972-845-8030 iSchool-Lewisville.com 1800 Lakeway Dr. Lewisville, TX 75057

Fiscal year ending Aug. 31, 2019 Degrees/certicates

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH TEXAS

Fall 2019

Student enrollment

39,192 Total enrolled at university in fall 2019 9,457 Degrees/certicates issued in scal year 2018-19

50.9%

43.6%

12.2%

14.6%

22.3%

24.9%

8.3%

10%

TUITION-FREE . NOW ENROLLING

6.3%

6.8%

Fiscal year ending Aug. 31, 2019 Degrees/certicates

TEXAS WOMAN'S UNIVERSITY

Fall 2019

Student enrollment

15,710 Total enrolled at university in fall 2019 3,770 Degrees/certicates issued in scal year 2018-19

46%

40.1%

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16.9%

18.1%

22.2%

27.3%

13.1%

12.5%

1.8%

2.1%

NOTE: NUMBERS MAY NOT ADD UP TO 100% DUE TO ROUNDING. SOURCE: 2020 TEXAS PUBLIC HIGHER EDUCATION ALMANAC FROM TEXAS HIGHER EDUCATION COORDINATING BOARDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

11

LEWISVILLE  FLOWER MOUND  HIGHLAND VILLAGE EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2021

A growing program

straight from high school into a techni- cal eld or military service. Years later, they realize that in order to advance their careers, they needed a degree. “The students we have are … great students, serious students,” Jackson said,notingthat theaverageageof astu- dent pursuing a Bachelor’s of Applied Arts and Sciences degree in the Adult Completion program is 35-45 years old. “They’re on a mission; they’re focused on nishing these degrees.” Students eligible for MSU’s Adult Completion Program have at least 18-24 hours of nontraditional educa- tion, such as vocational training, work- force credit, military service or other applicable work experience. MSU can accept up to 90 credit hours that are applicable toward the 120-hour pro- gram, Jackson said. Oerings for adult learners are usu- ally compressed and accelerated and online or hybrid. Students enroll in courses based on what ts into their schedules, Jackson said. Crosley said she was working more than 60 hours a week when she enrolled. The program gave her the exibility to continue earning money while working toward her degree. “I was able to develop a schedule that met my needs because I worked

CONTINUED FROM 1

The number of students who have earned degrees at Midwestern State University and North Central Texas College has grown in recent years as both schools zero in on adult learners. 2011-12 Bachelor of Applied Arts & Sciences degree at Midwestern State University Associate Degree of Applied Sciences at North Central Texas College 94 151 184 166 201 195 183 208 256 230 2014-15 67 2017-18 100 2012-13 84 2015-16 84 2018-19 122 2013-14 83 2016-17 99 2019-20 130 students have received a degree through these programs since school year 2011-12. 2 , 637

given me] self-condence, self-su- ciency and a broader perspective of dierent cultures.” MSU and North Central Texas Col- lege, both of which have campuses in FlowerMound, oer several options for students invariousphasesof their adult lives. By “meeting students where they are,” the programs allow them to earn degrees on their own terms. “Students may be able to cut o 18 months to two years of a tradi- tional degree route, which saves them money, saves them time and saves a lot of brain cells,” said Delores Jackson, director of the Bachelor of Applied Arts and Sciences Adult Completion Pro- gram at MSU. Across Texas, colleges and univer- sities are zeroing in on adult educa- tion. The goal, according to the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, is to upskill and reskill members of the workforce so the state can remain com- petitive on the global stage. Program logistics According to Jackson, many of the students in MSU’s Adult Completion Program attended college but may not have nished. Others may have gone

SOURCES: MIDWESTERN STATE UNIVERSITY, NORTH CENTRAL TEXAS COLLEGE COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

weird hours,” she said. “I still had to be devoted tomy studies, but I was able to manage it better by being able to take some of the classes online.” North Central Texas College also oers exible opportunities for stu- dents to earn a degree, take profes- sional development courses online or participate in workforce training. “Many of our students are

coming back to either nish a degree they started or retool their career options,” Chancellor Brent Wallace said. “It’s pretty awesome what we are able to do for an adult learner.” Understanding the need About 23% of Lewisville residents age 25 or older have attended some college but do not have a degree,

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

The Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board set a goal in 2015 for 60% of Texans ages 25-34 to have a college degree or technical certicate by 2030. The data below shows how the state is progressing toward that target. Raising the bar

MSU’s latest eort to serve adult learners is through a partnership with Guild Education, a nonprot that matches colleges and universities with companies that wish to oer a debt- free path for employees to advance academically. Guild student profile 33 56% 54% 74% is the average student age of students are female

train students to ll those gaps. One of the biggest challenges employers say they encounter when hiring is a lack of soft skills, such as interviewing, public speaking and problemsolving, and overall emotional intelligence, Bagley said. In response, MSU is looking into developing workshops and seminars focused on improving these areas, Bagley said. NCTC recently launched Aspire to Be Hired, a program that seeks to embed the development of marketable skills into the college’s existing programs. This integration is also part of the state’s 60x30TX initiative. Crosley said the Adult Completion Program taught her more than just aca- demics. She gained a newfound respect for diversity and other cultures, which she said are essential for her job. This constant pursuit of knowledge is the example she hopes to set for her family. “I want my children and my grand- children to see that once you get to a certain age, that doesn’t mean you stop learning,” she said. “You’re con- stantly learning.”

education initiatives, said Rachel Bag- ley, senior associate director of the Flower Mound campus. The university’s latest eort to sup- port adult learners is through a partner- ship with Guild Education, a nonprot that matches colleges and universities with companies that want to oer a debt-free path for their employees to advance academically. “Our initiatives align very well,” Bagley said of MSU’s partnership with Guild. “They are focused on adult workers who are seeking upward mobility, and we are focused on the exact same thing.” Students enrolled in MSU’s Guild program do not pay any tuition up front, Bagley said. They also receive personalized coaching and technol- ogy services provided through Guild. Students enrolled in a Guild program are two times more likely to have a promotion or role change than the average employee, according to the organization. Addressing hiring needs At a recent roundtable hosted by MSU, Bagley said some of the largest employers in Denton County discussed needs from the workforce. The goal, Bagley said, was to see howMSU could

60% - 2030 goal 41.0% 42.3% 43.5%

are students of color

have some prior college experience

40.3%

Students enrolled in a Guild program are 2x more likely to have a promotion or role change than the average employee.

9%

consider English their second language

2015

2016 2017

2018

SOURCE: TEXAS HIGHER EDUCATION COORDINATING BOARDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

SOURCE: GUILD EDUCATIONCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

according to 2019 American Commu- nity Survey ve-year estimates. In Flower Mound and Highland Village, those percentages are about 17% and 21%, respectively. In 2015, Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board set a goal of at least 60% of Texans ages 25-34 having a technical certicate or postsecondary

degree by 2030. This initiative, dubbed 60x30TX, also aims to award 6.4 mil- lion certicates or degrees. Without this benchmark, Texans face a future of “diminished incomes, opportunities and resources,” accord- ing to the board. The 60x30TX goal is one of the primary drivers for MSU’s adult

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LEWISVILLE  FLOWER MOUND  HIGHLAND VILLAGE EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2021

Lewisville proposes new complex to replace aging buildings CONTINUED FROM 1

Chief Mark McNeal spoke at a Lewis- ville Chamber of Commerce luncheon Aug. 24 about what the expanded space would include. “So the Main Street side is pro- posed as the police side that will come around to the corner, and as you turn north on Valley Parkway, you’ll have a fire station, fire administration and a parking garage in the back,” McNeal told the luncheon crowd. Deaver said at the chamber lun- cheon that the proposal is the result of city personnel coming together with consultants to figure out what would be needed to operate successfully. The new complex, Barron said, is “an investment in the future of your police and fire operations.” The proposal calls for a new police administration building to connect the existing city jail on Main Street. A new space for fire administration would be built along with a new enlarged Central Fire Station with five vehicle bays instead of three. “Central is our busiest district and roughly will stay that way from now on,” McNeal told council this summer. The police and fire departments would be connected with shared spaces for training, a fitness center and conference rooms. “If we weren’t willing to do that, we would have to build separate build- ings, and there is a cost associated with that,” Deaver said. The new complex would house the dispatch center and emergency oper- ations center with backup generator power and the ability to withstand tornado-force winds. A proposed two-story parking structure would add secure parking for police and fire personnel. It would also protect emergency and spe- cialty vehicles from the weather and include some of the more industrial uses, such as weapons cleaning and evidence storage. “We’re looking at full city buildout of what fire staff and police staff can ultimately be,” consultant Don Wertz- berger with 720 Design Inc. told city officials during a July presentation. If voters give their approval, the design process for a new public safety complex would begin shortly after that. City officials say there are a lot of logistics to consider. City personnel would have to relocate to temporary homes while the existing buildings are demolished and replaced. Those relo- cation costs are built into the total proj- ect budget, according to the city. Preserving parking during con- struction for other city services,

Lewisville is proposing to tear down the existing police and fire buildings and build a bigger, more advanced complex that will serve the city’s needs. Parking will also be reconfigured. Designs are still preliminary and are subject to change.

NEW EXISTING

PARKING GARAGE

DENTON COUNTY LEEWALKER GOVERNMENT CENTER

A parking garage would protect emergency and specialty vehicles from the weather, provide more security for first responders, and house uses such as evidence storage and weapons cleaning.

FIRE DEPARTMENT

The proposal calls for expanding the Central Fire Station from three bays to five bays and building enough space to house fire administration along Valley Parkway.

LEWISVILLE PUBLIC LIBRARY

LEWISVILLEMUNICIPAL COURT

CITY JAIL

POLICE DEPARTMENT

A new and expanded Lewisville police headquarters would connect to the existing municipal jail fronting Main Street. The proposal also includes an emergency operations center and shared spaces, such as training rooms and a fitness area, with the fire department.

CITY ANNEX

N

W. MAIN ST.

RENDERINGS COURTESY CITY OF LEWISVILLE

Adding space for police and fire Key Dates

“When you look at these two facil- ities, in comparison to all of our other city facilities, they’re worn out,” City Manager Donna Barron said. On the ballot Lewisville voters will decide Nov. 2 whether to approve a $95 million bond measure to build a new public safety complex. The project is estimated to cost $96.7 million, with the remaining $1.7 million coming from 2015 bonds approved but not yet spent. Barron said the city has looked at its debt capacity to ensure room not only to fund this new complex but also to handle future debt. “Because of how the city has han- dled their debt over time, we can actu- ally sell this debt without raising their [property] tax rate,” Barron said. The existing police and fire build- ings along Main Street and Valley Parkway would be torn down to make way for the new 116,000-square-foot complex. It would be more than three times the current size. “We’ve just spent a lot more time looking at the options, and we believe that the better investment is to tear down the current and build new,” Bar- ron said of the city’s plan. Police Chief Kevin Deaver and Fire

The proposed public safety complex would be designed to address the needs for the police and fire departments, which have outgrown their existing space.

Voters will decide “for” or “against” a $95 million bond measure to fund the new public safety complex.

Fire Department

Police Department

October

square feet Proposed 85,000

Proposed

Last day to register to vote

Early voting 18-29 4

31,000

Proposed square feet 116,000

square feet Current space 12,386 square feet Parking spaces Current total

Current space 24,887 square feet

November

2

Election Day

Proposed total

608

876

SOURCE: CITY OF LEWISVILLE/ COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

$95Mbondmeasure proposed with no change to city’s tax rate

BY SAMANTHA VAN DYKE & VALERIE WIGGLESWORTH

so did those departments. Space is now at a premium with police spread among three different buildings, fire administration convert- ing closets into offices and the Central Fire Station at capacity. City officials have identified nearly $2.33 million worth of maintenance at the buildings, including leaky roofs, mold and obsolete equipment.

The city of Lewisville is looking to replace its aging police and fire departments along Main Street with a new public safety complex. The Central Fire Station was origi- nallybuilt in 1975 and thepolicedepart- ment in 1984. Both were expanded in 1997. But as the city continued to grow,

14

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