Bay Area Edition | June 2021

BAY AREA EDITION

VOLUME 3, ISSUE 11  JUNE 25JULY 22, 2021

ONLINE AT

emerge n c e

2021 H E A L T H C A R E E D I T I O N

Art

DEMAND OUTPACES SUPPLY The supply of full-time registered nurses is projected to grow by 27.7% between 2018-32, but the demand is set to rise 46.8%.

Nurses ‘accept, adapt, overcome’ Health care workers adjust to challenges amid COVID19 pandemic

SUPPLY ANDDEMANDOF GULF COAST REGISTEREDNURSES

Projected demand

Projected supply

Percentage of demand unmet

21.9%

19.9%

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18%

BY COLLEEN FERGUSON

Many cities around the Bay Area have some sort of public art to reect their identities. Seabrook has pelican statues. Friendswood has murals. Clear Lake has painted trac utility boxes. Until last month, League City had nothing, but it is aiming to change that. Over the next couple of years, the city will make a concerted eort to create and install dierent forms of public art across the city. The art will reect the city’s history, future and values, giving an identity to resi- dents and visitors alike, ocials said. To demonstrate this eort, an artist in May nished painting the rst piece of public art for the city: Autility box in League Park has been adorned with longhorns, a train and other imagery reecting the city’s culture. CONTINUED ON 28 League City public art campaign to reect city’s culture, heritage, values BY JAKE MAGEE In May, League City unveiled a League Park mural, the rst of many planned art installations. COURTESY CITY OF LEAGUE CITY

16.2%

For southeast Houston’s nurses and nursing educators, change has been the only constant while deliv- ering care and instruction during the pandemic. Kelsea Heiman, an emergency room nurse at Houston Methodist Clear Lake Hospital, said nurses have felt a lot of extra weight on their shoulders while treating patients as COVID-19 guidelines continue to evolve. This has led to a sense of exhaustion for the nurses putting aside their own fears to pro- vide patient care, she said. “COVID[-19] has caused a lot of burnout,” she said. “People are starting to evaluate [their] work-life balance.” Educators at the University CONTINUED ON 22

14.6%

12.9%

11.4%

10.2%

2020 2022 2024 2026 2028 2030 2032

2018

UNMET DEMAND FOR RNS

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1 Panhandle: 0% 2 North Texas: 14.7% 3 East Texas: 17.9% 4 Central Texas: 19.8%

5 Gulf Coast: 21.9% 6 South Texas: 6.7% 7 Rio Grande Valley: 27.2% 8 West Texas: 4.2%

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SOURCE: TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF STATE HEALTH SERVICES COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

HEALTHCARE EDITION 2021 SPONSORED BY • HoustonMethodist Clear LakeHospital • University of Houston-Clear Lake • UTMBHealth

IMPACTS

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PEOPLE

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BAY AREA EDITION • JUNE 2021

Joe’s surgery is now in the rearviewmirror. We put it there. Even before we meet one another, we know we have something in common. Because if you’re facing a neurological issue — you not only want compassion and technology, you want expert physicians with a never-give-in, never-give-up attitude. The kind of attitude that put Joe’s surgery in the rearview mirror, and put Joe back on the dance floor.

We’re St. Luke’s Health, taking pride in changing destinies. Find out how at StLukesHealth.org/Neuro .

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

ABOUT US

Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the rst edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and Pugerville, Texas. We have expanded our operations to include hundreds of employees, our own printing operation and over 30 hyperlocal editions across three states. Our circulation is over 2 million residential mailboxes, and it grows each month with new residents and developments.

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

FROMPAPAR: We hope you enjoy our annual Health Care Edition as much as we enjoyed compiling useful health care-related news for you. We have written about the region’s shortage of nurses previously, but our front-page story this month looks at how COVID-19 has led to an even greater need for nurses in our area hospitals and medical practices. Papar Faircloth, GENERALMANAGER

Community Impact Newspaper teams include general managers, editors, reporters, graphic designers, sales account executives and sales support, all immersed and invested in the communities they serve. Our mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Our core values are Faith, Passion, Quality, Innovation and Integrity.

FROM JAKE: One of the rst things I did when I moved to Houston three years ago was spend time walking around and taking photos of the amazing street art. Locals are excited to know quality art is coming to League City. Read our front-page story to learn more about League City’s art initiative. Jake Magee, EDITOR

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CORRECTION: Volume 3, Issue 10 Bay Area Pet Guide, Page 12 Bayside Animal Hospital’s phone number is 281-334-2273.

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BAY AREA EDITION • JUNE 2021

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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October, according to the Land Rover web- site. Buyers will be able to choose from a selection of 2020 and 2021 Land Rovers including the Range Rover, Range Rover Sport, Range Rover Velar, Range Rover Evoque, Discovery, Discovery Sport and Defender, per the website. There will also be certified pre-owned vehicles and used cars available. Updates are being posted to the dealership’s Facebook page. www.facebook.com/landroverclearlake 7 At the same location as Land Rover of Clear Lake, a Jaguar of Clear Lake dealership will also open at 17970 Gulf Freeway, Friendswood, on the west side of I-45 between El Dorado Boulevard and FM 2351 in October. Buyers will be able to select from a variety of different models with certified pre-owned and used vehicles available. www.facebook.com/jaguarclearlake 8 Black Rock Coffee Bar plans to open at the corner of Bay Area Boulevard and Texas Avenue in Webster. A timeline for the opening has not been revealed. Black Rock Coffee Bar offers specialty coffees, hot or cold; non-coffee beverages, such as tea and hot chocolate; and blended drinks, such as smoothies. The business has loca- tions in Katy and the west side of Houston. www.br.coffee 9 Goldfish Swim School will open at 20251 Gulf Freeway, Webster, in Sep- tember. Registration opens in July, and pre-registration is now open. The swim school teaches classes for swimmers as young as four months old, with no more than four students per instructor. There are four other Goldfish Swim School loca- tions in the Houston area, including Sugar Land and Katy. 281-509-9611. www.goldfishswimschool.com/webster

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NOWOPEN 1 Women’s clothing store La De Da Fine Lingerie opened at a new location under new ownership on May 1. The business in Park Plaza at 16932 Hwy. 3, Webster, carries matching undergarment sets and single items in a variety of sizes and colors. The store also sells nursing bras, loungewear and robes. 281-796-7318. http://la-de-da-fine-lingerie.business. site 2 Gator’s Bar & Grill opened in mid-April at 3535 Gulf Freeway, Dickin- son. The restaurant serves burgers, sand- wiches, salads, desserts and drinks. True to its name, it also serves tender alligator fillets, breaded and brined in house with a remoulade sauce. 832-340-7016.

www.gatorsbarandgrill.com 3 Texas Entertainment Xperience opened in mid-March at 10000 Emmett F. Lowry Expressway, Ste. 3161, Texas City. The arcade and gaming center features go-karts, trampolines, a ropes course, a skating rink, mini golf, party rooms and more, per the business’s Facebook page. 409-316-9335. www.texasentertainmentxperience.com COMING SOON 4 Breakfast and brunch concept restaurant Brick & Spoon plans to open at the Texas Station Shopping Center at the intersection of FM 518 and FM 528 in Friendswood. A timeline for its opening has not been established. Brick & Spoon—

which has most of its locations in Ala- bama, Louisiana and Mississippi—serves omelets, breakfast tacos, pancakes, burgers, drinks and more. www.brickandspoonrestaurant.com 5 Mister Car Wash is opening soon along FM 518 adjacent to the Kemah AutoZone. A timeline for the opening has not been revealed. Mister Car Wash offers different levels of cleanings with services including vacuuming, window cleaning, dashboard dusting and towel drying vehicles’ exteriors. The business has over 300 locations, but only one in the Bay Area at 1380 FM 528, Webster. www.mistercarwash.com 6 Land Rover of Clear Lake will open at 17970 Gulf Freeway, Friendswood, in

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY COLLEEN FERGUSON & JAKE MAGEE

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FunCity Sk8

Exploration Green

COURTESY FUNCITY SK8

COURTESY MOHAMMED NASRULLAH

LOCAL HOT SPOT

Houston Spaceport

RELOCATIONS 10 Java Owl Coffee House reopened in mid-May at 1354 E. NASA Parkway, Ste. J, Houston. The business was previously located at 10821 Upper Bay Road, Nassau Bay, and moved when the first building was demolished to make way for Houston Methodist Clear Lake Hospital’s expansion. Some stained glass windows and doors were saved from the first location and brought to the new one, according to Java Owl Facebook posts. The business sells locally roasted coffee; leaf teas; specialty beverages, such as Vietnamese and Cuban coffees; locally baked goods; and local beers and wines. 281-957-9814. www.facebook.com/javaowlcoffeehouse EXPANSIONS 11 FunCity Sk8 , 1500 N. Texas Ave., Webster, is expanding by building a game room. By the end of summer, the skating rink’s new room will include arcade and other types of games that will award players tickets to buy small prizes. The rink also installed a full-service bar just before the COVID-19 pandemic began, and the business recently upgraded its menu. Additionally, FunCity Sk8 upgraded its parking lot and completed fresh paint jobs inside the building and out. 281-332-4211. www.funcitysk8.com IN THE NEWS 12 On May 7, Trey Boring was an- nounced as the new president of IMS Worldwide , a leader in “international logistics trend analysis and foreign-trade

zone consulting,” according to a news release. Boring has served 15 years as senior vice president over the for- eign-trade zone division at 309 Henrietta St., Webster. Boring has helped hundreds of companies manage their U.S. customs relationships. 281-554-9099. www.imsw.com 13 A bench at Exploration Green’s Phase 2 on Reseda Drive, Houston, was dedicated to victims of COVID-19 at a ceremony and walk-a-thon event June 10. Money was raised through the event for the COVID-19 Wall of Memories nonprofit. Clear Lake residents Ruth and Mohammed Nasrullah run the nonprofit, which aims to commemorate coronavi- rus victims in the Bay Area and beyond. https://charity.gofundme.com/o/en/ campaign/walkforthewall 14 San Jacinto College , 8060 Spencer Hwy., Pasadena, was recognized as a finalist with distinction in a national community college excellence award competition. The Aspen Prize for Com- munity College Excellence recognizes outstanding community colleges across the United States. San Jac won $100,000 and the honor of Finalist with Distinction in a virtual award ceremony. The college was an Aspen Prize finalist in 2019. 281-476-1501. www.sanjac.edu CLOSINGS 15 Grazia Italian Kitchen at 1001 Pineloch Drive, Ste. 1100, Houston, closed May 25, but the restaurant plans to relocate to Texas City in the fall from 1001 Pineloch Drive, Ste. 1100, Houston. www.graziaitalian.com

JAKE MAGEE/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

The Houston Spaceport at Ellington Airport is the site of several business developments over the past few weeks. COMING SOON 1 Collins Aerospace broke ground in June on an 8-acre parcel in the recently completed Phase 1 of the Houston Spaceport. The plan includes a second 8-acre tract Collins will have the option to expand into. By summer 2023, Collins Aerospace will build a 116,000-square-foot facility that will include oce space, manufacturing laboratory space and 10,000 square feet of accelerator space. The accelerator space will be subleased by Collins Aerospace to a third-party organization that will bring Houston’s entrepreneurial, corporate and academic communities together to accelerate innovation and opportunities to tackle aerospace-related challenges, ocials said. The development will add 250 engineering and technician jobs to the area. Construction will take about two years to complete, ocials said. www.collinsaerospace.com EXPANSION 2 Intuitive Machines will break ground in Phase 1 of the Houston Spaceport in

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the fall. The company, which is building a lunar lander that will go to the moon in January, will build a 125,000-square- foot facility on a 12.5-acre parcel, just south of the Houston Aerospace Support Center. Intuitive Machines has a presence in the HASC, which also hosts the EDGE Center, where San Jacinto College students learn and train for aerospace- related jobs. By expanding, Intuitive Machines will have its own space with room for more operations. In its facility, Intuitive Machines will have oce, production, assembly and test space. It will have an advanced loading dock, tiered storage and oce tenant space for U.S. Department of Defense units, among other amenities. This expansion will bring the company’s total employees from 120 to 250. www.intuitivemachines.com

Friendswood Downtown: 601 S. Friendswood Dr. Friendswood Bay Area: 3211 FM 528

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BAY AREA EDITION • JUNE 2021

TODO LIST

June & July events

COMPILED BY SAVANNAH KUCHAR

JUNE 26

SPACE CENTER CAMPING SPACE CENTER HOUSTON

JULY 03

FIREWORKS EXTRAVAGANZA CHESTER L. DAVIS SPORTSPLEX

JULY 17

JEEPMEETUP VOODOO HUT RESTAURANT

Families can spend the night and participate in space- related activities. Dinner and breakfast are provided, and a second-day visit to Space Center Houston is included with the ticket. 5 p.m.-9 a.m. $69.95 (per person). Space Center Houston, 1601 E. NASA Parkway, Houston. 281-244-2100. www.spacecenter.org

League City hosts a reworks display with live music, reworks and inatables. Attendees are encouraged to bring their own lawn chairs or blankets. 4-10 p.m. Free. Chester L. Davis Sportsplex, 1251 League City Parkway, League City. 281-554-1000. www.leaguecity.com

On the third Saturdays of each month, “Jeepeople” are welcome to gather for live music, brunch and lunch. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Free (admission). Voodoo Hut, 511 Bradford Ave., Kemah. 281-549-6164. www.stayhappening.com/e/jeep-kemah-meet-up- E2ISTKTET9G

COURTESY SPACE CENTER HOUSTON

COURTESY CITY OF LEAGUE CITY

COURTESY VOODOO HUT

04 CITIZEN APPRECIATION DAY This Fourth of July, League City families can come for activities such as face painting, a petting zoo, moonwalks and swimming in the open Hometown Heroes pool. The event features live entertainment along with complimentary food served by City of League City sta. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Hometown Heroes Park, 1001 E. League City Parkway, League City. 281-554-1000. www.leaguecity.com

04 KEMAH BOARDWALK FOURTH OF JULY Visitors to the Kemah Boardwalk can enjoy live music and a reworks display over Galveston Bay along with Uncle Sam stilt walkers and live music. 9:30 p.m. Free (admission), $25 (event parking). Kemah Boardwalk, 215 Kipp Ave., Kemah. 281-535-8100. www.kemahboardwalk.com

10 NATUREWITHKRISTINE Anyone interested in learning more about nature can join Texas Master Naturalist Kristine Rivers for small animal spotting in the morning or to listen for nature sounds in the afternoon. 9-11 a.m., 3-5 p.m. Free. Dr. Ned and Fay Dudney Clear Creek Nature Center, 1220 Egret Bay Blvd., League City (morning class); Ghirardi WaterSmart Park, 1910 Louisiana Ave., League City (afternoon class). 281-554-1000. www.leaguecity.com

JULY 03 ASTRONOMY IN THE PARK Amateur astronomers can gather to see the stars, moon and any visible planets along with a 100-foot solar system model and astronomy clips displayed on a laptop. If residents have their own telescopes, they are encouraged to bring them. 7-10 p.m. Free. Rustic Oaks Park, 5101 Orange Blossom Court, League City. 281-554-1000. www.leaguecity.com

Find more or submit Bay Area events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES Medians across League City to be improved KEY:

COMPILED BY JAKE MAGEE

UPCOMING PROJECTS

Landscaping and detention ponds Median improvements

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COMPLETED PROJECTS right-turn lane will be created at League City Parkway and Magnolia. Timeline: construction begins as early as summer 2021-TBD Cost: $4.2 million Funding source: city of League City Installation of League City Parkway trac signals This project includes designing trac signals where League City Parkway intersects with Landing Boulevard, Magnolia Lane and West Bay Area Boulevard. Additionally, a westbound

Despite residents shooting down a city-proposed idea to install medians along Main Street, League City will take advantage of a program to improve existing medians across the city. After League City City Council’s unanimous approval May 11, League City will partner with the Texas Department of Transportation to provide landscape improvements along major TxDOT corridors in the city. The total estimated cost for this project is $6.62 million, but League City will pay only up to $450,000—at least at rst. The work includes improvements to existing medians along the east side of FM 518, FM 646, Hwy. 96 and Marina Bay Drive, totaling $3.26 mil- lion; I-45 landscape improvements totaling $1.71 million; I-45 detention ponds totaling $1.23 million; and city entry signs totaling $424,000. As part of the deal, TxDOT will fund nearly all the work. The only costs incurred by the city are the design and construction fees from a contractor, Pacheco Koch. Addi- tionally, two years after construction is completed, League City will be responsible for the ongoing maintenance of these projects. “It’s a real good deal,” said David Hoover, League City’s director of planning and development. Today, the city’s medians are unremarkable with only strips

The Texas Department of Transportation will improve existing medians and install landscaped detention. Work could begin as early as fall and take a year or two. TOTAL: $6.62M COST TO LEAGUE CITY: $450,000 ROAD IMPROVEMENTS

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COST BREAKDOWN

Median improvements: $3.26M I-45 landscaping: $1.71M I-45 detention ponds: $1.23M New city entrance signs: $424,000

of grass, Hoover said. Landscaping improvements include adding dierent types of trees and poten- tially wildowers along the medians. “There’s a lot of good opportuni- ties to really make some dierence because right now they’re just plain,” he said of the medians. Additionally, League City will get a say in how green areas and detention ponds alongside I-45, which TxDOT is widening, will appear. Some could end up with fountains, several trees and other potential improvements, Hoover said. “It’s an attempt to create some- thing that looks better than a hole in the ground,” Hoover said. The projects could go to bid as early as this fall and take anywhere from a year to two to complete, Hoover said. When Mayor Pat Hallisey initially saw the agenda item, he was worried it had to do with the new median

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plan residents opposed, he said at the May 11 council meeting. In fall 2020, League City ocials proposed taking advantage of the TxDOT program that would have allowed for the free construction of medians along Main Street between I-45 and Egret Bay Boulevard. The road has a shared center turn lane the medians would have replaced. League City ocials thought the medians would draw more attention to the economically stagnant area. However, many Main Street business owners opposed the move, saying it would make it harder for residents to reach their businesses, so the city nixed the plans.

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF JUNE 7. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT BAYNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM. where Butler and Turner intersect. Timeline: November 2019-June 2021 Cost: $4.04 million Funding source: city of League City Butler Road and Turner Street reconstruction This project reached substantial completion May 3 with nal comple- tion expected in June. Turner Street between Calder and Butler roads and Butler between Turner and League City Parkway have been converted from as- phalt to concrete with two travel lanes and a left-turn lane and a roundabout

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BAY AREA EDITION • JUNE 2021

CITY&SCHOOLS League City, Webster swap land for Landing Boulevard extension

That Pain... DOESN’T HAVE TO WAIT

want the entirety of the east-west road within its city limits, League City City Manager John Baumgartner has said. There is an Exxon gas station within League City that will end up inWeb- ster’s city limits now that the land swap has been approved. The Landing extension project will alleviate congestion in League City by giving motorists another north-south road to reach I-45. Construction could begin as early as the second half of 2022, Baumgartner said.

BY JAKE MAGEE

LEAGUE CITY After City Council’s unanimous vote June 8, League City will swap some land withWebster to make way for an extension to Landing Boulevard. League City has had plans to extend Landing where it intersects with FM 518 west of I-45 for years. When con- structed, North Landing will go north from the intersection, over Clear Creek and then turn east at a roundabout—yet to be constructed—to intersect with I-45 inWebster. League City will pay about $28.1 million of the approximately $65 million project. The Texas Depart- ment of Transportation is paying about $31.3 million of the project, and Webster is paying $5.6 million. Agreeing to pay for a portion of the road, Webster officials asked League City if the two cities could alter their boundaries a bit. Webster leaders

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Mayor, council members clash over how to honor historical Winfield family

BY JAKE MAGEE

the Butlers and the rest of the found- ing families in this town,” Hallisey said. Dugie eventually clarified his amendedmotion would still honor the Winfields. He andMillican said this would be better than renaming part of Hobbs, which is a major road that has been and will be a staple in League City. “It’s just atrocious that you continue the racial garbage of not letting them in,” Hallisey said. “It’s not right.” Dugie apologized to Hallisey. “I’m sorry if somehow I offended you, but I think we’re on the same page,” Dugie said. Dugie’s amended motion passed 5-2.

LEAGUE CITY Mayor Pat Hallisey and a couple League City Council members clashed June 8 over an agenda item related to renaming part of a major road after a family signifi- cant to the city’s history. The agenda item proposed would have renamed Hobbs Road between Ervin Street and FM 517 to Winfield Road. The Winfields are a Black family who settled in League City 151 years ago and have been “forgotten,” Hallisey said. After Hallisey made a motion to rename the portion of Hobbs, Council Member Hank Dugie amended the motion to instead name a new road that will intersect with Hobbs to Winfield Road. Hallisey became angry, telling Dugie and Council Member Larry Millican it is “embarrassing” how they do not want to support the name change. “They deserve to be acknowledged in the same way that we acknowledge

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Proposed road renaming

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

News fromLeague City, Houston & Clear Creek ISD

Clear Creek ISDnixes virtual academy

Houston City Council approves newbudget

presented. It would cost around $255,000 to provide services for these high-risk students next school year, the data showed. About twice that number of inter- mediate and high school students put in virtual learning requests, Assis- tant Superintendent of Secondary Education Karen Engle told trustees. It would cost about $1.53 million to provide staffing for both face-to-face and asynchronous secondary learners in 2021-22. A full virtual academy will therefore not be an option next year. HOUSE BILL 1468 HB 1468 WOULD HAVE ALLOWED PUBLIC SCHOOL DISTRICTS TO CREATE LOCAL REMOTE LEARNING PROGRAMS, OR VIRTUAL SCHOOLS. WHILE POISED TO PASS, THE BILL BECAME COLLATERAL DAMAGE WHEN THE HOUSE DEMOCRATS BROKE QUORUM MAY 30. SOURCE: TEXAS AMERICAN FEDERATION OF TEACHERS/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

of debt payments and self-sustaining funds such as the Houston Airport System. The approved general fund budget represents a $96 million increase from the FY 2020-21 budget. A $608 million infusion of federal funds from the American Rescue Act helped the city resolve the shortfall. Projected sales, hotel and property tax revenue decreases due to the COVID-19 pandemic put the city in a precarious position leading into the new fiscal year that could have forced layoffs and land sales without the federal funds, Turner said.

BY EMMA WHALEN

Houston City Council meets at 1:30 p.m. Tuesdays for public comment and at 9 a.m. Wednesdays for regular business at 901 Bagby St., Houston. Meetings are streamed at www.houstontx.gov/htv. Clear Creek ISD board of trustee s meets at 6 p.m. the fourth Monday MEETINGSWE COVER HOUSTON The Houston City Coun- cil approved a $5.1 billion budget for fiscal year 2021-22 on June 1 and, due to an infusion of federal funds, avoided a $201 million shortfall. “2020 was a year like none other; financially it was worse than hurricane Harvey because it was a disaster that lasted 14 months,” Mayor Sylvester Turner said. “This is the worst budgetary shortfall that we’ve faced as a city.” The budget is composed of a $2.58 billion general fund, which supports a majority of city functions outside

BY COLLEEN FERGUSON

CLEARCREEK ISD The district will not offer Clear Connections for remote learners during the 2021-22 school year, Clear Creek ISD leaders said June 14. Some asynchronous options will be available to secondary students via the Clear Access course system, which has been used since 2008. House Bill 1468, if it passed, would have expanded online learning options for Texas districts by allowing for average daily attendance funding through a virtual learning platform, Assistant Superintendent of Elemen- tary Education Holly Hughes said at a board workshop. The bill addressed education for grades 3-12; the Leg- islature closed without its passage, meaning districts have to fund their own virtual education. Of the 119 third-, fourth- and fifth-graders who requested to learn virtually, 29 are considered medically high-risk, according to data Hughes

of each month at 1955 W. NASA Blvd., Webster. Watch online at www.ccisd.net/boardmeeting. League City City Counci l meets at 6 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month at 400 W. Walker St., League City. Watch at www.facebook.com/leaguecitytexas.

Providing quality care to the Southeast Houston area for over 25 Years.

Dr. Bahaeddin Shabaneh

Dr. David Hamer

Dr. Gerard Abreo

Dr. Mary Mercado Dr. Molham Aldeiri

Dr. Anna Harkins, Jr.

Dr. Ahmad Al-Taweel

Webster Location 530 Orchard Street Webster, TX 77598 (O) 281-338-4004

Pasadena Location 5010 Crenshaw Rd. Ste. 110 Pasadena, TX 77505 (O) 832-399-0400

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Please call our office if you have questions about which insurance plans we take

SAME DAY AND SATURDAY APPOINTMENTS • IN OFFICE TESTING • 24 HOUR ON CALL PHYSICIANS

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BAY AREA EDITION • JUNE 2021

H E A L T H C A R E E D I T I O N 2021 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER IS PROUD TO SAY THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS

GOLD SPONSOR

Houston Methodist Clear Lake Hospital brings all the expertise and compassionate care of the world-renowned Houston Methodist Hospital in The Texas Medical Center to the Bay area. Located in Nassau Bay, across from the NASA Johnson Space Center, Clear Lake oers innovative, high-quality, patient-centered care in a welcoming, healing environment. We are proud to oer an exceptional array of programs and services at our full-service hospital, including heart and vascular care, neurology, orthopedics & sports medicine and women’s health. And when you need emergency care, we provide easy, online check-in to our ER, to help shorten wait times to be seen by our board- certied emergency medicine physicians. houstonmethodist.org/clearlake

GOLD SPONSOR

University of Houston-Clear Lake serves a diverse community with a high-quality education to prepare students to thrive in a competitive workplace and make valuable contributions to their communities. Whether you are looking to advance your career or just starting your college search, the university oers 90 undergraduate and graduate degree programs through four academic colleges at three campus locations in Clear Lake, Pearland and the Texas Medical Center. Take the next step in your healthcare career at at UH-Clear Lake. Advance your nursing career in our RN-to-BSN program, ranked among top nursing programs in Texas and the U.S. by the Nursing Schools Almanac, become a leader in healthcare through with a degree in Healthcare Administration, or help people improve their health through our tness and human performance program. Discover more today at www.uhcl.edu.

GOLD SPONSOR

From primary care to the most complex procedures, The University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB Health) system of care includes hospitals and emergency departments on four campuses; primary, specialty and urgent care services; and collaborations with physicians throughout the region. We oer our innovative care close by at the UTMB Health Clear Lake Hospital Campus, League City Hospital Campus, and primary and specialty care clinics located throughout the region. Services include: primary care; urgent care; 24/7 emergency care at both hospital locations, including our new pediatric emergency department at our Clear Lake Hospital Campus; comprehensive specialty care services for pediatrics, women’s health, orthopedics, cardiology, gastroenterology, neurology/neurosurgery and much more. Find a doctor, schedule an appointment or learn more at doctors.utmbhealth.com or by calling (800) 917-8906.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

HEALTH CARE SNAPSHOT

COMPILED BY COMMUNITY IMPACT STAFF

COMPARING COUNTY HEALTH Of the 254 counties in Texas, Harris County ranks 30th statewide in overall health outcome. Galveston County ranks 55th. Galveston County has fully vaccinated roughly 49% of its population—2% higher than Harris.

Nearly half of the eligible population in both counties are vaccinated. The following data is accurate as of June 18. COMBATING COVID19

VACCINATION DEMOGRAPHICS

8.57% 13.01% 22.46% 35.16% 15.02% 5.78% 47.70% 26.90% 17.80% 4.50% 3.10%

8.65% 10.93% 34.48% 28.58% 10.48% 6.88% 52.50% 25.70% 15.50% 3.60% 2.70%

5.26% 10.08% 19.83% 39.74% 21.25% 3.84% 42.50% 28.80% 21.00% 5.30% 2.40%

Asian

Black

COUNTYVACCINATIONS

White Hispanic

HARRIS COUNTY

GALVESTON COUNTY

PEOPLE AGE 12+ WITH AT LEAST ONE DOSE

58.10%

BRAZORIA COUNTY

Other

55.44%

Unknown

54.26%

AGE BREAKDOWN

55.99%

16-49 50-64 80+ 65-79

Statewide

PEOPLE AGE 12+ FULLY VACCINATED

47.88%

49.62%

12-15

47.31%

N

46.93%

COVID19 BREAKDOWN

Statewide

In both Harris and Galveston counties, COVID-19 recoveries have far surpassed active cases. The following data is accurate as of June 17.

HEALTH OUTCOMES INCLUDE:

HEALTH OUTCOMES 2021 STATEWIDE HEALTH CARE RANKINGS OUT OF 254 COUNTIES

• LENGTHOF LIFE • QUALITYOF LIFE , such as the number of poor mental and physical health days reported

COUNTY CASES

In both counties, active cases and deaths are in the hundreds, while recoveries are in the thousands.

57 55 63

30 30 69

19 17 35

Length of life Overall

HEALTH FACTORS INCLUDE:

• HEALTHBEHAVIORS , such as smoking, obesity, physical activity, excessive drinking, alcohol- impaired driving deaths, sexually transmitted infections and teen births • CLINICAL CARE , including health insurance coverage; number of physicians, dentists and mental health providers; preventable hospital stays; and u vaccinations • SOCIOECONOMIC FACTORS , such as educational attainment levels, children in poverty, income inequality and violent crimes • PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT FACTORS , such as air pollution, drinking water violations, housing problems and long commutes

Active 4,247 4,659 Deaths

393,255 Recoveries

Total 403,151

Quality of life HEALTH FACTORS

137 77 48

15 90

323 39

Overall

Health behaviors

370 Deaths

33,598 Recoveries

Active 825

Total 34,793

46 43

61

Socioeconomic Physical environment Clinical care

78

160 241

147

240

Active 468 434 Deaths

35,332 Recoveries

Total 37,155

SOURCES: TEXAS HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES, TEXAS HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES, U.S. CENSUS BUREAU, HARRIS COUNTY, GALVESTON COUNTY, BRAZORIA COUNTYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Providing quality care to the Southeast Houston area for over 25 Years

We often care for patients with the following concerns:

• Recurrent infections of the skin or other soft tissue (supportive tissues such as muscles and fat)

• Mycobacterial infections of the lungs and skin • Different types of fungal infection • Fever of unknown cause

• Bone and joint infections • Other chronic infectious diseases

• Recurrent urinary tract infections • Recurrent herpes virus infections

Our dedicated and caring physicians strive to provide the highest quality care in a timely manner.

Webster Office | 532 Orchard Street | Webster, Texas 77598 | 281.338.7202 | houstoninfectiousdisease.com

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BAY AREA EDITION • JUNE 2021

Caring for you all over.

From primary care to the most complex procedures, The University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB Health) system of care includes hospitals and emergency departments on four campuses; primary, specialty and urgent care services; and collaborations with physicians throughout the region. UTMB Health offers the largest regional network of primary care and specialty care providers that provide care for: • Cardiology and Cardiac Surgery • Women’s Care, including Labor & Delivery Services • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine • Neurology and Neurosurgery • Gastroenterology and Colorectal Surgical Services • Advanced Surgical Services, including Minimally Invasive Surgery • And more

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In the Bay Area region, UTMB Health has numerous clinics and two full-service hospitals with 24/7 emergency departments, including our Pediatric ED on the Clear Lake Hospital Campus . You have access to the latest treatment options and advanced procedures—all conveniently nearby.

518 FM

WEBSTER

518 FM

FRIENDSWOOD

LEAGUE CITY

528 FM

DICKINSON

96 HWY

517 FM

146 HWY

2004 FM

646 FM

ALVIN

3 HWY

6 HWY

TEXAS CITY

35 HWY (800) 917-8906 | utmbhealth.com SANTA FE

Scan to find a provider near you.

The University of Texas Medical Branch is in-network for most major insurance plans.

288 HWY

2004 FM

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

HOSPITALS

Information on local hospitals in the Bay Area

2 0 2 1 H E A L T H C A R E E D I T I O N

COMPILED BY COMMUNITY IMPACT STAFF

Trauma level

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1 HCA Houston Healthcare Clear Lake 500 Medical Center Blvd., Webster 2813322511 www.hcahoustonhealthcare.com • Trauma level: II • NICU level: III • Total number of employees: 2,045 • Number of beds: 532 • Telemedicine oerings: none • Latest news: HCA Houston Healthcare opened a new free-standing emergency room, HCA Houston ER 24/7 Pearland, in May, per a media release. The full-service ER is a department of HCA Houston Healthcare Clear Lake, providing a full range of services for adults and children at 2906 Broadway St. in Pearland. 2 Houston Methodist Clear Lake Hospital 18300 Houston Methodist Drive, Nassau Bay 2815232000 www.houstonmethodist.org/locations/ clear-lake • Trauma level: N/A • NICU level: II • Total number of employees: 900 • Number of beds: 178 • Telemedicine oerings: Primary care doctors and specialists oer telemedicine visits. • Latest news: A new medical building opened in May, and the Spine Center launched in November. 3 Houston Physicians Hospital 333 N. Texas Ave., Webster 2817296651 www.houstonphysicianshospital.com • Trauma level : N/A • NICU level : N/A • Total number of employees : 400 • Number of beds : 20 inpatient beds, adding 18 observation beds with expansion • Telemedicine oerings : none • Latest news : The hospital will complete a 38,400-square-foot expansion by the end of 2021 to meet patient volume demands, per a media release. The • rst-oor expansion will include a kitchen, a dining facility, a private sta break area, sterile processing and a sta

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Hospitals have varying trauma levels depending on services provided.

5

3

ASTORIA BLVD.

Level I • Highest level of care • Full range of specialists, equipment in-house 24/7 • Oer teaching, research components

2

HOUSTON METHODIST DR.

6

4

1

Level IV • Provide initial evaluation, stabilization, diagnostic capabilities • Will likely have to transfer to higher-level trauma center Level III • Oer resources for emergency surgery, intensive care • May have to transfer to Level I and II centers Level II • Oer specialists on call 24/7 • Can transfer to Level I facilities • No research component required

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MAP NOT TO SCALE N

5 Memorial Hermann Southeast Hospital 11800 Astoria Blvd., Houston 2819296100 www.memorialhermann.org • Trauma level: III • NICU level: III • Total number of employees: 1,512 • Number of beds: 293 • Telemedicine oerings: varies by physician • Latest news: none 6 UTMB Health Clear Lake Campus Hospital 200 Blossom St., Webster 8326326500 www.utmbhealth.com • Trauma level: III • NICU level: I • Total number of employees: 621 • Number of beds: 185 • Telemedicine oerings: none currently in inpatient setting • Latest news: The Clear Lake campus earned its Level III trauma designation in February, according to a media release.

7 UTMB Health League City Campus Hospital 2240 S. Gulf Freeway, League City 4097721011

www.utmbhealth.com • Trauma level: N/A • NICU level: N/A • Total number of employees: more than 650 • Number of beds: 97 inpatient • Telemedicine oerings: none • Latest news: none 8 St. Luke’s Health - Patients Medical Center 4600 E. Sam Houston Parkway S., Pasadena 7139487000 www.stlukeshealth.org • Trauma level: N/A • NICU level: N/A • Total number of employees: 528 • Number of beds: 61 • Telemedicine oerings: none • Latest news: The center is seeking full Bariatrics Center of Excellence designation after successful completion of the Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery Accreditation and Quality Improvement Program survey.

SOURCES: TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF STATE HEALTH SERVICES, TEXAS SECRETARY OF STATE’S OFFICE COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

meeting room, and the second-oor build-out will add four new operating rooms. The third oor will be used for post-acute recovery and rehabilitation. 4 Kindred Hospital Clear Lake 350 Blossom St., Webster 2813167800 www.kindredhealthcare.com • Trauma level : N/A • NICU level : N/A • Total number of employees : 276 • Number of beds: 110 • Telemedicine oerings: none • Latest news: none

No Annual Fee Low Interest Rates #1 Houston Credit Union Google

96

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6640 South Shore Blvd., Suite 100 League City, TX 77573 713.852.6700 TexasBayCU.org

NMLS: #280545

This credit union is federally insured by the National Credit Union Administration.

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BAY AREA EDITION • JUNE 2021

Leading Medicine IN CLEAR LAKE

Advanced Care Close to Home Houston Methodist Clear Lake Hospital provides specialized services, comprehensive emergency care and the most advanced technology and procedures available, ensuring patients receive the highest quality treatment and care — right here in our community.

3

45

HOUSTON METHODIST PRIMARY CARE GROUP

146

2351

HOUSTON METHODIST CLEAR LAKE HOSPITAL

HOUSTON METHODIST PRIMARY CARE GROUP

HOUSTON METHODIST PRIMARY CARE GROUP

NASSAU BAY

We are proud to offer: • Advanced imaging • Breast Care Center • Cancer Center • Cardiovascular care • Emergency services • Neurology

528

FRIENDSWOOD

3

45

• Orthopedics and sports medicine

LEAGUE CITY

518

HOUSTON METHODIST PHYSICIAN CLINICS

96

• Primary care • Urology and

urogynecology • Weight loss surgery • Women’s services

houstonmethodist.org/clearlake 281.333.8899

16

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

ENVIRONMENT

2 0 2 1 H E A L T H C A R E E D I T I O N

Flooded homes at risk ofmold growth When local resident Lisa Piper and her family started getting sick last summer, the last thing she expected was mold. Piper, who owns Natural Living yard to keep an eye on it. The house will stand while the family litigates. Bob Phalen, University of Hous- ton-Clear Lake associate professor and BY JAKE MAGEE

This yellow tube helps remove mold spores from the areas being cleaned.

Walls have been stripped to the studs to get rid of mold within.

chair of its occupational safety and health program, has a professional history as an industrial hygienist. He said he has not seen a case as extreme as the Pipers’ but that mold can be dangerous. “I’ve done assessments where peo- ple got pretty sick, but it was mostly nausea, vomiting,” he said. Phalen said he worked a case in which dockworkers were getting sick opening shipping containers that held mold-infested pallets. Some ended up in the hospital, he said. Mold typically aects respiratory systems, causing coughing or allergic responses. Those who have asthma can see it worsen due to mold, and mold can sometimes even cause infections in people, Phalen said. That said, mold is everywhere, and if you are sampling for it, you will nd it, Phalen said. Phalen suspects mold can be poten- tially more prevalent in the Greater Houston area, considering it is hot, humid, and prone to rain and oods. With the February freeze causing hundreds of homes’ pipes to burst, if residents did not properly dry out their houses, mold could be a future problem, Phalen said. “If there was water damage, any porous material needs to be removed— anything that was wet,” he said. Piper urged residents to be vigilant, especially if they took on water during the freeze. “Mold inspections are extensive, but they are worth every dime,” she said.

Food Co-op & Cafe in League City and purchased a Bacli house a year ago, said she and her family began experi- encing nausea, migraines, exhaustion and other symptoms. “In early summer, all of our health started to change a bit, and we weren’t really paying attention to what it was,” she said. After researching, Piper thought the symptoms could be due to mold in the house. In the fall, a home inspector conrmed her suspicions, Piper said. “Who ... would ever think their house is making them sick?” she said. Professionals eventually made it to the house to begin to tear out mold-in- fested walls. As it turned out, every wall of every room had thick, black mold behind it, basically making the house uninhabitable, Piper said. Piper suspects the house ooded during Hurricane Harvey and was not properly dried out, leading to the mold growth. Homeowners insurance does not cover mold growth in Texas, and the Pipers do not have health insur- ance, leading to nancial problems. Additionally, the family had to throw out 90% of their belongings due to fears they may be infested with mold, Piper said. “We’re losing everything—I mean everything,” she said. Today, Piper and her family are stay- ing in a rental. Until recently, Piper’s husband lived in a tent in the house’s

Due to the amount of mold in the Pipers’ house, it has been deemed a biohazard and must be torn down, Lisa Piper said. The Pipers started a fundraiser on Go Fund Me to oset the costs of mitigating the mold.

COURTESY LISA PIPER

MOLD PRIMER Mold can be an issue in hot, humid environments, such as the Greater Houston area.

WHAT IS MOLD?

Fungi commonly found on food or wet materials

WHERE IS MOLD FOUND?

Indoors, mold is most often associated with damp, musty locations, such as basements and bathrooms.

WHAT CAUSES MOLD?

There are vemajor causes for mold growth: oods, roof and window leaks, condensation, plumbing leaks and damp conditions.

WHO IS AFFECTED BY MOLD?

Those living withmold can develop respiratory disease, asthma and allergies. Children, the elderly and pregnant women are at higher risk.

HOWDOES ONE ADDRESS MOLD? If there is water damage or mold can been seen or smelled, it should be professionally removed before symptoms appear.

COURTESY ADOBE STOCK

SOURCE: AMERICAN INDUSTRIAL HYGIENE ASSOCIATIONCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Symptoms of Chronic Venous Insufficiency

• Bulging or varicose veins • Leg(s) ever feel heavy, tired or achy – especially at the end of the day • Leg swelling at the end of the day • History of thrombosis or blood clot in your leg(s) • History of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) • Ulcer or open sore on your lower leg • Patient stands for long periods of time, such as at work • Patient frequently engages in heavy lifting • Family history of varicose veins or chronic venous insufficiency or venous reflux Let our experienced physicians provide relief with minimally invasive vein disease treatment

Webster Office 530 Orchard Street Webster, Texas 77598 281-338-4004 Pasadena Office 5010 Crenshaw Rd. Ste 110 Pasadena, Texas 77505 832-399-0400

Providing quality care to the Southeast Houston area for over 25 years.

www.southeasthoustonveinclinic.com

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BAY AREA EDITION • JUNE 2021

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