Sugar Land - Missouri City Edition | January 2021

2021 SUGAR LAND MISSOURI CITY EDITION

ONLII NE AT

A N N U A L C O M M U N I T Y G U I D E

VOLUME 8, ISSUE 5  JAN 13, 2021FEB. 9, 2021

VIRTUAL LESSONS

With remote learning and the stress of the coronavirus pandemic, FBISD saw a higher failure rate in Term 1 of the 2020-21 school year.

ANNUAL COMMUNITYGUIDE 2021

SOURCE: FORT BEND ISDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

of students received an F in Term 1, 2020-21.

of students received an F in Term 1, 2019-20.

21%

13%

IMPACTS

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COMMUNITY INFO

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COURTESY FORT BEND ISD

DINING LISTINGS

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TOP STORY TO WATCH IN 2021

Online obstacles persist for Fort Bend ISD students After seeing more failing students in rst nine weeks, district looks for xes

BY CLAIRE SHOOP

the percentage of failing students by subpopulation. While overall failure rates declined at nine elementary schools, all second- ary campuses showed increases in the percentage of students failing. Addi- tionally, the percentage of students failing increased at 22 out of 25 Title I campuses. District data also shows for kinder- garten through 10th-grade math, failure rates increased by 1.8%; for kindergar- ten through 12th-grade reading and language arts, the failure rate increased by 2.5%; and for kindergarten through 10th-grade science, the failure rate increased by 2.9%. Briana Ruiz, who has two sons enrolled in FBISD, one in kindergarten CONTINUED ON 16

student performance during the rst nine weeks. Experts across the state said the reports of higher student failure rates are unfortunate but not unexpected. “In many ways, what we should be doing is thinking maybe a little bit less about where students are at right now and [instead] about how we can help students get to where they need to be as we begin to leave the situation that we’re currently in,” said Monty Exter, the senior lobbyist at the Association of Texas Professional Educators. Student performance Deputy Superintendent Diana Sayavedra said the district analyzed failure rates by campus, the percentage of failing students by subject area and

With higher failure rates in Fort Bend ISD—as inmuchof the nation and state— local education leaders are looking at ways to increase engagement in the online environment and adjust curric- ulum to recover lost learning, a process education experts said could take years. Approximately 21%of FBISD students failed one or more classes during online learning in Term 1, an 8% increase, or 6,063 students, from the same period last year. Superintendent Charles Dupre said while other districts are seeing even higher failure rates, the data from FBISD is worrisome. “The data … is concerning—it’s con- cerning to all of us—but it’s the real- ity,” Dupre said during a presentation Dec. 14 to the board of trustees on

SHOPPING LISTINGS TRANSPORTATION

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HEALTH CARE

DEVELOPMENT REAL ESTATE

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SUGAR LAND - MISSOURI CITY EDITION • JANUARY 2021

Kindness is a gift that each of us is born with. And when we share it, the goodness that’s released is amazing. Our human connection is important to our well-being, but it’s essential when we’re sick and hurting. For decades, we’ve been proud to bring world-class medical and academic excellence to our communities. But we also know that treating every patient with kindness, empathy, and respect is key to healing. Humankindness is what we call this strength. It has stood the trials of life and the test of time, and it leads us forward every day. Learn more at stlukeshealth.org . thepower of human connection. Never underestimate

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

CONTENTS

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

IMPACTS

7

Now Open, Coming Soon &more

FROMAMY: Happy New Year, everyone! 2020 was crazy, and while some businesses made it through unscathed, many of our community’s local small businesses felt the brunt of the shutdowns and slow economy. As part of our Annual Community Guide, which is included in this issue, we have a listing of businesses and restaurants that opened in 2020 (see Pages 10- 12). Let’s show them some love and help them grow in 2021. Amy Martinez, GENERALMANAGER

MARKET TEAM GENERAL MANAGER Amy Martinez, amymartinez@communityimpact.com EDITOR Laura Aebi REPORTER Claire Shoop GRAPHIC DESIGNER Chase Brooks ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Amanda Feldott METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Jason Culpepper ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Kristina Shackelford MANAGING EDITOR Marie Leonard ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Kaitlin Schmidt CORPORATE LEADERSHIP PUBLISHERS AND FOUNDERS John and Jennifer Garrett GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Warner John and Jennifer Garrett began Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 in Pugerville, TX. The company’s mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Today, we operate across ve metropolitan areas, providing hyperlocal, nonpartisan news produced by our full-time journalists in each community we serve. BECOMEA#COMMUNITYPATRON Newspaper’s legacy of local, reliable reporting by making a contribution. Together, we can continue to ensure citizens stay informed and keep businesses thriving. COMMUNITYIMPACT.COMCIPATRON CONTACT US CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES DIRECTOR Tess Coverman WHOWE ARE Please join your friends and neighbors in support of Community Impact 245 Commerce Green Blvd., Ste. 200 Sugar Land, TX 77478 • 5129896808 PRESS RELEASES slmnews@communityimpact.com SUBSCRIPTIONS communityimpact.com/subscriptions © 2021 Community Impact Newspaper Co. All Rights Reserved. No reproduction of any portion of this issue is allowed without written permission from the publisher.

ANNUAL COMMUNITY GUIDE

COMMUNITY SNAPSHOT Data on Sugar Land and Missouri City

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FROMLAURA: Welcoming a new year gives us all a perfect opportunity to reect on where we have been and where we are going. In this issue, we cover some topics we expect to impact the upcoming year for residents of Sugar Land and Missouri City—from local developments (see Page 17) to coronavirus vaccine distribution (see Page 16). While nobody could have predicted how 2020 would turn out, I have high hopes for 2021. Laura Aebi, EDITOR

DINING LISTINGS

10

Restaurants that opened in 2020

SHOPPING LISTINGS

12

THIS ISSUE BY THE NUMBERS

Businesses that opened in 2020

Local sources 15

New businesses 6

3

3

Transportation updates

New developments

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Updates on the coronavirus vaccine DEVELOPMENT News on Tang City Plaza and more

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SUGAR LAND  MISSOURI CITY EDITION • JANUARY 2021

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IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

COMPILED BY CLAIRE SHOOP

weave extensions, natural hair styles, dread locs and microblading. 281-229-4932. https://houseofblushair studio.glossgenius.com 6 JerseyMike’s Subs opened a location at 3607 Hwy. 90A, Ste. 106, Stafford, on Nov. 4. The nationwide sandwich chain serves hot and cold subs along with break- fast items. The new Stafford Jersey Mike’s joins three existing Sugar Land and Missou- ri City locations. www.jerseymikes.com COMING SOON 7 A Dunkin ’ location is coming to 6231 Hwy. 6, Missouri City in early 2021, according to Dunkin’s marketing agency. The location was formerly a Carl’s Jr. Dunkin’ serves a variety of coffee drinks, donuts, breakfast sandwiches, muffins and more. This will be the first Dunkin’ location in the Sugar Land and Missouri City area. www.dunkindonuts.com 8 E-commerce retailer Amazon has an- nounced it will open a fulfillment center in Missouri City in 2021. Located at 2303 Hur- ricane Lane, Fresno, the 1 million-square- foot fulfillment center will create more than 500 full-time jobs, and associates will pick, pack and ship large items, including patio furniture, outdoor equipment and rugs. www.amazon.com 9 Hoover Oaks Memory Care and Assisted Living is finishing construction on a new facility at 1722 Eldridge Road, Sugar Land. Scheduled to open in the spring of 2021, the facility will provide 24-hour assistance to 16 residents. This is Hover Oaks’ first location and will feature a courtyard, a wellness center and a beauty salon. https://hoover-oaks-memory-care- and-assisted.business.site EXPANSIONS 10 Rustika Café and Bakery’s Sugar Land location, located at 3227 Hwy. 6, Sugar Land, hosted a grand opening Dec. 5 for the new cafe portion of the busi- ness. The cafe menu includes breakfast items such as huevos, omelettes, frittatas and crepes—as well as soups, salads, sandwiches, tacos and empanadas for lunch. Rustika is continuing to serve its full selection of bakery goods. 281-494-4230. www.rustikacafe.com

WATERVIEW TOWN CENTER DR.

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MCHARD RD.

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SUGAR LAND

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HURRICANE LN.

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SIENNA PKWY.

TM; © 2021 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER CO. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. MAP NOT TO SCALE N

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NOWOPEN 1 USANinja Challenge , a physical fitness and training facility for kids, opened Nov. 4 at 202 Industrial Blvd., Ste. 903, Sugar Land. The gym’s ninja obstacle course incorporates gymnastics, climbing, cross training, and track and field for children ages 4-17. USA Ninja Challenge offers classes for children and teens, camps and party packages. 281-201-1880. www.ninjasugarland.com 2 Summer Moon Coffee , an Aus- tin-based coffee shop, held a soft opening Dec. 5 for its latest location in the Oyster Creek Crossing shopping center at 9402 Hwy. 6, Ste. 100, Missouri City. The business—which serves hot and iced coffee

4 Waters Edge Winery & Bistro opened Nov. 21 at 4828 Waterview Town Center Drive, Ste. 700, Richmond. The family-owned establishment crafts more than 50 types of wine locally using grapes sourced from around the world. Waters Edge also offers custom wines and labels, as well as a food menu featuring appetizers, salads, sandwiches, flatbreads and desserts. 346-843-2320. www.wewrichmondtx.com 5 House of Blu’s Hair Studio had a grand opening Dec. 19 for the multicultural salon located at 3708 McHard Road, Ste. C, Mis- souri City. Owner Shalis Lucien—along with a team of hair stylists—offer a variety of salon and spa services including haircuts, color services, silk presses, braiding styles,

drinks as well as noncoffee drinks and light bites—is known for its wood-fired cof- fee-roasting process and signature Moon

Milk creamer. 346-816-7281. www.summermooncoffee.com

3 Mala Sichuan Bistro opened a location in the Jusgo Supermarket shopping center at 3412 Hwy. 6, Ste. P, Sugar Land, in De- cember after several delays. The Chinese restaurant features dishes from the Sich- uan province, including kung pao chicken, peppercorn chicken and crispy mala beef as well as vegetable plates, soups, fried rice and chow mein. Mala Sichuan Bistro has locations in Chinatown, Montrose and Katy’s Asian Town. 832-532-7744. www.malasichuan.com

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SUGAR LAND - MISSOURI CITY EDITION • JANUARY 2021

Ranked number one in the nation for cancer care by U.S. News &World Report.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

A N N U A L C O M M U N I T Y G U I D E 2021

COMMUNITY SNAPSHOT

Data and analysis on local communities

COMPILED BY LAURA AEBI AND CLAIRE SHOOP

PHOTOS BY CLAIRE SHOOPCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

SUGAR LAND

MISSOURI CITY

Sugar Land saw a jump in population between 2014-19, corresponding to when it annexed Greatwood and New Territory. During that time, the median household income increased by nearly $16,000. The majority of its students attend Fort Bend ISD, but some are zoned for Lamar CISD. The city is located inside Fort Bend County.

Missouri City saw smaller but steady population growth between 2014-19. Furthermore, at 39.6, the city’s median age closely resembles that of Fort Bend County and the state of Texas. According to census data, nearly 42% of Missouri City residents are Black, while 22% are white and about 17% are either Hispanic or Latino, or Asian.

POPULATION CHANGE

MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME

AGE ANALYSIS

Fort Bend County +20.93% +44.03% +7.82% Five-year change

0-19

20-39 40-59 60-79 80+

$105,400

2014

25%

21.9%

29.4%

20.2%

$121,274

2019

20.5% 3.4% 2%

24.8%

25.9%

26.9%

$84,662

2014

Median age

Fort Bend County 36.3

42.2 39.6

$87,915

2019

LOCAL DEMOGRAPHICS*

EDUCATION LEVEL

LARGEST EMPLOYMENT SECTORS** 1 Management occupations 2 Sales and related occupations 3 Business and nancial operations 4 Oce and administrative support 1 Oce and administrative support 2 Management occupations 3 Sales and related occupations 4 Educational instruction and library occupations

11.4% 42.7% 6.9% 0.2% 36.5%

16.6% 21.8% 41.6% 0.1% 17.8%

Hispanic or Latino

White

High school diploma or higher achieved

94%

91.5%

Black or African American

American Indian or Alaska native

Asian

Native Hawaiian or other Pacic Islander Some other race Two or more races

0.2% 0.3% 1.9%

0.1% 0.5% 1.6%

Bachelor’s degree or higher achieved

60.1%

43.7%

**EMPLOYMENT FOR AGE 16 AND OLDER

*HISPANICLATINO IS NOT A RACE, BUT THE HISPANICLATINO PERCENTAGE BELOW MAY INCLUDE MULTIPLE RACES LISTED. THE RACES LISTED, HOWEVER, DO NOT INCLUDE HISPANICLATINO RESIDENTS CENSUS DATA MAY NOT ADD UP TO 100% DUE TO ROUNDING.

SOURCES: U.S. CENSUS BUREAU AMERICAN COMMUNITY SURVEY 2019 5YEAR ESTIMATESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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SUGAR LAND  MISSOURI CITY EDITION • JANUARY 2021

DINING

Restaurants that opened in 2020 or are coming in 2021. This list is noncomprehensive.

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VOSS

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Drake’s Burgers and Shakes

W AIRPORT BLVD.

COURTESY DRAKE’S BURGERS AND SHAKES

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8 Scholars and Scoundrels Bar & Grill 17101 W. Grand Parkway S., Ste. 100, Sugar Land 832-471-6023 www.scholarsandscoundrels barandgrill. com $$ H K 9 State Fare Kitchen & Bar 15930 City Walk, Sugar Land 713-234-1405 www.statefaretx.com $$$ B H K 10 Tropical Smoothie Cafe 3607 Hwy. 90A, Ste. 114, Staord 281-902-6454 www.tropicalsmoothiecafe.com $ K ASIAN 11 Mala Sichuan Bistro 3412 Hwy. 6, Ste. P, Sugar Land 832-532-7744 www.malasichuan.com $$ 12 Sit Lô Vietnamese Street Food 3412 Hwy. 6, Ste. R, Sugar Land 281-302-5306 www.sitlohtx.com $$ EUROPEAN 13 Alex’s Kitchen 2601 Cartwright Road, Ste. E, Missouri City 832-987-1750 www.facebook.com/ alexs-kitchen-105953084356130 $$

MISSOURI CITY

99 TOLL

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Average entrees: $ Up to $9.99 $$ $10-$19.99 $$$ $20 or more B Breakfast/brunch H Happy hour K Kids menu

AMERICAN 1 Drake’s Burgers and Shakes 6560 Greatwood Parkway, Sugar Land 281-937-7868 www.drakesburgersandshakes.com $$ K 2 First Watch 17412 W. Grand Parkway S., Sugar Land 346-396-4401 www.rstwatch.com $$ B K

3 Gyro Hut 1914 Wescott Ave., Ste. 150, Sugar Land 346-350-5119 www.gyrohuttx.com $ 4 Howdy Hot Chicken 19922 Hwy. 59, Sugar Land 832-847-4974 https://www.facebook.com/pages/ category/Halal-Restaurant/ Howdy-Hot-Chicken-119875229683153 $ K 5 Jersey Mike’s Subs 3607 Hwy. 90A, Ste. 106, Staord

281-969-5641 www.jerseymikes.com $ K

6 Pluckers Wing Bar 12469 Hwy. 59, Staord 832-558-9464 www.pluckers.com $$ H K 7 Raising Cane’s 12627 S. Kirkwood Road, Staord 281-494-8672 www.raisingcanes.com $ K

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10 NOWHIRING SALES PROFESSIONALS

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY CLAIRE SHOOP & MATT DULIN

2 0 2 1 S P E C I A L E D I T I O N

$$ H K 17 Mirchi Peri Peri 1912 Wescott Ave., Ste. 200, Sugar Land 346-874-7418 www.mirchiperiperi.com $ K GERMAN 18 The Sauer Kraut Grill 734 Crabb River Road, Richmond 713-331-9013 https://thesauerkrautgrill.square.site/ $$ K MEXICAN 19 Grab N Go Tacos 4821 LJ Parkway, Ste. 99, Sugar Land 832-999-4222 www.grabngotacos.com $ B H K 20 La Tapatia 13574 University Blvd., Ste. 1200, Sugar Land 281-302-5642 www.latapatia.com $$ H WINERIES 21 Messina Hof Harvest Green Winery and Kitchen 8921 Harlem Road, Richmond www.messinahof.com/harvestgreen $$

15

Sweet Paris Crêperie & Café

COURTESY SWEET PARIS CRÊPERIE & CAFÉ

City Orchard’s facilities include eight 2,000 gallon tanks and a dog-friendly patio.

FILIPINO 14 Jollibee 6127 Hwy. 6, Missouri City 346-295-9060 www.jollibeeusa.com $ FRENCH 15 Sweet Paris Crêperie & Café 15911 City Walk, Sugar Land 346-368-2029 www.sweetparis.com $$ B K FUSION 16 Cabo Dogs Lounge & Grill 7022 Hwy. 6, Ste. 100, Missouri City 832-271-6900 https://cabodogs.com

COURTESY CITY ORCHARD

WORTH THE TRIP CITY ORCHARD City Orchard opened its doors last January at 1201 Oliver St., Houston. The cidery produces hard ciders using apples from the Great Lakes region, where co-owners Patrick Kwiatkowski and Mat Smith have ties. “City Orchard is a unique concept in that we’re bringing fresh-pressed juice from apples grown in the Great Lakes and using them to make cider in Houston,” Kwiatkowski said in a news release. The cidery also features a taproom with beer brewed on-site, as well as a selection of domestic and imported wines and an in-house apple-based

wine. It also oers pizza, crepes and other specialty bites from its City Orchard Food Truck. www.cityorchardhtx.com $$ B H K

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SUGAR LAND  MISSOURI CITY EDITION • JANUARY 2021

SHOPPING

Retailers that opened in 2020 or are coming in 2021. This list is noncomprehensive.

COMPILED BY CLAIRE SHOOP

5

VOSS

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BURNEY RD.

29

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90

Sharkey’s Cuts for Kids

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COURTESY SHARKEY’S CUTS FOR KIDS

PROMENADE WAY

MISSOURI CITY

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BRISBANE CT.

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21 Jello’s Liquor 4225 Sienna Parkway, Ste. 140, Missouri City www.facebook.com/ Jellos-Liquor-402105719853774 COMING SPRING 2021 HEALTHFITNESS 22 Blue Legend Swim School 6926 Brisbane Court, Sugar Land 832-598-6666 www.bluelegendswimschool.com 23 CBD American Shaman 403 Hwy. 6, Ste. A1, Sugar Land 281-201-8958 www.cbdamericanshaman.com 24 Goldsh Swim School of Sugar Land 16618 Hwy. 59, Ste. A, Sugar Land 281-789-6089 www.goldshswimschool.com/sugar-land 25 F45 18802 University Blvd., Ste. 160, Sugar Land 281-407-1655 www.f45training.com 26 Serenity Organics 9101 Sienna Crossing Drive, Ste. 188, Missouri City 832-440-0621 www.serenityorganicscbd.com 27 Spenga 13540 University Blvd., Ste. 250, Sugar Land 832-241-7676 https://spenga.com 28 UFC Gym Sugar Land 16566 Hwy. 59, Ste. B, Sugar Land 346-340-8323 www.ufcgym.com 29 USA Ninja Challenge 202 Industrial Blvd., Ste. 903, Sugar Land 281-201-1880 www.ninjasugarland.com 30 YogaSix 18921 University Blvd., Ste. 920, Sugar Land 713-364-2506 www.yogasix.com

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15

www.educate-one.com 8 iCode 4899 Hwy. 6, Ste. 113C, Missouri City 281-584-6618 www.icodeschool.com/sugarland117 9 Imagine Early Education and Childcare 5320 Hwy. 6, Missouri City 833-742-4453 www.imaginechild.com COMING 2021 10 PREfessionals Academy Little Scholars Center 2420 Cartwright Road, Missouri City 832-409-4247 www.prefessionalsacademy.com CLOTHING 11 Heart Cru 3340 FM 1092, Ste. 140, Missouri City 281-969-7605 www.heartcru.com FOODBEVERAGE 12 Birdhouse Coee 7270 Hwy. 6, Ste. 100, Missouri City 281-969-7239 www.birdhousecoeemctx.com 13 Churned Creamery 9303 Hwy. 6, Ste. 400, Missouri City 832-440-2152 www.churnedcreamery.com 14 HTeaO 4510 Hwy. 6, Sugar Land

281-962-4610 www.hteao.com 15 Summer Moon Coee 9402 Hwy. 6, Ste. 100, Missouri City 346-816-7281 www.summermooncoee.com GARDENINGHOME GOODS 16 Cornelius Garden Center and Nursery 6720 Hwy. 90A, Sugar Land 281-201-6772 www.calloways.com/cornelius 17 Home Studio 6 6726 Hwy. 6, Missouri City 713-504-3184 www.homestudio6.com 18 Painted Tree Marketplace 15555 Hwy. 59, Sugar Land 832-886-0500 www.paintedtreemarketplace.com 19 Paradise Grills 15820 Hwy. 59, Ste. 300, Sugar Land 832-916-4607 www.paradisegrillsdirect.com GROCERIES 20 Al-Rabba World Food 5800 New Territory Blvd., Sugar Land 281-277-0138 https://alrabbaworldfood.com

BEAUTY 1 Cherry Blow Dry Bar 9101 Sienna Crossing Dr., Ste. 190, Missouri City 281-778-0059 www.cherryblowdrybar.com 2 Clean My Teeth 6130 Hwy. 6, Missouri City 832-447-7244 www.cleanmyteeth.com 3 House of Blu's 3708 McHard Road, Ste. C, Missouri City 281-229-4932 https://houseolushairstudio. glossgenius.com 4 Mattison Avenue Salon Suites & Spa 2181 Texas Ave., Sugar Land 281-907-3294 www.mattisonsalonsuites.com 5 Sharkey’s Cuts for Kids 1914 Wescott Ave., Ste. 110, Sugar Land 281-201-2363 www.sharkeyscutsforkids.com CHILDRENEDUCATION 6 Childrens Lighthouse 15013 Voss Road, Sugar Land 281-207-6845 www.childrenslighthouse.com 7 Education One 3632 Hwy. 6, Sugar Land 281-903-7478

12

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATION

Updates on key transportation stories

2 0 2 1 S P E C I A L E D I T I O N

OTHER PROJECTS TO FOLLOW IN 2021 Upcoming county bond projects

TOP TRANSPORTATION STORIES OF 2021

Hwy.6expansioninSugarLand tobring increasedmobilityto areaoncecompleted

BROOKS ST.

2

1464

6

KENSINGTON DR.

99 TOLL

BY CLAIRE SHOOP

90

59

Work on the $12.1 million project to expand a portion of Hwy. 6 in Sugar Land from six to eight lanes is projected to be completed in March, according to Deidrea George, a public information ocer at the Texas Department of Transportation. Work on the project began nearly two years ago, in early 2019. However, George said, due to utility delays—as lines had to be relocated before construction began—the rst piece of new pavement was not poured until February 2020. Over the last 10 months, contractors have worked to construct a new northbound lane and a new southbound lane between Lexington Boulevard and Brooks Street. During dierent phases of construction, various lanes were closed as new sidewalks and trac lights were installed and the outermost lanes were added. George said these extra lanes are needed to increase mobility, ease congestion and provide a safe commute for residents in one of the state’s fastest-growing counties. The project has cost TxDOT $6.4 million and the city of Sugar Land $1.1 million, George said. “The additional lanes will help mobility by moving more motorists through the area at a faster pace, thus reducing congestion,” George said in an email. “Commuters and shoppers will reap the benets of the completed project with a faster commute, a safer commute and new pedes- trian facilities.” George said TxDOT contractors have beneted from having less trac on the roads due to the coronavirus pandemic, which allowed for some projects to be accel- erated and has minimized the eects on commuters and residents. The project encompasses the stretch of Hwy. 6 in front of the Sugar Land Town Square and First Colony Mall entrance, two popular shopping and dining hubs within the city.

TOWN CENTER BLVD. 1

N

Owens Road extension This project will connect Owens Road to Hwy. 90A. It will include the installation of a trac signal at Hwy. 90A and upgrades to the railroad crossing. Timeline: TBD Total cost: $14.4 million (bond amount: $9 million) Funding sources: Fort Bend County, city of Sugar Land

MAP NOT TO SCALE N

1

CHIMNEY ROCK RD.

A new lane and sidewalk were installed at Town Center Boulevard. (Photos by Claire Shoop/Community Impact Newspaper)

2234

UNION PACIFIC RAILROAD

LAKE OLYMPIA PKWY

521

2

TABOR MILLS DR.

CHIMNEY ROCK RD.

N

Chimney Rock Road & Lake Olympia Parkway extensions These two projects will extend Chimney Rock Road from its current endpoint at FM 2234 to Tabor Mills Drive and, in turn, connect Lake Olympia Parkway from Chimney Rock Road to the railroad Total cost (Chimney Rock Road): $14 million (bond amount: $4.9 million) Total cost (Lake Olympia Parkway): $11.5 million (bond amount: $3.8 million) Funding sources: Fort Bend County west of FM 521. Timeline: TBD

During construction, like that at Hwy. 6 and Kensington Drive, various lanes along Hwy. 6 were closed causing some delays.

Sugar Land Town Square management said while the development has numerous entry and exit points for easy access, the completed expansion of Hwy. 6 will only help. “We appreciate infrastructure improvements that will further enhance access to the village for the surrounding community and visitors to more easily enjoy its increas- ingly diverse dining options, expanding retail and enter- tainment oerings, events, and amenities,” Matt Ragan of Rebees, a management company for Sugar Land Town Square, said in an email.

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13

SUGAR LAND  MISSOURI CITY EDITION • JANUARY 2021

HEALTH CARE

Updates on the biggest health care news

Q&AWITHDR. JACQUELYNMINTER FORT BEND COUNTY HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES DIRECTOR

TOP HEALTH CARE STORY OF 2021

VACCINE CANDIDATES A Food and Drug Administration panel recommended Pzer’s vaccine Dec. 10 and Moderna’s Dec. 17 for emergency use authorization, paving the way for the vaccines to be distributed. Two other companies that have used dierent methods to develop vaccines have also entered Phase 3 trials. SOURCE: TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF STATE HEALTH SERVICESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Coronavirus vaccine arrives in Fort Bend County

WHAT DO YOU HAVE TO SAY TO INDIVIDUALS WHO ARE APPREHENSIVE ABOUT GETTING VACCINATED? COVID-19

Ecacy rate

Company

Age group Doses needed Storage

Ultra-cold frozen, lasts 5 days refrigerated

BY LAURA AEBI

21 days apart 2DOSES

PFIZER BIONTECH

95%

16 and up

The local distribution of the coro- navirus vaccine began last month, with Methodist Hospital in Sugar Land being the rst to receive a Pzer vaccine shipment in the area. Addi- tional hospitals and local pharmacies received shipments from both Pzer and Moderna the following week. “Hope is on the horizon,” Fort Bend County Judge KP George said at a press conference on Jan. 4. “The vaccine is here.” So far, the Moderna and Pzer vaccines are the only ones available in Texas—but a trial of the Astra- Zeneca vaccine should yield results early this year and could lead to its distribution, the process for which is decided by the state. “Texas has convened a team of appointed external and internal sub- ject-matter experts into the COVID-19 Expert Vaccine Allocation Panel (EVAP) to develop vaccine allocation strategies as recommendations to the Texas Commissioner of Health,” said Dr. Jacquelyn Minter, the Fort Bend County Health and Human Services director, said in an email. The distribution process is taking place in phases, beginning with individuals allocated to Phase 1A— hospital sta working directly with COVID-19 and high-risk patients. “Protecting health care workers is essential to keeping the health care system intact and able to care for COVID-19 and other patients, so phase 1A of vaccine distribution, when the vaccine supply is most limited, will focus on making vaccine available to health care workers,” Minter said. “To support this distri- bution, the EVAP has recommended, and the Commissioner of Health has approved, a tiered denition of healthcare workers specic to Phase 1A.” Phase 1B, which began in Houston at the beginning of the month, extended to individuals outside of the health care industry, focusing on

vaccination is a safer way to build protection than risking the severe illness that sometimes occurs with natural infection with SARS CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. COVID-19 vaccination will help protect you by creating an antibody response without the risk of severe illness. Both of the vaccines available have undergone extensive testing and have safety and eectiveness proles that are very good according to researchers of traditional vaccines. WILL PEOPLE BE ABLE TO GO “BACK TO NORMAL” ONCE THEY ARE VACCINATED? Normal activities without masks and distancing will not be wise immediately after vaccination. As a community we will still need to wait until a majority of the population has received the vaccine, so that herd immunity is reached. This will provide the greatest protection for those most at risk for severe complications of COVID-19. WHAT DO YOU SEE THE TIMELINE LOOKING LIKE FOR DISTRIBUTION OF THE VACCINE IN SUGAR LAND AND MISSOURI CITY? It is anticipated that the populations outside the priority groups will begin receiving vaccine in the early spring. If the priority groups are completed sooner and more vaccine is available, this timeline could be shortened. vaccine,” George said before the initial shipment of 1,000 doses was received by the county. “We are ready to administer the vaccine. ...We are ready to get to work.” As the county awaits additional shipments, George and Minter both reiterated the need for continued precautions. “Please continue to keep your guard up,” George said. “Wear your masks. Wash your hands. ... Be patient.” Details regarding vaccine distri- bution in Fort Bend County can be found at www.chealth.org.

Frozen, lasts 30 days refrigerated

28 days apart 2DOSES

94.1%

MODERNA

18 and up

28 days apart 2DOSES

ASTRAZENECA OXFORD

70.4%

Refrigerated

18 and up

JANSSEN JOHNSON& JOHNSON

Frozen, lasts 3 months refrigerated

TBD

1 DOSE

18 and up

those who have a greater risk from the virus that causes COVID-19. That group includes those age 65 and older and individuals age 16 and older with at least one chronic medical condi- tion that puts them at increased risk for severe illness. The second tier of vaccines includes direct care sta in freestand- ing emergency medical care facilities and urgent care clinics; community pharmacy sta who may provide direct services to clients, including vaccination or testing for individuals who may have COVID-19; public health and emergency response sta directly involved in administration of COVID-19 testing and vaccinations; last responders who provide mortu- ary or death services to decedents with COVID-19; and school nurses. On Jan. 4, Fort Bend County announced it had received 1,000 vaccines and would begin contacting preregistered individuals to schedule their rst dose, but according to its website, Fort Bend County’s corona- virus vaccine preregistration was full as of that date. “We have requested that more vaccine be made available to our citizens,” George said. “We are work- ing very closely with the concerned authorities and we are doing every- thing in our power to make sure it is distributed in an orderly manner.”

George said the county has requested “hundreds of thousands” of vaccines, but the actual allocation remains up to the state. While pre- registration for the vaccine has lled up, George said registration for future vaccine shipments will open soon. According to the Fort Bend County Health & Human Services website, “registration will re-open once a signicant number of registrants are vaccinated or FBHHS receives a larger allotment of the vaccine.” Registering, however, does not necessarily mean someone will be next in line for vaccination, George said. Prioritization of the distribution at that point will defer to the Health and Human Services Department. “As soon as they make them avail- able, we will get the information out,” George said. “We are eventually going to open up a registration process where you could sign up—you could register—to get a COVID vaccine when it is available.” As of Jan. 7, Harris County had provided the rst dose of the vaccine to 69,900 individuals, with Fort Bend County at 10,782, according to the Texas Health and Human Services website. During that distribution, Fort Bend County has focused on rst responders, health care workers and medical providers. “We are ready to receive this

14

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

DEVELOPMENT

The biggest developments to watch

2 0 2 1 S P E C I A L E D I T I O N

TOP DEVELOPMENT STORIES OF 2021

Construction underway at Tang City Plaza

Imperial area to seemore growth

A

A

A

BY CLAIRE SHOOP

BY CLAIRE SHOOP

B

Construction continues at Tang City Plaza, while some tenants have already opened their doors. Located at Hwy. 6 and Colonial Lakes Drive inMissouri City, the Pan-Asian development spans 15.4 acres and includes retail condos and hotel space across multiple buildings. “There are a lot of Asian people who live in First Colony, that is why our property is so popular,” Frank Lee, the broker and principal at Dreams Come True Realty, said in an email. “We will have a complex of over 225,000 square foot shopping, education, medical, restaurant, etc. that you can enjoy within your neighborhood.” Lee said new construction is underway on Buildings A, D, E and F. Each of these buildings feature commercial condos, which can be bought or leased on a per-unit basis. Additionally, the second and third oors of Building A will house Tang City Hotel, while the rst oor will oer retail space. Both buildings B and C are nished and have been sold to an individual owner, who also owns several businesses within the center. Existing tenants include TIHU Coee, We Rock the SpectrumKid’s Gym, Asia Blue, Mitsi Dance School, Pinoy Gourmet, iCode, Spider Smart, Wei Foot Relax, Select Therapy and U Village.

Two developments in the Imperial area will undergo construction in 2021, according to Doug Adolph, Sugar Land’s communications and commu- nity engagement director. Construction is underway at the rst project—named Imperial Square— which is located on the east side of Hwy. 6, north of Crown Garden Trail, but south of the existing RaceWay convenience store. Once completed, this development will consist of two buildings totaling just under 24,000 square feet, Adolph said. One building will house an Indo-Pak grocery store called Imperial Spice, while the other will be Elite, an Indo-Pak restaurant. A second Imperial-area devel- opment, located at the northeast intersection of Crown Garden Trail and Hwy. 6, will be a 10,000 square foot retail center, Adolph said. Sugar Land City Council approved the necessary zoning changes for the project at its Nov. 17 meeting. Adolph said there will be additional buering between the commercial property and the nearby neighborhood. The Imperial area continues to experience growth. Recently, the nearby Sugar Land Skeeters became the Houston Astros’ Triple A franchise, a move which Adolph said will greatly aect the area.

E

F

C

D

6

MAP NOT TO SCALE N

SOURCE: TANG CITY PLAZACOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Building E is currently under construction. (Photos by Laura Aebi/Community Impact Newspaper)

Building A’s second and third oorswill house the Tang CityHotel.

The rst oor of Building A will oer retail space.

Momentumslows at Fort Bend Town Center II

THE PLAN The 42-acre development is currently untouched land.

The project will oer an Indo-Pak restaurant and grocery store. (Claire Shoop/Community Impact Newspaper)

BY CLAIRE SHOOP

raw land, Alvis said. Fort Bend Town Center II will be anchored by a Cinemark movie the- ater, an industry hard hit by eorts to reduce the spread of the coronavirus. While Alvis said he believes the development is going to “all come together,” progress is slow, and it is tough to give a date for when constructionmight begin. “We are pushing as quickly as we can,” Alvis said. “We are going to bring the city some good stu.”

Progress on Fort Bend Town Cen- ter II, a proposed 300,000-square- foot development at the northwest corner of Fort Bend Parkway Toll Road and Hwy. 6 inMissouri City, has slowed due in part to the pandemic, said AndrewAlvis, a senior associate with NewQuest Properties. What is envisioned to be an entertainment-based destination center with retail shops and sit-down restaurants is currently 42 acres of

IMPERIAL SQUARE

1

CINEMARK

6

2 IMPERIAL DEVELOPMENT UNNAMED CROWN GARDEN TR.

6

MAP NOT TO SCALE N

SOURCE: NEWQUEST PROPERTIES COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

N

15

SUGAR LAND  MISSOURI CITY EDITION • JANUARY 2021

TOP STORY

CONTINUED FROM 1

and the other in 10th grade, said her younger son has not met standards in writing, something Ruiz attributes in part to him not being able to catch up after online learning. Ruiz said he struggles with some learning disabili- ties, including speech comprehension issues, and is in a bridge class to help him catch up. “If he is unable to catch up along the way and has to be held back, he will be so far behind and such a stand out, making hima prime subject for bullies,” Ruiz said. However, FBISD’s 8-percent- age-point increase in the student failure rate did not aect all students equally. District data shows Hispanic and Latino students, as well as Black stu- dents, saw larger percentage point increases of failing grades when com- pared to their white and Asian peers. Similarly, bilingual students and English-language learners as well as at-risk and economically disadvan- taged students also saw large increases. “The students prior to COVID[-19] who were most at risk—low-income students, special needs students, stu- dents who English is not their rst language—are even more at risk now,” Educate Texas Executive Director John Fitzpatrick said. Educate Texas Policy Director Pris- cilla Aquino Garza said if schools are using the same metrics as in previ- ous years to measure student suc- cess, it makes sense they are seeing dierent results under these dierent conditions. “We are using the same measure- ments we’ve always used in the class- room to measure success,” Aquino Garza said. “I’m not saying you throw those out, but I do think you have to ask yourself, ‘Are these measurements telling me the same thing they were intended to tell me when I wasn’t in a pandemic, when I didn’t have all my students working virtually?’” On Dec. 10, the Texas Education Agency announced schools will not receive AF ratings based on student performance on the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness for the 2020-21 school year. Still, stu- dents are poised to take the STAAR. “I know it’s a little unpopular right now ... but there’s got to be some sort of standardized test done this year,” said state Rep. Jacey Jetton, RRichmond. “We need some sort of assessment to gure out where children are at and

Across reading and language arts, math, and science, Fort Bend ISD saw an increased failure rate in Term 1 of this year when compared to the same period last year. The following charts show the breakdown of failure rates by subject for dierent subpopulations, including race and ethnicity, and special student groups. SOURCE: FORT BEND ISDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER *ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE **A 504 PLAN ENSURES CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES RECEIVE ACCOMMODATIONS Fort Bend ISD Change in Failure Rate

AVERAGE CHANGE FROM 201920 TO 202021:

READING AND LANGUAGE ARTS K12

+2.48%

MATHALGEBRA K10

+1.77%

SCIENCEBIOLOGY K10

+2.89%

Indicates where change from 2019-20 to 2020-21 is higher than average .

RACE ETHNICITY

STUDENT GROUP

2020-21

CHANGE

2020-21

CHANGE

2019-20

2019-20

American Indian or Alaskan Native

13%

+4%

Bilingual/ESL*

9%

9%

+1%

8%

2%

0%

Asian

2%

Gifted and talented

1%

0%

1%

Black or African American

9%

+3%

6%

8%

+1%

Special education

7%

13%

+5%

Hispanic Latino

8%

Economically disadvantaged

12%

+4%

8%

Native Hawaiian or Pacic Islander

6%

+2%

4%

Two or more races

12%

+3%

At-risk

9%

6%

+2%

4%

4%

+1%

8%

+1%

White

3%

Section 504**

7%

American Indian or Alaskan Native

6%

0%

11%

+2%

6%

Bilingual/ESL*

9%

2%

0%

Asian

2%

Gifted and talented

1%

+1%

0%

Black or African American

8%

+1%

7%

6%

-2%

Special education

8%

12%

+4%

Hispanic Latino

8%

Economically disadvantaged

6%

-2%

8%

Native Hawaiian or Pacic Islander

7%

+2%

5%

Two or more races

10%

+1%

At-risk

9%

+1%

5%

4%

4%

+2%

8%

0%

White

2%

Section 504**

8%

American Indian or Alaskan Native

7%

+4%

10%

+5%

3%

Bilingual/ESL*

5%

2%

Asian

1%

+1%

Gifted and talented

0%

0%

0%

Black or African American

7%

+4%

3%

7%

+2%

Special education

5%

10%

+6%

Hispanic Latino

4%

Economically disadvantaged

10%

+6%

4%

Native Hawaiian or Pacic Islander

7%

+3%

4%

9%

+4%

Two or more races

At-risk

5%

4%

+2%

2%

3%

+2%

7%

+2%

White

1%

Section 504**

5%

16

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

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