Lake Travis - Westlake Edition | June 2020

LAKE TRAVIS WESTLAKE EDITION

VOLUME 11, ISSUE 6  JUNE 11JULY 15, 2020

ONLINE AT

Ageneration-dening crisis Youth in the Lake Travis-Westlake area lend a hand amid COVID19 outbreak

The Jones family, who live in the Westlake area, spearheaded an initiative to provide food and resources to individuals experiencing homelessness in the Austin area. The eort has grown into a collaboration among 40 families and 70 children from Eanes ISD, Lake Travis ISD and The Girl’s School of Austin.

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weeks of donations families children sandwiches donated

BY AMY RAE DADAMO

and to the community of people experiencing homelessness. encouragement Prior to making that trip to the camp May 29, Jones and her crew had spent the morning organizing several boxes lled with paper sacks containing sandwiches and other food items. Since their rst trip to the camp, the Joneses have developed relationships with many of its residents, and

On the morning of May 29, Terri Jones, along with a cohort of kids and her friend Julie Zavodny, packed their vehicles with homemade lunches, many of which contained notes of encouragement, that were then delivered to Camp R.A.T.T., Austin’s Responsible Adult Transition Town. This was Jones’ ninth trip to R.A.T.T. in nine weeks, and the group’s mission remains to provide support

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toiletry bags sleeping bags pairs of men’s work boots

From left: Henry Zavodny, Cooper Zavodny, Lucy Zavodny and Mackenzie Jones on May 29 load a car with food for those experiencing homelessness. (Brian Rash/Community Impact Newspaper)

CONTINUED ON 42

Drop in vaccinations due to COVID19 fears creating potential for outbreak HEALTHCARE EDITION

“I STILL DON’T FEEL THAT CONFIDENTWEWON’T SEE ANOUTBREAK. ... OURHERD IMMUNITY IS ERODING.” ALLISON WINNIKE, PRESIDENT AND CEO OF THE IMMUNIZATION PARTNERSHIP

BY IAIN OLDMAN

Newspaper , Austin Regional Clinic experienced a 22% drop in adminis- tered pediatric vaccines in March and April as compared to March and April of last year. Pediatric wellness checks also declined by 38% in that same time. “Nationally, we have seen that the number of children receiving vaccines CONTINUED ON 36

At a time when general practitioners and pediatric care clinics are taking extraordinary measures to ensure the safety of patients, many parents in and around Austin are hesitant to bring their children in for routine wellness checks and vaccinations. According to data provided to Community Impact

SPONSOREDBY • Baylor Scott & White Health • Premier Family Physicians • Vik Complete Care HEALTH CARE EDI T ION 2020

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LAKE TRAVIS - WESTLAKE EDITION • JUNE 2020

From the bottom of our hearts, thank you.

Thank you to all the essential workers who keep Central Texas moving. We appreciate you today and everyday.

www.MobilityAuthority.com

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LAKE TRAVIS - WESTLAKE EDITION • JUNE 2020

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

CONTENTS

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

IMPACTS

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Now Open, Coming Soon &more

MARKET TEAM GENERAL MANAGER Phyllis Campos EDITOR Brian Rash

FROMPHYLLIS: Having lived in the Lake Travis-Westlake area for many decades, I have always been aware of the philanthropic spirit of our community’s youth. This issue’s front-page story from Reporter Amy Rae Dadamo shines a well-researched light on that spirit. Phyllis Campos, GENERALMANAGER

REPORTER Amy Rae Dadamo GRAPHIC DESIGNER Jay Jones ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Jacqueline Harris METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Travis Baker MANAGING EDITOR Joe Warner ASSISTANT MANAGING EDITOR Amy Denney ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Haley Grace CORPORATE LEADERSHIP PUBLISHERS AND FOUNDERS John and Jennifer Garrett GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Lanane CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES DIRECTOR Tess Coverman WHOWE ARE John and Jennifer Garrett began Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 in Pugerville, Texas. The company’s mission is to build informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Today we operate across six metropolitan areas, providing hyperlocal, nonpartisan news produced by our full-time journalists in each community we serve. BECOMEA#COMMUNITYPATRON Please join your friends and neighbors in support of Community Impact Newspaper’s legacy of local, reliable reporting by making a contribution. Together, we can continue to ensure citizens stay informed and keep businesses thriving. COMMUNITYIMPACT.COMPATRON CONTACT US 16225 Impact Way, Ste. 1 Pugerville, TX 78660 • 5129896808 PRESS RELEASES ltwnews@communityimpact.com SUBSCRIPTIONS communityimpact.com/subscriptions © 2020 Community Impact Newspaper Co. All Rights Reserved. No reproduction of any portion of this issue is allowed without written permission from the publisher. SUPPORT LOCAL JOURNALISM

FROMBRIAN: Several factors are hurting preventive health care eorts amid the COVID-19 pandemic, and local health experts say these factors could be creating potential for other outbreaks. Read an extensive report about this in our Health Care Edition’s front-page story. Brian Rash, EDITOR

TODO LIST

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Local events and things to do TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES 13 Hwy. 71 has been trending safer CITY& COUNTY 19 The latest local news

THIS ISSUE BY THE NUMBERS

Local sources 39

New businesses 4

Community events 15

Teachers of the Year 2

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IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

BY AMY RAE DADAMO

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Central Texas Pediatric Dentistry

Anvil + Aura

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COURTESY CENTRAL TEXAS PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY

COURTESY ANVIL + AURA

LAKEWAY

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High 5 Family Entertainment Center

Iron Wolf Ranch & Distillery

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COURTESY HIGH 5 FAMILY ENTERTAINMENT

COURTESY IRON WOLF RANCH & DISTILLERY

MAP NOT TO SCALE N TM; © 2020 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER CO. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

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7 Spicewood Community Library re- opened to the public May 20 at 1011 Spur 191, Spicewood. The library will continue to oer its book takeout service for pa- trons who prefer it. More details on how to check out books and the full catalog can be found on the library’s website. 830-693-7892. www.spicewoodlibrary.org 8 Twin Liquors unveiled new renova- tions at its location in Bee Cave’s H-E-B Shopping Center May 29. The liquor store, located at 12400 Hwy. 71, Bee Cave, expanded by nearly 1,000 square feet with the addition of a beer cooler and temperature-controlled wine room. 512-402-0333. www.twinliquors.com. CLOSINGS 9 Lucy’s Fried Chicken on May 14 permanently closed its lakeside location at 2900 N. RM 620, Austin. The Aus- tin-based restaurant opened in 2016 and served fried chicken, oysters and other Southern staples. Owner Alan Richard- son conrmed the closing in an email to Community Impact Newspaper . “With the COVID[-19] closures, it couldn’t have been worse timing for the Lake,” Richard- son said. “March and April generate the largest revenue for the entire year, and those sales in turn help get us through the slower winter months.” Lucy’s Fried Chicken still has two Austin locations on South Congress Avenue and Burnet Road as well as one in Cedar Park. The three re- maining locations are open to the public for dine-in seating at limited capacity due 10 Pier 1 Imports announced May 19 the closure of all locations, including the one in the Shops at the Galleria at 12700 Shops Parkway, Bee Cave. The closure will be complete when the company is able to sell its remaining inventory, ac- cording to a press release by Pier 1. Stores to the COVID-19 pandemic. www.lucysfriedchicken.com

temporarily closed due to COVID-19 will reopen for liquidation sales, according to the release. “We are grateful to our dedicated and hardworking associates, millions of customers and committed vendors who have collectively support- ed Pier 1 for decades,” Robert Riesbeck, Pier 1 chief executive ocer said in the release. 512-402-0479. www.pier1.com IN THE NEWS 11 Real estate technology company Compass Real Estate , located at 2500 Bee Caves Road, Austin, launched Austin Homes Live on May 19. Austin Homes Live is a virtual tour event simulator for prospective homebuyers. The inaugu- ral event took place live through the company’s newly formed website. Those who tuned in were privy to advice from 35 Compass agents who led sessions centered on buying historic homes, pricing strategies for sellers, waterfront properties and more. 512-575-3644. www.compass.com 12 As the COVID-19 pandemic hit the Austin area, Iron Wolf Ranch & Distill- ery pivoted to produce hand sanitizer along with its handcrafted spirits. In an eort to “protect their pack,” the Spicewood-based distillery, located at 101 CR 409, Spicewood, is oering hand san- itizer made from 80% alcohol antiseptic solution, according to co-founder Glenda Watters. For each 8-ounce bottle of hand sanitizer purchased by a customer, a bot- tle will be donated to an essential worker, Watters said. The business opened its outdoor area to the public May 1 with limited capacity. Iron Wolf’s temporary hours are from 4-7 p.m. Fridays, noon-8 p.m. Saturdays and noon-6 p.m. Sundays. Individual bottles of hand sanitizer are priced at $5.75, and bulk purchase of 60 bottles is available for $270. Customers may call for inquires. 512-970-3203. www.ironwolfranch.com

NOWOPEN 1 Anvil + Aura opened May 7 at the Hill Country Galleria at 12800 Hill Country Blvd., Ste. E-120, Bee Cave. The shop, located next door to Everything but Water, sells jewelry handmade in Austin by Andrea Moore and Tiva Rose. “Much of the collection is dened by original components that re-imagine and make wearable small wonders inspired by the natural world around us,” Rose said. “Our intention is to bridge the gap between fashion and ne jewelry while ultimately providing today’s savvy customer with original, desirable and attainable jewelry.” Materials include reclaimed diamonds and semi-precious stones set in 10 karat yel- low gold, sterling silver or ancient bronze. 737-222-5176. www.anvilanduara.com 2 Central Texas Pediatric Dentistry opened a new location in Lakeway in early June. The practice, led by husband-and- wife duo Dr. Steve Hernandez and Dr. Angie Hernandez, is located at 1008 S. RM 620, Ste. 201, Lakeway. 512-262-4966. www.ctpdkid.com 3 Total Wine & More opened a new Bee Cave location May 28 within the Hill Country Galleria. The Maryland-based liquor store chain replaces the former Twin Liquors location at 3925 Market St., Bee Cave. 512-827-0038. www.totalwine.com COMING SOON 4 Surf Thru Express Carwash is coming soon to 16600 Sweetwater Village Drive in Bee Cave. The national business is an express exterior carwash allowing customers to remain in their vehicles through the wash process. Surf Thru also

oers a free vacuum system for vehicle interiors and unlimited monthly wash membership options. “Surf Thru uses the best water saving technology available and prides itself for cleaning and purify- ing all wastewater to protect our water supply and rivers and streams,” a press release from the company states. Surf Thru captures the waste produced by ve- hicles, including gas, oil and brake uids, and sends it to hazardous waste facilities. Construction is set to begin in the middle of June with a completion date scheduled for the beginning of 2021. The location does not have a phone number at this time. www.surfthruexpress.com REOPENING 5 High 5 Family Entertainment Center , located at 1502 RM 620, Lakeway, reopened to guests May 29, according to information from Jenny Emley, High 5 Entertainment vice president of sales and marketing. Among other safety precautions put in place at the entertain- ment centers are QR codes that replaced menus on the table for guests to view from their phones, and the company installed a touchless handwashing station near the game room for easy access. 512-580-7469. www.bowlhighve.com 6 Ladies of Charity Lake Travis Thrift reopened at 1508 S. RM 620, Lakeway. The nonprot organization and boutique thrift shop opened May 11 for donations only and the following day for shopping. At this time the shop is accepting all do- nations except for furniture. All shoppers must wear masks and maintain a distance of 6 feet from other patrons and sta at all times. The shop is operating with lim- ited hours Tuesday through Friday from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 512-263-0314. www.laketravisthrift.com

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LAKE TRAVIS  WESTLAKE EDITION • JUNE 2020

TO-DO LIST

June and July events

JUNE 13

PETERSON BROTHERS VIRTUAL PERFORMANCE

JUNE 18

OUTDOORMOVIE NIGHT STAR HILL RANCH

JULY 12

FARMERSMARKET HILL COUNTRY GALLERIA

The Hill Country Galleria will conclude its virtual Saturday Night Concert series with a livestreamed performance by the Peterson Brothers. The free concert series hosted by Austin City Limits Radio traditionally takes place at the galleria’s main plaza. Due to coronavirus concerns, the performances have been moved to a virtual platform on ACL’s website. 7 p.m. Free. 512-263-0001. www.acl-radio.com

The community is invited to attend Star Hill Ranch for a free outdoor movie night hosted by the Lake Travis Film Festival. The event will feature a showing of “Homestate” by David Hickey, a film shot in Dripping Springs. Reservations may be made through the Lake Travis Film Festival’s Facebook page. 7:30-10:30 p.m. Free. Star Hill Ranch, 1500 Hamilton Pool Road, Bee Cave. 512-662-2232. www.laketravisfilmfestival.com

The Lone Star Farmers Market, featuring fresh produce and more than 40 local vendors, will take place at the Hill Country Galleria’s Central Plaza lawn. The recurring event will take place with several guidelines in place amid the coronavirus pandemic. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Hill Country Galleria, 12700 Hill Country Blvd., Bee Cave. 512-924-7503. www.lonestarfarmersmarket.com

JUNE 13 CONVERSATIONWITH POLLY HOLYOKE The Westbank Community Library will host an online event led by Polly Holyoke, author of “The Neptune Trilogy.” Holyoke

hold its discussion through Zoom on the second Wednesday of each month. Those interested in joining the club should contact the library for more information on how to sign up. 9:30 a.m. Free. Spicewood Community Library, 1011 Spur 191, Spicewood. 830-693-7892. www.spicewoodlibrary.org

will discuss the elements of a story and the importance of being specific when writing. Students will have the opportunity to improve their writing skills for state writing assessments. Registration is required through programs@westbanklibrary.com. 11 a.m. Free. Westbank Community Library, 1309

Westbank Drive, Austin. 512-327-3045. www.westbanklibrary.com 13 VIRTUAL BOOK CLUB The Spicewood Community Library officially reopened to the public May 20, but some events are still taking place virtually. The monthly book club will

in the h-e-b center bee cave & 71 Grand Re-Opening

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY AMY RAE DADAMO AND BRIAN RASH

13 LIVEMUSIC AT THE GNARLY GAR The Gnarly Gar on Lake Travis will host a live performance by the Texas- based Ryan Ross Band. The eatery is open to the public and is accommodating limited dine-in capacity due to concerns amid the coronavirus pandemic. 8:30- 11:30 p.m. Free. The Gnarly Gar, 18200 Lakepoint Cove, Point Venture. 512-267-1845. www.gnarlygar.com 16 LAUGHTER YOGA Instructor Simone Barnes will lead a virtual yoga session for the Westbank Community Library. The free yoga class will incorporate laughter and deep inhalation and exhalation practices. The class is available for participants of all ages who will learn techniques to feel more energetic and relaxed, according to the library. The class will be held through Zoom, and more information is available on the library’s website. 6 p.m. Free. Westbank Community Library, 1309 Westbank Drive, Austin. 512-327-3045. www.westbanklibrary.com 17 LEARNANEWLANGUAGE Westbank Library has launched a weekly virtual class centered on learning new languages. The class is suitable for those preparing for a trip, looking to refresh their language skills or wanting to learn something new, according to the

Westbank Library. The introduction to foreign languages class will also feature helpful tips and resources. The event will take place on Zoom with registration information available on the library’s event calendar. 3-4 p.m. Free. Westbank Community Library, 1309 Westbank Drive, Austin. 512-327-3045. www.westbanklibrary.com 18 SHADOWFACTORY PUPPETS EVENT The Bee Cave Public Library will host several virtual programs in collaboration with Lake Travis Community Library. The community is invited to enjoy a show for all ages by puppeteer Matt Sandbank, who will provide a backstage look at his work with puppets. The library remains closed to the public but will continue to offer a variety of digital resources. Information on how to register can be found on The Lake Travis Community Library website. 2-3 p.m. Free. Lake Travis Community Library, 1938 Lohmans Crossing Road, Austin. 512-263-2885. www.laketravislibrary.org 20 FOOD DRIVE The Shepard of the Hill Lutheran Church in West Lake Hills will host its Bread For All food drive event. The donation drive will be held in the church’s courtyard on Saturday mornings.

The event’s Zoom information can be found on the library’s event calendar, with tech support available. 5-6 p.m. Free. Westbank Community Library, 1309 Westbank Drive, Austin. 512-327-3045. www.westbanklibrary.com JULY 09 SINGING ZOOLOGIST The Lake Travis Community Library will host a virtual event featuring Lucas Miller, an Austin-based singing zoologist, who will celebrate wildlife with songs and humor, according to the library. Registration and Zoom information can be found on the library’s website. 2 p.m. Free. Lake Travis Community Library, 1938 Lohmans Crossing Road, Austin. 512-263-2885. www.laketravislibrary.org 11 SPANISH STORYTIME The Westbank Community Library will host a virtual Spanish storytime event every Saturday, including on July 11. Representatives of the Westbank Community Library said that Spanish language skills are not required to participate. 10 a.m. Free. Westbank Community Library, 1309 Westbank

Requested items include nonperishable food such as rice, peanut butter, beans and more. The church is also collecting fabric masks for clients and staff at the foster care organization Upbring Foster. 9-11 a.m. Free. Shepard of the Hills Lutheran Church, 3525 Bee Caves Road, Austin. 512-327-3370. www.shephills.org 25 PARENTING AND EDUCATION CONVERSATION The Westbank Community Library will host a discussion on parenting and educating children in grades kindergarten through 12th grade. Topics are focused on the psychology that informs the approach to raising and teaching children, according to a press release from the library. Educators and parents may attend. The event will be held via Zoom every Thursday with registration information available on the library’s website. 6-7 p.m. Free. Westbank Community Library, 1309 Westbank Drive, Austin. 512-327-3045. www.westbanklibrary.com 29 WRITINGWORKSHOP New and seasoned writers are invited to join the Westbank Community Library for a free writing workshop. The recurring event will take place through Zoom as the library remains closed to the public during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Drive, Austin. 512-327-3045. www.westbanklibrary.com

Find more or submit events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

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LAKE TRAVIS - WESTLAKE EDITION • JUNE 2020

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES Despite steadily rising trac counts, Hwy. 71 in western Travis County has been trending safer

BY BRIAN RASH

have enough [personal protective equipment] ... but we do now. Trac counts are up, and we’re writing anywhere from 12-20 tickets per day per deputy.” Suits said that rate of citation represents an increase that has been helped by a Travis County-funded pilot program that in late 2019 assigned two deputies to Hwy. 290 from Austin city limits to the Hays County line and added a deputy to Hwy. 71 from the Bee Cave’s western city limits to the western edge of Travis County. Short, who on behalf of Safer71 presented the TxDOT data to Bee Cave City Council in late May, said as of May 28 there have been zero deaths in 365 days on that stretch of Hwy. 71. Short said he believes the ocer enforcement presence has had an enormous impact on that gure. Short said Safer71 played a pivotal role in helping

Information from the Texas Department of Transportation as of late May shows while trac counts along Hwy. 71 where it meets RM 620 in western Travis County have risen steadily from 2015-20, the death rate on that road has also been dropping in that same time period. The numbers, taken from TxDOT’s Crash Records Information System and other department databases, show in 2014, the average daily traf- c count at that intersection stood at 36,788 automobiles. So far through the end of May, 2020 numbers show an average daily trac count of 59,926. In the same time period from 2014- 20, TxDOT data shows the average death rate along the roughly 15-mile stretch of Hwy. 71 from Southwest Parkway to the Blanco County line showed gradual increases until 2018, when it peaked at 0.15 deaths per

Data shows Hwy. 71 has become safer, including the number of crashes and injuries per week, according to the Texas Department of Transportation. (Community Impact Newspaper sta)

  I N DANGE R

Over the last couple of years, dangerous outcomes on the portion of Hwy. 71 in western Travis County from Southwest Parkway to the Blanco County line have diminished. These reductions come after several years of trending increases.

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week. By the end of 2019, that rate had dropped to 0.02 deaths per week. Also of note, crashes per week on that stretch of Hwy. 71 dropped from 3.54 in 2018 to 2.14 so far

“WE’REWRITINGUP PEOPLE WHOARE GOINGA LOT OVER THE SPEED LIMIT.” STACY SUITS, TRAVIS COUNTY PRECINCT 3 CONSTABLE

secure the funding for Travis County’s safety pilot program, which amounted to a $530,290 allocation in its 2019-20 budget, and he is grateful to be seeing positive

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Crashes per week Injuries per week Serious injuries per week Deaths per week

0.5 0.0 1.5 1.0 2.5 2.0 3.0 3.5 4.0

in 2020, and for those same parame- ters, injuries per week dropped from 1.44 to 0.62. Greg Short, the president of Safer71, a trac safety advocacy group formed in 2018 following the death of a western Travis County res- ident on Hwy. 71, said he commends several entities for their work in helping to diminish trac accidents along that road, including the Bee Cave Police Department, the Texas Department of Public Safety and Travis County Precinct 3 Constable Stacy Suits. “We’re real pleased with the eorts out here,” Suits said of trac enforcement along Hwy. 71 and added the time period from late March to early April is an anomaly in terms of limited ocer presence because there were fewer cars on the road due to the onset of restrictions brought about by the COVID-19 pandemic. “We backed o for a couple of weeks because we didn’t

results come from the eort, espe- cially with regard to diminishing deaths and injuries. Adding context to the increased ocer presence and enforcement on Hwy. 71, Suits also emphasized the increase in citations to drivers in the last few months is not a result of ticketing motorists for what he described as minor violations. Rather, those driving dangerously and endangering themselves and others have predominately been the targets of ticketing along the western stretch of the road. “We’re writing up people [who are] going a lot over the speed limit,” Suits said. “Which means they’re weaving in and out of trac, and they’re not able to stop at stoplights ... because they’re driving too damn fast.” ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF MAY 26. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT LTWNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020 *

YEAR

   Since 2014, the daily trac count at Hwy. 71 where it meets RM 620 has increased steadily. 2014 36,788

46,771

2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 *

48,530 48,884

51,884

54,478

59,926

*DATA FROM 2020 IS THROUGH MAY 26

SOURCE: TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

13

LAKE TRAVIS  WESTLAKE EDITION • JUNE 2020

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

DEVELOPMENT UPDATES

Projects underway in Lake Travis-Westlake

Bee Cave officials approve changes to large multiuse development dubbed The Backyard

BY BRIAN RASH

The planned development district, or PDD, that will contain a high-capacity entertainment venue called The Backyard will have additional changes after Bee Cave City Council on May 26 approved amendments on zoning and development standards for the roughly 35-acre project. The Backyard will be located between Bee Cave Parkway and Hwy. 71, just west of RM 620 and Bee Cave Central Park. A previous amendment to the PDD came in March 2019, and information from the city states that version of the approved project included an outdoor event venue, a 125-room hotel with an exhibit hall and meeting space, oces, parking garages and a hilltop garden. The changes council approved for the development during the May 26 meeting include renaming the project’s music venue to an event venue, increasing that venue’s maximum capacity to 3,700 from 3,410 by adjusting the denition of an “attendee” and allowing a maximum noise level of 75 decibels within a 5,000-foot radius of the venue. The new PDD agreement states Willie Way, a planned road connecting to Bee Cave Parkway that will run through The Backyard, will become a public road. With regard to parking, the new agreement allows for satellite services to be connected to the devel- opment via a shuttle service, which city sta stated “mitigates potential increased trac” during peak attendance times. Changes also include replacing what was going to be a single large restaurant space with a food, beverage and retail village integrated into the design of the event venue that will provide a more contin- uous array of options for the community at large, according to city information. The approved amendment broadens the timeline for completion of the development to three to seven years. During public comment on the agenda item,

complaints were levied against the development about parking, lighting, noise and access to The Backyard. Adrian Overstreet, the owner of Bee Cave Sonesta Austin Hotel who also owns what is called the Target tract of land north of the proposed development, said parking will likely bleed into his properties and wants those issues addressed before the amendment is agreed to by city ocials. Former Bee Cave Mayor Monty Parker, who throughout 2018 and into 2019 was instrumental in helping broker one of the most recent development agreements between the city of Bee Cave and The Backyard, oered an endorsement of the proposed amendment, saying now is the time to advance the long-awaited project. Developers for the project said that due to con- cerns raised by Bee Cave residents, they wanted to request expediting construction of one of the parking structures to the same time as construction of the event venue. Some conditions were attached to council’s nal vote to approve the proposed amendments, including updating timing of Garage P2 to Phase 2 of construction. City Manager Clint Garza said the next step for the project will see the developers submitting a site plan, which he anticipates to happen in June or July. The city will need to agree to an acceptable plan for shared parking outside of The Backyard prior to accepting the site plan, Garza said.

Vandegrift High School construction projects could face some delays Upgrades to Vandegrift High School could be nished after the targeted August completion date. (Brian Perdue/Community Impact Newspaper)

BY BRIAN PERDUE

While upgrades remain on schedule at Steiner Ranch Elementary School, Vandegrift High School’s more extensive upgrades and additions may not be completed in time for the 2020-21 school year. Although LISD ocials said there is no guaran- tee the district’s campuses will even be open in August, construction, funded mostly from the 2017 school bond, continues across the district. Jimmy Disler, LISD’s chief facilities and opera- tions ocer, said May 14 that coronavirus concerns have slowed VHS construction inspections by the city of Austin, potentially jeopardizing August completion dates of some VHS projects. City of Austin spokesperson Robbie G. Searcy said in a May 19 email that there have been no inspections delays at VHS due to coronavirus, but added some inspections required by other departments can take longer due to the nature of the work. While the new agricultural center should be completed on time, Vandegrift’s classroom addi- tions and incubator renovation are taking longer than projected, he said. KEY UPGRADES AT LISD Funding for upgrades to Vandegrift High School and other campuses within Leander ISD comes from a $454.4 million school bond that district voters passed in 2017. Some of the projects include: Additions/renovations to increase capacity at VHS: $29,548,592 Construct secure vestibules for all schools and alternative schools: $7,749,328 Design, mitigation costs for secondary access road for VHS and Four Points Middle School: $3 million Expand grandstands for Monroe Stadium: $1.1 million Renovate career and technical education classrooms for Cedar Park and Leander high schools: $11,711,919 SOURCE: LEANDER ISDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

OnMay 26, Bee Cave City Council approved changes to the development agreement for The Backyard. (Rendering courtesy city of Bee Cave) Prior to changes approved May 26, the last amendment to the planned development district known as The Backyard in west Bee Cave took place in March 2019. Some of the adjustments for the newest iteration of the project include: CHANGES TO THE BACKYARD

• changing the description of the music venue to the event venue; • replacing the former single large restaurant space with an integrated food, retail and beverage village integrated into the design of the event venue; • increasing the capacity for the main event venue from 3,410 to 3,700; • requiring a maximum noise level of 75 decibels within a 5,000-foot radius of the event venue; and • changing Willie Way, a road that will run through the development, to a public road.

THE BACKYARD Food, beverage, retail area Event venue area Hilltop garden area

Hotel area Oce area

N

SOURCE: CITY OF BEE CAVECOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

15

LAKE TRAVIS  WESTLAKE EDITION • JUNE 2020

STAY SAFE IN THE SUN!

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

EDUCATION BRIEFS

News from Eanes, Lake Travis & Leander ISDs

Eanes ISDmay freeze salaries or give up to a 2%raise for 202021

District teachers of the year named for Lake Travis ISD

Idalia Gannonwas announced as LTISD’s 2019- 20 Elementary School Teacher of the Year.

BY AMY RAE DADAMO

would consequently have an eect on class sizes. Leonard conrmed that as of the May 26 meeting, EISD has not laid o any sta members due to the corona- virus. Furthermore, sta reductions will not always result in layos as the district experiences annual attrition. Trustees, including board Presi- dent Jennifer Champagne, said they are cautious heading into the 2020-21 school year. If the district is permit- ted to reopen schools, there could be signicant costs associated with sanitizing or other guidelines related to the pandemic, Champagne said. In contrast, trustee Christie Bybee recommended a 2% salary increase and pushed EISD to remain competi- tive with neighboring districts. “One percent doesn’t sit right with me,” Bybee said, adding that the district could consider a one-time bonus. Chief Financial Ocer Chris Scott estimated a 1% increase would be a $500 annual increase or an additional $40 per paycheck for the average employee. The board will revisit the discus- sion at the June meeting.

BY AMY RAE DADAMO

EANES ISD Facing a budget short- fall, the Eanes ISD board of trustees could take a scally conservative approach in recommending salary adjustments, as ocials discussed potential adjustments during a May 26 board meeting. Though a nal decision was not reached, trustees are leaning toward freezing salaries or providing a 1% increase for the 2020-21 school year. The board approved a 4.5% raise across the board for the 2019-20 school year, which Superintendent Tom Leonard said was a stretch on the budget. Neighboring districts, including Lake Travis ISD, approved higher raises; however, trustees noted House Bill 3 provided LTISD with signicantly more assistance. “I would rather do 0% than have to reduce sta next year,” trustee James Spradley said. “As much as I would like to give a raise, I dislike reduc- tions even more.” Spradley, along with a majority of trustees, said he felt increasing salaries under the current budget constraints would create sta reductions. Potential layos in sta

LAKE TRAVIS ISD Lake Travis ISD ocials announced the dis- trict’s 2019-20 teachers of the year during the May 20 board meeting. Teachers were nominated by their peers for displaying exceptional dedication in their job. Selected teachers are considered knowl- edgeable and skilled educators who inspire students of all backgrounds and abilities to learn. In April, one educator from each campus was selected and announced as a campus teacher of the year. Out of those, two teachers were recognized as the LTISD elementary and secondary school teachers of the year. Idalia Gannon, a fth-grade dual-language teacher at Lake

Shannon Aguirre was announced as LTISD’s Secondary Teacher of the Year.

Travis Elementary School, is LTISD’s 2019-20 Elementary Teacher of the Year. Shannon Aguirre, a Latin teacher at Lake Travis High School, is the 2019-20 Secondary Teacher of the Year. The two Teacher of the Year award recipients will represent the district in the regional and state Texas Teacher of the Year program.

Summer recreational programs suspended; summer school moved to online platform

BY AMY RAE DADAMO

All meetings will be held virtually until further notice Eanes ISD board of trustees Meets on the fourth Tuesday at 6 p.m. at 601 Camp Craft Road, West Lake Hills www.eanesisd.net Lake Travis ISD board of trustees Meets on the third Wednesday at 6 p.m. at 607 N. RM 620, Lakeway www.ltisdschools.org Leander ISD board of trustees Meets on the third and fourth Thursday at 200 S. Vista Ridge Blvd., Cedar Park www.leanderisd.org For instant coverage of these meetings, follow us on Twitter: @impactsnews_ltw MEETINGSWE COVER programming in July,” Lancaster wrote. Questions should be directed toward campus principals or the district’s oce of community programs, according to district information.

LAKE TRAVIS ISD Due to con- tinued uncertainty caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, Lake Travis ISD students attending the aca- demic summer school session will do so through an online platform, according to a May 7 letter from Superintendent Brad Lancaster. Additionally, school-run recre- ational and child care programs will be suspended until June 30, with refunds being processed for those previously enrolled. “We acknowledge the hardship this places on parents to nd other child care services,” Lancaster wrote. “We also recognize the impact on our many instructors and coaches who earn additional income through our summer programs.” Until then, the district will be closely monitoring the situation and will determine whether programs can resume in July. “We will assess whether or not our district can safely and feasibly oer some level of recreational

Bruce Gearing speaks Aug. 15, 2019 after the Leander ISD board of trustees voted to make him the district’s next superintendent. (Brian Perdue/Community Impact Newspaper)

Despite governor allowing schools to reopen, LISDplans remote learning for summer school

BY BRIAN PERDUE

recommendations from the Texas Department of State Health Services were followed. “At this time, we don’t plan to oer anything in person in the month of June,” Gearing told LISD trustees May 19, adding sta is working on at least four scenarios for instruction when the 2020-21 school year starts.

LEANDER ISD Ocials will continue with a plan to use remote learning during summer school, according to Superintendent Bruce Gearing. On May 18, Gov. Greg Abbott gave schools permission to hold in-person summer school sessions starting June 1 as long as social distancing

17

LAKE TRAVIS  WESTLAKE EDITION • JUNE 2020

18

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY& COUNTY

News from Bee Cave, Lakeway, Rollingwood & West Lake Hills

Bee Cave ocials begin investigation of Council Member Bill Goodwin

BY BRIAN RASH

COVID-19 pandemic. Council Member Andrew Clark, who created the May 18 agenda item calling for an initiation of the inves- tigation, invoked several sections of the city charter that allow for ocials

exchange that his email essentially exonerates him because the verbiage within it shows he was aware he has no authority to require anything of city sta members. Prior to Bee Cave City Council’s May 12 regular meet- ing, at which Goodwin was sworn into oce for his new two-year term, Goodwin was still undecided as to whether he would return to the oce he resigned from in early April. That resignation came following the assertions of Goodwin’s misconduct. Regarding the new two-year council term beginning in May, Goodwin had already received the position in February because no one ran against him, and that appointment is not connected to previous term’s resignation.

members stated they have been put in a position in which they have no choice but to investigate—that it is warranted and required because of a March 28 statement made by Goodwin during a public meeting in which he seemingly

BEE CAVE City Council voted to initiate proceedings that will likely result in an investigation into City Council Member Bill Goodwin. The motion during the May 18 special called meeting authorized City Manager Clint Garza to seek outside counsel and then submit a proposal to council on the scope of an investigation into whether Goodwin’s actions violated Bee Cave’s home rule city charter. “I am really feeling like this is just a vicious, vindictive political takedown,” Goodwin said. “I am not going to lie down for this. You all are on notice that you better have a lot

to determine if a council member has levied conduct that qualies them for forfeiture of oce. One specic sec- tion within the city charter states “No

“I AMREALLY FEELING LIKE THIS IS JUST A VICIOUS, VINDICTIVE POLITICAL TAKEDOWN.”

acknowledged he violated the spirit of the city charter through an email he sent to Garza on March 21. That email

BILL GOODWIN, BEE CAVE CITY COUNCIL MEMBER

Member of the Council, including the Mayor, shall give orders to any subordinate of the City Manager, either publicly or privately.” Goodwin said during a heated

insisted City Council members and Bee Cave sta attend a March 24 City Council meeting in person and was seen by many who read it as a dangerous request amid the growing

of faith in your city attorney.” Jon Cobb and other council

THE ROAD TO INVESTIGATION Bee Cave City Council voted May 18 to investigate the actions of Council Member Bill Goodwin. As of press time, a date for when the scope of the investigation will be submitted remains unclear. MARCH APRIL MAY JUNE

May 12: Because no one challenged his seat, Goodwin is sworn into new term as a City Council member

May 18: City Council votes to investigate Goodwin

March 21: Goodwin sends email stating he expects sta to be in attendance at a March 24 City Council meeting

March 24: Council Member Jon Cobb calls for a vote for Goodwin’s removal as mayor pro tem

March 28: Goodwin resigns as Bee Cave mayor pro tem

April 1: Goodwin resigns from City Council

SOURCE: CITY OF BEE CAVECOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Rollingwood ocials approve budget calendar for city’s scal year 202021

BY AMY RAE DADAMO

May 20 meeting. The calendar was based on the timeline historically utilized by the city, according to Council Member Gavin Massingill. The approved budget calendar is scheduled out as follows:

ROLLINGWOOD Approaching bud- get season, Rollingwood City Council unanimously voted to approve the tentative budget and tax rate calen- dar for scal year 2020-21 during a

Darin Walker

Brian Plunkett

Linda Anthony

West LakeHillsMayor Linda Anthony and two council members sworn in

APPROVEDBUDGET CALENDAR

June 17: council will hold rst budget workshop to review the base budget July 6: council must submit all exceptional items or additional funding July 15: council will host second budget workshop July 25: city will receive certied estimates from Travis Central Appraisal District July 27: Rollingwood will communicate to Travis County that the city will be using the certied

estimate provided by the district Aug. 7: city will publish a

BY AMY RAE DADAMO

election as all three city ocials were running unopposed. Council elections are held on the rst Saturday in May every year. Elections for mayor, Place 2 and Place 4 occur during even-numbered years, and elections for Places 1, 3 and 5 occur in odd-numbered years, according to city information. The next regularly scheduled general election is May 1, 2021.

West Lake Hills Mayor Linda Anthony and Council Members Brian Plunkett, Place 2, and Darin Walker, Place 4, will continue to serve as city ocials. Anthony, Plunkett and Walker were sworn in during a virtual coun- cil meeting May 13, with the action item passing unanimously. Council voted Feb. 27 to cancel the

website notice for the community Aug. 14: city secretary will present nal budget draft Aug. 19: city will hold its third budget workshop to hold public hearings and vote on the proposed tax rate Sept. 16: nal budget workshop will be held on the FY 2020-21 budget and tax rate

SOURCE: CITY OF ROLLINGWOODCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

19

LAKE TRAVIS  WESTLAKE EDITION • JUNE 2020

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