Georgetown Edition | July 2020

GEORGETOWN EDITION

REAL ESTATE

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2020EDITION

VOLUME 13, ISSUE 11  JULY 24AUG. 20, 2020

PUSHING PAST THE PANDEMIC

Georgetown’s real estate industry survivesCOVID19 largelyunscathed

Williamson County Realtors data shows while the Georgetown real estate market took a hit in the rst months of the coronavirus pandemic, year-over-year growth returned in June, though the season also aects the market. Housing trends impact tax rates for city and district tax payers.

BY ALI LINAN

County Judge Bill Gravell’s decision to deem real estate as an essential indus- try as well as the county clerk’s oce’s recent move to an electronic ling sys- tem and Gov. Greg Abbott’s decision to allow electronic notarization. With- out these, he said, the outcome would have been dierent. “These activities by the government, coupled with Williamson County Real- tors acting both prudently and practi- cally in how they conducted business, helped to make sure that the impact on consumers here was minimized,” Hutchinson said. “While there was cer- tainly a year-over-year drop, the data would have been tragically and expo- nentially worse if not for the collective eort of these decision-makers.” CONTINUED ON 26

City of Georgetown

Georgetown ISD

Georgetown resident Miranda Brad- ley sold her old house and bought a new one in late March, right as the coronavi- rus pandemic was ramping up. She said though there were a few hic- cups, for the most part it was smooth sailing—a parallel to the Georgetown real estate market as a whole during the rst fewmonths of the pandemic. While most businesses halted and industries scrambled to minimize the damage, Georgetown’s real estate indus- try remained largely intact, and market prices remained at their current worth even as people stayed in. Bryan Hutchinson, CEO of William- son County Realtors, said the minimal damage canbe attributed toWilliamson

350

$350,000

300

$300,000

250

$250,000

200

$200,000

150

$150,000

100

$100,000

50

$50,000

0

$0

SOURCE: WILLIAMSON COUNTY REALTORSCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER January June May April March February

Residents and tourists alike gather on the George- town Square to enjoy art, music and events. Now they can expect to have an additional, aesthetically pleasing yet functional communal space downtown. Plans for the new City Center are underway. The unication project overseen by the city aims to encompass several blocks, according to Georgetown Facilities Director Eric Johnson. The cohesive space City Center project aims to unify sectionof downtown BY SALLY GRACE HOLTGRIEVE

would form a rectangle between West Street to Rock Street and between Eighth Street to Ninth Street. Chamber of Commerce President Jim Johnson said the city’s continued improvements and enhance- ments to downtown show a plan that provides addi- tional beautication to the downtown area. “Additionally, these projects are destination-cen- tered areas, which ideally will oer opportunities for consumers to visit and shop with our businesses in this area and lead to their economic success,” he said. City Council approved the project’s rst steps at the end of May—two items totaling $55,760. CONTINUED ON 32

New green and gathering spaces will be added as part of a city initiative. (Rendering courtesy city of Georgetown)

X SPONSOREDBY • Brohn Homes • Georgetown ISD • San Gabriel Builders MARKET AT A GLANCE 2020 EDI T ION REAL ESTATE

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