Franklin - Brentwood Edition - January 2021

CITY&COUNTY

Updates on the biggest issues facing local entities

2 0 2 1 S P E C I A L E D I T I O N

OTHER STORIES TO FOLLOW IN 2021

TOP CITY & COUNTY STORIES OF 2021

Entities to hold local elections The cities of Brentwood and Franklin will both hold elections in 2021, according to the Williamson County Election Commission. Williamson County and school board elections will be held in August 2022. Brentwood The city will hold elections May 4 to select three city commissioners. Commissioners serve for four years in at-large positions. The top three vote-getters from among all the candidates will win positions on the commission. The deadline to register to vote is April 5, and early voting will run from April 14-29. Franklin The city will host ward elections Oct. 26 to selected alderpersons for Wards 1, 2, 3 and 4. Alderpersons serve staggered four-year terms, according to the city. Ward alderpersons must reside in the area they represent. Decision on Williamson County seal In September, Williamson County voted to recommend the removal of the Confederate ag from the county seal, an action that authorizes the county to petition the Tennessee Historic Commission to vote on where it can be removed. Should the commission vote to allow the county to remove the waiver, the county would reconvene to decide what a new version of the seal will look like. As of press time Jan. 12, the THC had meetings scheduled for Feb. 18-19. Vacant seat on Franklin Board of Mayor and Aldermen Following the passing of Alderperson Pearl Bransford in November, the city has begun discussions on how best to ll her seat on the board. According to the city charter, the city can opt to leave the seat vacant, appoint an individual to serve the rest of the term—slated to expire in 2023—or hold a special election to ll the seat. As of press time on the afternoon of Jan. 12, the city was scheduled to discuss how to proceed but had not yet made a decision. For the latest updates, visit communityimpact.com. The county seal was adopted in 1968. (Wendy Sturges/Community Impact Newspaper)

VACCINE DISTRIBUTION The Williamson County Health Department has begun distributing COVID-19 vaccines in accordance with the Tennessee COVID-19 Vaccine Plan, which will run through 2021.

2020 Q4

2021 Q1

2021 Q2

2021 Q3

2021 Q4

75+ 65+

55+

45+

35+

25+

16+

Phase 1A1: Front- line workers, rst responders, long- term care facilities Phase 1A2: All other health care workers

Phase 1B: K-12 school and child care sta Phase 1C: High-risk individuals age 16 and older

Phase 2A: Critical infrastructure employees in social services, food production and public transit

Phase 2B: Transportation and critical utilities

Phase 3: Workers in grocery stores and corrections

Simultaneous age- based criteria phase

SOURCES: WILLIAMSON COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT, TENNESSEE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTHCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Williamson County begins COVID19 vaccine rollout

BY WENDY STURGES

February—and to allow local counties to begin vaccinating residents age 75 and older. As of press time Jan. 12, the county is only vaccinating individuals in Phases 1A1 and 1A2, which include front-line workers, rst responders, health care workers, and sta and residents in long-term care facilities. The county has also begun working to vaccinate residents age 75 and older, although vaccines are based on supply. Those who do not qualify for specic work-based phases will receive the vaccine based on their age range, accord- ing to the TDH. A waitlist for eligible phases was launched in the county Jan. 7.

Following emergency use approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, the Williamson County Health Department began distributing two forms of a vaccine for COVID-19 in accordance with Tennessee’s COVID-19 Vaccination Plan. Starting in late December, health care workers and rst responders, including those at Williamson Medical Center, began receiving the vaccine. However, on Dec. 30, the Tennessee Department of Health announced it would update its plan to allow for teachers to be included in Phase 1B—expected to begin in

Citymoves forward with Southeast Municipal Complex

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BY WENDY STURGES

The new facility will open this spring. (Wendy Sturges/Community Impact Newspaper)

The Franklin Board of Mayor and Aldermen held a special meeting Dec. 30 to approve a $9.3 million for the Southeast Municipal Complex, a new park to be located east of I-65 near Carothers Parkway. The 180-acre park is slated to be complete in 2024-25 and will feature multipurpose elds, sports and exercise areas, and an inclusive play- ground with accessible equipment for people with disabilities.

NewBrentwoodPoliceDepartment headquarters to open this spring

BY WENDY STURGES

facilities, such as a tness room and a rearms range. The headquarters will also include a community room, which will allow ocers to interact with the public. In December, the Brentwood City Commission approved a number of purchases for the new headquarters, including communi- cations and computer equipment, a ngerprint scan machine, tness equipment and internet infrastructure. The facility is slated to be opened this spring.

Construction work is wrapping up on Brentwood’s largest project to date: a 56,000-square-foot headquarters for the city’s police department. Ocials broke ground on the $29 million project Sept. 11, kicking o a monthslong project to con- struct a new facility. When complete, the new facility—located on Heritage Way near the Williamson County Indoor Sports Complex—will feature more oce space as well as training

HARPETH RIVER

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FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • JANUARY 2021

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