Franklin - Brentwood Edition - January 2021

2021 FRANKLIN BRENTWOOD EDITION

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A N N U A L C O M M U N I T Y G U I D E

VOLUME 2, ISSUE 11  JAN. 18FEB. 14, 2021

TOP STORY TO WATCH IN 2021

WCS, state address eects of COVID19 Early test results show losses in reading, math for young students

Ocials with Williamson County Schools and the Tennessee Department of Education are working to identify and remediate learning loss caused by school closures and changes related to the coronavirus pandemic. Preliminary data shows prociency in reading and math has decreased, particularly for younger students. Identifying learning issues

Local losses In fall assessments,

4.0% in reading 2.6% overall

7.0% in math 3.6% for online students

First-graders showed

Middle school prociency rates dropped

BY WENDY STURGES

WCS ocials found that students had seen losses in prociency in math and reading as compared to assessments from 2019. Statewide statistics State ocials and education experts have said these learning losses are present across Tennessee. prociency in math. prociency in reading. 67% 66%

Passing rates for high schools in the rst quarter of 2020-21 dropped by

While many students have returned to on-cam- pus learning in the past several months, they have also been subject to learning loss due to pandemic- related school closures in early 2020, which has prompted local and state ocials to take action in 2021. According to preliminary data from assess- ments given to students in the fall, Williamson County Schools ocials calculated that some students have lost as much as 9% prociency in reading and math as a result of school clo- sure last spring. This number is lower than the 50%-65% decreases estimated by the Tennes- see Department of Education ocials in Sep- tember; however, local ocials said, there is still catching up to do. “We haven’t seen nearly that kind of loss in our students, but we have seen some that denitely need to be addressed,” WCS Superintendent Jason Golden said. CONTINUED ON 14

Enrollment in K-12 public schools dropped by

3.5%

1 in 3 third-graders can read at their appropriate grade level.

4 of 5 students had fewer in-person days than in a typical school year.

(or 33,000 students ) in 2020-21.

19%

fewer students enrolled in community college in 2020 than in 2019.

SOURCES: WILLIAMSON COUNTY SCHOOLS, TENNESSEE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION, STATE COLLABORATIVE ON REFORMING EDUCATIONCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

ANNUAL COMMUNITY GUIDE 2021

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

CONTENTS

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

IMPACTS

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Now Open, Coming Soon &more TODO LIST

MARKET TEAM EDITOR Wendy Sturges

FROMLACY: I know many of us are happy to see 2021 and to bid a not-so-fond farewell to 2020. However, many of the hardships that have hit our community in recent months are still present. Our Annual Community Guide features some of the top issues we’ll be keeping a close eye on in 2021, including development, education and the coronavirus pandemic. We hope this issue helps guide you through the new year. Lacy Klasel, PUBLISHER

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Annual events in 2021

SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNER Lindsay Scott ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Maureen Sipperley METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Lacy Klasel, lklasel@communityimpact.com MANAGING EDITOR Matt Stephens ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Aubrey Galloway CORPORATE LEADERSHIP PUBLISHERS AND FOUNDERS John and Jennifer Garrett GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Warner CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES DIRECTOR Tess Coverman WHOWE ARE John and Jennifer Garrett began Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 in Pugerville, TX. The company’s mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Today, we operate across ve metropolitan areas, providing hyperlocal, nonpartisan news produced by our full-time journalists in each community we serve. BECOMEA#COMMUNITYPATRON

ANNUAL COMMUNITY GUIDE

COMMUNITY DATA

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Statistics for Franklin, Brentwood

FROMWENDY: While this was a hard year for many businesses, the Franklin and Brentwood areas still had a large number of new shops and restaurants open in 2020. If you are looking to continue supporting local shops and eateries, our shopping and dining listings (see Page 8) feature several notable businesses that opened last year, plus a few that are coming in 2021. Wendy Sturges, EDITOR

SHOPPING AND DINING 8 Retailers and restaurants that opened in 2020, are coming in 2021

THIS ISSUE BY THE NUMBERS

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TRANSPORTATION

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Local road projects to watch in 2021

Local sources

New businesses

Community events

Shopping and dining listings

BUSINESS FEATURE

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FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • JANUARY 2021

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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MARYLAND WAY

BRENTWOOD

Restoration Hardware

The Learning Experience

WENDY STURGESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

COURTESY THE LEARNING EXPERIENCE

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NOWOPEN 1 Cae Artisan held a soft opening in late December at 1113 Murfreesboro Road, Ste. 254, Franklin, near Painted Tree Marketplace. The cafe oers a selection of pastries, sandwiches, soups and coee drinks. 615-547-3400. www.caeartisan.com 2 Corner Pub held a grand opening Jan. 4 in the Cool Springs area at 9200 Carothers Parkway, Ste. 100, Franklin, in the former location of Franklin Abbey. The pub, which also operates locations in Franklin, Brentwood and Nashville, oers craft beer, wine and cocktails as well as a food menu with burgers, sandwiches, salads and entrees. 615-435-3951. www.cornerpubtn.com 3 Chrysalis Modern Italian opened in early January at 9040 Carothers Park- way, Ste. A201, Franklin. The full-service, casual dining space oers Italian classics, such as saltimbocca, osso buco, eggplant parmigiana and bruschetta as well as an antipasti menu, a wine list and house cocktails. 615-472-1712. www.chrysalis-modern.com 4 Restoration Hardware held a grand opening for RH Outlet on Dec. 16 at 1626 Galleria Blvd., Brentwood, according to a company spokesperson. The store oers furniture, rugs and other home decor items. This is the second Middle Tennes- see location for the company. 615-815-1974. www.rh.com 5 The Hangout at Brentwood Nutrition opened in November at 7020 E. Church St., Ste. 10, Brentwood. The smoothie shop oers protein shakes,

energy drinks, teas and gluten-free items. 615-873-1041. www.thehangoutatbrentwood.com Franklin-based business Five Point Consulting opened in December to serve the Williamson County and Greater Nashville area. Owners Bryce and Callie Mooney oer talent sourcing and recruit- ing services for businesses and individu- als. An oce location is expected to open in the future. 503-349-3949. https://vepoint.consulting COMING SOON 6 Volunteer State Bank will open a new location in the Cool Springs area at 101 International Drive, Ste. 100, Franklin, in the former location of First Advantage Bank. The branch location, slated to open in February, oers personal and business banking services. Volunteer State Bank also operates a location in Brentwood. www.volstatebank.com 7 A new location of The Learning Expe- rience will open at 201 Swanson Branch Way, Franklin, near Columbia Avenue. The early childhood education center oers programs for children ages six weeks to six years. An opening date has not been announced. The Learning Experience also operates locations in Murfreesboro, Mt. Juliet and Hendersonville. 615-551-1198. www.thelearningexperience.com/center/ franklin-tn-shadow-green 8 Nashville-based eatery Waldo’s Chicken & Beer is slated to open Jan. 25 in Liberty Station at 1201 Liberty Pike, Franklin. The eatery oers fried chick- en dishes, such as chicken and biscuits,

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COMPILED BY WENDY STURGES

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Waldo’s Chicken & Beer

Visit Franklin

WENDY STURGESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

COURTESY VISIT FRANKLIN

Williamson County ’s mask mandate has been extended through Feb. 27 following a Dec. 28 declaration from Williamson County Mayor Rogers Anderson. The order comes as active coronavirus case counts in Williamson County have risen above the levels seen during the spring and summer, according to data from the Tennessee Department of Health. The same exceptions to the previous mandate will apply, including for those who cannot wear a mask due to health conditions and for residents who are outdoors, as long as they are able to stay 6 feet away from others. Exemptions also apply to residents age 12 and younger; however, they do not apply to students on school grounds, as both Williamson County Schools and Franklin Special School Dis- trict have face mask requirements. www.williamsoncounty-tn.gov

sandwiches, salads and chicken tenders with signature sauces. Waldo’s also fea- tures a beer menu with local craft beer on tap. www.waldoschicken.com IN THE NEWS 9 Visit Franklin announced Jan. 5 that Ellie Westman Chin will depart the local tourism board eective Jan. 29 to move to Madison, Wisconsin. Since Westman Chin began with the organization in 2016, Williamson County has seen a 48% increase in visitors to over 1.81 mil- lion annually, and visitor spending in the county has grown to $497.2 million, an increase of almost $90 million each year since 2014, according to Visit Franklin. 400 Main Street, Ste. 200, Franklin. 615-591-8514. www.visitfranklin.com

Culaccino Italian Restaurant + Bar opened in Franklin in early January. COURTESY CULACCINO ITALIAN RESTAURANT + BAR, VICTORIA ROSA

FEATURED IMPACT NOWOPEN Culaccino Italian Restaurant + Bar opened Jan. 8 in Harpeth Square at 104 E. Main St., Franklin. The eatery, headed by Executive Chef Frank Pullara, oers wood-red pizzas, house-made pastas and other Italian dishes. The restaurant also includes an outdoor patio and bar with re pits as well as a wine list, local craft beers and seasonal cocktails, such as South for the Winter, made with aged rum, toasted coconut and pineapple. 615-435-3539. www.culaccinotn.com

The eatery features Italian fare, small plates and cocktails.

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FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • JANUARY 2021

TO-DO LIST

Annual events scheduled for 2021

COMPILED BY WENDY STURGES

Destinations W H I L E D I S T A N C I N G Although many local venues may have changed policies due to the coronavirus pandemic, there are a number of local venues residents can enjoy while practicing safe social distancing from other visitors. Natchez Trace National Scenic Trail History buffs can hike a portion of the 450-mile trail once traveled by settlers, American Indians and enslaved persons. A 20-mile portion of the trail, known as the Highland Rim section, is managed by the National Park Service. The Park at Harlinsdale Farm This 200-acre park is home to a historic horse farm as well as hiking trails, a dog park, a 5K track and a catch-and-release fishing pond. The city of Franklin Park is open from dawn to dusk daily. Marcella Vivrette Smith Park Named for the family of Marcella and Reese Smith, this 400-acre park features six miles of hiking trails, a playground, multipurpose athletic fields and the historic Ravenswood Mansion, which was built in 1825.

Williamson County saw a large number of events canceled in 2020 as local and state leaders cautioned against large gatherings due to the coronavirus pandemic. However, many organizers are hoping to bring events back in 2021. While all events included were confirmed as of press time, dates are subject to change as well as cancellations.

APRIL 24 AND 25

SEPTEMBER 25 AND 26

a cocktail hour, dinner and dancing. 6 p.m.-midnight. Ticket pricing TBD. 1368 Eastern Flank Circle, Franklin. www.williamsonheritage.org 30 PUMPKINFEST Williamson County’s annual fall festival returns with food, vendors and family-friendly live entertainment. The event will be held along Franklin’s Main Street, centered around a traditional pumpkin display. 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Free (admission). Downtown Franklin. www.williamsonheritage.org DECEMBER 11 AND 12 DICKENS OF A CHRISTMAS Franklin’s annual holiday festival celebrating the Christmas season with a Dickensian theme, held in downtown Franklin, features roughly 200 musicians, dancers and characters from the classic work of Charles Dickens, such as “A Christmas Carol” and “Oliver Twist.” 10 a.m.-7 p.m. (Sat.), 11 a.m.-4 p.m. (Sun.). Free (admission). Downtown Franklin. www.williamsonheritage.org

MAIN STREET FESTIVAL The Heritage Foundation of Williamson County hosts this annual event celebrating shopping and history in downtown Franklin. The event will feature food, shopping, entertainment and activities. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. (both days). Free (admission). Main Street, 106 Third Ave. N., Franklin. www.williamsonheritage.org. AUGUST 06 THROUGH 14 WILLIAMSON COUNTY FAIR Planning is already underway for the county’s annual fair, which was held virtually in 2020. The event is slated to include rides, food, agricultural contests and live entertainment. Hours and ticket pricing TBD. Williamson County Ag Expo Park, 4215 Long Lane, Franklin. 615-794-4386. www.williamsoncountyfair.org

PILGRIMAGEMUSIC &

CULTURAL FESTIVAL Event organizers announced 2021 dates for the annual music festival last September following the cancellation of the 2020 festival. The event will feature multiple stages with live music as well as food trucks and a Maker’s Village with goods from local artisans. Music lineups are expected to be announced later this year. Hours and ticket pricing TBD. The Park at Harlinsdale Farm, 239 Franklin Road, Franklin. https://pilgrimagefestival.com OCTOBER 02 HERITAGE BALL The annual Heritage Ball, hosted by the Williamson Heritage Foundation, is one of the longest-running events in Williamson County. The black-tie event raises funding for the foundation’s future preservation projects. The event, to be held at Eastern Flank Battlefield Park, will be the 47th Heritage Ball and feature

Find more or submit Franklin and Brentwood events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY WENDY STURGES COMMUNITY SNAPSHOT 2021 A N N U A L C O M M U N I T Y G U I D E Data and analysis on local communities

FRANKLIN PHOTOS BY WENDY STURGESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

BRENTWOOD

Founded in 1799, the city of Franklin is home to the seat of Williamson County as well as to several battleeld sites and historic homes from the Civil War era. The city is governed by the board of mayor and aldermen and holds elections every two years.

While the area was settled in the 1850s, Brentwood was incorporated in 1969. Brentwood is now 90% made up of residential areas and is home to several parks and trails. The city is governed by a city commission and holds elections every two years.

*HISPANICLATINO IS NOT A RACE, BUT THE HISPANICLATINO PERCENTAGE BELOW MAY INCLUDE MULTIPLE RACES LISTED. THE RACES LISTED, HOWEVER, DO NOT INCLUDE HISPANICLATINO RESIDENTS.

SOURCES: U.S. CENSUS BUREAU AMERICAN COMMUNITY SURVEY 2019 FIVEYEAR ESTIMATES, CITY OF FRANKLIN, CITY OF BRENTWOOD, WILLIAMSON COUNTY, WILLIAMSON COUNTY SCHOOLS, FRANKLIN SPECIAL SCHOOL DISTRICTCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

POPULATION CHANGE

MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME $81,432 $98,231 2014 2019

AGE ANALYSIS 0-19

State +3.9% Williamson County +16.2% +17.0% +8.5% Five-year change

20-39 40-59 60-79 80+

32.5% 14.9% 32.9% 17.1% 2.5% 26.6% 25.8% 28.8% 15.2% 3.6%

$138,395 $168,688 $91,743 $112,962

2014 2019 2014 2019

Median age 38.4 41.7

Williamson County 39.1

State 39

Williamson County

LOCAL DEMOGRAPHICS* Hispanic or Latino White Black or African American American Indian or Alaska native Asian Native Hawaiian or other Pacic Islander Some other race 6.9% 77.5% 6.6% 0.0% 6.8% 0.0%

EDUCATION LEVEL High school diploma or higher achieved

LARGEST EMPLOYMENT SECTORS** 1 Management, busi- ness, nance and arts 2 Computer, engineer- ing and science 3 Education, legal, community service arts and media 4 Health care practi- tioners and technical 5 Service 1 Management, busi- ness, nance and arts 2 Computer, engineer- ing and science 3 Education, legal, community service arts and media 4 Health care practi- tioners and technical 5 Service

2014 2019

Bachelor’s degree or higher achieved

4.7% 84.1% 1.8% 0.0% 7.3% 0.0%

4.8% 84.6%

4.1% 0.1% 4.2% 0.0% 0.1% 2.2%

92.6% 95.1%

62.3% 61.5%

98.4% 99.4% 73.3% 74.5%

0.1% 2.1%

0.1% 1.9%

Two or more races

**EMPLOYMENT FOR AGE 16 AND OLDER

LOCAL ELECTED OFFICIALS Williamson County Board of Commissioners*** Mayor: Rogers Anderson District 2: Elizabeth “Betsy” Hester & Judy Herbert District 4: Chad Story & Gregg Lawrence District 6: Erin Nation & Paul Webb District 7: Bert Chalfant & Tom Tunniclie

Williamson County Board of Education Superintendent: Jason Golden Angela Durham Dan Cash Eliot Mitchell Brad Fiscus

Franklin Special School District Board of Education Superintendent: David Snowden Robert Blair Alicia Spencer Barker Allena Bell

District 8: Jerry Rainey & Barb Sturgeon District 9: Chas Morton & Matt Williams District 10: David Landrum & Robbie Beal District 11: Brian Beathard & Sean Aiello District 12: Steve Smith & Dana Ausbrooks Franklin Board of Mayor and Aldermen Mayor: Ken Moore Beverly Burger

Dana McLendon Scott Speedy Margaret Martin

Ann Petersen Clyde Barnhill Brandy Blanton Brentwood City Commission Mayor: Rhea Little Ken Travis Nelson Andrews Anne Dunn Mark Gorman Susannah Macmillan Regina Smithson

Kevin Townsel Robin Newman Tim Stillings

Jennifer Aprea Jay Galbreath Shelia Cleveland Candy Emerson Rick Wimberley Eric Welch K.C. Haugh Nancy Garret

***COMMISSIONERS LISTED FOR FRANKLIN AND BRENTWOOD AREAS ONLY

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FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • JANUARY 2021

SHOPPING&DINING

Retailers, restaurants that opened in 2020 or are coming in 2021

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER STAFF

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www.partyfowl.com $$$ B H K 6 Perry’s Steakhouse 5028 Aspen Grove Drive, Franklin www.perryssteakhouse.com $$ COMING FEBRUARY 2021 7 Shake Shack McEwen Northside, Franklin www.shakeshack.com $ B K COMING 2021 8 Waldo’s Chicken and Beer

www.peaceloveandlittledonuts.com $$$ B 17 Pies by Gigi 330 Franklin Road, Ste. 906D, Brentwood 615-678-8434 www.piesbygigi.com $ B 18 Southerner’s Coee 328 Fifth Ave. N., Franklin 615-861-9807 www.southernerscoee.com $ B 19 tiny little donuts 1203 Murfreesboro Road, Franklin 615-679-9422 www.tinylittledonuts.com $ B BARS, BREWERIES &PUBS 20 Americana Taphouse 94 E. Main St., Franklin 615-790-2309 www.americanataphouse.com $$$$ H 21 Curio Brewing Company 216 Noah Drive, Franklin 615-472-1124 www.curiobrewing.com $ H 22 Hop House Tennessee Taps 117 Fifth Ave. N., Ste. B, Franklin 615-454-8592 www.hophousetntaps.com $$$ H 23 Vintage Vine 100 4051 Aspen Grove Drive, Franklin www.vintagevine100.com COMING 2021 MEXICAN 24 Tamale Joe’s 2000 Mallory Lane, Ste. 310, Franklin www.tamalejoes.com COMING 2021 SWEETS &TREATS 25 Hattie Jane’s Creamery Camden Commons, Franklin https://hattiejanescreamery.com COMING 2021

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1201 Liberty Pike, Franklin www.waldoschicken.com $ H K COMING 2021 ASIAN 9 Poke Bros. 430 Cool Springs Blvd., Ste. 110, Franklin 615-435-3451 www.eatpokebros.com $$$ K 10 Thai Esane 203 Franklin Road, Ste. 100, Brentwood www.thaiesane.com COMING 2021 11 Vui’s Kitchen 1201 Liberty Pike, Ste. 113, Franklin 615-567-5962 www.vuiskitchen.com $ BAKERIES & CAFES 12 Cae Artisan 1113 Murfreesboro Road, Ste. 254, Franklin 615-547-3400 www.caeartisan.com $ B 13 Franklin Bakehouse 100 Main St., Franklin 615-628-8493 www.franklinbakehouse.com $ B 14 Just Love Coee Cafe 4031 Aspen Grove Drive, Ste. 138, Franklin 615-465-6661 www.justlovecoeecafe.com/mcewen $ B K 15 Kate & Lulu’s Kitchen 158 Front St., Ste. 110, Franklin 713-647-1077 www.kateandluluskitchen.com $ B 16 Peace, Love and Little Donuts 213 Franklin Road, Ste. 120, Brentwood 615-964-7995

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Average entrees: $ Up to $9.99 $$ $10-$19.99

$$$ $20 or more

B Breakfast/brunch

H Happy hour

K Kids menu

www.henpeckedchicken.com $ 3 Izzy’s Feel Good Food 901 Columbia Ave., Franklin 615-719-2861 www.izzysfranklin.com $$$ B K

COMPILED BY WENDY STURGES

DINING AMERICAN 1 CoreLife Eatery 401B Cool Springs Blvd., Ste. 220, Franklin 615-387-9996 www.corelifeeatery.com $$$ K 2 Henpecked Chicken 146 Pewitt Drive, Brentwood

4 MOOYAH Burgers, Fries & Shakes 213 Franklin Road, Ste. 160, Brentwood 615-942-8199 www.mooyah.com $ K 5 Party Fowl 1914 Galleria Blvd., Franklin 615-614-3636

26 Jeni’s Splendid Ice Creams 4021 Aspen Grove Drive, Franklin

615-628-8542 www.jenis.com $$$

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

2 0 2 1 S P E C I A L E D I T I O N

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tiny little donuts

The NOWMassage

WENDY STURGESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

COURTESY THE NOW MASSAGE

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Assembly Food Hall is slated to open in downtown Nashville this spring.

COURTESY ASSEMBLY FOOD HALL

WORTH THE TRIP DINING

Assembly Food Hall is slated to open in downtown Nashville this spring and to bring with it a number of eateries and bars. Set to be located at the corner of Fifth Avenue and Broadway, the food hall will feature Nashville staples, such as Prince’s Hot Chicken and The Pharmacy, as well as sweet options, such as The Liege Wae Co., NoBaked Cookie Dough, Hattie Jane’s Creamery and Coco’s Dulce & Cafe. An exact opening date for the new dining center had not been announced as of press time. www.foodhallco.com $$$$ B H K COMING 2021

Scissors & Scotch

Row House

MAUREEN SIPPERLEYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

COURTESY ROW HOUSE

27 Sweethaven 1015 Westhaven Blvd., Ste. 130, Franklin 615-398-8743 www.sweethaventn.com $ SEAFOOD 28 The Boilery Seafood & Grill 545 Cool Springs Blvd., Ste. 195, Franklin 615-567-6853 www.theboileryseafood.com $$$$$ H K SHOPPING BEAUTY&WELLNESS 29 Athenian Nail Spa & Bar 1201 Liberty Pike, Franklin 615-645-3772 www.athenianspa.com 30 Freecoat Nails 3065 Mallory Lane, Franklin 615-465-8180 https://freecoatnails.com 31 Frenchies Modern Nail Care 790 Jordan Road, Ste. 112, Franklin 615-567-3535 www.frenchiesnails.com 32 The NOWMassage Franklin 125 First Ave. N., Franklin 615-229-7656 www.thenowmassage.com 33 PROSE 4031 Aspen Grove Drive, Ste. 126, Franklin 615-549-6085 www.myprose.com 34 Renew U-360 5112 Peter Taylor Park Drive, Ste. 400, Brentwood 615-891-1442 www.renew-u360.com

35 Scissors & Scotch 205 Franklin Road, Ste. 120, Brentwood 615-852-8108 www.scissorsscotch.com 36 sek Sauna Studio 1201 Liberty Pike Ste. 121, Franklin 615-241-0702 www.seksauna.com COMING 2021 37 Vida-Flo 1201 Liberty Pike, Franklin 615-628-8038 www.vidaofranklin.com BOUTIQUES 38 Bless Your Glam Boutique 1113 Murfreesboro Road, Ste. 254, Franklin 615-815-9733 www.blessyourglamboutique.com 39 City Farmhouse 117 Third Ave. N., Franklin 615-268-0216 www.cityfarmhousefranklin.com 40 Mainstream Boutique 6041 Rural Plain Circle, Ste. 100, Franklin 615-435-3059 www.mainstreamboutique.com 41 The Kind Poppy 117 Third Ave. N., Franklin www.thekindpoppy.com 42 Your CBD Store 1735 Galleria Blvd., Ste. 1047, Brentwood 615-465-6084 www.facebook.com/ yourcbdstorecoolspringstn CRAFTS 43 Pinspiration Brentwood 91 Seaboard Lane, Ste. 108, Brentwood 629-202-7498 www.pinspiration.com 44 Spark: An Art Studio 213 Franklin Road, Ste. 110, Brentwood

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Tracking T H E O P E N I N G S

Although 2020 was a tough year for small businesses, a number of new shops and eateries still opened in the Franklin and Brentwood areas.

openings in 2020 83

in 2020 5

in 2020 11

expansions

relocations

NOTE: THESE ESTIMATES ARE BASED ON BUSINESSES INCLUDED IN COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER ’S MONTHLY IMPACTS SECTION AND ARE NOT MEANT TO BE COMPREHENSIVE.

48 Eat the Frog Fitness 205 Franklin Road, Ste. 150, Brentwood 615-431-3764 www.eatthefrogtness.com 49 F45 Training 995 Meridian Blvd., Ste. 100, Franklin 615-985-4545 www.f45training.com/franklincoolsprings 50 Row House 1201 Liberty Pike, Ste. 107, Franklin 615-716-1174 www.therowhouse.com PETS 51 Pet People 225 Franklin Road, Brentwood 615-864-7899 www.petpeoplestores.com

615-483-9847 www.sparkartbrentwood.com FITNESS 45 The Camp Transformation Center 1722 General George Patton Drive, Brentwood 615-915-2068 www.thecamptc.com 46 Carbon Culture USA 209 S. Royal Oaks Blvd., Ste. 184, Franklin 615-629-7547 www.carbonculture-usa.com 47 Club Pilates 4031 Aspen Grove Drive, Ste. 120, Franklin 615-538-1199 www.clubpilates.com

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FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • JANUARY 2021

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATION

Updates on key transportation stories

2 0 2 1 S P E C I A L E D I T I O N

OTHER PROJECTS TO FOLLOW IN 2021

TOP TRANSPORTATION PROJECT TO WATCH IN 2021

Cities partner forMcEwen Drive extension

Project partnership The cities of Franklin and Brentwood approved an agreement in December to begin work on an extension of McEwen Drive, which serves as a boundary between the two cities in some areas. Project costs will be split between the cities. A new timeline for the project has not been determined.

MACK C. HATCHER PKWY.

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BY WENDY STURGES

Mack C. Hatcher Parkway northwest extension Phase 1 of the Mack C. Hatcher Parkway northwest extension is on track to open in late 2021, according to the Tennessee Department of Transportation. The project will extend the roadway from Hillsboro Road to Del Rio Pike. Phase 1 of the roadway will create a two-lane road with a bridge over the Harpeth River. Timeline: 2019-November 2021 Cost: $45.1 million Funding sources: TDOT, city of Franklin

BRENTWOOD

The process to revive a long- planned project to extend McEwen Drive has begun following a new agreement between the cities of Franklin and Brentwood. In December, both cities approved resolutions to agree on boundary lines related to the McEwen Drive Phase 5 extension, which would extend the roadway fromWilson Pike to the Franklin-Brentwood city limits, near Clovercroft Creek. According to Brentwood City Manager Kirk Bednar, the original agreement between Franklin and Brentwood goes back to 2007, when both cities agreed to adjust the city boundary lines to include some land tracts in the city of Brentwood. Bednar said in the original agree- ment, the cities decided future developers would pay for the roadway as the land area was developed; how- ever, that plan did not come to pass. “Shortly after that, the recession hit, [and] no development occurred,” he said. “When development did nally come back in 2012-13, the developers in that area sued the city of Brentwood because they had development plans coming forward, … and essentially, the courts decided that those developers could not be made responsible for building an arterial road that was going to serve

HERBERT DR.

FRANKLIN

CLOVERCROFT CREEK

Roadway features According to the city of Franklin, the roadway extension is ultimately set to include four lanes but will initially be constructed as a 2-lane road. The

V E

MAP NOT TO SCALE N

road will also feature: • Curbs and gutters; • A multiuse trail; • Street lighting; and • Gas pipeline upgrades.

a much larger area than just their subdivision.” Since that time, Bednar said, the agreement had been amended, but the project itself was paused until both cities approved the new agreement in December. Bednar said the funding for the project will no longer be develop- ment-driven; rather, it will split between the two cities. Brentwood will pay 59.4%, and Franklin will pay the remaining 40.6%. The city of Brentwood is expected to contribute at least $10 million, although funding has not yet been nalized because gas line relocations still need to be conducted in the area, Bednar said. The city of Franklin is expected to manage the project. Bednar said each city will be responsible for acquiring any necessary right of way.

SOURCES: CITIES OF FRANKLIN AND BRENTWOODCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

OWL CREEK

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An additional project to extend the roadway beyond that point through the Tarragon subdivision will be a future city of Brentwood project. A timeline for that portion of the road has not been announced. Bednar said while construction will likely not begin for a few years, the agreement marks a rst step in the process. As of late 2020, work was set to begin on redesign work for the project, Bednar said. An engineering agreement for the project is set to be ready by February at the latest.

Sunset Road widening The city of Brentwood is working to widen a portion of Sunset Road— spanning from Owl Creek to Concord Road—from two to three lanes with a 10-foot multiuse trail on the west side of the roadway. Final paving is underway on the roadway as of late December; however, work is weather- dependent. Timeline: 2019-winter 2021 Cost: $8.9 million Funding source: city of Brentwood

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY&COUNTY

Updates on the biggest issues facing local entities

2 0 2 1 S P E C I A L E D I T I O N

OTHER STORIES TO FOLLOW IN 2021

TOP CITY & COUNTY STORIES OF 2021

Entities to hold local elections The cities of Brentwood and Franklin will both hold elections in 2021, according to the Williamson County Election Commission. Williamson County and school board elections will be held in August 2022. Brentwood The city will hold elections May 4 to select three city commissioners. Commissioners serve for four years in at-large positions. The top three vote-getters from among all the candidates will win positions on the commission. The deadline to register to vote is April 5, and early voting will run from April 14-29. Franklin The city will host ward elections Oct. 26 to selected alderpersons for Wards 1, 2, 3 and 4. Alderpersons serve staggered four-year terms, according to the city. Ward alderpersons must reside in the area they represent. Decision on Williamson County seal In September, Williamson County voted to recommend the removal of the Confederate ag from the county seal, an action that authorizes the county to petition the Tennessee Historic Commission to vote on where it can be removed. Should the commission vote to allow the county to remove the waiver, the county would reconvene to decide what a new version of the seal will look like. As of press time Jan. 12, the THC had meetings scheduled for Feb. 18-19. Vacant seat on Franklin Board of Mayor and Aldermen Following the passing of Alderperson Pearl Bransford in November, the city has begun discussions on how best to ll her seat on the board. According to the city charter, the city can opt to leave the seat vacant, appoint an individual to serve the rest of the term—slated to expire in 2023—or hold a special election to ll the seat. As of press time on the afternoon of Jan. 12, the city was scheduled to discuss how to proceed but had not yet made a decision. For the latest updates, visit communityimpact.com. The county seal was adopted in 1968. (Wendy Sturges/Community Impact Newspaper)

VACCINE DISTRIBUTION The Williamson County Health Department has begun distributing COVID-19 vaccines in accordance with the Tennessee COVID-19 Vaccine Plan, which will run through 2021.

2020 Q4

2021 Q1

2021 Q2

2021 Q3

2021 Q4

75+ 65+

55+

45+

35+

25+

16+

Phase 1A1: Front- line workers, rst responders, long- term care facilities Phase 1A2: All other health care workers

Phase 1B: K-12 school and child care sta Phase 1C: High-risk individuals age 16 and older

Phase 2A: Critical infrastructure employees in social services, food production and public transit

Phase 2B: Transportation and critical utilities

Phase 3: Workers in grocery stores and corrections

Simultaneous age- based criteria phase

SOURCES: WILLIAMSON COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT, TENNESSEE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTHCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Williamson County begins COVID19 vaccine rollout

BY WENDY STURGES

February—and to allow local counties to begin vaccinating residents age 75 and older. As of press time Jan. 12, the county is only vaccinating individuals in Phases 1A1 and 1A2, which include front-line workers, rst responders, health care workers, and sta and residents in long-term care facilities. The county has also begun working to vaccinate residents age 75 and older, although vaccines are based on supply. Those who do not qualify for specic work-based phases will receive the vaccine based on their age range, accord- ing to the TDH. A waitlist for eligible phases was launched in the county Jan. 7.

Following emergency use approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, the Williamson County Health Department began distributing two forms of a vaccine for COVID-19 in accordance with Tennessee’s COVID-19 Vaccination Plan. Starting in late December, health care workers and rst responders, including those at Williamson Medical Center, began receiving the vaccine. However, on Dec. 30, the Tennessee Department of Health announced it would update its plan to allow for teachers to be included in Phase 1B—expected to begin in

Citymoves forward with Southeast Municipal Complex

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BY WENDY STURGES

The new facility will open this spring. (Wendy Sturges/Community Impact Newspaper)

The Franklin Board of Mayor and Aldermen held a special meeting Dec. 30 to approve a $9.3 million for the Southeast Municipal Complex, a new park to be located east of I-65 near Carothers Parkway. The 180-acre park is slated to be complete in 2024-25 and will feature multipurpose elds, sports and exercise areas, and an inclusive play- ground with accessible equipment for people with disabilities.

NewBrentwoodPoliceDepartment headquarters to open this spring

BY WENDY STURGES

facilities, such as a tness room and a rearms range. The headquarters will also include a community room, which will allow ocers to interact with the public. In December, the Brentwood City Commission approved a number of purchases for the new headquarters, including communi- cations and computer equipment, a ngerprint scan machine, tness equipment and internet infrastructure. The facility is slated to be opened this spring.

Construction work is wrapping up on Brentwood’s largest project to date: a 56,000-square-foot headquarters for the city’s police department. Ocials broke ground on the $29 million project Sept. 11, kicking o a monthslong project to con- struct a new facility. When complete, the new facility—located on Heritage Way near the Williamson County Indoor Sports Complex—will feature more oce space as well as training

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FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • JANUARY 2021

TOP STORY

Students at Williamson County Schools who enrolled in the district’s online learning program saw slightly lower passing rates than in-person students at the same time in 2019-20. For the spring semester of the 2020-21 school year, about 25% of previously online students have opted to return to in-person learning. Online learning

third grade—have lower prociency rates than what the district has typ- ically seen in the past. Only 67% of rst-graders, who would have been kindergarten students in the 2019-20 school year, showed prociency in reading, and only 66% showed pro- ciency in math. “One of the biggest challenges is that K-[second grade] is dedicated to learn- ing to read, so when kids are learning to read, any hiccup along that process is going to have dramatic impacts, whereas when kids are older, they’re using their reading skills to learn more information,” said David Allen, assis- tant superintendent of teaching, learn- ing and assessment for WCS. At district middle schools, average scores for reading and math among students in grades 6-8 decreased by 2%-9% as compared to scores from last year, a net 4% decrease in reading and a net 7% decrease in math. Statewide, concerns about reading skills are much the same. Even prior to the pandemic, early literacy was a concern for students statewide. According to SCORE, only one in three third-graders in Tennessee is reading at an appropriate grade level. “Literacy rates are not great for any students in the state, and we, in par- ticular, focus on literacy prociency at the end of third grade because if you haven’t learned to read well by the end of third grade, the data shows that students don’t catch up in the later years,” Wasson said. Online learning, inequity gaps WCS assessments also show that online learners have a slightly lower passing rate than in-person students as compared to data from the 2019- 20 school year, according to the dis- trict. In the rst quarter of the 2020-21

CONTINUED FROM 1

Statewide, education experts esti- mate learning loss could range from a few months to up to a year of lost time, which school districts are work- ing hard to recover. Teresa Wasson, director of strategic communications for the State Collab- orative on Reforming Education, or SCORE—a nonpartisan, nonprot edu- cation advocacy group—said Tennes- see is suering from the short-term eects of learning loss and long-term evidence is also becoming apparent. “Everybody knows this has been an extraordinary year, and there’s a lot of concern about learning loss, under- standably, and student experience has been very, very dierent during this pandemic, even within the same district,” Wasson said. Learning loss While the district did not conduct TNReady or TCAP assessments during the 2019-20 school year, WCS fall data indicates some scores decreased as compared to those of years past. In a special meeting Dec. 17, Golden presented the results of those assess- ments to theWCS Board of Education. He said the district issued additional screening assessments in early Jan- uary, the results of which will be reviewed at the end of the year to see how students progressed. “We don’t have anything to com- pare it to for the years past, but it does give us a driver so we can compare what’s happening in the fall to what’s happened in the winter and what’s happening in the spring as we nish the year,” Golden said. Golden said data at the elemen- tary level shows students in younger grades—particularly those lower than

Elementary school

Middle school

High school

Fall 202021

Total: 6,751 online students

3,300

1,613

1,838

Spring 202021 2,271

Total: 5,066 online students

1,055

1,740

SOURCE: WILLIAMSON COUNTY SCHOOLS COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

school year, high school passing rates were 1.6% lower than they were at the same time the previous year for in-person students. Among online learners, passing rates were 3.8% lower than the previous year. “We were concerned that this was a risk—that the online students would have a higher failure rate, and they do,” Golden said. “So what that means is more intervention, more intervention.” That rate could change again in spring semester assessments, as 25% of online learners opted to return to campus at the start of 2021. Middle and elementary school students saw the highest rates of returning to cam- pus, as a combined 1,587 students opted not to continue online learning. While there has been a loss in learn- ing prociency overall, Wasson said, such losses are often more signicant for students of color and those who are economically disadvantaged. Additionally, the eects of the pan- demic on learning do not end after graduation, according to SCORE. The organization estimates an average

19% of students statewide did not enroll in community college programs in 2020. Racial gaps are evident there as well: White student enrollment was down by 17%, and Black student enrollment was down by 31%. “That’s very troubling given the fact that most jobs in Tennessee now and in the future are going to require employees to have that kind of educa- tion after high school,” Wasson said. Student intervention By pursuing early intervention, school ocials said they hope to close

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