Chandler Edition - July 2021

CHANDLER EDITION

2021 R E A L E S T A T E E D I T I O N R I S I N G COST OF REAL ESTATE According to median sales price data from Maricopa Association of Governments, the cost of homes has risen over the past decade. Experts say the pandemic and low inventory have inated prices even more.

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VOLUME 2, ISSUE 12  JULY 20AUG. 23, 2021

Campus ushers in newera for Arizona College Prep

$495K*

35.2% increase from 2020 to 2021

$500K $450K $400K $150K $200K $350K $250K $300K

BY ALEXA D’ANGELO

In 2007, the rst iteration of what is now Arizona College Prep High School opened at Hamilton High School as a school within a school designed to give students an alternative to the larger high schools in Chandler USDwith between 3,000-4,000 students on a campus. The students and sta moved into their own space—the old Erie Elementary School—in 2012 and got renamed Arizona College Prep-Erie. There, the students and sta stayed for nearly 10 years without playing elds for students and without space to grow the student body, school ocials said. CONTINUED ON 15

$366K

152.6% increase from 2012 to 2021

$196K

$0

2012 2013

2014 2015

2016 2017

2018 2019 2020 2021

*2021 NUMBER IS FROM JUNE DATA PROVIDED BY REALTOR KATHLEEN BANISTER

COMPARING COSTS Before the pandemic, Chandler home values and rents were already higher than metro and national gures, based on 2019 Census data provided by the Maricopa Association of Governments.

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PHOENIXAREA $250,000 $1,124

USA $217,500 $1,062

$300,800 CHANDLER $1,312

Median 2019 home value Median 2019 gross rent

Low inventory leads to rising housing prices Low inventory and a lack of new housing devel- opments to keep up with the city’s demand have contributed to sky-high housing prices real estate experts said they are seeing across Chandler. the director of themaster of real estate development program at Arizona State University. “The reason we have prices escalated as high and as quickly as we do is a lack of inventory. The Valley continued to grow during and after the Great Recession, but the entire homebuilding marketplace stalled and under-built CONTINUED ON 12 BY ALEXA D’ANGELO SOURCES: MARICOPA ASSOCIATION OF GOVERNMENTS, U.S. CENSUS BUREAU 201519 5YEAR AMERICAN COMMUNITY SURVEY ESTIMATES, REALTOR KATHLEEN BANISTERCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER “What we are living with now is a result of and reaction to the Great Recession,” said Mark Stapp,

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Chandler USD’s newest campus, Arizona College Prep High School, opens July 21. (Alexa D’Angelo/Community Impact Newspaper)

REAL ESTATE EDITION 2021

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THIS ISSUE

ABOUT US

Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the rst edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and Pugerville, Texas. We have expanded our operations to include hundreds of employees, our own printing operation and over 30 hyperlocal editions across three states. Our circulation is over 2 million residential mailboxes, and it grows each month with new residents and developments.

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

FROMAMY: This month’s edition looks at the real estate market. It’s fair to say that the housing market in Chandler has been hot the past several months. There is limited availability of housing, even as smaller inll lots are developed into housing. In our front-page story, we talk with experts to see what this means for home prices and aordability as we’ve seen prices continue to increase. Amy Lawson, PUBLISHER

Community Impact Newspaper teams include general managers, editors, reporters, graphic designers, sales account executives and sales support, all immersed and invested in the communities they serve. Our mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Our core values are Faith, Passion, Quality, Innovation and Integrity.

FROMALEXA: When Chandler USD starts its new school year July 21, the doors of the district’s newest high school building will also open. Arizona College Prep High School is now home to the sta of Arizona College Prep Erie as well as students from a 2-square-mile boundary around the new campus. In our front-page story this month, we talked to the former district superintendent and the school principal as to why this campus was necessary for the growth of the school. Alexa D’Angelo, EDITOR

Our purpose is to be a light for our readers, customers, partners and each other.

WHATWE COVER

Visit our website for free access to the latest news, photos and infographics about your community and nearby cities. communityimpact.com LIVE UPDATES

MARKET TEAM EDITOR Alexa D’Angelo

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BUSINESS &DINING Local business development news that aects you

TRANSPORTATION &DEVELOPMENT Regular updates on area projects to keep you in the know

SCHOOL, CITY & COUNTY We attend area meetings to keep you informed

ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Aubrey Galloway CORPORATE LEADERSHIP GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Warner CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES &MARKETING DIRECTOR Tess Coverman CONTACT US 610 N. Gilbert Road, Ste. 205 Gilbert, AZ 85234 • 4804824880 PRESS RELEASES chnnews@communityimpact.com SUBSCRIPTIONS communityimpact.com/subscriptions © 2021 Community Impact Newspaper Co. All rights reserved. No reproduction of any portion of this issue is allowed without written permission from the publisher.

CORRECTION: Volume 2, Issue 11 In a graphic on Page 16 titled “Mental health aected nationwide,” the second bar chart under “Household income” should have indicated the responses were for households with incomes less than $40,000. In the Impacts section on Page 4, numbers 1,8 and 9 should have said the businesses are at the corner of Chandler Boulevard and Dobson Road. Sign up for our regular newsletter to receive the latest headlines direct to your inbox. communityimpact.com/newsletter YOUR INBOX

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CHANDLER EDITION • JULY 2021

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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Feed the Children

Chipotle

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JASON M. GUTIERREZ/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

ALEXA D’ANGELO/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

3 Transcend Art Collective Tattoo Studio opened April 30 at 950 E. Pecos Road, Ste. 16, Chandler. The business is a tattoo and piercing shop. 480-742-5990. https://transcendartcollective.net COMING SOON 4 Bruster’s of Chandler , an ice cream shop, is expected to open in Septem- ber in Chandler. The ice cream shop will be located at 50 E. Warner Road, Chandler. Bruster’s of Chandler will be a free-standing location offering at least 40 flavors made fresh daily at the store. With this new store, owner Dan Tarkoff will open his second Bruster’s location in Arizona. He also owns Bruster’s of Arrowhead located at 17115 N. 51st Ave., Glendale. https://brusters.com 5 Bestway is moving its U.S. headquar- ters to Chandler in the fall. The newly constructed building is 129,680 square feet and is located at 3435 S. McQueen Road, Chandler. Bestway has been in Phoenix since 2010. The company is a leader in the inflatable and outdoor leisure sector, specializing in above- ground pools; air mattresses; camping equipment; and water sports equipment, including kayaks, paddleboards and small boats, according to the release. www.bestwaycorp.us 6 Chipotle will open a fourth location in Chandler at the corner of Chandler Boulevard and Alma School Road. The fast-casual Mexican restaurant will be housed in the space that previously held Krispy Kreme, located at 1055 W. Chan- dler Blvd. The restaurant serves burritos, tacos and burrito bowls. Construction at the restaurant was ongoing as of July 13,

and an opening date is not yet known. www.chipotle.com 7 Scheels, an employee-owned sports retailer, will open its first Arizona loca- tion in the fall of 2023 at Chandler Fash- ion Center, located at 3111 W. Chandler Blvd., Chandler. The company will take over the space left vacant by Nordstrom at the mall and will open after a full renovation and expansion featuring 220,000 square feet of entertainment attractions, specialty shops and bou- tiques. The Chandler store will employ approximately 400 associates. www.scheels.com 8 The Sugar Bar , a candy store and bar combination, anticipates opening in Chandler in October. The business will be located at 960 E. Warner Road, Ste. 6, Chandler. The business promotes itself as Arizona’s first bar and candy store, which will cater to all ages. 480-589-5246. www.thesugarbar.com 9 Mox Boarding House plans to open a new entertainment concept in Chandler. The company, which offers a restaurant experience paired with various games, has served the Pacific Northwest for the past decade, and the Chandler location will be the company’s first foray into Ar- izona. The opening date for the Chandler store is not yet known, but construction has started at 1371 N. Alma School Road in Chandler, according to a news release from the city. www.moxboardinghouse.com. RELOCATIONS 10 Against the Ropes relocated to 222 E. Warner Road, Ste. 7, Chandler, this spring. The business, which offers

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TM; © 2021 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER CO. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

NOWOPEN 1 Feed the Children , a nonprofit fo- cused on alleviating childhood hunger, opened its newest distribution center June 22 at 3475 S. McQueen Road, Chan- dler. The 104,300-square-foot building houses more than 3,000 pallets of food and household essentials to distribute to community partners throughout the Western U.S., according to a news release from the nonprofit. The facility will also

offer a volunteer area, more than 1,800 square feet in office space and 25 dock doors. www.feedthechildren.org 2 Sagebrush Coffee opened a location at 393 W. Warner Road, Ste. 121, Chan- dler, on July 1. The business, which has been an online coffee roastery and tea business for nearly a decade, offers a va- riety of espresso, coffee and tea as well as a grab-and-go menu. 480-250-7159. www.sagebrushcoffee.com

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY ALEXA D’ANGELO

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The Chandler City Council approved a 71-acre business park development. (Jason M. Gutierrez/Community Impact Newspaper)

Mox Boarding House

Against the Ropes

FEATURED IMPACT COMING SOON The Chandler City Council tentatively approved an ordinance June 24 for a 71-acre business park development at the northwest corner of McQueen and Queen Creek roads. Schrader Farms Business Park will be used for light industrial and business park land uses, according to Chandler City Council agenda documents. According to the plan submitted to the city, the development will consist of six single-story buildings constructed in two phases. Phase one includes three eastern business park buildings, street improvements and landscaping. The commercial development on the corner has not had a specific building design or site layout, according to the

COURTESY MOX BOARDING HOUSE

TOM BLODGETT/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

city records. That corner commercial parcel will be developed separate from the business park. Core5 is the developer for the business park, according to city documents. According to the developer’s proposal, the architectural design will lean toward contemporary southwest architecture.

IN THE NEWS The Gila River Indian Community announced June 18 a fourth casino is in the works just south of Chandler. The Gila River Indian Community, as well as other tribes, recently signed an amended gaming compact with the state allowing for a fourth casino for the community, including hiring an architect to design the casino and prepping the site for construc- tion. The casino will be located south of the intersection at Gilbert Road and Hunt Highway, an exact address was not known as of press time. The project is expected to take 18-24 months to design, according to the release. No other project details had been announced as of press time. Ste- phen Lewis, Gila River Indian Community governor, said in a statement that adding the casino will bring more revenue, securi- ty and other services to the community.

a high-intensity boxing workout led by trainers along with weight lifting, was originally located at 1727 N. Arizona Avenue, Ste. 8, Chandler. The gym first opened in December 2019. 480-590-3242. www.againsttheropesfitness.com ANNIVERSARIES 11 La Ristra New Mexican Kitchen , a family-owned and -operated restaurant, celebrated the one-year anniversary of its downtown Chandler location July 7. The restaurant specializes in New Mexican cuisine and is located down- town at 140 N. Arizona Ave., Chandler. This marks the second location for the restaurant, with the first being in Gil-

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CHANDLER EDITION • JULY 2021

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W. GUADALUPE RD. TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES

COMPILED BY ALEXA D’ANGELO

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underground. Work has also begun on the segment from Via de Palmas moving north

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF JULY 13. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT CHNNEWS@COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM. Funding sources: town of Gilbert bonds and funds, Maricopa Association of Gov- ernments, developer contributions 4 Lindsay Road/Loop 202 interchange An interchange at Lindsay Road and Loop 202 will be built to provide access to Loop 202 and a frontage road system on the north side of Loop 202 between Lindsay Road and Gilbert Road. Status: Traffic restrictions on Lindsay be- gan in March and will remain throughout the remainder of the project. The project is coordinating traffic control with the Ger- mann Road improvements project. Timeline: October 2020-November 2021 Cost: $18.15 million lights. It would then reduce to four lanes to the south. Traffic signals will be in- stalled at Appleby, Ocotillo and Chandler Heights roads. Status: Traffic restrictions are one lane in each direction. The project is nearing completion. Timeline: March 2020-August 2021 Cost: $25.96 million Funding sources: town of Gilbert, Maricopa Association of Governments

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toward Chandler Heights. Timeline: February 2020- September 2022 Cost: $17.17 million Funding source: city of Chandler 2 Chandler Boulevard bike lane addition Chandler Boulevard has bike lanes

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throughout the entire city, with a short segment missing that will be completed as part of this project, according to the city of Chandler. The segment stretches from I-10 to 56th Street. Status: Combs Construction Company is working on the north side of Chandler Boulevard installing curbs and gutters and preparing for new pavement, traffic signal relocation and fire hydrant relocation. Timeline: March-September Cost: $904,828 Funding source: Maricopa Association of Governments 3 Val Vista Drive widening The town of Gilbert is widening Val Vista Drive from Appleby Road—about where Val Vista narrows to one lane in each direction—to Riggs Road. The result will be a six-lane section from Ocotillo Road to Merlot Street with a raised, landscaped median; bike lanes; sidewalks; and street-

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ONGOINGPROJECTS 1 Cooper Road improvements

street lighting, traffic signals, drainage components, landscaping and utility relocations. The project was outlined in the city’s 10-year capital improvement plan as a necessary infrastructure im- provement. Status: Electric crews continue work on the east side of Cooper to install electric conduit and future streetlights as part of the conversion of overhead power lines to

An effort is underway to expand Cooper Road to four lanes—two lanes in each direction. The project begins about 3,500 feet north of Chandler Heights Road to Riggs Road. Improvements include the construction of raised medians, bike lanes, left-turn lanes, sidewalks, curb, gutter,

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY& EDUCATION

News from Chandler & Chandler USD

COMPILED BY ALEXA D’ANGELO

NUMBERTOKNOW

Chandler USDgoverning board approves 15%budget override

Chandler City Council hires newpresiding citymagistrate

The Maricopa County board of supervisors approved spending priorities for $435 million in federal COVID-19 relief funds available to the county through the American Rescue Plan Act passed by Congress. $435M

since 1989 and the eighth that has passed. The only election that failed was an eort in 2012. An override was later passed by voters in 2013. OVERRIDE HIGHLIGHTS According to the district, an override will allow Chandler USD to: • maintain safety features at district schools; • maintain respectable class sizes; • help the district attract and retain great teachers; • enhance technology services; • fully implement the programs related to the long-range strategic plan, Journey 2025; • reduce the district’s need to eliminate eective programs and services to students and parents; and • provide professional development for teachers to increase student achievement. SOURCE: CHANDLER USDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

CHANDLER USD Voters will see a Chandler USD maintenance and operations budget override on the Nov. 2 ballot after the governing board voted to call for the override election during a meeting June 23. The vote was unanimous among the board members. The district is operating under a 15% M&O operating override, according to agenda documents. By law, the last year of full funding of the override is scal year 2022-23, according to the district. An override is a voter-approved initiative that generates additional tax revenue to fund projects and operations, according to a presenta- tion for the board created by CUSD ocials. CUSD’s last override election was passed by voters in 2017, according to the district. That 2017 election marked the ninth override election

CHANDLER The Chandler City Council appointed Alicia Skupin to the position of presiding city magistrate to head up the Chan-

CITYHIGHLIGHTS

GRAND OPENING! Chandler City Council Aug. 12, 6 p.m. 88 E. Chicago St., Chandler 480-782-2181 • www.chandleraz.gov Chandler USD board Aug. 11, 7 p.m. 1525 W. Frye Road, Chandler 480-812-7000 • www.cusd80.com MEETINGSWE COVER CHANDLER The City Council approved an agreement with Salt River Project on June 24 to fund a portion of a proposed transmission line project that would provide power to the expansion of Intel. The City Council approved an agreement that would have the city funding the dierence between building the lines overhead and the added cost of putting them underground.

Alicia Skupin

dler Municipal Court eective July 1 during a council meeting June 24. Skupin has served as a magistrate for Chandler since October 2014. Skupin was appointed to the interim presiding city magistrate position after the Chandler City Council removed David Fuller from the post in December. Before coming to Chandler, Skupin served over a two-year span as a judge pro tempore in the Mesa, Scottsdale and Surprise municipal courts. Prior to becoming a judge, she was a partner in Skupin Law Group and a contracted public defender.

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CHANDLER EDITION • JULY 2021

Each room at the med spa is catered to the specic services provided. (Alexa D’Angelo/Community Impact Newspaper)

UnmarkedBeauty andWellness 2410 S. Gilbert Road, Ste. 1, Chandler 480-737-1394 www.unmarkedbeautywellnesschandler.com Hours: Mon.-Fri. 9 a.m.-6:30 p.m., Sat. 9 a.m.-4 p.m., closed Sun. She named her business Unmarked Solutions LLC and later transformed that into Unmarked Beauty and Wellness to pay homage to where she got her start. “I’m still giving people condence and changing the way they see themselves,” she said. “That’s why I do this.” WHAT’S INANAME? The name Unmarked Beauty and Wellness comes from Brandie’s prior experience in the medical eld for 18 years as an emergency room and trauma nurse. Brandie was looking for a change and started working with the nonprot Soul Survivor doing tattoo removals on tracked women. “I fell in love with aesthetics then,” Brandie said. “These were beautiful women, and I had a small part in changing their lives. After that I knew I wanted to do something in aesthetics.”

BUSINESS FEATURE

Al and Brandie Heredia own Unmarked Beauty and Wellness in Chandler. (Alexa D’Angelo/Community Impact Newspaper)

Unmarked Beauty andWellness Medical spa oers services to boost both condence and health B randie and Al Heredia did not expect they would open a business during the pandemic. facial membership and other oerings. “I think there is a misconception that you have to be a millionaire or be vain to go to a med spa,” Brandie said. “Caring for your skin is something everyone can benet from. Skin is the largest organ of the body, and everyone wants to be able to age gracefully. We want people to have con- dence in how they look [and] feel.” BY ALEXA D’ ANGELO

Unmarked Beauty and Wellness had been primed for expansion in February 2020—Brandie and Al were selecting a spot for their third location—and then the world shuttered in March as the coronavi- rus raged through cities and states. Against all odds, the couple opened their second Chandler location o Gilbert and Germann roads in February 2021. “We had to close for two months, but our sta just trained and trained,” Brandie said. “We were doing virtual consultations and continued to meet new clients.” Al said the temporary closure was “a blessing.” “We had a chance to come together and learn an abundance of skills,” Al said. The medical spa oers a range of services, from teeth whitening to body sculpting to a monthly

Unmarked Beauty and Wellness is celebrating seven years in business in July, Brandie said, and there is not anything the couple would rather do. “We want people to understand their skin or their bodies and help educate people to do what’s best for them,” Brandie said. “It’s great to see people listen and be happy with their results.” Al said the sta is highly trained and ready to deliver the best results possible to clients. “We believe in delivering the best service,” Al said. “We want to give you the treatment that works best for you, that’s medical-grade and deliver those high-end results.”

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

LOCALLY SOURCED

Bread from Capistrano’s Bakery Phoenix

Eggs from Hickman Farms Maricopa

Owner Brandy Grooms (second from left), shown with her sta, is the fth “Wanda” at Wonderful Wanda’s.

Meats from Boar’s Head Chandler

Potatoes from Sage & Sand Potato Phoenix

Wonderful Wanda’s incorporates daily specials and weekly dessert specials.

Ross’s Big Breakfast (pictured) was named after co-owner Ross Buckendahl. Several menu items are named after family and friends of the owners. (Photos by Alexa D’Angelo/Community Impact Newspaper)

DINING FEATURE

Wonderful Wanda’s

Breakfast joint brings taste of small town Midwest to Chandler

B randy Grooms knew she wanted to buy a restaurant when she moved from small- town Nebraska to the Valley. She had spent her life working in restaurants and wanted to nd one that was the right t. Enter: Wonderful Wanda’s, a restaurant that has been a Chandler staple since the 1990s. “I am the fth Wanda,” Grooms said with a laugh. She purchased the business from the pre- vious owner—the fourth Wanda—and by February 2019 she was the owner of Wonderful Wanda’s. The original owner in the 1990s, when the restaurant was a bakery, was named Wanda. Grooms said the owners since the original Wanda have tried to make the restaurant their own. “We have home cooking—everything here is like eating from grandma’s kitchen,” Grooms said. “It’s very Midwestern. Everything is made with care and attention to detail and amazing, local- ly-sourced ingredients. And butter, a lot of butter.” BY ALEXA D’ANGELO

The restaurant serves breakfast and lunch during weekdays and on the weekends serves all-day breakfast. The restaurant has only 10 tables inside, but Grooms said people are happy to wait for a table to get a hearty meal. The restaurant also does plenty of to-go orders and Doordash orders, Grooms said. “We have a strong following,” Grooms said. “When you share food with people, it bonds people. That’s all I want this place to be.” As Grooms told the story of the restaurant and the menu, which was designed by her college-aged daughter, she greeted the customers who walked in by name. “Our regulars are our backbone,” she said. “I take the time to talk and catch up with them when they come in. I get to see the next phases of their lives, too. I just believed in this place and it’s been amazing. This place is part of our family now.”

Everything in the Wonderful Wanda’s kitchen is locally sourced, which is important to the owners.

WonderfulWanda’s 6401 W. Chandler Blvd., Chandler, 480-763-8100 www.wonderfulwandas.com Hours:Mon.-Fri. 7 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Sat.-Sun. 7 a.m.-1:00 p.m.

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CHANDLER EDITION • JULY 2021

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

2021 R E A L E S T A T E E D I T I O N MARKET AT AGLANCE

COMPILED BY TOM BLODGETT

Homes in the six ZIP codes within Chandler saw more homes sold at a higher average sales price from July 2020 to June 2021 compared to the same time frame in 2019-20. Days on the market includes time from a home’s listing to its contract closing. SOURCE: WEST AND SOUTHEAST REALTORS OF THE VALLEY COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

85226

85224

85225

202

85286

10

85248

85249

TOTAL HOMES SOLDOVER TIME

85248

85249

85286

85224

85225

85226

June 2019-May 2020 June 2020-May 2021 AVERAGE DAYS ON THEMARKET

160

85224 -43.62%

85225 -36.49%

140

28.45

16.04

30.58

19.42

85248 -42.81%

85226 -16.16%

120

45.83

26.21

29.08

24.38

100

85249 -49.21%

85286 -34.25%

42.33

21.50

34.54

22.71

80

AVERAGE HOME SALES PRICE June 2019-May 2020 June 2020-May 2021

60

85224

85225

85226

+16.56% $308,000 $359,000

+21.58% $292,000 $355,000

+21.97% $346,000 $422,000

40

20

85248

85249

85286

+15.46% $414,000 $478,000

+25.38% $461,000 $578,000

+20.57% $418,000 $504,000

0

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CHANDLER EDITION • JULY 2021

CONTINUED FROM 1

I N V E N T O R Y BUILDING

HOUSING MARKET IN CHANDLER According to 2019 data from the Maricopa Association of Governments, owner-occupied units account for nearly 65% of all housing within the city. 59,209 owner-occupied units 91,216 total housing units 32,007 renter-occupied units

Experts say the Great Recession caused a slowdown in the construction of new housing units, and while developments in Chandler never quite came to a complete stop, it did slow down. Experts say multifamily housing is now outpacing new single-family housing construction.

Single-family

Multifamily

1,500

1,000

500

0

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

SOURCES: MARICOPA ASSOCIATION OF GOVERNMENTS, U.S. CENSUS BUREAU 2019 5YEAR AMERICAN COMMUNITY SURVEY ESTIMATESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

from 2008 to 2015. We set ourselves up for this problem.” In the past year, Chandler ZIP codes have seen the median price of homes sold increase between 20% and 50% compared to the median prices the year prior, according to local real estate data from West and Southeast Realtors of the Valley, a real estate agent group. Local Realtor Kathleen Banister said the median home price across Chandler as of June is $495,000, a 39.44% overall increase from June 2019 when the median was $355,000. “Aordable housing is important in Chandler,” Banister said. “Everyone needs a place to live. Chandler’s econ- omy is growing as more employers

move to Chandler, and those employ- ees need houses—290 people a day are moving to Arizona. Importantly, homeownership is the best way for most people to build wealth, which increases a family’s quality of life and net worth for generations to come.” Stapp said the pandemic created a perfect storm for the housing market. With new builds taking longer due to a supply chain shortage—the low inven- tory has only exacerbated an existing aordability issue across the Valley. “Add to this whole mix the pan- demic, and it is the low-wage earning service workers that have been most hurt and that causes a really big dis- parity in income,” Stapp said. “The Valley has a lot of working poor. And

working poor can include teachers and phlebotomists—it doesn’t always mean it’s a bartender or server or someone working in a hotel or resort. These are critical jobs for our commu- nity. In places like the southeast Val- ley, the greatest share on a percentage basis of new home building growth is built for higher median incomes. Peo- ple are getting pushed out of the mar- ket to places like Florence or Coolidge where the price of land is cheaper.” In the city of Chandler, multifamily housing developments are outpacing single-family housing developments, but ocials say single-family housing is being developed—just on smaller inll lots as the city draws closer to build-out. According to data from the

city of Chandler, 500 new single fam- ily residential units were completed in 2019 compared t0 1,500 multifam- ily units. “Supply has not yet met demand, and it’s still going that way,” said Kevin Mayo, planning administrator for the city of Chandler. Supply and demand Mayo said unlike the rest of the Valley, Chandler slowed down—but never stopped—building single-family homes in the aftermath of the Great Recession. But, Mayo said, what was constructed in that time has not kept up with the city’s population growth. Many of the new single-fam- ily developments in the city have

12

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

2 0 2 1 R E A L E S T A T E E D I T I O N

been smaller houses on smaller lots because the city only has about 9% of undeveloped land left before being considered built out, he said. “Where Chandler is at the moment is normal outside of the current, crazy market,” Mayo said. “Chandler plan- ninghas no inuence over that outside crazy market. But where Chandler is in our evolutionary growth cycle, the sizes of lots that we are seeing is nor- mal and to be expected.” But even with those smaller inll lots being constructed and opened— the city’s housing inventory is far from meeting the needs of the people moving here, Banister said. “Economists and real estate ana- lysts project inventory levels to increase in 2021,” Banister said. “First, builders have more permits in the pipeline, although that inventory may take longer because of lumber prices and availability. Next, mortgage for- bearance is phasing out, and 15% of Americans do not have a solid plan to catch up on their payments. Home- owners have enjoyed rapid appre- ciation in the values of their homes so most have plenty of equity to sell quickly without foreclosing. Finally, more people are ready to list as they become open to having strang- ers come through their house with COVID[-19] easing.” Banister said more inventory does not necessarily mean prices will drop. “Sellers have become accustomed to asking over the market value and getting it,” Banister said. “With more inventory, the days on market get longer. Next, the percentage of price reductions start to increase. When buyers have more choices, sellers tend to accept oers with inspection and appraisal contingencies, agree to repairs, give concessions or throw in

Arizona at the end of July, Powell said, and the city is bracing to see people reaching out for rent and mortgage assistance to stave o eviction. “There is a lack of aordable hous- ing across the country,” Powell said. “There is education that’s needed. I think there is a negative view of Section 8 housing. If you did have it come to your neighborhood, it’s not a negative. It’s a positive. There are inspections; the people meet with a housing specialist and go through a series of background checks. There is a great deal of oversight. It can be a very good thing, putting someone in stable housing with the resources to go with it.” Powell said, ultimately, there just are not enough aordable housing options in the city. “There is going to have to be more aordable housing, bottom line,” Powell said. Council Member Matt Orlando said Chandler City Council will continue discussing workforce housing, public

housing and residential density. “I don’t want to drive the workers out of the city,” Orlando said. “We have to be good civil servants and solve some of the problems [compa- nies] are facing to keep employment numbers up. If they can’t get the right mix of folks to work in their areas, they might leave. It eects the eco- nomic balance as well as the social balance.” Orlando said the city is discussing developer incentives to set aside a number of units in development for workforce housing; revitalizing older neighborhoods with code enforce- ment; and redeveloping city-owned properties for workforce housing, among other options. “We are trying to keep folks locally without having them drive 30-40 miles to get to their jobs in Chandler,” Orlando said.

a home warranty. Increased inventory means fewer bidding wars. When a seller is reviewing one oer, instead of 12, the buyer is much less likely to have to pay over the asking price.” Helping residents nd housing Leah Powell, director of neighbor- hood resources for the city of Chan- dler, said the city is a public housing authority that receives federal fund- ing to assist low-income Chandler families with housing. There are 303 aordable hous- ing units in the city, Powell said, but 1,000 families are on the waiting list for public housing. “I would say we have a demand that does not meet the available housing units, and the [Department of Hous- ing and Urban Development] does not allow us to build additional units,” Powell said. The last year has also held o evic- tions with an eviction moratorium in place since the early days of the pan- demic. That moratorium expires in

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PRICES

Experts are concerned that working-class people are getting priced out of the single-family housing market in southeast Valley cities such as Chandler, where the cost of single-family housing has increased in the last decade.

1,000 500 1,500 2,500 2,000 3,000

2012

2020

0

less than $149K

$150K-$199K

$200K-299K

$300K-$449K $450K-$750K

more than $750K

SOURCE: MARICOPA ASSOCIATION OF GOVERNMENTSCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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14

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

E. QUEEN CREEK RD. SCHOOL BOUNDARY COLLEGE PREP HIGH SCHOOL ARIZONA

The new campus will mark the rst time the students have their own playing elds and room to spread out and grow since the ACP model began in 2007. Inside Chandler’s new School The new high school is built to have a smaller campus feel than the rest of the district’s secondary schools. The ACP model has always aimed to administer a smaller school environment. Any student can attend the school through open enrollment, but it does have a 2-square- mile boundary.

E. OCOTILLO RD.

J.V. BASEBALL

E. BROOKS FARM RD.

FOOTBALL STADIUM

E. CHANDLER HEIGHTS RD.

MAP NOT TO SCALE

N

CAFETERIA & KITCHEN

VARSITY BASEBALL

E. RIGGS

GYM

MAP NOT TO SC

PERFORMING ARTS

PLAYFIELD

AUXILIARY GYM

CLASSROOMS

CLASSROOMS

$84M total cost 306,818 sq. ft. 7 sports spaces 1,200 enrollment 7 buildings

J.V. SOFTBALL

VARSITY SOFTBALL

TENNIS COURTS

ADMIN. CLASSROOMSMEDIA CENTER

N

E. BROOKS FARM RD.

SOURCE: CHANDLER USDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

as individuals and get to the road they want to continue on after high school.” New facility The new high school is 306,818 square feet, according to district o- cials, and construction—which was still ongoing in early July—will be largely completed by the time the school opens its doors to students July 21. Bickes said the school’s gym will not be ready as the year begins. “The facility is beautiful,” he said. “It’s really a new beginning for ACP.” The facility oers seven sports spaces and seven buildings in addition to a gym, a cafeteria and a bookstore. Students at this campus, in keeping with ACP tradition, will continue to wear uniforms—the only high school in the district that requires it. Arizona College Prep High School will, for the rst time in its history, have attendance boundaries with the new campus. A 2-square-mile bound- ary between Cooper and Lindsay roads and Ocotillo and Chandler Heights roads is set for the school, but Bickes said students from anywhere in the district can attend the school through the district’s open enrollment policy. “We oer the full range of honors and [Advanced Placement] classes in addition to regular classes and special education classes,” Bickes said. “Our aspirations are to build a personalized high school experience to meet the needs of each individual student.”

new campus in July. “It’s overwhelming in an exciting and fun way,” she said. “You walk in and it’s kind of like, ‘All this is for us?’ We always adapted to what was avail- able and necessary, but it’s awesome to see this campus be so much bigger than what we had ever imagined for the school. We will have a variety of dierent students, but we will keep that feel of being very focused on col- lege and career readiness. We know this school is dierent.” Bickes said the new campus will be heavily inuenced by the student body, just like at the previous campus. “Seniors run the rst day of school,” Bickes said. “They create a vision for what they want the school year to look like and set the tone that rst day. Their motto, they decided for the year, is ‘2022: The start of something new.’ I think kids talking to kids can be more impactful sometimes than adults talking to kids. This is their school, and the atmosphere is really up to them.” Bickes said even with the opening of the larger campus, Arizona College Prep High School will not lose the quality that makes it unique. “We all say it’s a family, andwe want to be that family at this new campus, too,” he said.

In last year’s graduating class of 187 seniors, more than $23.4 million in academic scholarships were given to students. Graduates from the school have been accepted to 128 colleges and universities including Johns Hopkins University, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Vanderbilt University and Yale University, to name a few. The school sees 99% of students matricu- late to a college or university, accord- ing to school ocials. Former Superintendent Camille Casteel said it was an honor for this campus to be the last built in her 25-year tenure as superintendent before she ocially retired in July. “I am so excited for them,” she said. “Teachers moved in [in late June], and the excitement at the campus is palpable. It’s a great place for families and another wonderful option for our students.” Bickes said the full-service facility is creating as much excitement among students as it is sta. “I watched a baseball practice here the other day and I don’t know who was more excited, the students or the coach,” he said. “We had sports teams before, but they always practiced somewhere else. They never had a home game on their campus.” School pride Advanced Placement U.S. History teacher Kristen Bunch said she is excited to welcome students to the

CONTINUED FROM 1

July 21 marks the start of the school year and the opening of Arizona Col- lege Prep High School—the district’s newest campus—which will house the Arizona College Prep students and sta in a state-of-the-art high school facility, Principal Robert Bickes said. The $84 million bond-funded facil- ity is outtted with a football eld; baseball and softball elds; a soccer eld; classroom buildings; and room for electives such as culinary arts, orchestra and choir. “The demand continued to grow as we went on,” Bickes said. “The rst graduating class had eight seniors. Eventually around 800 students were interested in the campus, and it kept growing.” Bickes said he anticipates around 1,200 students will walk through the halls of the new facility located at Gil- bert and Brooks Farm roads in Chan- dler this school year. “We will maintain all the sta and students from the other campus and with them, we will keep the culture that is so important to ACP,” he said. “It’s all about the connections stu- dents make here. We are tight-knit and want to make sure we do every- thing we can to ensure kids are valued

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CHANDLER EDITION • JULY 2021

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