Spring - Klein Edition | July 2021

SPRING KLEIN EDITION

2021 R E A L E S T A T E E D I T I O N

ONLINE AT

VOLUME 8, ISSUE 4  JULY 17AUG. 20, 2021

WESTWARD EXPANSION

THE CENTRUMREOPENS

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Springwoods Village transforms into City Place City Place, formerly known as Springwoods Village, is set to add roughly 600 single- and multifamily residential units by 2023 with thousands more in the works, developers of the master-planned community announced June 29. (Wesley Gardner/Community Impact Newspaper)

REAL ESTATE BRIEFS HOME IMPROVEMENT MARKET AT A GLANCE REAL ESTATE EDITION 2021 CCEMS ANNOUNCES NEWPARTNERSHIP

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BY WESLEY GARDNER

Formerly known as Springwoods Vil- lage, the 2,000-acre, master-planned community near Spring’s northern border is now City Place, according to Warren Wilson, executive vice presi- dent for CDC Houston, a subsidiary of Coventry Development Corp.

According to Wilson, the rebranding eort draws from the popularity of the existing CityPlace, a 60-acre mixed- use development within the master- planned community that includes a central plaza; oce buildings;

Hundreds of residential units and a pair of roadway projects are coming to the renamed Springwoods Village in the coming years, ocials with devel- oper CDC Houston announced during a June 29 press conference.

CONTINUED ON 19

17 15 14

Spring, Klein businesses look for labor as unemployment aid ends

“WE’RE GOING TOHAVE TOWORKUNTILWE ... GET THE LABOR FORCE THAT WE NEED. I GUESS THE OTHERALTERNATIVE IS CLOSINGAND THAT’S NOT ANALTERNATIVE.” RANDY HALL, HOKULIA SHAVE ICE FRANCHISE COOWNER

BY BROOKE ONTIVEROS

Clarissa and Randy Hall, the Spring franchise owners of Hokulia Shave Ice, are taking a risk. Understaed by roughly 60%, the couple will need 24 employees once they open their second Spring-area snow cone store July 17; they currently employ nine. “Worst-case scenario is going to be us spending addi- tional hours in the shack to make it successful. I mean, we just have to risk that,” Randy Hall said. “We understand

Clarissa and Randy Hall will open another Spring snow cone store in July. (Brooke Ontiveros/Community Impact Newspaper)

CONTINUED ON 22

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SPRING - KLEIN EDITION • JULY 2021

Joe’s surgery is now in the rearviewmirror. We put it there. Even before we meet one another, we know we have something in common. Because if you’re facing a neurological issue — you not only want compassion and technology, you want expert physicians with a never-give-in, never-give-up attitude. The kind of attitude that put Joe’s surgery in the rearview mirror, and put Joe back on the dance floor.

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THIS ISSUE

ABOUT US

Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the rst edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and Pugerville, Texas. We have expanded our operations to include hundreds of employees, our own printing operation and over 30 hyperlocal editions across three states. Our circulation is over 2 million residential mailboxes, and it grows each month with new residents and developments.

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

FROMKIM: Summer is the perfect time to spend with family and friends creating long-lasting memories. With only a few weeks left this summer, there is still time to enjoy activities, such as those featured in our To-Do List (see Page 7). In addition to local oerings, you can be at the beach in just over an hour or venture out west to the Hill Country and enjoy the beauty our state has to oer. Whatever you decide to do, s’mores are always a great way to end the day! Kim Giannetti, GENERALMANAGER

Community Impact Newspaper teams include general managers, editors, reporters, graphic designers, sales account executives and sales support, all immersed and invested in the communities they serve. Our mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Our core values are Faith, Passion, Quality, Innovation and Integrity.

FROMHANNAH: Due to a combination of building material and labor shortages, buying a new home is taking longer and becoming increasingly expensive across the Greater Houston area. Paired with low inventory, local real estate agents said these circumstances are creating an ideal seller’s market, while buyers are having to pay more for less. To learn more about the state of the local housing market in Spring and Klein, see our annual Real Estate Edition on pages 14-19. Hannah Zedaker, EDITOR

Our purpose is to be a light for our readers, customers, partners and each other.

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BUSINESS &DINING Local business development news that aects you

TRANSPORTATION &DEVELOPMENT Regular updates on area projects to keep you in the know

SCHOOL, CITY & COUNTY We attend area meetings to keep you informed

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SPRING  KLEIN EDITION • JULY 2021

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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vehicle, motorcycle, life and umbrella insurance policies. 346-355-5133. www.brightway.com The Mane Thing , an animal-assisted mental wellness service, celebrated its grand opening July 8. Customers can book a one-hour session to learn about equine care and create art on the side of a horse with safe paint at the horse- aided wellness and support center. The Mane Thing works with at-risk youth and those with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and offers both professional and personal coaching as well as mental health peer support sessions. 832-219-6263. www.themanethingllc.com COMING SOON 5 Houston-area eatery BB’s Tex- Orleans will open a new location this fall at 21441 Hwy. 249, Tomball, according to Maricela Bassler, chief brand officer for BB’s Tex-Orleans. The eatery will feature a Cajun-inspired menu, such as boiled crawfish, po’boys and homemade gumbo as well as a full-service bar. www.bbstexorleans.com 6 Dutch Bros Coffee is planning to open a third Spring-area coffee shop this fall at 8617 Spring Cypress Road, Spring. The Oregon-based drive-thru coffee company serves specialty coffee, smoothies, freezes, teas, a private-label Dutch Bros Blue Rebel energy drink and nitrogen-infused cold-brew coffee. Dutch Bros Coffee is also planning to open two additional area locations this summer, all of which will be locally operated by Todd

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NOWOPEN 1 Woodall’s Bar-B-Que celebrated its grand opening the week of July 5 at 22920 Kuykendahl Road, Ste. 500, Spring. With recipes handed down through generations, the family-owned restaurant specializes in traditional Texas barbecue such as brisket, ribs, chicken, turkey, sausage and burgers. 281-205-7717. www.woodallsbbq.com

2 Owner Dr. Raj Banga opened Harmony Pet Clinic on June 28 at 9166 FM 2920, Ste. 300, Tomball. The full-service animal clinic provides vaccines; wellness exams; emergency care; and surgeries, including spaying, neutering, and tumor or lump removal. 832-307-3366. www.harmonypetclinic.com 3 After closing its doors Feb. 22 due to damage caused by Winter Storm Uri, Primrose School of Spring-Klein

reopened June 14 at 22003 Bridgestone Lane, Spring. The private preschool offers care and after-school programs for chil- dren from infancy to age 12. 281-350-9595. www.primroseschools.com 4 Jorge Balderas opened Brightway, The Balderas Agency on June 14 at 23919 Gosling Road, Ste. B, Spring. The new Brightway Insurance Agency offers cus- tomized home, flood, auto, boat, condo, renters, personal articles, recreational GEARS RD.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TO-DO LIST

July & August events

COMPILED BY COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER STAFF

weight loss and general health and wellness. 832-562-3390. www.vitalityclinics.com 10 Beauty & Confidence Electrolysis relocated June 13 from 5529 Louetta Road, Ste. A, Spring, to 25420 Kuykend- ahl Road, Ste. B-400, The Woodlands. Owner Angie Quiroz first opened the business, which offers a permanent hair removal process called electrolysis, in Spring on April 1. 346-298-1172. http://bcelectrolysis.weebly.com ANNIVERSARIES 11 Locally owned business Robin’s Snowflake Donuts & Cafe celebrated its five-year anniversary July 4. Married couple Vuth and Robin Nou opened the business in July 2016 at 4660 Louetta Road, Ste. 170, Spring. The business of- fers gourmet kolaches and more than 60 varieties of doughnuts. However, Robin said the business is most known for its many flavors of egg rolls, such as boudin and smoked brisket with mac and cheese. 832-585-1106. www.facebook.com/ snowflakedonutslouetta 12 Cole Health , located at 16835 Deer Creek Drive, Spring, will celebrate its 20th anniversary in August. Founded by Jennifer and Adam Cole, Cole Health began as a home-based business in 2001 originally named Cole Speech and Language Center. Today, Cole Health is a family of companies including Cole Pedi- atric Therapy and Cole ABA Solutions that offers speech, occupational and physical therapy as well as applied behavior analy- sis services. 281-379-4373. www.colehealth.com NAME CHANGES 13 Following the completion of church- wide renovations in early July, Cypress Trails United Methodist Church will change its name to Spring Community Church effective Aug. 1, according to senior pastor Brandi Horton. Located at 22801 Aldine Westfield Road, Spring, the church will offer a traditional service at 9 a.m. followed by community groups at 10 a.m. and a contemporary service at 11 a.m. every Sunday beginning Aug. 8. The church’s new website, www.springcc.org, will launch Aug. 1. 281-353-2436. www.ctumc.org

COMPILED BY BROOKE ONTIVEROS

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AUG. 06&09

CATCHA FLICK COLLINS, PUNDT PARKS

Bring blankets, chairs and snacks to enjoy an outdoor showing of Disney’s animated movie “Brave.” Free mini bow crafts with cotton swab arrows are provided. 8-10 p.m. Free. Collins Park, 6727 Cypresswood Drive, Spring (Aug. 6); Pundt Park, 4129 Spring Creek Drive, Spring (Aug. 9). 713-274-4299. www.hcp4.net (Courtesy Harris County Precinct 4) A portion of proceeds from the event benefit Free the Captives, a nonprofit that fights against human trafficking. Period dress is required. 9 p.m.- midnight. $60 (one ticket), $95 (two tickets). Plane and Level, 203 Gentry St., Spring. 346-804-3058. www.facebook.com/victorious1.studio AUGUST 01 THROUGH SEPT. 06 DINE OUT FOR A CAUSE Visit participating restaurants throughout the Greater Houston area for a monthlong annual fundraiser benefiting the Houston Food Bank. Participating restaurants, announced starting July 15, serve specially priced, multicourse prix fix menus including brunch, lunch and dinner, available for dine-in and takeout. $20-$49 per meal. Locations and times vary. 713-223-3700. www.houstonfoodbank.org 11 , 18 AND 23 HEAD BACK TO SCHOOL Spring ISD students return to school Aug. 11, followed by Klein ISD students Aug. 18 and Cy-Fair ISD students Aug. 23. SISD students at Clark Primary School and Clark Elementary School return to school July 19. 281-891-6000. www.springisd.org. 832-249-4000. www.kleinisd.net. 281-897-4000. www.cfisd.net

Sassy Feet Dance Studio

COURTESY SASSY FEET DANCE STUDIO

JULY 16 THROUGHAUG. 01 ATTENDAMUSICAL Catch a showing of “9 to 5, The Musical” based on the hit 1980s movie. The musical contains some mature subjects and language; and candy, snacks and soda are available at the concession stand for $1 each. 8 p.m. (July 16-31), 3 p.m. (Aug. 1). $21 (adults), $18 (students, seniors and military). Playhouse 1960, 6814 Gant Road, Houston. 281-587-8243. www.playhouse1960.com 17 SIP ROSÉ Taste over 12 unique rosés, from sparkling to exotic wines. The wine room gives away a bottle of Methuselah of AIX rosé for those who buy a bottle or an extra glass of wine and sets up a photo booth area for wine drinkers to take pictures at. Rosé bottles are 15%-20% off for to-go purchases. Attendees with prepurchased tickets receive two free rosé tastings. Noon-9 p.m. $14 (four tastings), $20 (eight tastings), $25 (10 tastings). Envy Wine Room, 126 Midway St., Spring. 281-528-9868. www.envywineroom.com 30 VISIT THE ROARING 1920’S Experience the roaring ‘20s at a one-night-only “Great Gatsby”-themed party. Enjoy European wines and tapas while dancing to period music played by a DJ, a trumpeter and a saxophonist.

Sesock. The company is currently hiring for each of the new locations. www.dutchbros.com 7 A new emergency dispatch center that will serve nearly half a million people in north Harris County is set to be housed in the Emergency Services District No. 16/Klein Fire Department facility at 16810 Squyres Road, Spring. The operation, which will service fire response and emergency rescue calls, is being spearheaded by the Texas Emer- gency Communications Center. According to TECC Executive Director Lori Broad- rick, the new dispatch center will create a more unified operation for emergency services responders throughout the growing area with a tentative start date set for Sept. 3. www.kleinfiredept.com RELOCATIONS 8 Sassy Feet Dance Studio will relocate from 5020 Louetta Road, Ste. 150A, Spring, to 6402 Louetta Road, Ste. 120, Spring, on Aug. 1. The dance studio offers classes in ballet, pointe, jazz, tap, hip- hop, contemporary, jazz funk, lyrical and musical theater for students ages 4 years old up to adults. 346-236-6188. www.sassyfeetdancestudio.com 9 Vitality Hormones & IV Bar moved in late April from 111 Vision Park Blvd., Ste. 100, Shenandoah, to 8707 Spring Cypress Road, Ste. E, Spring. The business offers hormone evaluation and balancing with services including IV infusions, sexual health medicine, vitamin injections, vampire facials, O shots and P shots, and other services geared toward

Find more or submit Spring and Klein events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES

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ONGOING PROJECT

UPCOMING PROJECTS

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Aldine Westfield Road, Sciaaca Road intersection improvements The Harris County Engineering Department is designing a project to install a warranted traffic signal at the intersection of Aldine Westfield and Sciaaca roads in Spring. Bryant said Harris County officials aim to begin construction on the project in the third quarter of 2022, and the project is expected to take 40 days to complete once construction begins. Timeline: third quarter 2022-fourth quarter 2022 Cost: TBD Funding source: Harris County Engineering Department

Kuykendahl Road, Preserve Way intersection improvements The Harris County Engineering Department is designing a project to install a traffic signal at the intersection of Kuykendahl Road and Preserve Way. According to Victoria Bryant, assistant director for Harris County Precinct 4’s Capital Improvement Projects Division, the county hopes to begin construction in the fourth quarter of 2021, and the project is expected to take 40 days to complete once construction begins. Timeline: fourth quarter 2021-first quarter 2022 Cost: TBD Funding source: Harris County Engineering Department

BirnamWood Boulevard Segment 1 Harris County Precinct 4 is studying a project to extend Birnam Wood Boulevard from north of Hickorygate Drive to just south of Otto Road as a four-lane concrete paved section with improved drainage accommodations and traffic signal installation/modification as warranted. Bryant said the county’s goal is to complete the project’s study phase by the fourth quarter of 2021. Timelines for the remaining phases of the project will be identified upon the completion of the study phase, she said. Timeline: TBD Cost: TBD Funding source: Harris County Precinct 4

Riley Fuzzel Road expansion Construction is underway on a project to expand Riley Fuzzel Road to five lanes with improved drainage between Elm Street and the Hardy Toll Road. The project will also realign the road at West Hardy Road to incorporate a four-way intersection and close the railroad crossing at Caroline Street to accommodate a new crossing north of Riley Fuzzel. While the roadway is open, additional design work is underway to connect East Hardy and Riley Fuzzel roads, which was not part of the original scope of work. Timeline: April 13, 2020-fourth quarter 2021 Cost: $5.02 million Funding source: Harris County Precinct 4

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF JUNE 29. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT SKLNEWS@COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

WORTHWHILE CONVERSATIONS APPEARANCES CAN BE DECEIVING…

UNDER THE FIDUCIARY STANDARD, DOES PAYING A FEE FOR FINANCIAL ADVICE ASSURE AN ADVISOR IS ACTING IN YOUR BEST INTEREST? People assume that, of course. But just because a financial advisor is associated with a Registered Investment Advisor (RIA) firm does not mean all advice will be fully subject to the fiduciary standard. The majority of financial advisors working under an RIA firm also affiliate with a broker-dealer and routinely “switch hats” from advisor to broker when working with clients. This switch may be unapparent, but it means the legal standard for advice has been lowered. WASN’T THE LAW RECENTLY CHANGED SO THAT BROKERS ARE UNDER A FIDUCIARY STANDARD? You are referring to the new Regulation BI (“Best Interest”) that does indeed apply to brokers. It IS a step up from the old “Suitability” standard, but it stops short of applying a fiduciary standard to brokers on all of their activities for clients. So, this means the client must understand when their broker is offering investment advisory services (and acting as a full fiduciary) versus when they are functioning in a product-selling mode (and under the new, but lower, BI standard).

THAT SOUNDS A BIT CONFUSING TO SORT OUT… It can be confusing. Firms are now required to provide a simple disclosure to you called a “Client Relationship Summary.” In plain language and just a few pages, this must answer key questions about fees and potential conflicts of interest. IS THERE A SIMPLE WAY CLIENTS CAN ENSURE THEY ARE ALWAYS UNDER THE FIDUCIARY UMBRELLA? Ask your advisor to answer one question, in writing: “Will 100% of the recommendations you make to me in all of our business interaction be subject to the fiduciary legal standard?” Imagine how a “Yes” response can eliminate a myriad of concerns in the client-advisor relationship. This is the model we follow at Linscomb & Williams. Now in our 50th year of business, our experienced team is ready right now to meet and renew your confidence in a truly client-centered wealth management relationship, either virtually, or in person, from any of our locations. For more information, or a copy of our Form ADV, Part II, with all of our disclosures, call Grant Williams at 281 841 0707, or visit www.linscomb-williams.com.

Lantz Bowman and Phillip Hamman discuss the importance of using advisors who advise clients exclusively under the fiduciary standard. (Left to right: Lantz Bowman, CFP ® ; and Phillip Hamman, CFA, CFP ® )

1925 Hughes Landing Blvd., Ste. 200 The Woodlands, Texas 77380 281.841.0707 www.linscomb-williams.com Linscomb & Williams is not an accounting firm.

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SPRING - KLEIN EDITION • JULY 2021

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

DEVELOPMENT The Centrumcompletes renovations, reopens 4 years after HurricaneHarvey

BY HANNAH ZEDAKER

kitchen, the addition of a greenroom with dressing rooms and television monitors, Americans with Disabil- ities Act-compliant restrooms, a renovated bridal suite, state-of-the- art lighting and sound systems, and new theater seating, among other enhancements. The venue also traded its burgundy color scheme for cooler blue and gray tones. The revitalized Centrum also features a $330,000 oodgate system, watertight doors and sealing walls to make the venue more resilient in the event of another ood. Appliances, such as air conditioning units, have also been raised 3 feet above ground level, and hallways that had previ- ously been carpeted are now tiled for additional ood-resiliency measures. Performing arts Although renovations are continu- ing to wrap up as of mid-July, the Centrum reopened for Easter Sunday service earlier this year and hosted its rst event June 18, a graduation ceremony for the Commonwealth Institute of Funeral Services. In time for its 25th anniversary, Cypress Creek FACE will also return to The Centrum with its 2021-22 Star-Lit Series, which will run Oct. 16-May 14. “We are excited to announce we will be back in The Centrum for our 25th anniversary season, 2021-22,” said Nanci Decker, Cypress Creek FACE executive director, in a state- ment. “When we lost The Centrum to ooding during Hurricane Harvey in August 2017, we thought that was hard, but being forced to close down by a pandemic for over a year has been heartbreaking. Now that the

AREVITALIZEDVENUE Improvements at The Centrum include the addition of a greenroom, a renovated bridal suite, and state-of-the-art lighting and sound systems.

After a nearly four-year closure following damage caused by Hurricane Harvey in August 2017, renovations are wrapping up this summer at The Centrum with a slate of events scheduled to take place over the next year. For 20 years, The Centrum served as a cornerstone for the Spring and Klein community, hosting both church services for the Cypress Creek Christian Church and Community Center and performing arts events for local organizations, such as the Cypress Creek Foundation for the Arts and Community Enrichment, prior to Hurricane Harvey. After being ooded with 2.5 feet of water, the 21,000-square-foot venue has since been closed to the public during ongoing renovations and negotiations with the Federal Emergency Manage- ment Agency. After receiving a $1.09 million grant from FEMA last May and hosting a fundraiser last summer, Norma Lowrey, the executive director of the Cypress Creek Christian Church and Community Center, said church ocials were able to begin construction on the $2.7 million project last August. “I’m just excited to get to this point,” Lowrey said. “I think [The Centrum reopening] will give the community a shot in the arm because for the past three or four years, there has not been a space like this, and users had to go to dierent facilities. It’s just one more step in recovery from Harvey.” Improvements at The Centrum include an upgraded catering

The 21,000-square-foot venue is able to seat 877 people and features a catering kitchen. (Hannah Zedaker/Community Impact Newspaper)

CYPRESS CREEK

N

The venue now features a $330,000 oodgate system. (Courtesy Bruce Frogge)

6823 Cypresswood Drive, Spring

SOURCE: CYPRESS CREEK CHRISTIAN CHURCH AND COMMUNITY CENTERCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

pandemic numbers are down and The Centrum is being renovated again, we are extremely excited to be present- ing performances again.” Originally anticipated to open by Christmas 2020, Lowrey said a shortage of labor and materials due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic has delayed The Centrum’s reopen- ing. Custom-built items, such as the facility’s 12 air conditioning units and lighting and sound systems, have also slowed the process, she said. “I think people, just in this last

year, have been missing this kind of experience,” Senior Minister Bruce Frogge said. “At this point, I don’t even think people care what the con- cert is; they just want to gather with people and participate in something.” Church ocials said a donor appre- ciation event is planned for early September with a grand opening celebration to follow. For more infor- mation about booking The Centrum for an event, call 281-376-7121 or visit www.thecypresscreekcenter.org/ the-centrum.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

NEWS BRIEFS Cypress Creek EMS, American Jet International contract lets local medical personnel take flight

Spring ISD trustees retire

BY WESLEY GARDNER

Spring ISD trustees Donald Davis and Jana Gonzales— who represent positions 6 and 7, respectively—stepped down from the board July 1 after announcing their retirements June 22. Gonzales, who served on the board for 15 years, said at the meeting she was stepping down because she is moving out of the district. “I will never stop supporting Spring ISD,” she said. “Thank you for allowing me to serve this wonderful district.” Davis, who served on the board for six years, said while he is stepping down, he will remain active within the district. “We have dierent values, but there was a common bond on this board: We always put our students rst,” he said. District ocials accepted applications through July 12 to temporarily ll the vacancies until the Nov. 2 elections are held. Board members will review applications and ll vacancies by appointment during its Aug. 5 work session. Davis Gonzalez

BY WESLEY GARDNER

Cypress Creek EMS is set to add another chapter to its 45-year history by partnering with American Jet International to provide a medical ight crew and equipment to assist with medical transports throughout the nation and abroad out of AJI’s Houston headquarters at Hobby Airport. CCEMS CEO Wren Nealy signed the agreement with AJI—an aircraft charter company that provides medical ights and organ transports—at Hobby Airport on June 30. The new partnership comes as CCEMS’ contract with Harris County Emergency Services District No. 11 enters its nal months. That contract will expire Sept. 4. “This is a glimpse into what Cypress Creek [EMS] is going to be for the next 46 years,” Nealy said. “This is just one of the opportunities that we have been working on. ... We’re denitely not going away.” CCEMS ocials said the partnership with AJI will ensure all aircraft are employed with

state-of-the-art medical equipment. Ocials said aircraft satellite communication and CCEMS’ body-worn cameras will allow physicians to provide livestreamed telemedicine. AJI Director of Operations Sean Borland echoed Nealy’s excitement for the new partnership. “CCEMS is an outstanding medical provider that is constantly innovating ways to serve the community,” Borland said in a statement. CCEMS and American Jet International ocials celebrate their new partnership at Hobby Airport. (Wesley Gardner/Community Impact Newspaper)

Local school districts invest in teachers, sta

County creates $833Mood-resilience trust

Teachers and sta at Spring, Klein and Cy-Fair ISDs can look forward to pay raises in the 2021-22 school year, following the June approval of each district’s 2021-22 budget. In KISD’s $494.5 million budget approved June 14, all employees received a 2.5% pay increase of the control point; the district’s starting teacher salary rose to $57,800; and returning teachers saw a salary increase of $1,550. Additionally, all returning benet-eligible employees received stipends. “Our Klein family is made up of remarkable people who are dedi- cated to the success of every stu- dent, and we’re pleased to continue oering competitive compensation in our district,” KISD Superinten- dent Jenny McGown said. Similarly, SISD’s $433.6 million budget approved June 22 includes more than $6 million in sta invest- ment. All SISD sta members will receive a 2% salary increase based on the control point—or midpoint salary—of each position and the starting teach salary rose to $57,500. “Our goal with compensation is to BY WESLEY GARDNER, DANICA LLOYD & HANNAH ZEDAKER

BY HANNAH ZEDAKER

department presented recom- mendations June 29 to address the decit, which were approved, including the creation of a Harris County ood-resilience trust to backstop the bond program and provide for ood-control needs beyond the bond. The trust sits at $489 million, but the county will add $343 million by scal year 2030 by increasing the annual transfer from the Harris County Toll Road Authority by 25%, or $40 million, beginning in 2023. “With this ood-resilience trust, we’re taking money that we could have used on other projects,” Pre- cinct 1 Commissioner Rodney Ellis said. “We are robbing Peter to pay Paul because we have not gotten the money from the [Texas General Land Oce].”

INVESTING IN EDUCATORS Spring, Klein and Cy-Fair ISDs each increased their starting teacher salaries ahead of the 2021-22 school year, in hopes of staying competitive with neighboring districts.

Harris County Commissioners Court established an $833 million ood-resilience trust at its June 29 meeting to ll the funding gap the Harris County Flood Control District is facing in its $2.5 billion bond program approved by voters in 2018. The Harris County Budget Oce revealed a $1.3 billion shortfall to complete bond projects March 9 due to a lack of partner funds. While the county has chipped away at the funding gap, $951 million in unmet needs remained as of late June. “We’ve done pretty good ... by securing $1.25 billion in partner funding. But we have a long way to go still,” interim HCFCD Executive Director Alan Black said June 29. The HCFCD and the budget

KLEIN ISD

$56,500

2020-21

+2.3%

$57,800

2021-22

SPRING ISD

$56,500

2020-21

+1.77%

$57,500

2021-22

CYFAIR ISD

$56,000

2020-21

+4.46%

$58,500

2021-22

SOURCES: SPRING, KLEIN AND CYFAIR ISDS COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

“WE ARE ROBBING PETER TO PAY PAUL BECAUSE WE HAVE NOT GOTTEN THE MONEY FROM THE TEXAS GENERAL LAND OFFICE.” RODNEY ELLIS, HARRIS COUNTY PRECINCT 1 COMMISSIONER

always ensure we are in a position to recruit and retain talent across the district,” SISD Superintendent Rodney Watson said. CFISD’s $1.09 billion budget approved June 24 included a 5% sal- ary increase for employees. Starting teacher salaries rose to $58,500.

13

SPRING  KLEIN EDITION • JULY 2021

2021 R E A L E S T A T E E D I T I O N

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER IS PROUD TO SAY THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSOR

SILVER SPONSOR

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A Montessori based education helps prepare children for a lifetime of learning and success in school. Children at Klein-Spring Montessori learn to love and care for each other, their environment, and themselves.

MARKET AT AGLANCE Eight of the Spring and Klein area’s nine ZIP codes saw an increase in the number of homes sold from June 2020-May 2021 as compared to the prior 12 months, while ZIP code 77066 saw a decline. The average price of homes sold rose year over year in all Spring- and Klein-area ZIP codes in that time, with the exception of ZIP code 77070 which saw a decrease. Alina Rogers, a broker with Sparrow Realty, said the spike in the average price of homes sold in ZIP code 77389 is due, in part, to several $1 million homes sold there.

COMPILED BY HANNAH ZEDAKER

249

45

77389

99 TOLL

2920

77373

77388

77379

77070

77090

77069

77068

1960

SOURCE: ALINA ROGERS, A BROKER WITH SPARROW REALTYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

77066

N

June 2019-May 2020 June 2020-May 2021 AVERAGE HOME SALES PRICE

NUMBER OF HOMES SOLD June 2019-May 2020 June 2020-May 2021

335

189

345

$191,787 $210,469

+19.23% $243,974 $290,889 +12.8% $193,628 $218,420 +6.8% $245,893 $262,614

+12.68% $270,987 $305,359 +25.69% $179,240 $225,282 +107.76% $454,712 $944,697

-7.76%

+7.94%

+8.41%

+9.74%

309

204

374

521

229

979

-15.45% $360,158 $304,524 +18.84% $316,243 $375,834

+22.65%

+13.97%

+14.91%

639

261

1,125

1,382

722

817

+18.89%

+21.61%

+27.05%

1,643

878

1,038

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

GUIDE

Local businesses oer home improvement tips

2 0 2 1 R E A L E S T A T E E D I T I O N

HOME IMPROVEMENT COMPILED BY WESLEY GARDNER & MATT STEPHENS

MAINTAINING YOUR HOME

The National Association of Home Builders oers routine home maintenance tips for homeowners looking to maintain their homes’ value and ensure their safety.

1

ASKAHOME REMODELER

2

Luis and MJ Aguilar, owners of LA Home Solutions and Remodeling in Spring, oer several tips to make sure homeowners are prepared for hurricane season.

Find other useful home ownership tips at www.nahb.org.

6

9

WHAT CAN HOMEOWNERS DO TO MINIMIZE HURRICANE DAMAGE? Before the season gets busy, you want to make sure you have enough plywood on hand in case you need to board up your windows. ... One of the other things that gets overlooked is just cleaning your gutters to make sure that there is no excessive debris in there. ... Sealing windows and doors is also a huge thing people just don’t really think of. WHAT CAN HOMEOWNERS DO TO ABATE FLOOD DAMAGE? Have some fans available that you could run o of a generator in case you do have ooding. Then, you can immediately

start to dry some of those areas out. Once water gets into your home, there’s not a whole lot you can do other than moving things o the wall. ... When moisture sits in an area that’s not very well ventilated, mildew and mold start to grow a lot quicker. WHAT LONGTERM WEATHER SOLUTIONS CAN BE INSTALLED? When you’re talking about really high winds and debris ying around, getting shutters on your windows really helps. ... Another thing is to hire a licensed electrician to come in and put a house surge protection system in to help with the electrical items.

7

4

8

10

5

3

EXTERIOR

INTERIOR

1 Roofs should be inspected by a qualied roofer every three years, and skylights should be inspected so leaks do not develop. 2 Ensure downspouts and gutters do not get clogged with leaves and other debris. 3 Inspect siding each year to see if it needs repainting, and trim shrubs away so they do not touch the siding. 4 Check for split or cracked caulking on windows and doors annually, and replace the caulk as necessary. 5 Moving parts of garage doors need to be oiled once every three months.

6 Air lters require regular replacement, generally once every three months. 7 Safety and security : Regularly check security alarms and circuit breakers. Check batteries in smoke and carbon monoxide detectors twice a year. 8 Clean each faucet’s aerator every three to four months. Maintain garbage disposals by running cold water through them. 9 Masonry walls can develop a white powder that can be scrubbed o with water and a sti brush. 10 Hardwood oors without polyurethane need to be waxed with a liquid or paste “spirit” wax. Use emulsion wax on vinyl.

Luis and MJ Aguilar Owners

STUEBNER AIRLINE RD.

LA Home Solutions and Remodeling 6635 Spring Cypress Drive, Ste. B, Spring 281-707-4271 www.lahomesolutionsinc.com

N

SOURCE: NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF HOME BUILDERSCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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SPRING  KLEIN EDITION • JULY 2021

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

REAL ESTATE BRIEFS

2 0 2 1 R E A L E S T A T E E D I T I O N

Material demands delaying construction, driving up prices

Development updates

BY DANICA LLOYD & HANNAH ZEDAKER

COMPILED BY WESLEY GARDNER

IN SHORT SUPPLY Contractors across the U.S. are facing material shortages in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a U.S. Chamber of Commerce survey.

Due to a rise in demand for construction mate- rials, 71% of contractors said they have faced a shortage of supplies needed to complete projects, and 82% said cost uctuations have aected their business, according to the U.S. Chamber of Com- merce’s quarterly Commercial Construction Index report released March 18. Rising costs and a short supply of materials have caused construction delays locally and beyond, said Mike Dishberger, CEO of Houston-based Sandcas- tle Homes and former Greater Houston Builders Association president. “People had nothing better to do [during the pandemic] than stay at home and decide they want to buy a new house or remodel,” he said. “So, demand has exceeded supply, and when that happens, prices rise.” For example, Dishberger said plywood cost $7 per sheet in April 2020 and was up to $50 per sheet this June. A recent copper shortage increased the price of his electrical materials by 25%, he said. Dishberger said he has seen costs go up in the past but never quite to this extent. Realtor Janet Dziedzic, who has been a part of Spring-based The Matthews Team RE/MAX Legends for 17 years, said building materials, such as windows, tile and home appliances, are in short supply. While brick used to take six to 10 weeks to get delivered, Dziedzic said it is now taking anywhere from 16 to 20 weeks. “Builders are getting frustrated because where it used to take them four months or so to build a home, it’s now taking more like ve to seven months or even eight months,” Dziedzic said. On top of rising costs of lumber and other mate- rials, Dziedzic said increasing prices for laborers are also contributing to the problem. As a result, Dziedzic said resale homes are becoming more attractive options for many poten- tial homebuyers. However, low inventory is posing challenges on the resale side of the market. “The buyers who were looking [for homes] under $200,000 are now competing with investors,”

CADENCE CREEK Construction is underway on Cadence Creek, a multifamily community for residents age 55 and older located at 21901 Gosling Road, Spring. The complex, coming from developer Caldwell Communities, will feature one- and two-bedroom apartments ranging from 678-1,242 square feet. The community is projected to open in mid-2022, and amenities include a resort-style lap pool, a tness center, walking trails, a movement studio, a theater room and a game room. 713-690-0000 • www.cadencecreek.com Number of units: 189 Projected opening date: summer 2022

2020

2021

Contractors who expect their revenue to increase in the next year

47% 36%

Contractors whose businesses were aected by material cost uctuations

65% 82%

P R I N G S T U E B N E R R D .

Contractors facing or aected by material shortages

37% 71%

2920

N

VISTAS AT KLEIN LAKE Vistas at Klein Lake is a roughly 89-acre gated community located o TC Jester Boulevard and Spring Cypress Road. The neighborhood comprises 181 single-family lots with prices starting around $610,000. Vistas at Klein Lake is zoned to Klein ISD and features walking trails looping around lakes, bridges and an overlook gazebo. As of mid-July, Section 1 has ve sites available, while Section 2 is complete and Section 3 has 17 lots remaining. 888-424-8330 or 346-220-1709 • www.lennar.com Number of homes: 181 Opened: 2015

THE COST OF COVID19 Survey responses for the rst quarter of the year revealed 80% of contractors were experiencing project delays due to COVID-19. SOURCE: U.S. CHAMBER OF COMMERCE COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION INDEX Q1 2021COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER she said. “So these cash oers that are coming in over asking price are beating our rst-time home- buyers who used to be able to get a home around $200,000.” Dishberger said he expects to see elevated costs for several more months, and he does not anticipate costs ever declining to prepandemic levels. “Until they get supply channels worked out where they have materials going across the country in rail, trucks, ship—however they get here—and get employees to work to do that, the issues are going to continue,” he said.

2920

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