The Woodlands Edition | October 2020

COMMUNITY

150years of history Tamina is an unincorporated community that was founded in 1871 by freed slaves following the end of the Civil War. It is the site of a cemetery expected to receive a historical designation from the state this year.

SHENANDOAH

SWEET REST CEMETERY  TAMINA AFRICAN AMERICAN CEMETERY

A sign marks the boundaries of the unincorporated Tamina community. (Andrew Christman/Community Impact Newspaper)

TAMINA RD.

45

TAMINA

OAK RIDGE SCHOOL RD.

OAK RIDGE NORTH

Students attending OSHA training learn about re extinguisher safety. (Courtesy Rita Wiltz)

SOURCES: ELIJAH EASLEY, RITA WILTZ COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Collaborative eorts The unincorporated Tamina community has been able to collaborate with groups and government ocials to bring needed resources to its population.

Tamina community pushes for aid and change Members of the unincorporated, historic Tamina community have pushed to expand health care resources for residents during the coronavirus pan- demic while continuing to struggle with local issues such as poor drainage, community leaders said. Rita Wiltz, a community representative and community members had tested positive. Wiltz said while testing was available, 693 people in the surrounding area made use of the resources, BY ANDREW CHRISTMAN

MAY

SEPTEMBER OCTOBER

Free coronavirus testing was provided for 693 people in the area through the collaboration of area groups and ocials.

more than what had initially been planned for. Through $25,000 of grant funding, Children’s Books on Wheels was able to host training courses for the OSHA 30 certicate to residents free of charge through September, which taught safety responsibility and hazards that workers can experience on a job site. The class had eight graduates, and Wiltz said the certications can be used in industries such as construction and oil and gas.

St. Christus Mobile Clinic is providing free u vaccinations.

the executive director of Tamina-based nonprot Children’s Books on Wheels, has helped organize a variety of events including coronavirus testing, free u vaccinations, and Occupational Safety and Health Administration courses to provide job training for residents. “We never missed a beat,”

NOVEMBER

SUMMER

Historical certication is expected from the state of Texas for Tamina Sweet Rest Cemetery.

Eight local residents received occupational training certicates through programs hosted by Children’s Books on Wheels.

SOURCES: RITA WILTZ, ELIJAH EASLEYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Wiltz also said a partner- ship with Houston-based St. Christus Mobile Clinic allowed children and adults to get free u vaccinations through September and October before the start of u season. However, despite the

“WE HAVE STREETS THAT FLOODREALLY BAD. ... IT IS SOBAD, YOU ALMOST NEEDABOAT.” RITA WILTZ, DIRECTOR, CHILDREN’S BOOKS ON WHEELS

Wiltz said. “We had volunteers come in and work with us to provide the services for the children and residents.” Community Impact Newspaper has previously reported Tamina, located east of I-45 and bordered by Shenandoah and Oak Ridge

Tamina Sweet Rest Cemetery. The cemetery has been under standing water due to ooding for several years. The organization’s chair, Elijah Easley, said restoration progress is at a standstill for the time being, though he noted the project gained some traction over the past year. Easley said the organization is waiting for the cemetery to receive a historical certication from the state of Texas, which is anticipated to happen in November. “They have to come out and walk the grounds to get it declared as historical,” Easley said. “It is a two-fold process. We cannot do anything for now until we get the rest of the water out.” Easley said he has met with Mett’s oce, who has pledged support for the project. “I believe we are going to get a x for it,” Easley said.

North, was founded in the 1870s when the Houston and Great Northern Railroad line was built through Montgomery County. A Tamina community web- site describes it as one of the few original African American settlements left in the country. In May, Wiltz was part of a collaboration consisting of City Cathedral Church; the Tamina Steering Committee; Montgomery County Precinct 4 Commissioner James Metts; the Texas Division of Emergency Management; and U.S. Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee, DHouston, to bring free coronavirus testing to the area after several

advances the community has been seeing, Wiltz said the area is still suering from problems such as poor drainage and little relief from ood damage. “There is a lot of money coming through the county, and we are concerned with [whether] some of it [will come] through Tamina,” she said. “With the hurricane and oods that come, we have streets that ood really bad right o of Main Street. It is so bad, you almost need a boat.” Another local group pushing for county aid is the Tamina Cemetery and Community Development Corp., which aims to restore the

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THE WOODLANDS EDITION • OCTOBER 2020

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