Bellaire - Meyerland - West University Edition | Sept. 2020

BELLAIRE MEYERLAND WEST UNIVERSITY EDITION

VOLUME XX, ISSUE XX  XXXXXXXXXX, 2020 2020 PUBLIC EDUCATION EDITION

ONLINE AT

VOLUME 2, ISSUE 5  SEPT. 330, 2020

EQUITY

Home to 280 schools, Houston ISD has 135 campuses with an A or B rating under 2019 state accountability standards, but some neighborhoods have few or none. HISD has launched an eort to gure out how to bring equitable access to every student.

SOLVING FOR

SOURCE: TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

C-F rated schools: acceptable or in need of improvement

A-B rated schools: exemplary/recognized performance

Total number of students in C-below schools: 105,184

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of students are disadvantaged 75%

of students are disadvantaged 94%

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Bellaire P&Z to consider fate of parking lot

of students are disadvantaged 80%

District overall

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STAAR scores: At or above grade level in English Despite some gains, HISD struggles to close achievement gaps on state standardized tests.

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90

Economically disadvantaged All students

25% 50% 75% 100%

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CITY & COUNTY

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ARCHWAY ACADEMY LOCAL SCHOOLS DISTRICT DATA EDUCATION E D I T I O N 2020 PUBLIC SPONSOREDBY Marine Military Academy

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'13-14 '14-15 '15-16 '16-17 '17-18 '18-19 0%

HISD PROJECT LOOKS TOBALANCE THE EQUATION 18

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After PPPparachute, where will small businesses land?

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“WHEN THINGS DID OPEN, THE ACTIVITY OF GETTING THINGS BACKGOINGHAS BEEN REALLY SLUGGISH.” CHRIS MACHA, OWNER OF ELECTRICAL PARTS OUTLET NEAR UPTOWN

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Janice Jucker has seen her fair share of disasters as a busi- ness owner in Houston. As the owner of Three Brothers Bakery—which has loca- tions in Braeswood, in Memorial and on Washington Ave- nue—Jucker said she has been through four oods, a re and a hurricane. As of March, she can add a global pandemic to the list. “When thingsrst startedhappening,wehadabigplummet CONTINUED ON 21

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THIS ISSUE

CONTENTS

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

IMPACTS

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Now Open, Coming Soon &more TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES 7 3 project updates to know CITY& COUNTY 9 News from Bellaire and West University

MARKET TEAM SENIOR EDITOR Matt Dulin CITY HALL REPORTER Emma Whalen REPORTER Hunter Marrow SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNER Anya Gallant METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Jason Culpepper ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Kristina Shackelford MANAGING EDITOR Marie Leonard ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Tessa Hoee CORPORATE LEADERSHIP PUBLISHERS AND FOUNDERS John and Jennifer Garrett GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Warner John and Jennifer Garrett began Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 in Pugerville, TX. The company’s mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Today we operate across ve metropolitan areas, providing hyperlocal, nonpartisan news produced by our full-time journalists in each community we serve. BECOMEA#COMMUNITYPATRON CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES DIRECTOR Tess Coverman WHOWE ARE

FROMKRISTINA: September is nally here, and although it may look dierent, the 2020-2021 academic year is getting underway. In addition to our education section, take a peek at a hyperlocal analysis on the Paycheck Protection Program (see Page 21). Don’t forget to shop local and stay up to date on what new businesses are open and coming soon (see Page 5). Kristina Shackelford, ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

PUBLIC EDUCATION

DISTRICT DATA HISD at a glance CAMPUS DATA

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FROMMATT: The Bellaire-Meyerland-West University area enjoys great public schools, but that is not the case for some parts of the district. It is going to take an all-in approach to make sure all of Houston ISD’s schools and students have the best chance for success, especially as COVID-19 has made inequalities starkly apparent, district leaders and community members told us for our front-page story. Matt Dulin, SENIOR EDITOR

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Neighborhood &magnet schools FEATURE

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Archway Academy

THIS ISSUE BY THE NUMBERS

Local sources 16

New businesses 4

Neighborhood schools 21

3,035

Local PPP loans

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BELLAIRE  MEYERLAND  WEST UNIVERSITY EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

IMPACTS

COMPILED BY MATT DULIN & HUNTER MARROW

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

WESTHEIMER RD.

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HERMANN PARK

WEST UNIVERSITY PLACE

W. HOLCOMBE BLVD.

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Work on the Kolter Elementary “Grassroom” could be soon underway. FEATURED IMPACT SCHOOL NOTES Site preparation work and construction on a new outdoor learning space at Kolter Elementary School, 9710 Runnymeade Drive, Houston, was slated to begin in late August or early September, just weeks after the newly built school building opened for sta to begin moving in. The new space takes the school’s original “Grassroom” concept—a learning lab based around agriculture and local nature—with a completely new design provided pro bono by landscape architects with Clark Condon, said Ryhsse Goldfarb, a parent helping to lead the eort. “It was a really big part of our school program prior to [Hurricane] Harvey. It made our school unique. But Harvey destroyed everything,” Goldfarb said. The rst phase, which includes a vegetable garden, could be up and running in the fall semester, which means the school can resume its sweet potato festival and other events. Like its original, the Grassroom will also include prairie and a pond, but the new design will be wheelchair accessible and will also feature a buttery garden and fruit orchard. The Kolter Parent-Teacher Organization will organize more fundraising opportunities to continue developing the Grassroom to realize the full vision, Goldfarb said. https://kolterpto.com/the-grassroom RENDERING COURTESY CLARK CONDON

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BAYLAND PARK

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BEECHNUT ST.

AMHERST ST.

BRAYS BAYOU

UNIVERSITY BLVD.

N. BRAESWOOD BLVD.

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WILLOWBEND BLVD.

MAP NOT TO SCALE N TM; © 2020 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER CO. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

NOWOPENREOPENINGS 1 The John P. McGovern Museum of Health and Medical Science reopened to the general public Aug. 22. The museum, located at 1515 Hermann Drive, Houston, reopened with new hours and updated health protocols. The museum had been closed since March 17 in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. During the closure, the museum provided support for front- line health care workers and medical or- ganizations by hosting emergency blood drives and donating personal protective equipment to organizations in need. 713-521-1515. www.thehealthmuseum.org 2 MYX Blend Bar opened a new location in Rice Village at 2524 Amherst St., Ste. E110, Houston, on Aug. 1. MYX Blend Bar allows customers to create custom lipsticks and lip gloss that reect an individual’s style by choosing from eight dierent bases and then blending in pigments, avors, anti-aging treatments 3 Men’s Health Bellaire opened July 27 at 5103 Bellaire Blvd., Ste. 240, and is now accepting appointments. The clinic specializes in men’s sexual wellness, including the treatment of low testos- terone. Men’s Health Bellaire uses an integrated, holistic approach to health care that focuses on restoring vitality and improving a man’s sexual wellness and performance. 832-925-7712. https://menshealthbellaire.com 4 Boxwood Dentistry , located at 5101 Bellaire Blvd., Ste. 260, opened in June and is oering dental care for all ages, including cosmetics and general dentist- ry. Rhesa Bautista is a native Houstonian and more. 713-393-7262. www.myxblendbar.com

who earned her doctorate of dental surgery at The University of Texas School of Dentistry in 2003. She has nished postgraduate training at The Las Vegas Institute for Advanced Dental Studies. 281-407-1266. https://boxwooddentistry.com 5 Houston catering business and farmer’s market staple Little Kitchen HTX opened a new cafe in August at Rice University’s Brochstein Pavilion, 6100 Main St., oering grab-and-go options. Owned by Becca Kerr and chef Jason Kerr, the kitchen also plans to open a Jersey Village location. www.littlekitchenhtx.com RELOCATIONS 6 Fig Tree Jewelry and Accessories , at 6132 Village Parkway, moved one door over to a larger location, eective Sept. 1. The chain oers jewelry, accessories and clothing from a variety of brands. 281-235-7449. https://gtreejewelryand accessories.com IN THE NEWS 7 Bellaire-based nonprot Second Serv- ings , 4500 Bissonnet St., Ste. 360, was one of two Texas charities selected Aug. 5 to receive a $100,000 grant from The ReFED COVID-19 Food Waste Solutions Fund to immediately scale its food waste reduction and hunger relief eorts. The grant funds came as the organization res- cued nearly $14 million worth of perish- able food in the rst six months of 2020. With the new funding, the nonprot looks to expand as well as hiring additional part- time food delivery drivers. 713-824-6605. www.secondservingshouston.org

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Boxwood Dentistry

MATT DULINCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

8 The Nob Hill apartment community, 5410 N. Braeswood Blvd., in the Meyer- land area, has been renanced for $54.8 million under a Freddie Mac loan secured by real estate rm Newmark Knight Frank working in partnership with the proper- ty’s owner, Steadfast Cos. The property was listed for a potential sale in February. “Nob Hill provides over 1,300 units of workforce housing, which is more critical now than ever,” NKF Executive Manag- ing Director Matt Greer said in a news release. The apartment community is over 50 years old, with rent ranging from around $690 up to over $1,200 a month. www.nobhillhoustonliving.com CLOSINGS 9 Leasing information has been posted at the Union Kitchen location at 4057 Bellaire Blvd., Houston, which has been closed since March until further notice. The restaurant’s locations on Ella Bou- levard and in the Memorial area remain open. www.theunionkitchen.com

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES

COMPILED BY HUNTER MARROW

ONGOING PROJECTS

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LINKWOOD DR.

LOCUST ST.

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B

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BELLAIRE BLVD. CEDAR ST.

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LAKELAND DR.

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GRAMERCY ST.

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Bellaire council again delays decision on additional funds for street projects

Buffalo Speedway reconstruction Design plans for drainage improvements and a complete road surface replace- ment on Buffalo Speedway have been submitted to the Texas Department of Transportation and will remain under re- view through November, when TxDOT is expected to begin soliciting bids. The city of West University Place will be notified once TxDOT has selected a contractor, which will mobilize about 60 days there- after to begin work in January 2021. Timeline: October 2018-2023 Cost: $32.56 million Funding sources : city of West University Place, TxDOT, federal grants

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During its Aug. 3 meeting, Bellaire City Council once again deferred deciding on approving or rejecting a request for additional funds for administration and management services on two street proj- ects: A one on the 4500 block of Maple Street and Bolivar Street and B one on the 5100 and 5200 blocks of Spruce and Fifth streets between Cedar and Locust streets. Council decided to take no action on an ordinance that would have autho- rized interim City Manager Brant Gary to execute an agreement with construction

management company ARKK Engineers for $116,313 in additional funding, which would be used to cover the extra time construction has taken on the two proj- ects. Timeline: April 2019-July 2020 Cost: Maple and Bolivar streets: $1.61 million, Spruce and Fifth streets: $2.42 million Funding source: Bonds for Better Bellaire program

Woodshire South paving and drainage Contractors were given the go-ahead to begin work in Houston’s Woodshire neighborhood in early August. Improve- ments to drainage, new concrete streets, curbs, sidewalks, driveways, streetlights, and water lines are included as part of the plan. Work on Lakeland Drive and Bassoon Drive will begin first. Timeline: summer 2020-winter 2021 Cost: $11.6 million Funding sources: city of Houston drain- age fee, combined utility service

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF AUG. 31. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT BMWNEWS@COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

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BELLAIRE - MEYERLAND - WEST UNIVERSITY EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

Being ranked nationally means a lot to us.

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& Gastroenterology And it could mean a lot to you.

This year, U.S. News &World Report—ranked us as one of the best hospitals in the country. That’s meaningful to us, and it could be meaningful to you. Because if you, or anyone in your family, needs treatment in any of those specialty areas, it’s comforting to know that some of the best doctors, in one of the best hospitals, are here for you. Right next door.

You can learn more about our rankings at StLukesHealth.org/USNWR .

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY& COUNTY

Local municipal news

WESLAYAN ST.

BELLAIRE BLVD.

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Bellaire determined in March that it allowed a parking lot to be built in error.

Planning commission reviews parking lot

BY HUNTER MARROW

January by the city of Bellaire, after which the contractor began construc- tion on the lot at 4300 Bellaire Blvd. In March, the city provided notice to Evelyn’s Park about the error and ordered the lot to be removed within 14 days. Before the 14-day deadline passed, Evelyn’s Park ocials submitted applications for the zoning amendment and a specic-use permit. The city has suspended all enforce- ment action for this property while the applications are being considered. The commission only serves as a recommending body. Bellaire City Council will make the nal decision on the applications. next scal year remains unchanged at $0.4473 per $100 of valuation. WESTUNIVERSITYPLACE City ocials are exploring a program to allow residents to request check-ins on their homes while they are away for extended periods. City Council voted 3-2 on Aug. 10 to ask City Manager David Beach to review the proposal, called HomeSecure, and provide recommendations. WESTUNIVERSITYPLACE The city’s noise ordinance was amended July 27 to expand quiet hours and implement tighter restrictions on equipment, including leaf blowers. The new quiet hours are before 7 a.m. and after 7 p.m. Monday-Friday, before 8 a.m. and after 5 p.m. Saturday, and before noon and after 5 p.m. Sundays and holidays.

BELLAIRE The Bellaire Planning and Zoning Commission is expected to revisit Sept. 10 whether to support a request from Evelyn’s Park that would allow a parking lot that was approved in error—by the city’s own admission— to remain in place. The commission held a public hearing Aug. 13 to consider the request by Evelyn’s Park Conservancy to add “Accessory Parking” as an allowable use within the R-5 Residential Zoning District. With the amendment, the park is seeking a permit for that use. The application came as the result of a permit being issued in error in

CITYHIGHLIGHTS

WESTUNIVERSITY A trial run of the Virtual Gate license plate-reading device in West University Place captured at least 95% of plates of vehicles traveling through city entrances, according to an update provided to City Council Aug. 24. The city will begin installing cameras at 15 other locations by the end of 2020 as part of the Phase 1 rollout. BELLAIRE The City Council backed a proposal during its rst budget workshop Aug. 10 to move the city’s eet replacement program to an ownership model with expected savings of nearly $833,000 over the next 10 years. The council is expected to formally approve the change when it adopts the scal year 2020-21 budget Sept. 14 followed by the tax rate Sept. 21. The proposed tax rate for the Bellaire City Council meets the rst and third Monday of each month at 7 p.m. at 7008 S. Rice Ave., Bellaire. Meetings are streamed at www.bellairetx.gov. West University Place City Council meets the second and fourth Monday of each month at 6:30 p.m. at 3800 University Blvd., Houston. Meetings are MEETINGSWE COVER

available via teleconference. Find details at www.westutx.gov. Houston City Council meets weekly at 1:30 p.m. Tuesdays for public comment and 9 a.m. Wednesdays for regular business at 901 Bagby St., Houston.

Meetings are streamed at www.houstontx.gov/htv.

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BELLAIRE  MEYERLAND  WEST UNIVERSITY EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

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Our purpose at Marine Military Academy is to inspire positive academic, physical and moral growth in every cadet. To achieve this, we provide a disciplined, distraction-free setting that allows cadets to focus on their educational and personal development. Throughout this journey, cadets learn to take ownership of their lives and develop the tools they need to succeed not only in college, but in life.

2020 PUBLIC EDUCATION EDITION

H O U S T O N I S D S N A P S H O T DISTRICT DATA

COMPILED BY MATT DULIN After several years of enrollment decline, HISD leveled o in 2019-20 with over 210,000 students. Projects from its 2012 bond initiative and Hurricane Harvey reconstruction are nearing completion. SOURCES: TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

201920 TEACHER STATS TOTAL NUMBER OF TEACHERS

STUDENT ENROLLMENT

201920SUPERINTENDENT ANNUAL SALARY

STARTING TEACHER SALARY

LARGE URBAN DISTRICT COMPARISON

84.4% AUSTIN ISD 80.9% DALLAS ISD 80.9% SAN ANTONIO ISD

RETENTION RATE

2017-18

2016-17

2018-19

2019-20

2015-16

LARGE URBAN DISTRICT COMPARISON

80.9%

FROM 201516 -2.58%

CONSTRUCTION UPDATES KOLTER ELEMENTARY

201920 ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS 79.14%

Sta is now moving into the new school, which was rebuilt after Hurricane Harvey. Timeline: June 2018-August 2020 BELLAIRE HIGH SCHOOL After the new building is completed in 2021, the original site will be demolished for a garage and administration wing. Timeline: July 2018-summer 2021 LAMAR HIGH SCHOOL A new academic wing opened last fall. The original building is under renovation. Timeline: April 2017-winter 2020

60.24%

STATE AVERAGE

201920 ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS 20.27%

20.26%

STATE AVERAGE

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BELLAIRE  MEYERLAND  WEST UNIVERSITY EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

CLASSICAL STEAM MONTESSORI INFANTS • PREK • MIDDLE SCHOOL ENROLLING FALL 2020 Attendance choices include classroom or distance learning (CST or EST)

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

Public Education Edition 2020

A N I N S I D E L O O K A T H O U S T O N I S D D A T A A N D D E M O G R A P H I C S B Y C A M P U S CAMPUS DEEP DIVE COMPILED BY MATT DULIN More than 26,000 students attend a zoned school in the Bellaire-Meyerland-West University area, with almost half considered economically disadvantaged. SOURCE: TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

B HOUSTON ISD 2019 RATING

ACCOUNTABILITYRATINGS FOR 2020 AND BEYOND All Texas school districts and campuses will receive a Not Rated: Declared State of Disaster for the 2020 accountability ratings, according to the Texas Education Agency. The State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness measures student performance in reading, writing, math, science and social studies. The state has said all students will be required to take the STAAR in 2021, as of press time. Campus ratings are based on several categories, including Student Achievement, School Progress and Closing the Gaps, all of which compare student performance.

OVERALL RATING Exemplary performance Recognized performance Acceptable performance In need of

improvement Unacceptable performance

DEMOGRAPHICS

DEMOGRAPHICS

ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 201920 DATA

MIDDLE SCHOOLS 201920 DATA 15 Fondren* 16 Lanier * 17 Meyerland* 18 Pershing*

Feeder schools

Feeder schools

1 Condit 2 Elrod* 3 Herod*

785 38.6% <10 159 54 275 <10 34 260 16 780 96.5% <10 27 167 572 0 <10 10 15 811 48.5% <10 61 205 327 0 <30 189 15

1,050 96% <10 21 309 700 <10 <10 11

21

1,461 21.9% <10 282 199 431

<10 88 452

20

4 Horn

822 10.3% <10 288 <50 129 0 49 315

16

1,476 60.2% <10 22 495 770 <10 19 167 19, 21

5 Kolter*

687 21.4% <10 66 85 180 0 <30 328 17

1,785 50.4% <10 123 602 679 <10 31 343

19

6 Longfellow*

733 70.4% <10 58 434 178 <10 13 46

16 15 17

DEMOGRAPHICS

7 Lovett* 8 Parker*

671

31.1% <10 63 157 171

0 <10 251

912 42.2% <10 <40 137 418 0 41 281

HIGH SCHOOLS 201920 DATA

9 Poe* 10 Red*

844 26.7% <10 77 77 304 <10 67 316 17

640 68% <10 18 116 398 0 <10 99 749 13.6% 0 249 74 103 <10 <10 272 579 94.1% 0 <30 125 407 0 <10 23

17 16 16 16

11 Roberts 12 Shearn

13 Twain

913

18.1% <10 189 83 201

<10 42 395

19 Bellaire* 20 Lamar* 21 Westbury*

3,450 46.9% <20 443 723 1417 <10 70 782 92.2%

14 West University

1,284 3.7% <10 238 <50 152 0 62 789 18

2,807 57.6% <20 164 750 1039 <10 68 771

93.8%

2,402 87.7% <10 31 751 1556 <10 16 44 83.1%

*ALSO A MAGNET SCHOOL

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BELLAIRE  MEYERLAND  WEST UNIVERSITY EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

SELECTION PROCESS

A N I N S I D E LO O K AT D ATA A N D D E M O G R A P H I C S MAGNET SCHOOLS COMPILED BY MATT DULIN As a District of Choice, Houston ISD oers dozens of programs oering specialized opportunities in addition to zoned neighborhood schools. Many have open enrollment into a lottery-style selection process; others require additional qualications.

AR: Academic rating A threshold based on test scores must be met.

AUD: Audition

E/E: Exam or experience Students must pass an exam or have previous experience.

Students must submit a portfolio or performance.

DEMOGRAPHICS

SOURCES: TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

COLLEGECAREER

DEMOGRAPHICS

MIDDLE SCHOOLS

Baylor CollegeOfMedicineAcademy 632 8.9% <10 36 291 271

0 <10 26 -

418 21.8% <10 <10 97 305 0 <10 <10 - 479 8.8% 0 <10 239 225 0 <10 10 - 1,250 18.9% <10 118 92 1,007 <10 <10 29 - 530 3.6% <10 <10 269 230 0 <10 10 AR 1,624 94.5% <10 0 142 1459 <10 <10 11 473 72.7% <10 24 56 346 0 <10 42 AR - 2,784 89.4% <10 110 257 2,386 <10 <10 24 AR 457 86.2% <10 12 13 427 <10 0 <10 AR 467 83.5% <10 <10 93 355 0 <10 11 AR 486 83.7% 0 <10 <50 436 0 0 0 AR 1,480 92.5% <10 <10 195 1,266 0 <10 <10 AR 427 99.1% 0 10 217 189 <10 <10 <10 AR 871 41.8% <10 269 153 311 <10 14 115 AR

Baylor College Of Medicine Biotech Mickey Leland College Prep Sharpstown International School Young Women's College Prep

STEMFUTURES ACADEMY

HIGH SCHOOLS

Austin

ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS

Challenge Early College

825 99.2% 0 <10 37 778 0 0 <10 - 868 94% <10 <10 127 723 0 <10 <10 - 448 94.6% 0 0 <10 439 0 0 <10 - 422 97.2% <10 <10 347 70 0 <10 <10 - 655 15.1% <10 33 23 228 <10 44 323 -

Berry

Chavez Debakey

Cornelius

Davila

East Early College Law And Justice

Hartseld Harvard Herrera Lantrip Lockhart

North Houston Early College

896 97.7% 0 <10 <10 856 0 0 23 699 78.4% <10 <10 33 630 0 <10 27

- -

Northside

South Early College

578 88.1% <10 <10 545 13 <10 <10 <10 -

814 92.8% 0 <10 714 87

Yates

0 <10 <10 AR

395 93.7% <10 0 10 381

Pugh

0 0 <10 -

1,125 65.1% <10 48 479 548 0 <20 30 - 344 99.1% 0 <10 193 145 0 <10 0 - 589 33.4% <10 19 42 259 <10 19 245 -

Rice School /La Escuela Rice

DEMOGRAPHICS

Ross

Sinclair Stevens

659 95.1% <10 <10 60 554 0 <10 37 846 89.2% <10 18 369 437 0 <10 13 523 92.5% <10 <10 86 390 0 <10 32

- - -

Valley West Wainwright

392 99.5% <10 0 314 64 0 <10 10 - 504 89.1% 0 16 355 116 <10 <10 11 -

Wesley Whidby Clifton Deady Hartman

FINE ARTS

ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS

MIDDLE SCHOOLS

< 10 22

622 94.2% 0 <10 99 490 0

-

Atherton

569 99.3% 0 0 439 123 0 <10 <10 - 719 87.1% <10 <10 194 484 0 <10 22 -

701 96% <10 <10 <10 688 0 0 <10 - 1,260 96% <10 <10 281 962 <10 0 12 1,032 42.7% <10 17 64 702 <10 29 215 - -

Bell

Bruce

435 97.5% 0 <10 296 131

0 <10 0 -

Burbank Burrus Codwell Cook Jr. Crespo Crockett

-

Hogg

911 96.5% <10 <10 116 775 0 <10 13

- -

950 98.3% <10 60 130 718 0 <10 33 1,260 83.1% <20 54 345 750 0 <10 92

Long Academy

373 96.2% <10 0 249 117

0 <10 <10 -

Revere

401 91.5% <10 0 368 26 <10 0 <10 - 653 98.9% <10 <10 387 242 0 <10 18 - 730 95.9% 0 <10 <10 720 0 0 <10 - 562 64.6% <10 14 62 433 <10 13 37 601 93.8% <10 0 140 448 0 <10 <10 - 477 97.9% <10 0 397 74 0 <10 <10 - 733 70.4% <10 58 434 178 <10 13 46 - - 520 73.3% <10 <10 353 133 0 17 12 91% 0 <10 61 848 0 0 <20 - 437 91.8% 0 0 <10 423 0 0 <10 - - 925 718 91.4% <10 <20 446 236 0 <10 23 AUD 640 95% <10 0 338 286 0 <10 12 AUD 1,330 95.5% <10 <10 483 824 <10 <10 <10 AUD 750 95.3% <10 0 121 619 0 <10 <10 AUD 1,107 96.6% 0 23 201 870 0 <10 <10 - 650 94.6% <10 13 283 339 0 <10 13 AUD 438 96.1% <10 0 283 151 0 <10 <10 -

1,452 88.8% <10 61 59 1,308 <10 <10 16 -

Stevenson Williams

461 98.7% <10 <10 220 231

0 <10 <10 -

Energy Institute HIGH SCHOOLS

741 48.3% <10 27 206 363 0 <10 133 AR 1,125 95.7% <10 <10 188 905 0 <10 20 - 2,291 64.5% <10 21 250 1767 <10 24 223 AR

Garden Villas

Furr

Kashmere Gardens

Heights Kashmere

Longfellow MacGregor Patterson Scroggins

830 97.6% <10 0 505 303 0 <10 15 2,060 92.9% <10 <10 75 1,950 0 <10 17

- -

Milby

752 95.9% <10 <10 148 578 <10 <10 16 AR

Scarborough

1 8 AR

1,538 93.4% <10 <10 722 781

Sterling Waltrip

0 11

MIDDLE SCHOOLS

1,914 69.9% <10 <10 245 1,505 0 17 136 AR

Fleming

819 94.7% <10 0 384 421

Booker T. Washington

-

Gregory-Lincoln

0 <10 11

2,857 54% <10 199 821 1,280 <10 39 507 -

Westside

Key

Lawson Marshall

DEMOGRAPHICS

Ortiz Welch

Kinder HSPVA HIGH SCHOOLS

794 16.9% <10 73 133 217 <10 31 336 AUD

INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGES ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS Arabic Immersion Mandarin Immersion MIDDLE SCHOOLS HIGH SCHOOLS Wharton K8 Dual Language Pin Oak Middle Academy for International Studies

DEMOGRAPHICS

407 53.6% 0 19 94 109 0 15 170 - 702 25.2% 0 294 109 126 <10 <70 109 E/E

600 40.2% 0 11

72 396 0 18 103 E/E -

VANGUARDGIFTED ANDTALENTED ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS

- -

1,254 35.2% <10 189 102 466 0 <50 451

938 68.6% <10 92 370 321

Askew Carrillo

0 <30 128 E/E

497 65.6% <10 14 180 267 0 <10 30 AR 1,829 95% <10 54 330 1,408 0 <10 32 AR

533 85.6% 0 <10 <10 510 0 <10 12 E/E 571 91.2% 0 <10 <10 558 0 0 <10 E/E 487 62.6% 0 <10 38 382 0 <20 49 E/E 890 14.7% <10 35 41 286 <10 41 482 E/E 603 78.6% <10 <10 29 556 0 <10 13 E/E 714 15.5% <10 <30 28 234 0 49 381 E/E 90% <10 <10 241 474 <10 <10 <10 E/E 732

Sharpstown

De Zavala

DEMOGRAPHICS

Helms

Oak Forest Roosevelt

Travis

Windsor Village MIDDLE SCHOOLS

MONTESSORI MAGNET SCHOOLS ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS Garden Oaks Montessori Wilson Montessori Blackshear

1,302 50.6% <10 14 177 808 <10 33 268 E/E

Black

1,538 96.2% <10 <10 71 1,451

Burbank Hamilton

0 0 12 E/E

1,210 81.3% <10 10 93 1070 <10 <10 30 E/E 1,015 22.6% <10 471 128 204 <10 51 157 E/E

425 99.1% <10 <10 365 51

0 <10 0 -

T. H. Rogers School HIGH SCHOOLS Carnegie Vanguard

849 39.2% <10 24 48 457 <10 41 273 E/E 602 34.2% <10 42 55 262 <10 30 211 E/E

E/E

854 30.3% <10 255 88 282 <10 34 191

14

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

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Screening all patients

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BELLAIRE  MEYERLAND  WEST UNIVERSITY EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

FEATURE

BY HUNTER MARROW

Archway Academy uses a three-part model to best serve its students in their educational and sobriety goals. RECOVERY STAFF: Five recovery coaches oer support throughout the week, while students attend a wellness period at the beginning of each day to foster community. EDUCATIONAL FACULTY: Education is a collaborative eort between Archway and one of Southwest Charter Schools’ Phoenix Schools. The schools were designed to provide high-quality education in multiple Houston-area residential treatment centers and alternative learning facilities. DEDICATED SPACE: Palmer Memorial Episcopal Church provides the space for 100-140 students each year. COMMUNITY SUPPORT

Every morning, students attend a wellness period to connect with recovery coaches and air out any struggles they may be experiencing with sobriety. (Photos courtesy Archway Academy)

Palmer Memorial Episcopal Church provides space for school facilities.

AWAY THROUGH Archway has served the recovery community for over 15 years.

ArchwayAcademy Public-private high school helps students overcome substance use W hen the nonprot Archway Academy rst opened in 2004, it was the rst of its depending on the number of days they have been sober. Archway leverages ve recovery

2008

2004 First founded:

Formed partnership with Southwest Charter Schools Students served each year: 100-140 5 Number of 9 Number of teachers

Archway that the intimacy of the size had more of a small-town feel so that kids would be able to nd their place,” Coles said. Students attend classes like any nor- mal high school, though each is either enrolled in the school’s Passageway or Archway programs and progresses through the 12-step recovery model. Passageway students hold fewer than 60 days of sobriety with those in Archway hold greater than 60. Because of concerns with COVID- 19, Archway will oer the rst six weeks of classes online beginning Sept. 8 but will accommodate stu- dents who would be harmed by being left alone. “We’re oering families the ability to qualify for in-person learning if a student’s mental health is suering greatly in isolation,” Coles said.

kind in Houston. Known as a recovery high school, Archway Academy is designed specically for students recovering from substance use, one of 42 in the nation, according to the Association of Recovery Schools. In 2008, Archway Academy partnered with Southwest Charter Schools, transitioning the school from an exclusive private model to what it is today: a private-public hybrid. “It’s the partnership model that allows us to be high-quality in educa- tion and recovery,” Archway Academy Executive Director Sasha Coles said. The school uses a three-part model to keep students sober and in class and oers two programs for students

coaches and clinicians to get students the help they need, while Southwest Schools provides seven full-time and two part-time teachers. Meanwhile, Palmer Memorial Episcopal Church, across the street fromRice University at 6221 Main St., Houston, provides space for the campus. The academy serves 100-140 stu- dents each year from across Greater Houston facing a broad spectrum of conditions—from sex tracking to alcoholism and drug addiction. Students attend the class during the day and return home at night. With a class size of eight to 12 per teacher, the school aims to foster a sense of community. “We knewwhen we opened

recovery coaches

8-12:1 Student-teacher ratio

ArchwayAcademy 6221 Main St., Houston 713-328-0780 www.archwayacademy.org

CAMBRIDGE ST.

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BELLAIRE  MEYERLAND  WEST UNIVERSITY EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

CONTINUED FROM 1

Financial equity: Per-pupil spending, including Title I and grants

Student supports: Counseling, social/ emotional resources

WHAT WILL BE STUDIED? HOW WILL THE EQUITY PROJECT WORK?

2020-21

PLANS FOR PROGRESS

4 WAYS

APPROACHING EQUITY The Equity Project will attempt to marshall data and insights to guide the district’s short- and long-range strategies for closing educational gaps.

1. Researchers meet with HISD ocials. Specic research questions, data needs, and a theory of action will be developed to guide the use of study ndings.

2. Research briefs are compiled. Depending on the topic, research can include briefs, one- page summaries and presentations.

HISD HAS PROGRESSED The district has confronted inequities on several

The ndings on the rst few topics are expected to be released this fall. More will be released throughout the year with major completion by summer 2021. 3. The results of each study are shared publicly. Findings will be shared on the Equity Project’s website: www.houstonisd.org/equityproject .

fronts, from pre-K to college readiness and most recently COVID-19.

Ensuring that all students receive the resources, supports, and opportunities they need to achieve success in school, career, and life. SOURCE: HOUSTON ISDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

HOW IS HISD DEFINING ‘EQUITY’?

HISD looking toundoendemic inequalities outcome-based data that said, ‘OK, if I take this decision, this is what it’s going to achieve for my students.’” Inprogress BY MATT DULIN & HUNTER MARROW

ideally you have everyone thinking about it, and some- one who takes ownership at a high level to keep equity top of mind come budget season and other key decisions.” For example, the district could oer additional fund- ing for targeting equity goals, said Catherine Horn, the chair of the University of Houston’s Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies. “The healthiest district eco- systems are those that create wonderful interactive eco- systems that have the most up-to-date information on what teachers and parents are experiencing,” Horn said. Ultimately, the data from the studies will inform mul- tiple strategies, Sung said. In the short term, the study will also attempt to address the eects of COVID-19. “Everyone wants the one thing—the quick x,” Sung said. “The reality is we need to do many things really well to make a dierence. ... If it was an easy solution, we would have done it already.” Acollectivecall HISD ocials also said they hope the study can prompt wider community participation. “We don’t want this just to be some obscure study. We want the community engaged,” Cruz said. The challenge will be gal- vanizing a vision for what

struggle to reach higher state ratings, and the COVID-19 pandemic has made economic gaps glaringly obvious. These mounting challenges have prompted the district’s Equity Project, a comprehen- sive eort to understand how it can meet the needs of stu- dents and improve outcomes. It was formally approved in February. The project will in some ways represent a culmina- tion of eorts with the Hous- ton Education Research Consortium, a longtime dis- trict collaborator based at Rice University, said Rick Cruz, HISD’s superintendent for strategy and innovation. The HERC has already conducted studies looking at closing edu- cational gaps. “What we want to do is bring it all together into a cohesive framework so we truly understand what needs to happen,” Cruz said. Theneed From racial and ethnic dis- parities to socioeconomic forces to special education needs, the district faces chal- lenges that exist throughout the state, only magnied. About 8 out of every 10 HISD students are econom- ically disadvantaged—eligi- ble for free or reduced-price lunch—far above the state

average of about 6 in 10. Put another way, all but 30 out of 280 schools have a majority of its students fac- ing economic disadvantages before they even enter the classroom. Despite receiving an over- all B rating under the state’s accountability system in 2018- 19, more than half of HISD students, including 60% of its high schoolers, attended a school rated C or lower. The district’s graduation rate also lags behind the state—about 85% compared to 92%. And even though the dis- trict has reduced the number of schools failing to meet state standards every year since 2012—thanks in large part to a program called Achieve 180—the performance of one school in 2019 put HISD in the throes of a possible state take- over. A lawsuit in response to the takeover is pending in an appeals court. On the campus level, school leaders struggle with charting the best course of action to address their students’ needs each year. “You would take decisions, budgetary or even otherwise, thinking that that’s what equity is,” said Jyoti Malhan, a former principal who is helping lead the equity proj- ect for the district. “But then there was no evidence or

For an hour, sometimes more, Ariel Batiste rode the bus to Lamar High School each morning. There, she had a packed schedule with International Baccalaureate courses, marching band and other after-school activities. Then she was back on the bus to her home in North Houston. “It was rough. …Therewere some 16-hour days,” Batiste said. “And my younger sister was with me. It was a family operation.” At Lamar, she was selected to apply to participate in Emerge, a college-readiness accelerator targeting students based on academic perfor- mance and economic status. Agraduate of Lamar, Batiste went on to get a bachelor’s degree from the University of Southern California, and she is now attending Howard Uni- versity for a law degree. She is one of hundreds of students given a chance at life-chang- ing success through Emerge, which is one of a constellation of programs HISD has oered to deliver better outcomes for its students. But despite these eorts, thousands of students do not graduate high school in four or six years, half of its schools

At least 10 consortium researchers will work on the project, said Erin Baumgart- ner, the HERC’s associate director for HISD research and relations. The HERC’s previous research with HISD will be reviewed and compiled along with wholly new studies, Baumgartner said. The goal is to havemost of this work com- pleted by 2021, but the work will not stop there. “The study we’re doing right now is not the be-all and end-all,” she said. “It’s a start- ing point. We’re focusing on a handful of topic areas in the rst year while recognizing that this is something that’ll be going on past this year.” Findings for pre-K educa- tion will be among the rst to be released as part of the project, along with ndings on school discipline and a deep dive into the characteristics of teachers within the district. Turning reports into action- able plans in a decentralized school district, which grants autonomy to school principals, could prove to be a challenge. “Ideally, you set expecta- tions, provide resources and hold principals accountable for their outcomes,” HISD trustee Anne Sung said. “And

18

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

Public Education Edition 2020

Technology: Access to devices and connectivity

Facilities: Campus-based resources and transportation

Human capital: Teacher/principal eectiveness

Academic & extracurriculars: All district-sponsored programs and activities

COVID-19: Preparedness for and eects from disruption

This campus turnaround program was implemented in 2017 to lift performance at campuses rated Improvement Required. The program includes social and emotional support, teacher incentives and training, targeted curriculum and school leadership. In its rst year, it received national recognition. $17.7 MILLION 53 Schools receiving support Annual investment SCHOOL TURNAROUNDS 1

COLLEGE ACCESS 2

HISD consistently enrolls about 15,000 to 16,000 prekindergarten students every year. In 2019, it began oering free full-day pre-K. PREKINDERGARTEN 3

TECHNOLOGY 4

This college-readiness program founded in 2010 targets high- achieving students from low- income families with the goal of gaining acceptance into top-tier, out-of-state schools. It takes them on campus tours and oers mentoring, test prep and help with college applications.

Responding to the widespread digital access gaps in the transition to virtual learning, the district is providing devices and internet hot spots.

Without pre-K:

Total devices (laptops, iPads) distributed by September

99,112

22% of students were school ready.

One year of pre-K:

Total hot spots distributed by September

25,779

39% of students were school ready.

of participants graduate college in 4 years. 83%

1,300

Students participating annually

Two years of pre-K:

$31.19 MILLION in federal funds

45% of students were school ready.

student outcomes should look like and rallying parents—and voters—to that cause, said Elliott Witney, the chief pro- gram ocer for Good Reason Houston, a nonprot which consults with area districts on improving schools. “One of the dicult things is creating a case for urgency,” he said. “The number of kids

at risk will grow, not shrink, without bold action with equity at the center.” Cruz said the district is open to a wide range of partner- ships to implement changes. “There are lots of people out there and organizations that have the desire to help us. We ask them to please give us a call because we are serious

about this,” he said. Without a wider commu- nity eort and informed advo- cacy, success for students such as Batiste becomes a “luck of the draw,” she said. “I’m fortunate to have had my mother advocate for me. But most kids don’t have a parent who knows how to advocate. The jumps we had

to go through just to get access to another public school—not even a private school—were unfair,” Batiste said. Batiste’s mother took steps to make sure she had access to a good school, but she won- dered: Why were there not good schools in her neighbor- hood to begin with? “It’s in everyone’s best

interest that there are no quote-unquote bad schools,” she said. “It’s better for the city. It will only make the city as a whole thrive. It’ll only go up. Who wouldn’t want that?”

Tell us what you think. Comment at communityimpact.com .

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BELLAIRE  MEYERLAND  WEST UNIVERSITY EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

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