Plano North November 2020

PLANONORTH EDITION

VOLUME 2, ISSUE 2  NOV. 12DEC. 16, 2020

ONLINE AT

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IMPACTS

THE FEATHERED NEST

DESI GINGER

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The Collin County Economic Opportunity Assessment, released in October and commissioned by nonprot Communities Foundation of Texas, shows a growing and changing county population. This report oers tangible data that will help to strengthen the eorts of several entities, including the city of Plano, the Plano Chamber of Commerce and the North Texas Commission, as they work to better Collin County and set policy goals for future change. See the full story on Page 16 . A CHANGING COLLINCOUNTY

KEYINDICATORS

The assessment looked at economic opportunity and wellness in Collin County in four main areas: resident income; education; debt and assets; and health.

6% The bottom fth of earners have seen income decrease by 6% since 2006. INCOME 1 IN4 A quarter of public school students are economically disadvantaged. EDUCATION

$96K The area’s median income is among the highest in the region.

2X Hispanic residents are twice as likely to experience poverty.

1 MILLION Collin County’s population surpassed 1 million in 2018.

2X Collin County’s population is growing twice as fast as Dallas County’s.

100% This is how much of the population growth in residents age 17 and under was driven by children of color between 2012-16.

3X This is the rate at which low-income area students drop out of school.

24% Hispanic residents have the lowest college graduation rates of any group.

$37K This is the average student loan balance for county residents. DEBT&ASSETS 1 IN 10 Every tenth child in McKinney and Plano is uninsured. HEALTH

95% This is how many adult area residents have a credit score.

20% The average student debt balance has grown by a fth since 2010.

2X Plano has twice the rate of uninsured residents as Frisco.

70% Most residents have insurance through employers.

INSIDE

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SOURCE: COLLIN COUNTY ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY ASSESSMENTCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER LIESBETH POWERSCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

CONTENTS

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

IMPACTS

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Now Open, Coming Soon &more TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES 9 Ongoing road projects NEWS REPORT 10 Collin County election could cost upwards of $2.5 million CITY& COUNTY 13 The latest local news BUSINESS FEATURE 14 The Feathered Nest

MARKET TEAM GENERAL MANAGER Leanne Libby,

FROMLEANNE: The phrase “shop local” has gained new importance over the last several months. As we enter into a unique holiday season, remember to support the businesses that drive the Plano economy. You can nd many of these businesses in our newspaper every month as well as online at communityimpact.com/pln. We continue to partner with local businesses to bring unbiased, trusted local journalism to your door every month, and we thank you for your readership and patronage. Leanne Libby, GENERALMANAGER

llibby@communityimpact.com EDITOR Olivia Lueckemeyer REPORTERS Makenzie Plusnick, Liesbeth Powers GRAPHIC DESIGNER Chase Autin ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Rebecca Anderson, Stephanie Burnett MANAGING EDITOR Valerie Wigglesworth ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Breanna Flores CORPORATE LEADERSHIP PUBLISHERS AND FOUNDERS John and Jennifer Garrett GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Warner METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Christal Howard John and Jennifer Garrett began Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 in Pugerville, Texas. The company’s mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Today, we operate across ve metropolitan areas providing hyperlocal, nonpartisan news produced by our full-time journalists in each community we serve. BECOMEA#COMMUNITYPATRON CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES DIRECTOR Tess Coverman WHOWE ARE

FROMOLIVIA: The recently concluded election saw record turnout among residents of Collin County and North Texas. Thousands of residents showed up to do their civic duty early in the process, resulting in an election that saw more than 86% of in-person ballots cast before Election Day. No matter where you land on the political spectrum or how you feel about the results, this level of participation is something to be proud of. Olivia Lueckemeyer, EDITOR

THIS ISSUE BY THE NUMBERS

Local sources 11

New businesses 6

Community events 10

Transportation updates 6

DINING FEATURE

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Desi Ginger

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LOCAL GETAWAYS GUIDE Things to do in Plano and beyond REAL ESTATE

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PLANO NORTH EDITION • NOVEMBER 2020

SOUTH IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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SOUTH PLANO

Pita Town

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COURTESY PRODUCT BROTHERS

W. PARK BLVD.

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PRESTON PARK RD.

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Protocol

NOWOPEN 1 Midas opened an auto-repair shop Oct. 5 at 620 W. Parker Road, Plano. The business offers routine car maintenance, such as oil changes and brake repairs, and it also sells tires. 469-331-0709. www.midas.com 2 Park Wine & Spirits opened in late October at 4101 E. Park Blvd., Ste. 160, Plano. The family-owned liquor store will offer a variety of products for alcohol- ic beverages. The store hopes to pair competitive prices with “a more personal shopping experience,” according to its Facebook page. 214-440-2626. www.facebook.com/parkwinespirits 3 Pita Town opened in Plano at the end of September at 700 W. Spring Creek Parkway, Ste. 106, Plano. The Mediter- ranean restaurant was created by the Product Brothers, who have frequented farmers markets as a vendor in the Dallas area for the better part of 10 years. Among other items, the Product Brothers sells its range of seven hummus flavors, including artichoke and chipotle black bean hummus, tzatziki and feta. Pita Town will offer new foods from the group, such as shawarma and falafel, and will also

7 Top Fitness Store will open a location at 2201 Preston Road, Ste. F, Plano. An opening date has not been confirmed. The exercise equipment company sells treadmills, ellipticals, lateral train- ers, climbers, exercise bikes, rowers, strength equipment and more. The business also has a location in Southlake. 888-338-9869. www.topfitness.com 8 Texas Collision Centers will open Nov. 30 at 2501 N. Central Express- way, Plano. The business specializes in all aspects of collision repair, includ- ing bumper, paint, hail damage and paintless dent repair. 469-214-9161. www.texascollisioncenters.com RELOCATIONS 9 Nova Cesta Counseling moved to a new office space this August at 5068 W. Plano Parkway, Ste. 220, Plano. The new office includes a play therapy space and therapy rooms for adults and teens. Nova Cesta offers counseling services to peo- ple of all ages and is currently operating in person and via telehealth services. The counseling service previously operated out of an office off Custer Parkway and Plano Parkway in Plano. 972-767-9628.

allow for guests to buy some items that are usually only available at the markets, according to a post by the group. 469-367-0820. https://pitatown.net 4 Upscale men’s resale store Protocol opened Nov. 7 at 6405 W. Parker Road, Ste. 320, Plano. The family-owned store features men’s luxury goods for up to 75% off retail prices. Protocol took over the space formerly occupied by Kid to Kid. www.protocolplano.com 5 Q-Day Walk-In Clinic & Spa opened Sept. 28 at 3560 E. Park Blvd., Plano. Services include urgent care, treatment for allergies and the flu, chronic disease management, lab work and X-rays. It also offers flu shots and rapid COVID-19 tests. 972-424-0579. www.qdayclinic.com COMING SOON 6 Giant Party Sports opened Nov. 6 at 6101 K Ave., Ste. 110, Plano. The paintball and airsoft store also in- cludes a small gaming area for Xbox as well as a Nerf gun ring. Giant Party Sports also has a paintball and airsoft park in Allen, Texas. 469-863-7030. www.giantpartysports.com

COURTESY PROTOCOL

www.novacestacounseling.com 10 The Postal Shoppe opened in late October at its new location at 4757 W. Park Blvd., Ste. 113, Plano. It offers pack and mail services in addition to an array of gift shop items, such as essential oils and children’s items. It was formerly lo- cated at 2108 N. Dallas Parkway, Ste. 214, Plano. 972-403-7092. www.packandmailshoppe.com NAME CHANGE 11 Following a change in ownership, Infinite Bounds will begin rebranding as Texas Dynamix Gymnastics Plano in November. The gymnastics company will continue to be located at 1901 Pres- ton Park Blvd., Plano, and partner with Impact America Martial Arts and Rotem’s Pilates. Texas Dynamix Plano will offer consistent, current gymnast training with opportunities for exploring different avenues of gymnastics and expects to expand its offerings to include class- es such as dance, yoga, and additional tumbling and trampoline options for recreational and preschool programs, according to an owner message. Owner

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER, MAKENZIE PLUSNICK & LIESBETH POWERS

GATHER TOGETHER AND BE GRATEFUL. First of all, we are thankful for those who have been a big part of the PEAK family, the community we serve and our customers who put their trust in us. Have a blessed Thanksgiving Holiday with your family and stay safe.

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Soap Hope employs adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

COURTESY EMILEE PRADO

FEATURED IMPACT NOWOPEN Soap Hope moved its fulllment center Oct. 28 from Dallas to 600 Data Drive, Ste. 160, Plano. The online retailer sells all-natural body care products. Prots from Soap Hope purchases go toward supporting adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The company employs disabled individuals in various roles, such as warehouse stocking, shipping and assembly, according to a recent press release. The company recently merged with Plano-based My Possibilities, an organization that provides continuing education and vocational training for disabled adults, called HIPsters, or Hugely Important People. The organization recently launched MPact, which aims to bridge employment gaps for adults with disabilities. “We are very excited to ocially call Plano home,” Kate Knight, director Cortnee White Maestas also owns and operates Texas Dynamix Gymnastics in neighboring Carrollton. 972-491-1916. www.texasdynamixgymnastics.com 12 Watermark Plano is rebranding as CityBridge Community Church in Janu- ary, according to a video on its Facebook page. The church, located at 6400 K Ave., Plano, offers Sunday services as well as ministries for adults and children. 214-313-2000. www.watermark.org CLOSINGS 13 Friend & Foe closed permanently Oct. 22. The board game cafe, which opened last September at 2929 Custer

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of MPact for My Possibilities, said in a statement. “This move will attract more HIPsters to participate in the academy internships to learn the inner workings of employment in a fulllment center.” Over a 13-week program, HIPsters gain rst-hand work experience at Soap Hope, according to the release. Soap Hope is the rst MPact partner, said Michael Thomas, executive director for My Possibilities. “Our campus plans accommodate a full retail plaza, housing many local businesses that will provide HIPsters with job opportunities,” he said. 888-893-7627. www.soaphope.com Road, Ste. 312, Plano, cited daily, pandemic-driven revenue losses as the reason behind the closure. 14 Groggy Dog closed its west Plano showroom at 5690 W. Parker Road, Ste. 256, on Oct. 31. The east Plano showroom, located at 2901 Central Expressway, Ste. 119, will remain open. The full-service promotional prod- ucts company helps companies with event marketing, branding, employee retention and customer-acquisition programs. It offers in-house screen printing and embroidery. 972-378-4115. www.groggydogonline.com

W. Parker Rd.

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PLANO NORTH EDITION • NOVEMBER 2020

NORTH IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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Delucca Gaucho Pizza &Wine

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HEDGCOXE RD.

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nutritional supplements and compounding pharmacy services. Compounding phar- macies can make medicines from scratch using FDA-approved chemicals that meet particular needs, such as being in a certain strength or form. Spring Creek Pharmacy also offers vaccinations, aromatherapy, herbal remedies and vitamins, among other items and services. 972-517-7900. www.springcreekpharmacy.com NAME CHANGE 4 Lebanese Grill in Plano has changed its name to Rose Mediterranean Cuisine and will continue to offer the same quality and management as it did before the change, an announcement from the restaurant said. The name change, made in mid-September, was decided on as a way to better reflect the restaurant’s ambience and the food served there, the

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NOWOPEN 1 Delucca Gaucho Pizza & Wine opened in mid-October at 8240 Preston Road, Ste. 100, Plano. The neighborhood pizzeria uses wood-fired ovens to make its pizza. It also offers an extensive wine, beer and cocktail list. 469-888-4747. www.delucca.com

RELOCATIONS 2 Pipe and Palette moved from its location in Plano to Stonebriar Centre in Frisco at 2601 Preston Road, Ste. 1008, on Nov. 3. The art studio, which was formerly located at 1012 E. 15th St., Plano, hosts a variety of classes on dif- ferent art mediums and different levels.

Additionally, the studio offers prod- ucts by featured artists. 214-501-2314. www.pipeandpalette.com 3 Spring Creek Pharmacy relocated its store this fall to 4666 McDermott Road, Ste. 200, Plano. The pharmacy, which was previously located along Legacy Drive, offers a full-line pharmacy, including commercially available medications,

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER, MAKENZIE PLUSNICK & LIESBETH POWERS

Serving Plano for 27 Years! Please help us reach year 28.

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BAM Beauty Bar is now offering blowouts and makeup application in Plano.

COURTESY BAM BEAUTY BAR

FEATURED IMPACT NOWOPEN BAM Beauty Bar opened Oct. 31 in Legacy West at 7400 Windrose Ave., Ste. B116, Plano. The luxury blowout and makeup bar uses high-quality products and tools as well as hypoallergenic, cruelty-free beauty products in a Parisian-inspired setting. Prices include blowouts for $45, makeup application starting at $35, accessories starting at $25 and monthly membership packages starting at $80. Customers can sign

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Open Tuesday - Saturday: Lunch 11:00am - 3:45pm, Dinner 4:00 - 9:00pm, Closed on Thanksgiving. 221W Parker Rd, Ste 527 • 972-881-0705 www.bavariangrill.com

up for monthly memberships that unlock unlimited blowouts or makeup applications. The business’s agship location is in the Uptown-West Village area of Dallas. 214-501-5674. www.bambeautybar.com

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Rose Mediterranean Cuisine

Spring Creek Pharmacy

COURTESY ROSE MEDITERRANEAN CUISINE

COURTESY SPRING CREEK PHARMACY

Our campuses are open. Come for a tour today!

announcement said. Rose Mediterranean Cuisine also released a new menu that includes vegetarian plates in addition to original menu items, such as kebabs and shawarma. The restaurant remains locat- ed at 8000 Coit Road, Ste. 400, Plano. 469-777-3655. www.rosecuisine.com NEWOWNERSHIP 5 Woof Gang Bakery and Grooming changed owners in August. The shop, located at 8240 Preston Road, Ste. 125, Plano, offers pet grooming services and pet-friendly bakery items in addi- tion to a variety of pet care products. 214-407-8349. www.woofgangbakerylegacy.com CLOSINGS 6 NTB closed its location at 3901 W.

Spring Creek, Plano, in mid-October. The business, which sells tires and wheels but also offers oil changes and tire ser- vices, has three other Plano locations. 972-881-8473 (Custer Road location). www.ntb.com 7 W.W. Fairfield’s Bar & Grill closed indefinitely in September at 2001 W. Spring Creek Parkway, Plano. The restaurant opened in that location in April 2019 after closing its first loca- tion in Richardson in 2017. The bar and grill regularly held country music and karaoke events and served dishes such as hamburgers and sloppy Joes before closing temporarily in March—a closure that became indefinite in September. In an online announcement, W.W. Fairfield’s cited the shutdowns were due to the coronavirus pandemic as well as issues with its landlord. www.wwfairfields.com

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PLANO NORTH EDITION • NOVEMBER 2020

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES

C HRISTENE “C HRIS ” K RUPA D OWNS , ATTORNEY WILLS | ESTATE PLANNING GUARDIANSHIP | PROBATE LAW

PLANO

SRT TOLL

MCDERMOTT RD.

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CHASE OAKS BLVD.

HEDGCOXE RD.

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WEEKSLAWFIRM.COM 214.269.4290

LOS RIOS BLVD.

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Cost: $1.5 million Funding source: city of Plano 4 Plano Parkway project Work continues on a long-term road repair project that began in June on Plano Parkway. The full project will extend from Preston Road to the Dallas North Tollway. Crews are expected to focus on the portion of road between the bridge west of Shepton High School to the Dallas North Tollway. One lane will be closed at all times, with an additional lane closed during the day on weekdays and some Saturdays. Timeline: June 2020-June 2021 Cost: $3.5 million Funding source: city of Plano 5 Jupiter Road project An extensive project to repair pavement and sidewalk on Jupiter Road began in early January. The project, which will eventually stretch from 14th Street to the northern city limits, will affect northbound and southbound lanes between Parker Road and Los Rios Boulevard. One lane will remain closed at all times, with an addi- tional lane closed from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Timeline: January 2020-February 2021 Cost: $500,000 Funding source: city of Plano 6 Alma Drive project A project to repair pavement and sidewalk on Alma Road began in early October. The project, which stretches between Park Boulevard and 15th Street, is expected to last through mid-December. One lane will remain closed at all times, with an addi- tional lane closed from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Timeline: October-mid-December Cost: $500,000 Funding source: city of Plano

BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER

ONGOING PROJECTS 1 Spring Creek Parkway project

A new pavement repair project began in July on Spring Creek Parkway. Crews are expected to work on the Spring Creek lanes that stretch between US 75 and Premier Drive/Chase Oaks Boulevard. The project is expected to last roughly through the middle of November. One lane will be closed throughout the project, with an additional lane closed from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Timeline: July-November Cost: $800,000 Funding source: city of Plano 2 Coit Road project Crews are making pavement and sidewalk repairs on two stretches of sidewalk on Coit Road. The project is expected to be active between Spring Creek Parkway and Hedgcoxe Road. Northbound and south- bound lanes will be affected throughout the project area. One lane will remain closed at all times, with an additional lane closed from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Timeline: January 2020-summer 2021 Cost: $6.4 million Funding source: city of Plano 3 Parker Road project A section of Parker Road is being affected by a new construction project that will ultimately stretch from Independence Parkway to Preston Road. Construction will affect the roadway in both direc- tions—primarily between Coit Road and Independence Parkway—until the project’s completion. One lane will be closed at all times, with an additional lane closed during the day on weekdays and some Saturdays. Timeline: May 2020-March 2021

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UP TO DATE AS OF OCT. 29. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT PLNNEWS@COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

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Voters in Collin County turned out in record numbers to cast ballots in a number of local, state and national races. (Liesbeth Powers/Community Impact Newspaper)

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of voters who cast a ballot in the 2016 general election, which is the highest turnout since at least 1996, when record-keeping shifted to its current format. This year, the Collin County Elections Department sent out about 45,000 mail ballots, which is more than double the estimated 20,000 sent out four years ago, Sherbet said. He also said that 92% of the Collin County voters who cast a ballot in this election voted early. Of the 488,905 ballots cast this year, only about 8% were cast on Election Day. Collin County’s voter registration rolls have been increasing with the county’s population growth. Since 2016, more than 110,000 Collin County residents have registered to vote, according to records from the Collin County Elections Department. Even though ballots from all of Collin County’s 102 vote centers and early voting and absentee ballots have been counted, election results are not yet ocial, Sherbet said. The county still provisional ballots and mail-in ballots to count, Sherbet said Nov. 9, which was the last day to receive ballots from the military and overseas. Elections results are not nal until canvassed and certied by the county clerk. Under Texas election law, counties have until Nov. 17 to canvass election results.

Collin County ocials project that election costs this year will exceed $2.5 million, which is more than double what the county spent four years ago. Elections Administrator Bruce Sherbet said costs have not been nalized and that there are still a few runo races and special elections left to hold. In a typical presidential election, Sherbet said, it is “safe” to say that the elections budget would be about $1.2 million. There is no single rea- son for this year’s increase, he said. Since 2016, the county elections department has increased the number of polling places by 40%. Those new polling places require voting machines; poll workers and election judges, who receive hourly pay; contractors paid to test voting equipment; phone banks to assist voters; and, new this year, personal protective equipment due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Another reason for the increase is the upcoming December runo for the special election for Texas Senate District 30, which represents 14 counties, including a portion of Collin County. As with many things in 2020, this year’s election was unusual, according to Sherbet. Voter turnout surpassed 75%, up from the 67.8%

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PLANO NORTH EDITION • NOVEMBER 2020

You deserve

the highest level

of stroke care.

Now a Certified Comprehensive Stroke Center. At Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Plano, we’re here to help you and your loved ones in an emergency. We were recently named a Comprehensive Stroke Center by DNV-GL Healthcare, the highest certification possible for stroke care. So when every second counts, we’re ready to care for you with a dedicated stroke coordinator, advanced imaging systems and hybrid suite technology. All with protocols in place designed around your safety.

Call 9-1-1 immediately if you or a loved one is experiencing stroke symptoms.

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Texas Health is right there with you. Whatever comes.

Doctors on the medical staffs practice independently and are not employees or agents of Texas Health hospitals or Texas Health Resources. © 2020

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

UTILITIES Plano helps settlewater rate dispute after years of negotiations

BY WILLIAM C. WADSACK

combined $275 million in recent years for water their residents and busi- nesses did not use. The new agreement includes an updated allocation method developed by the cities. It will gradually adjust the annual water commitments for each city over the next eight years to more closely align with their historical water use. Then in 2029, that alloca- tion method will move to a combina- tion of the new annual minimums and actual water used. The new agreement includes an updated allocation method developed by the cities. It will gradually adjust the annual water commitments for each city over the next eight years to more closely align with their historical water use. Then in 2029, that alloca- tion method will move to a combi- nation of the new annual minimums and actual water used. Beginning in 2033, the annual minimum for

A new agreement on the North Texas Municipal Water District’s rate structure will allow cost sharing to be phased in for its member cities over the next 13 years. That change could have a ripple eect on consumer water bills in Plano, McKinney, Richardson, Frisco and the district’s nine other member cities. Representatives from each of the district’s 13 member cities signed an amended wholesale water services contract Oct. 29 at the district’s headquarters in Wylie. A separate agreement approved by the NTMWD and its member cities will settle the wholesale water rate cases that are pending before the Public Utility Commission of Texas. Those cases came about after the cities of Plano, Richardson, Garland and Mesquite argued that under the previous contract, they had paid a

Larry Parks, president of the district’s board of directors, speaks about the amended contract Oct. 29 in Wylie. (William C. Wadsack/Community Impact Newspaper)

each member city will be based on a ve-year rolling average of actual consumption. “This document is a pledge to continue our eorts for the benets of our cities, customers and citizens,” said Larry Parks, president of the district’s board of directors. “We celebrate this commitment to each city represented.” The new agreement addresses a “long standing issue Plano raised more than a decade ago,” City Manager Mark Israelson said in a

statement. He thanked the district, the Public Utility Commission of Texas and Plano’s fellowmember cities for coming together to forge an agreement. “The old contract could not be changed without the unanimous agreement of all 13 member cities,” he said. “Everyone had to give a little. But in the end, after several years of negotiations, everyone shared a common desire to unify to implement a new rate structure that is fair and equitable to all.”

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PLANO NORTH EDITION • NOVEMBER 2020

The latest and greatest at Legacy is not your typical T-Mobile store. In true T-Mobile style, we took the everyday wireless store experience and we shook things up. Stop by to check out the best place to experience T-Mobile—the hottest new tech, interactive experiences and so much more. COME SEE WHAT WE’VE BEENUP TO

Now open next to the Legacy Tower 5800 Legacy Dr Suite C-9, Plano, TX 75024

12

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY& COUNTY

News from Collin County, Plano & Plano ISD

Plano City Council Meets at 7 p.m. on the second and fourth Mondays of the month. Meetings are held at 1520 K Ave., Plano, and can be streamed at www.plano.gov/210/plano-tv. Agendas are available at the city website. www.plano.gov Plano ISD board of trustees Meets at 6 p.m. Nov. 17 and Dec. 8 in the Administration Building’s Board Room at 2700 W. 15th St., Plano. 769-752-8100. www.pisd.edu MEETINGSWE COVER CITY HIGHLIGHTS PLANO Public libraries in Plano reopened in late October for grab- and-go services every day of the week. Visitors will be able to look for materials and pick up holds in person using a self-checkout system and to shop lobby sales. Computer access will also be available on a first-come, first-served basis for two-hour sessions. Face coverings are required at all times, and kids play areas, meeting rooms and seating will not be available for use. In-person services will be available during library hours, which are Mondays-Thursdays from 9 a.m.-8 p.m., Fridays from 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Saturdays from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sundays from 1-5 p.m. NUMBER TOKNOW $500,000 Plano ISD and the city of Plano entered into an agreement Oct. 20 that will allocate $500,000 of the city’s CARES Act funding toward custodial items and personal protective equipment at PISD. So far, the district has spent roughly $275,000 on cleaning and sanitation items and roughly $550,000 on desk shields for students and staff, according to staff.

County sets voter turnout record

TURNOUT BOOM Collin County saw higher turnout in this election than the past six presidential races, Elections Administrator Bruce Sherbet said.

BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER

Mayo, went home with 39%. Also on the ballot was the race for House District 67, which pitted incumbent Jeff Leach, R-Plano, against Democratic challenger Lorenzo Sanchez. Leach had a narrow victory with 52% of the vote. The District 66 race had three candidates: incumbent Matt Sha- heen, R-Plano; Democrat Sharon Hirsch and Libertarian Shawn Jones. Shaheen kept his seat with 49.68% of votes, while Hirsch trailed behind with 48.47% of votes, according to unofficial results. Across Collin County, incumbent Republicans held onto their seats by narrow margins. Residents voted to re-elect incumbent President Donald J. Trump by 250,194 votes, or 51.38% of the total. Residents also voted to re-elect U.S. incumbent Republican Sen. John Cornyn by 260,790 votes two fire stations, roof replacements for municipal facilities, continued phases of improvement projects at Los Rios and Jack Carter parks, and street repair and reconstruction. If the entire preliminary bond were to receive approval from council and voters, there would be a projected tax rate increase of $0.0343 per $100 of assessed property value beginning in 2025. An increase would not be expected until the final year of the four-year issuance and would cause the average Plano homeowner’s tax bill to increase by $109.21 in fiscal year 2024-25. In addition to the complete list

COLLINCOUNTY Nearly 489,000 Collin County residents voted in the Nov. 3 election, according to unofficial results from the county’s elections office. Total turnout in Collin County landed at about 75%, which is higher than the last six presidential races, Elections Administrator Bruce Sherbet said. Roughly 92% of votes were cast early or by mail. Nearly 31,000 mail ballots were received, data shows. Key races in Collin County included commissioner races for Precincts 1 and 3. In the Precinct 1 race, incumbent Susan Fletcher defeated challenger Courtney Brooks with almost 60% of the vote. In the race for Precinct 3, incumbent Dar- rell Hale won another term with 61% of the vote. His opponent, Dianne C.

650,134 488,905

Turnout 75%

Registered voters

Total ballot cast

Early voting ballots

Election Day ballots

Mail-in ballots

421,368

36,689

30,848

SOURCE: COLLIN COUNTY/ COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

or 54.75% of the total. Results are unofficial until they are canvassed and certified by the county clerk. Under Texas election law, counties have until Nov. 17 to canvass election results.

Process begins for possible bond inPlano

of projects, city staff also prepared alternative referendum options valued at $101 million, $350 million and $375 million. The only package with no impact on the tax rate in 2025 is the $101 million option, according to the presentation. The other two options would have just under $100 in property tax impact for the average homeowner. Next steps in the process include a review of recommended projects by city boards, commissions and City Council before a series of public hearings in December, January and April. If council calls for the bond election, it would take place May 1.

BY LIESBETH POWERS

PLANO The first public view into the process behind a possible Plano bond election in May began with an Oct. 26 presentation of $409.5 million in recommended projects. The recommendations include roughly 27 departmental facilities projects, 19 park improvements, a single recreation center project and 20 street improvement proposals, according to the presentation. Specifics include the remodeling of

13

PLANO NORTH EDITION • NOVEMBER 2020

Mohammed U. Ibrahim, M.D.

Ready to Care for Your Family

BUSINESS FEATURE

Queenie Feige-Hider and her daughter, Nichole Fiorentino, bought the store in 2019. (Photos by Makenzie Plusnick/Community impact Newspaper)

The FeatheredNest Mother-daughter duo behind Plano boutique aims to make every woman feel special Q ueenie Feige-Hider said she and her daughter, Nichole Fiorentino, have daughters in here shopping at the same time. That’s the goal,” she said. Like most businesses, The BY MAKENZIE PLUSNICK

Quality care is right where you need it to be - close to home at Texas Health Family Care. As a board- certified family physician, Dr. Mohammed Usman Ibrahim is here to keep you and your loved ones well with care as individualized as each family member. As always, we have protocols in place designed around your safety. To learn more, go to www. THPG.org/IbrahimSafe. New patients welcome. We are scheduling both in-person and virtual visits. 2100 Hedgcoxe Road Suite 120 Plano, TX 75025 972-430-8325

Matching loungewear sets have gained popularity as people spend more time at home, Fiorentino said.

always loved small boutiques. So in 2019, they took the leap and bought their own. “We seek out this kind of place because we like to wear dierent clothes,” Feige-Hider said. A close friend of Feige-Hider’s owned The Feathered Nest for 11 years before selling. Since taking over, the mother- daughter pair has added more clothing, locally made jewelry, hats, bags and more. They said they enjoy supporting small businesses and that their boutique is meant to showcase those items. Fiorentino, the store’s buyer, described the Nest’s clothes as having a boho-urban air. She chooses items based on customer feedback, quality and pricing. “We have a long conversation with our customers; we engage them and listen to them,” Feige- Hider said. Fiorentino said it is important to her that the store is versatile enough to satisfy a variety of shoppers. “We wanted to get moms and

Feathered Nest has had to adjust to survive the pandemic. Customers’ priorities have changed, and shop- ping is not necessarily at the top of their list, Fiorentino said. “People are not coming into little dress shops and dropping a ton of cash,” Fiorentino said. As such, the pair has shifted the focus to online sales and changed the inventory. The boutique now oers more lounge sets for around the house or for dressing up. “I think it’s very

The store added fashionable masks once the pandemic set in.

The FeatheredNest 1018 E. 15th St., Plano 469-298-0738 www.facebook.com/ thefeatherednestPlano Hours: Wed.-Thu. 11 a.m.-4 p.m., Fri.-Sat. 11 a.m.-7:30 p.m., Sun. 1-3 p.m., closed Mon.-Tue.

important ... [that we give customers] something comfortable and lovely, something that

you can walk by the mirror and go, ‘Wow, I kind of like the way that looks on me,’” Fiorentino said.

E. 15TH ST.

14TH ST.

Texas Health Family Care is a Texas Health Physicians Group practice. Providers employed by Texas Health Physicians Group are not employees or agents of Texas Health Resources hospitals. © 2020

N

The store’s items are described as having a boho-urban air.

14

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

The tandoori fruit entrée ($13) is a variety of marinated fruits skewered and cooked in a tandoor.

9 HEALTH BENEFITS OF GINGER Most of the recipes at Desi Ginger incorporate ginger in some way. The natural root is known for its healing qualities. 1 Antibacterial power prevents gum disease 2 Calms nausea 3 Soothes sore muscles 4 Eases arthritis symptoms

DINING FEATURE

Ashok “Jerry” Barot opened Desi Ginger after moving to Plano to start a new life. (Photos by Olivia Lueckemeyer/Community Impact Newspaper)

Desi Ginger Owner’s harrowing story underscores genesis of Plano restaurant

5 Curbs cancer growth 6 Lowers blood sugar and cholesterol 7 Eases menstrual cramps 8 Protects against disease 9 Relieves indigestion

BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER

“Maybe you survive; maybe you don’t survive— there is no guarantee,” he said of the transplants. “I looked at my kids, and I was cursing myself, regretting it so much.” Barot received a second liver shortly after he was placed on the transplant list. Not long after his sur- gery, he and his family relocated to Plano in search of better access to medical care. A fewmonths later, Barot opened Desi Ginger. The menu at Desi Ginger features vegetarian and non-vegetarian recipes found in North Indian cuisine. Some of the most popular items include the Ginger House Chicken, a curried meat dish, and the Kaju Paneer, a chef-special curry made with cashews and Indian tofu and served with rice. As were all restaurants, Desi Ginger was hit hard by COVID-19. The business lost over $200,000 in catering orders for large events, such as weddings. But instead of dwelling on the past, Barot said he chooses to look forward to the future. “I’m condent that the business that I’ve lost will come back if I’m here,” he said. “If I’m not here, where will people go?”

Ashok “Jerry” Barot cheated death twice before opening Desi Ginger in Plano in 2019. So when the coronavirus pandemic upended the restaurant industry in March, he said, he felt prepared to take on the challenge. “It’s hard, but in business, this is not new for me,” he said. “I’ve lost so much money—I’ll make it back.” Barot immigrated to the United States in the late 1990s. At 15 years old, Barot was homeless on the streets of Mumbai, India, selling women’s night- dresses until he earned enough money to buy a ight to New York City. There, he started several of his own mall-kiosk businesses. In the early 2000s, Barot moved to Florida and eventually opened a nightclub o the exit of a busy freeway. It was in this environment, he said, that he developed an addic- tion to alcohol, which led to liver failure. In 2015, Barot received a liver transplant. But the rst liver did not take, so a second transplant was ordered in 2016. Both times, Barot said, he was faced with the reality that he could die and leave behind his wife and two young sons.

SOURCE: WEBMDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Desi Ginger 2205 N. Central Expressway, Ste. 180, Plano 469-910-8033 www.desiginger.com Hours: Tue.-Fri. 11:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m., 5:30-10 p.m.; Sat.-Sun. noon-3 p.m., 5:30-10 p.m.; closed Mon.

75

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PROVIDING A SAFE PLACE TO WORSHIP TOGETHER IN PERSON SERVICE: 9:00 AM 10:15 & 11:45 DRIVE IN SERVICE: 9:00 AM ONLINE SERVICE: 10:15 AM & 11:45

3301 PRESTON RD | PLANO TX 75093 WWW.GRACEPLANO.CHURCH

15

PLANO NORTH EDITION • NOVEMBER 2020

Unemployment in Collin County has climbed due to the pandemic. Because many residents get health insurance through their employer, loss of jobs will have an adverse aect on the county’s uninsured rate. Here is a snapshot of the county’s health trends leading up to the onset of the COVID-19 crisis. COUNTYHEALTH SNAPSHOT

Collin County economic report reinforces city ndings, eorts

also seen in our planning processes,” Schwarz said. The city’s study guided the devel- opment of the Plano Annual Action Plan for scal year 2020-21—the rst of a larger ve-year plan—which cre- ates a roadmap for the city’s use of roughly $10 million from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. The Action Plan, which was adopted by council members earlier this year, details possible uses for the rst year of funds, including funding for housing rehabilitation, rst-time homebuyers, homelessness preven- tion and aordable housing expan- sion, among other projects. Many of the recent eorts by Plano Neighborhood Services have been directly related to the coronavirus pandemic, Schwarz said. Existing assistance programs saw an increase in need in the last six to eight months of the pandemic, she said. The city assisted by actively disbursing funds for one of those programs: Collin CARES. Ocials worked in conjunction with city lead- ership in Frisco, McKinney and Allen to help with emergency housing and living assistance. Providing for small businesses Collin County has been uniquely aected by the pandemic because of the prevalence of small businesses in the county—there were more than 20,000 with less than 20 employees in 2018—specically in the hospi- tality, retail and dining industries, the report shows. These businesses have been hit the hardest, with high unemployment numbers persisting through the last half of the year. In the immediate aftermath of the pandemic, the Plano Chamber of Commerce’s role has been to help connect those businesses with solu- tions, including assistance programs, President and CEO Kelle Marsalis said. “We’re so identiable as a loca- tion for corporate headquarters, but the real heartbeat of Plano is our small-business community,” Marsa- lis said. “That’s one of the areas that [the pandemic] has highlighted, is that small businesses are struggling.” A more constant, long-term goal of the chamber is advocating for those

BY LIESBETH POWERS

Leaders of the nonprot Com- munities Foundation of Texas said they could not have anticipated the COVID-19 crisis when they embarked last year on a comprehensive analy- sis of economic opportunity in Collin County. The resulting report, released in October, now serves as a base- line for analyzing eects of the pandemic as various Plano and Collin County entities move ahead with their own priorities, CFT Chief Philanthropy Ocer Sarah Cotton Nelson said. The 44-page report, conducted by public policy nonprot Every Texan, was initially planned for release in April. It outlines data for Collin County on economic status as related to race and ethnicity, income, edu- cational attainment and wealth. The study’s authors used the six-month delay to craft a two-page addendum that gauges the eects of COVID-19 on employment, on job sectors and on health insurance coverage. The report’s ndings rearm what cities and organizations on the ground are seeing, Nelson said: disparities in education, health and wealth. The ndings indicate that the pan- demic will only continue to widen the need already evident in Col- lin County, said Ann Beeson, who stepped down as CEO of Every Texan shortly after the report was released. “We think it’s actually more important than ever to have that baseline data [and] … see how the county was doing right before this major challenge hit in the county and The city of Plano conducted a sim- ilar study on housing and economic opportunities within its borders. This eort was conducted within the same time frame as the Collin County report, Plano Neighborhood Services Director Lori Schwarz said. “A lot of things that [the report] mentioned—as far as the increasing diversity of our communities, the increasing senior population, the widening dierence in the low- to moderate-income families and peo- ple that are more median income—all of that was in line with what we had the world,” Beeson said. Plano sets eyes on housing

In 2018, Plano had almost twice the rate of uninsured residents as Frisco and had a higher uninsured rate than Collin County as a whole. UNINSURED RATES BY CITY

McKinney 10.1%

21.7%

Frisco 6.9%

Allen 7.2%

11.3%

Plano 12.6%

Dallas County

Collin County

SOURCE: U.S. CENSUS BUREAU 2018 AMERICAN COMMUNITY SURVEY 1YEAR ESTIMATESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

INSURANCE BY TYPE

Prior to the pandemic, the vast majority of Collin County residents had private health insurance through their employer.

PUBLIC HEALTH INSURANCE

0.9%

V.A. health care coverage alone or in combination Medicaid/means-tested public coverage alone or in combination Medicare coverage alone or in combination

6.3%

10.5%

PRIVATE HEALTH INSURANCE

1.4%

Tricare/military health insurance alone or in combination Direct-purchase health insurance alone or in combination Employer-based health insurance alone or in combination

12.2%

69.1%

SOURCE: U.S. CENSUS BUREAU 2017 AMERICAN COMMUNITY SURVEY 1YEAR ESTIMATES COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

RACIAL INSURANCE GAPS Gaps in uninsured rates have lessened over time, but there are still racial and ethnic disparities.

White Asian Black Hispanic

Aordable Care Act signed into law

Health Insurance Market Place opened

39.9%

29.2

27.4%

21

16.9% 15.4% 10.7%

16%

8.1% 6.4%

2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017

SOURCE: U.S. CENSUS BUREAU 2017 AMERICAN COMMUNITY SURVEY 1YEAR ESTIMATES COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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