Gilbert Edition - May 2020

GILBERT EDITION

VOLUME 2, ISSUE 9  MAY 27JUNE 23, 2020

ONLINE AT

CORONAVIRUS COVERAGE

Town encouraged by rst COVID19 revenue look April, May results will dene budget

TRIGGERING COVID CUTS The town of Gilbert has built its scal year 2020-21 budget with sales tax revenue marks that will trigger operating expense cuts if revenue projects to fall in those ranges. The town will review revenue in August and October to determine updated revenue projections.

All content in this print publication, both editorial and advertisements, was up-to-date as of the press deadline. Due to the fast-changing nature of this event, editorial and advertising information may have changed. Please visit communityimpact.com and advertiser websites for more information. Thanks for your support.

BY TOM BLODGETT

$100M

Gilbert’s revenue in March, when the eects of the coro- navirus pandemic rst hit, along with the town’s experience navigating the Great Recession, have left the town optimistic about making it through the scal year relatively unscathed. March revenue was close to at fromMarch 2019, and col- lections through the rst nine months of scal year 2019-20 generally have been ahead of projections. That leaves the town in position to absorb the expected impact in April andMay with some revenues, particularly for sales tax, expected to decline in the coming months after a record-setting start to the year. “[The coronavirus] really hit in about mid-March,” Town Manager Patrick Banger said. “And it was like that needle across the record. The music is moving along and then that denite scratching sound.” Even so, the town prepared its FY 2020-21 budget with a recession of unknown impact in mind. It includes trig- ger points where cuts, already identied, will be made if necessary. Final approval on the $992.84 million budget will not CONTINUED ON 10

$95M

Base budget $90M-$97M sales tax revenue

$90M

First round of cuts $88M-$90M Second round of cuts $85M-$88M

IMPACTS

4

$85M

Revisit budget <$85M

$80M

0

SOURCE: TOWN OF GILBERTCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

NEWMEXICAN GRILL

9

Home contractors still nding business through pandemic

2020HOME IMPROVEMENT GUIDE

SUPPORT LOCAL JOURNALISM

“WE’VE DONE OURHOMEWORK, AND FOR THE MOST PART IT’S BEENAWELL CALCULATED RISK.” BRADLEY ROGERS , AC RANGERS HEATING AND COOLING COOWNER

BY TOM BLODGETT

A large percentage of businesses have been hit hard by the coronavirus pandemic, and while some home contractor and service businesses in Gilbert have followed that trend, others are seeing an uptick in need. With people staying at home more, maintenance and improvement projects come to the forefront of residents’ minds, which in turn is keeping some home improvement businesses aoat during an uncertain time, according to some contractors. “While the phone’s ringing, I’m going to work seven days a week if I have to,” said Luke Crosthwaite, a Gilbert resident and owner of Crosthwaite Custom Construction. However, the eect is not universal. Some contractors struggle like most of the rest of the country’s businesses have. Most businesses, also, have had to adjust their prac- tices and take precautions to make people more comfortable

Please join your friends and neighbors in support of Community Impact Newspaper ’s legacy of local, reliable reporting by making a contribution. Any amount matters. Together, we can continue to ensure our citizens stay informed and keep our local businesses thriving. Become a #CommunityPatron

Bradley Rogers and his business partner started A/C Rangers Heating and Cooling during the heart of the pandemic restrictions, but the company has gotten o to a good start, Rogers said.

COMMUNITYIMPACT.COMPATRON

CONTINUED ON 13

AVISTA Medical Center is committed to keeping you and our employees safe.

20% OFF All Weight Loss Programs FREE PHYSICIAN CONSULTATION CALL TODAY (Only valid with coupon.) $175 value!

690 E Warner Rd. # 133, Gilbert, AZ 85296

Warner Rd.

480-892-1212 avistamed.com

N

Mon - Fri: 7AM - 6PM

ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS TELE-MED AND TELE-VISIT APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE NO COVID-19 – If you have symptoms, call for assistance in getting tested. Most Major Insurance Companies Accepted • Medicare and Medicare Advantage Accepted • Cash Plans Available

FREE consultation! ($175 Value!)

HIGH DOSE VITAMIN-C INFUSION TO HELP PREVENT OR LESSEN THE SYMPTOMS OF VIRUSES INCLUDING COVID-19 PHYSICIAN ADMINISTERED (while supplies last) $148

15% OFF injection packages! Savings of up to $500! 10% OFF your first injection! Up to $100 savings! (This can be combined with other offers.)

INFUSION MADE AFFORDABLE!

690 E Warner Rd. # 133, Gilbert, AZ 85296 | 480-892-1212 | avistamed.com

2

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

CONTENTS IMPACTS

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

4

Now Open, Coming Soon &more TRANSPORTATION

PUBLISHERS AND FOUNDERS John and Jennifer Garrett PUBLISHERPHOENIXMETRO Amy Ellsworth, aellsworth@communityimpact.com EDITORIAL EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Lanane MANAGING EDITOR Krista Wadsworth EDITOR Tom Blodgett COPY CHIEF Andy Comer COPY EDITORS Ben Dickerson, Kasey Salisbury STAFFWRITER Alexa D’Angelo ADVERTISING SALES DIRECTOR Tess Coverman ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Michelle Gavagan DESIGN CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Aubrey Galloway GRAPHIC DESIGNER Isabella Short STAFF DESIGNER Damien Hernandez BUSINESS GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER Claire Love ABOUT US John and Jennifer Garrett began Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 in Pugerville, Texas. The company’s mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. CONTACT US 610 N. Gilbert Road, Ste. 205 Gilbert, AZ 85234 • 4804824880 communityimpact.com PRESS RELEASES gilnews@communityimpact.com SUBSCRIPTIONS communityimpact.com/subscriptions © 2020 Community Impact Newspaper Co. All Rights Reserved. No reproduction of any portion of this issue is allowed without written permission from the publisher.

6

FROMAMY: Many of us have had to spend nearly all of our time at home during the pandemic. As a result, home project lists have grown in a number of households. At my house, the air conditioning had to be replaced after going out; the dryer had to be repaired; and some optional projects, such as installing a Ring doorbell and replacing some window coverings, have also ensued. As one of our cover stories notes, home improvement professionals are staying busy at this time, proving that I am not the only one who is tackling household projects right now. Amy Ellsworth, PUBLISHER

Local road projects

TOWN& EDUCATION

7

FROMTOM: Budgets can be dicult to understand, and talk about budgets and levies and rates can cause someone to tune out. Gilbert Management and Budget Director Kelly Pfost, however, can use Gilbert’s numbers to tell a story. The story she has told council and residents is that the town is on rm nancial ground even in the grip of a pandemic. Our front-page story looks at what Pfost and Town Manager Patrick Banger are seeing and how the town plans to handle it if the economy continues a hard downturn. Tom Blodgett, EDITOR

Gilbert and local school district news

BUSINESS FEATURE

8

Envision Painting

WHAT’S NEWAT COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER ? CUSTOMDIGITAL CAMPAIGNS FOR ADVERTISERS Our online partnership includes more value with record-breaking content and readership and exible weekly ad schedules. communityimpact.com/advertise

DINING FEATURE

9

NewMexican Grill HOME IMPROVEMENT GUIDE 15 Maintenance around the house REAL ESTATE 16 Residential market data IMPACT DEALS 17 Local coupons CORRECTION: Volume 2, Issue 8 Some line items in Gilbert Public Schools’ initial budget projection were mismatched with their totals in a graphic that appeared on Page 7. The corrected graphic appears in the issue’s e-edition at communityimpact.com.

DAILY LOCAL NEWSLETTER Sign up to receive daily headlines directly to your inbox. communityimpact.com/ newsletter

EEDITIONS Explore over 100 new interactive digital editions at communityimpact.com .

Proudly printed by

communityimpact.com

@impactnews_gil

facebook.com/impactnewsgil

BEST DECISION EVER

Using a Travel Leaders travel advisor for all my bookings.

480 - 892 - 4992 | www. t r a v e l b e t t e r a r i z o n a . c om | 9 a - 5 p M - F o r b y a p p o i n t me n t

3

GILBERT EDITION • MAY 2020

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

60

4

6

E. BASELINE RD.

13

3

18

E. GUADALUPE RD.

12

W. COMMERCE AVE.

E. ELLIOT RD.

10

GILBERT

11

Ooodles Pet Grooming

Vito's Pizza and Italian Ristorante

7

E. WARNER RD.

COURTESY OODLES PET GROOMING

TOM BLODGETTCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

E. VAUGHN AVE.

202

found throughout Arizona. The bar has views of downtown Gilbert and the San Tan Mountain. http://ilegalaz.com 9 Journey Five anticipates opening as early as the rst week of June at 2540 S. Santan Village Parkway, Gilbert. It oers modest, on-trend, aordable women’s dresses, tops, shoes and bags. This is the second location of the clothing store, with the original in Layton, Utah. www.journeyve.com 10 Kavala will open at 1455 W. Elliot Road, Ste. 101, Gilbert, in the site of the former 1455 Grill, but no date has been announced. It will serve Greek-Italian fu- sion food, including gyros, organic salads and organic coee. RELOCATIONS 11 Evolve Counseling & Behavioral Health Services moved to a new oce at 1206 E. Warner Road, Ste. 115, Gilbert, on Jan. 11. It oers individual, couples, family, teen and child counseling. 480-590-3915. www.evolvecounselingaz.com 12 Turf and Trees Landscaping moved to 732 W. Commerce Ave., Gilbert, in mid-February. It does landscape mainte- nance, installation, remodeling, irrigation repair and installation, tree trimming, removal, installation, stump grinding, pest control, termite control, pavers and articial turf. 602-517-9959.

4 Ooodles Pet Grooming opened March 18 at 3321 E. Queen Creek Road, Ste. 105, Gilbert. The salon specializes in poodles and doodle breeds, but the three groomers have experience in caring for all kinds of dogs and cats. 480-376-2530. www.ooodlesgrooming.com 5 Power Core Plus opened a second lo- cation at 3978 E. Chandler Heights Blvd., Ste. 102, Gilbert, on May 18. The tness boutique studio oers Pilates, barre and yoga with child care available. The rst location is in Mesa. 480-225-2540. www.powercoreplus.com 6 Vito’s Pizza and Italian Ristorante anticipated opening a location at 4865 S. Higley Road, Ste. 101, Gilbert, on May 25. The location will be the third in the Valley for Vito’s. The restaurant serves Italian cuisine and a Chicago-style thin-crust pizza. 480-245-4554. https://vitospizza.com COMING SOON 7 Though the coronavirus pandemic has caused delays, Gelato Cimmino antici- pates opening its second location as early as September at the northeast corner of Gilbert Road and Vaughn Avenue in Gilbert. It serves 100% natural gelato with natural ingredients and homemade cones. The rst location is in Scottsdale. https://gelatocimmino.com 8 A rooftop bar, ilegal Modern Cocktail Kitchen , postponed its opening from April 3 to likely Phase 3 of the state’s reopen- ing, perhaps August, at 313 N. Gilbert Road, Gilbert. It has a cocktail bar and a full scratch kitchen that uses fresh avors

8

W. RAY RD.

S. SANTAN VILLAGE PKWY.

E. PAGE AVE.

17

2

E. WILLIAMS FIELD RD.

E. CHANDLER BLVD.

9

15

E. QUEEN CREEK RD.

E. PECOS RD.

14

6 4

16

202

1

E. GERMANN RD.

E. QUEEN CREEK RD.

E . O C O

5

E. RIGGS RD.

MAP NOT TO SCALE N TM; © 2020 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER CO. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

HUNT HWY.

E. HUNT HWY.

NOWOPEN A/C Rangers Heating and Cooling opened for calls April 18. The locally owned and operated heating, ventilation and air conditioning company does installation, service and 24/7 emergency calls. 480-818-4772. www.acrangers.com 1 Joanne Siebert opened a Gilbert oce of her chiropractic practice at 3530 S. Val Vista Drive, A-111, Ste. 2, on March 1. She oers low-level laser therapy and custom orthotics and treats

automobile injuries. 520-350-1337. www.developyourhealth.com 2 LunchboxWax opened Feb. 25 at 2050 E. Williams Field Road, Ste. 105, Gilbert, in the SanTan Village mall. It bills itself as a full-service speed waxing salon for men and women. 480-405-0111. www.lunchboxwax.com/san-tan 3 Melt Wax Bar opened March 4 at 963 N. Gilbert Road, Ste. 5, Gilbert. It oers full-service face and body waxing. 480-395-0218. www.facebook.com/ Melt-Wax-Bar-111702793776290/

www.turfandtreesaz.com ANNIVERSARIES

13 AZ Dental celebrated its rst anni- versary April 29 at 1851 E. Baseline Road,

4

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY TOM BLODGETT

9

10

Journey Five

Kavala

TOM BLODGETTCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

TOM BLODGETTCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Ste. 103, Gilbert. The location practices general dentistry. 480-497-1197. www.facebook.com/azdentaloce 14 Christian Brothers Automotive celebrated its rst anniversary April 29 at 1245 E. Pecos Road, Gilbert. The franchise is the fourth location in the southeast Valley. It puts an emphasis on honest di- agnoses. It has a three-year, 36,000-mile warranty on labor and new components installed. 480-210-0466. www.cbac.com 15 Lallipop Daycare celebrated its rst anniversary May 20 at 1451 E. Williams Field Road, Gilbert. It oers day care for children ages 6 weeks-10 years from 6 a.m.-6:30 p.m. on weekdays. 480-786-6767. http://lallipopdaycare.com 16 Old Chicago Pizza and Taproom celebrated its rst anniversary May 13 at 2950 E. Germann Road, Chandler, on

the Gilbert border. The chain has been in business for more than 40 years serving craft beers and pizza at locations across the country. 480-912-7170. http://oldchicago.com/locations/chandler 17 Quick Quack Car Wash celebrated its rst anniversary May 29 at 5621 S. Power Road, Mesa, on the Gilbert border. The business promises a “car wash show full of lights and colors,” free vacuums, three-minute washes, memberships, and a “green and clean” earth-friendly wash. 888-772-2792. www.dontdrivedirty.com 18 Rio Rico Mexican Grill celebrated its 15th anniversary in March at 929 N. Val Vista Drive, Ste. 101, Gilbert. It serves homemade Mexican food for breakfast, lunch and dinner as well as cold beer, margaritas, piña coladas and wine. 480-539-4491. www.facebook.com/ riorico

Nurse practitioners Kristina Mattson (left) and Andrea Robbins opened Sapphire Health and Wellness. (Courtesy Sapphire Health and Wellness)

FEATURED IMPACT NOWOPEN Sapphire Health and Wellness opened May 1 at 3530 S. Val Vista Drive, No. A-111, Gilbert. Because COVID-19 has slowed down insurance contracts, it is accepting only cash-pay patients, but it anticipates a full opening and accepting insurance beginning June 15. Nurse practitioners Andrea Robbins and Kristina Mattson started Sapphire to use compassionate, holistic and

202

MERCY RD.

N

preventive care. They specialize in primary care, weight loss and addiction and focus on educating patients and preventing disease. 480-219-7810. www.sapphirehealthaz.com

DOMESTIC • EUROPEAN • JAPANESE & KOREAN•TRUCKS & SUV’S • HYBRID & ELECTRIC VEHICLE SERVICE

CONTACT US NOW! WWW.HIGHLINECARCARE.COM (480) 336-2889

NEW LOCATION 1372 N MARVIN ST, GILBERT, AZ 85233

BASELINE RD.

MELODY AVE.

MERILL AVE.

HIGHLINE CAR CARE SPECIALS

CUSTOMER REVIEW

$39.99 $49 FULL SYNTHETIC OIL CHANGE

$50 off CANNOT COMBINE WITH ANY OTHER OFFERS. BRAKE PAD REPLACEMENT

“Another excellent service. Highline is professional, timely, and charges reasonable rates - much better than the dealer! They had diagnosed and repaired in one day despite needing to order a

AC QUICK CHECK

MAKE SURE YOUR AIR CONDITIONING IS READY FOR THE SUMMER

part. I will definitely be back” - Jim L. 2014 Toyota Tundra

ADDITIONAL PARTS AND LABOR MAY APPLY.

UP TO 5 QUARTS.

5

GILBERT EDITION • MAY 2020

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES

COMPILED BY TOM BLODGETT

ONGOING PROJECTS 1 Val Vista Drive widening The town is widening Val Vista Drive from Appleby Road—about where Val Vista narrows to one lane in each direction—to Riggs Road. The result will be a six-lane section from Ocotillo Road to Merlot Street with a raised landscaped median, bike lanes, sidewalks and streetlights. It would then reduce to four lanes to the south. Traffic signals will be installed at Appleby, Ocotillo and Chandler Heights roads. Status: There are plans to close Val Vista from Appleby to Brooks Farm Road from May 18-July 21 while allowing mail, trash and business access. Timeline: March 2020-July 2021 Cost: $25.96 million Funding sources: bonds, town funds and Maricopa Associ- ation of Governments funds 2 Lindsay Road widening—Pecos Road to Loop 202 Lindsay Road will be improved from Pecos Road, including the intersection, to the Loop 202 underpass to major arte- rial standards. The improvements include additional lanes, a raised median, sidewalks and streetlights. Status: A weekend closure is planned at the intersection of Pecos and Lindsay roads for the first weekend of June. Lexington Street was opened to restricted traffic move- ments May 15. Timeline: May 2019-June 2020 Cost: $12.6 million Funding sources: town of Gilbert bonds, Maricopa Associ- ation of Government funds, developer contributions

3 Recker Road—Ray Road to Loop 202 improvements The town will complete Recker Road improvements to minor arterial road standards, including expanding to four lanes and adding a raised median, landscaping, bike lanes, sidewalks and streetlights. The project includes the relocation of power lines and a raised/landscaped median from Ray Road to the Loop 202-SanTan Freeway. Status: Construction started April 20. The contractor has started to relocate an existing private irrigation ditch onto the homeowner’s property and out of the right of way. Timeline: January-November Cost: $3.03 million Funding sources: town of Gilbert bonds, funds; developer contributions 4 Val Vista Drive reconstruction The town will do a major reconstruction of deteriorated asphalt pavement on Val Vista Drive from Baseline Road to the Guadalupe Road intersection, adding bike lanes, updating landscaping in medians and refreshing three signals to current standards. Signals will be updated to flashing left turns. Status: Median removals are complete, and work has begun on the signals. Traffic will be moved to the median, and work will begin on the outside lanes. Timeline: January 2020-January 2021 Cost: $6.32 million Funding source: town of Gilbert bonds and funds

60

E. BASELINE RD.

4

E. GUADALUPE RD.

E. ELLIOT RD.

E. WARNER RD.

3

E. RAY RD.

E. WILLIAMS FIELD RD.

E. CHANDLER BLVD.

202

E. PECOS RD.

2

LEXINGTON ST.

E. GERMANN RD.

E. QUEEN CREEK RD.

E. APPLEBY RD.

1

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF MAY 18. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT GILNEWS@COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

E. MERLOT ST.

MAP NOT TO SCALE N

CONCERNED ABOUT THE STOCK MARKET?

CELEBRATING THE COMMUNITY We As One Rise Welcome Back - Limited Time Offers

4.17% Current Annuity Rates 2 Year Certificate 2.30% APY* 1 Year Certificate 2.0% APY* 5 Year Certificate 4.07% APY*

FIVE YEAR ANNUITY CERTIFICATE

FOR A LIMITED TIME ONLY

• $250,000 Maximum Deposit • No Fees or Charges

• $20,000 Minimum Deposit • Guaranteed for the Term • No Gimmicks or Bonuses from Broker

WE CAN HELP WITH 401K, IRA & ROTH TRANSFERS

After 19 years in the financial industry, Sean Humeston's areas of expertise have now broadened to include estate and retirement planning, personal budgeting, wealth

Complete Trust & Will Package for only $ 795

transfer as well as insurance and income planning. Sean is a proud member of the Better Business Bureau, National Ethics Association and the Association of Financial Educators.

SCHEDULE A FREE CONSULTATION TODAY! 480-779-6221 Sean Humeston Wealth Strategist/CEO

WITH THIS AD!

10 pack of Rides Just $120!

Unlimited Rides Just $99 per month….for life!

1176 E Warner Rd., Suite 115 Gilbert, AZ 85296

Shoreline Financial Services of Arizona LLC is a deposit broker licensed in the state as well as a full service financial and retirement planning firm. We offer short and long term MYGA’s (Multi Year Guaranteed Annuities) from various insurance companies. Product brochures available upon request. FDIC insured CD’s are available upon inquiry. Products available on this ad are not a substitute for the advice of an attorney. You should consult with an attorney and www.ShoreLineAZ.com

www.cyclebar.com/location/gilbert | Facebook @cyclebargilbert 2484 S Santan Village Parkway, Ste. 103, Gilbert, AZ 85295 | 480.912.1253

6

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TOWN&EDUCATION

COMPILED BY TOM BLODGETT

News from Gilbert, Gilbert Public Schools, Higley USD and Chandler USD

QUOTE OF NOTE

Streets bonds packageunlikely to go to voters until 2021 ballot GILBERT A $495 million street bonds package town ocials

Civil engineer Yung Koprowski appointed to Town Council GILBERT Town Council is full again after council appointed a civil engineer to the last remaining vacant seat. Yung Koprowski will ll former Council Member Jordan Ray’s seat for the nal 32-plus months of his term. Koprowski was appointed April 21 on a 4-2 vote with Aimee Yentes and Jared Taylor dissenting. Koprowski’s primary discipline in civil engineering is in trac engineering, and she also has additional certications as a professional trac operations engineer and a road safety professional. She previously served on the Gilbert Citizens Transportation Task Force. Yung Koprowski

“I’MREALLY EXCITED FORYUNG KOPROWSKI BECAUSE OF HER TECHNICAL KNOWLEDGE, FOR HER EXPERIENCE AS ABUSINESS OWNER ANDAS A LONGTIME RESIDENTWHO CARES DEEPLY FOR THE COMMUNITY.” MAYOR JENN DANIELS ON THE MOST RECENT COUNCIL APPOINTMENT GILBERTPUBLIC SCHOOLS The governing board approved by a 5-0 vote May 5 for technology services and the purchasing department to purchase 7,000 Chromebooks for $2.32 million from CDW Government. The district provides Chromebooks for students’ use. HIGLEYUSD The board approved on May 13 an update to the next school year’s calendar and proposed calendars for the following four years through 2024-25. The calendars carve time for junior high school teachers to get professional development. CHANDLERUSD The governing board approved on May 6 the purchase of an estimated 2,600 HP Elite laptops for distribution and use by teachers at $1,300 each for a total of $3.38 million. The purchase is being made in preparation for increasing virtual instruction. Gilbert Town Council June 2, 6:30 p.m. June 16, 6:30 p.m. 50 E. Civic Center Drive, Gilbert 480-503-6871 • www.gilbertaz.gov Gilbert Public Schools Board June 9, 6:30 p.m. (work study/brief business) June 23, 6:30 p.m. 140 S. Gilbert Road, Gilbert 480-497-3300 www.gilbertschools.net Higley USD Board June 12, 10 a.m. June 24, 5:30 p.m. 2935 S. Recker Road, Gilbert 480-279-7000 • www.husd.org Chandler USD Board June 10, 7 p.m. June 24, 7 p.m. 1525 W. Frye Road, Chandler 480-812-7000 • www.cusd80.com Follow us on Twitter: @impactnews_gil MEETINGSWE COVER SCHOOL HIGHLIGHTS

anticipated putting before voters this fall likely will not appear before voters until the November 2021 ballot at sta’s recommendation. That recommendation came at the town’s nancial retreat April 16, a key budget planning event. While the work in putting together a bonds package largely has been completed, sta made the recommendation because of the economic environment in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic. Other funding requests: Police Chief Michael Soelberg presented proposals for a $16.3 million victims advocacy cen- ter and a $7.9 dispatch center

Additional street bonds to fund Gilbert transportation projects likely will have to wait until the 2021 ballot.

expansion. The North Water Treatment Plant, which originally went online in 1996, needs substantial investment if it is to maintain water quality. Sta recommends full plant reconstruction, at a cost of $273 million, or improvements to the existing plant at $285 million.

Summer partnership to giveHUSD students chance for credits HIGLEY USD The governing board agreed to allow district students to enroll in a Mesa Public Schools program to earn up to two semester high school credits this summer at a special board meeting May 7. The board also waived secondary summer school fees for this summer at the meeting. BUDGET REVISIONS An unexpected increase in enrollment, among other reasons, has allowed Gilbert Public Schools to revise its 2019-20 budgets limits. Here is how those budgets line up.

The program is the Mesa Distance Learning Program, and it will allow students an opportunity for credit acceleration that they normally do not have in summer school. Students still have credit-recovery options through HUSD summer school if they failed a class. All sum- mer school classes will be online. Dawn Foley, HUSD K-12 educational services assistant superintendent, called MDLP “one of the best online curriculums.” Both actions passed 5-0. Foley said the special board

AVAILABLE CREDITS This summer the following course options will be available to Higley USD students through Mesa Distance Learning Program. World history American history

Semester 1 and/or Semester 2 Government Economics SOURCE: HIGLEY USD COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

meeting was called to allow the district to start advertising the option to students.

District revises budgets for second time GILBERT PUBLIC SCHOOLS District ocials presented a second revision of its scal year 2019-20 budgets to the governing board at its May 5 meeting. The revision primarily came about as the district gured its nal average daily membership—the total enrollment of fractional and full-time students, minus withdrawals, of each school day through the rst 100 days in session. That number was 527.86 higher than the district anticipated going into the school year and resulted in a larger weighted student count and more money through the state’s funding formulas. A larger-than-anticipated budget balance carry forward from the previous scal year also contributed to the change. In the end, the district’s mainte- nance and operations budget limit grew to $239.29 million, and the unre- stricted capital budget limit increased to $12.19 million.

Unrestricted capital Maintenance and operations $234.7M $10.98M

$239.29M $12.19M

SOURCE: GILBERT PUBLIC SCHOOLS COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

7

GILBERT EDITION • MAY 2020

BUSINESSFEATURE

BY TOM BLODGETT

TIME TO PAINT Owner Pete Schnepp says when to paint is usually in the eye of the beholder, but he suggests some things homeowners should look for to judge whether it is time for repainting a house’s exterior. • Fading or peeling at the bottom of the house • Stucco cracks • Fascia board peeling and deterioration

“WE TREAT CUSTOMERS RIGHT, ANDWE GREWUP ORGANICALLYAS A RESULT OF THAT.” PETE SCHNEPP, OWNER

Envision Painting added disinfecting as a service in April.

Pete Schnepp said his company will not cut corners to give someone a lower price. He wants his work to be quality. (Photos courtesy Envision Painting)

Envision Painting Owner concentrates on earning high reviews, repeat business P ete Schnepp did not have a grandiose marketing plan when he started Envision Painting 13 years ago. Indeed, it was pretty there to be the lowest-priced contractor in town, but at the same time, we’re usually not the high- est-priced. So we’re fair with the customers. We treat them right, and we grew up organically as a result of that.”

Envision Painting does residential, commercial and homeowners association work.

simple. “I just really started out knocking on doors, going door to door,” Schnepp said. “With Craigslist, I was putting ads all the time on it. It wasn’t the most ecient, but the way to earn somebody’s business is to do a good job. Sure enough, after time, that begins to snowball.” Year over year, he saw growth in his client base, which includes residential, commercial and homeowners association customers. And so the philosophy has stayed in place. “Our goal every time we do a job for a customer is to get a ve-star review and ultimately earn their business for the next time they need a paint job,” he said. “Nowadays, a large majority of our business is repeat customers and referrals because we ingrain that with all our guys.” Doing a quality job means corners will not be cut, Schnepp said. Prep work will be done thoroughly. Paint will not be watered down. And that means pricing will probably not be the lowest. “We’re just a local company,” he said. “We treat people right. We do a good job. We’re not out

Like many businesses, Envision Painting has suf- fered a downturn during the coronavirus pandemic. Schnepp estimates business was o 50%-75% during April. Nonetheless, Schnepp is trying to rise to the occasion for the community. Following the lead of another contractor friend, Envision Painting used some of its marketing money to reimburse 50% of customers’ bills for those who ordered food from Gilbert restaurants April 13. Customers only had to like Envision’s Face- book page, ll out a form and upload the receipt to get an e-check. Later in April, with the equipment needed already in hand, Schnepp added disinfecting to the services Envision oers. And Envision is doing that sanitizing for currently unoccupied nonprots and “good causes” for free. “Honestly, I’ve been wanting to nd out ways to contribute to the community for a long time now,” Schnepp said. “And COVID just made me start getting creative.”

Disinfecting nonprots for no charge is a way of giving back to the community, Schnepp said.

EnvisionPainting P.O. Box 628, Gilbert 480-535-6625 www.phoenix-painting.com Hours: By appointment

For all the latest news related to Gilbert and COVID-19, coronavirus:

8

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

DINING FEATURE

BY TOM BLODGETT

The breakfast menu includes chorizo burritos ($6.49) with eggs and potatoes.

The grilled carne asada tacos ($2.99 or $4.99 for two) come on soft corn tortillas.

Ralph Aranda (right) credits his loyal customers for keeping him aoat during the coronavirus pandemic. (Photos courtesy NewMexican Grill)

NewMexicanGrill 3107 S. Lindsay Road, Ste. 101, Gilbert 480-899-0773 www.facebook.com/new-mexican- grill-131115090288041 around in the last few months or even a year or two back, that we haven’t been seeing them for awhile, all came back and supported us. All of them did. I’m so blessed to have great customers. I don’t even know how I can express what I feel, but it’s been total support.” CUSTOMER SUPPORT Opening New Mexican Grill lifted Ralph Aranda out of the Great Recession, and it does not look like the coronavirus pandemic will end it, he said. “The [customers] that hadn’t been

NewMexicanGrill Ex-wife’s encouragement, early cooking lessons pay dividends for owner R alph Aranda’s and Sydney McKinney’s marriage may not have worked out, but their friendship and business partnership stands strong. restaurant bug growing up with parents who ran Rafaelito’s, a in 2008, Aranda lost his job and could not nd other work. That is when McKinney urged him to start a restaurant cooking his way—“don’t add to it, don’t take away,” she told him.

small Mexican food place on South Central Avenue in Phoenix. They closed it in the mid-1970s as they both were working two jobs on top of the restaurant. But Aranda learned to cook from his mom and a grandmother living in Silver City, New Mexico. Her house always smelled of the Hatch chiles in the area that she was constantly cooking. “When you went in her house, you had to eat,” he said. “It didn’t work any other way, so you had better go there hungry.” Aranda has delivered pizzas, worked as an assistant manager at Taco Bell, opened a restaurant in Mesa for four years and worked as the food service manager for a nursing home. But during the Great Recession

Aranda runs the operations and McKinney does the administrative work for New Mexican Grill, the restaurant Aranda started in 2011 at McKinney’s urging, 13 years after their divorce. The dierent roles suit them and keep them from “tripping over each other,” said Aranda, who has noth- ing but praise for his former wife. “We had a good divorce, you know? Friendship,” Aranda said. “And we’ve been in business since. She’s a very trustworthy person, hard worker, dedicated and has a big heart. So I’ve probably got one of the best business partners anybody could have.” Aranda said he caught the

That meant cooking everything from scratch and using only Hatch chiles from New Mexico, just like his grandmother. When he opened the restaurant in January 2011, he made enough money to pay his bills. Business picked up over the next couple months, and with some publicity, he soon was too stressed to keep up with demand and had to expand his sta. It has gone well since then. “When I get to work in the morn- ing, I think about my grandma or my mom,” he said. “I always think that they’re still with me. I honestly believe that.”

Hours: Mon.-Fri. 7 a.m.-8 p.m., Sat. 8 a.m.-3 p.m., closed Sun.

E. PECOS RD.

N

Don’t Renew Until You Compare!

Affordable Health Insurance!

MISSED YOUR CHANCE FOR OPEN ENROLLMENT? WE CAN GET YOU COVERED! COVERAGE OPTIONS

Appointments Only for Office & Mobile — starting June 1st

• Health, Dental, Vision • Life and Accident • PPO Networks

• No Deductible Plans • First Dollar Coverage • Enroll Anytime

• Cancer, Heart

Attack and Stroke Plans Available

• Medicare Plans • Final Expense

f r a m e s & l e n s e s p a c k a g e

$ 149

$ 249

S i ng l e V i s i o n a s l ow a s

P r og r e s s i v e s s t a r t a t

950 E. Pecos Rd., Suite 5, Chandler 85225 480-331-6360

(602) 463-3662 | www.DAlbrecht.myhst.com FREE QUOTE! Call Today For Your

Qu a l i t y e y e w e a r a t a s i m p l e a n d a f f o r d a b l e p r i c e

s o s eye ca r e . com

9

GILBERT EDITION • MAY 2020

FILLING THE REVENUE POTS Gilbert is nine months into gathering revenue for the “pots” that fund the town’s general fund with the scal year ending June 30. The town uses the previous year’s collections to make projections for the next year’s budget. To date, most collections are ahead of last year’s pace.

Town sales tax

State shared sales tax

State shared income tax

$100M

$30M

$35M

$30M

$25M

$80M

$25M

$20M

$60M

$20M

$15M

$15M

$40M

$10M

$10M

$20M

2019-20 collections to date 2018-19 collections

$5M

$5M

SOURCE: TOWN OF GILBERT COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

0

0

0

would induce certain cuts. The town gures it can manage bal- ancing the budget through control of expenses, even if town sales tax reve- nue falls to $90 million, Pfost said. However, if projected revenue falls below $90 million—what the town considers a “medium impact” from the virus—some budget cuts will be enacted. If it falls below $88 mil- lion, a “large impact,” more cuts are triggered. If the revenue projects to be less than $85 million, the budget priorities will have to be revisited. “As the path unfolds and we get data over the next several months, we will be able to make dierent changes in our expenditures to match what- ever the revenue forecast is looking like,” Pfost said. One concern expressed when coun- cil gave preliminary budget approval was the hiring included. Most of those positions are for additional police ocers and reghters to meet the demands of a growing town.

customers pay on retail items pur- chased in town. The town sales tax makes up more than half of the revenue that feeds the general fund. It pays for things such as the police and re departments, parks and recreation, planning, zoning and human resources, Pfost said. For its budgets,

“It’s never good timing to have a worldwide pandemic, but to have it happen with just a few months left in our scal year when we’ve had a really good rst eight months—the eight good months are able to help oset likely losses that we would have for the last four,” Pfost said. “So it bal-

CONTINUED FROM 1

come until June 2. The budget is about $56 million less than the FY 2019-20 budget of $1.05 billion. Council also passed a tax levy of $25.88 million on May 5, an increase of $1.63 million, but maintained a sec- ondary property tax rate of $0.9896 per $100 of assessed valuation. That action reopened a debate within council of whether that represents a tax hike. Revenue pools The town’s most volatile revenue pools are from the Transaction Priv- ilege Tax, or sales tax, according to Management and Budget Director Kelly Pfost. The town has two such funds, one for the town’s sales tax of 1.5%, and the other from state shared sales tax, a payment Gilbert gets from the state from the state’s 5.6% sales tax. Those two rates, plus Maricopa County’s 0.7%, make up the 7.8% sales tax that

ances. If this hap- pened July 1 and we had a complete year of lower revenues, that would have been a lot harder for

the town uses reve- nue projections that forecast low or no growth, but through March, the town has collected $80.1 mil- lion in town sales tax, nearly 83% of its budgeted total for the year. Though the

“... WE CAN SAY THATWE GET A TREMENDOUS VALUE IN THE TOWNOF GILBERT FOR EVERY SINGLE DOLLAR.” JENN DANIELS, MAYOR

us to weather.” Budget triggers

In building the FY 2020-21 budget, the town did two things to protect itself from the coronavirus downturn. First, rather than use this past year’s revenue projections of up to $109million in town sales tax, it rolled over the projections from FY 2018-19. But beyond using that lower start- ing point, it built in trigger points that

town is no longer on track for record collections, ocials believe they are on track to withstand a sharp down- turn in the nal three months and meet projections. That is true for nearly all of its revenue funds. Also helping the town handle the impact was the timing of the crisis.

Deep Clean or Move In/Out Clean Our most thorough cleaning service. $ 25 OFF $ 10 OFF Your First Recurring Cleaning

License # 000825-2018

480-550-8282 Mon - Fri 8am - 5pm Sat & Sun - Closed twomaidsgilbert.com

WEEKLY, BI-WEEKLY, AND MONTHLY CLEANING OPTIONS AVAILABLE

10

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

GENERAL FUND REVENUE STREAMS Gilbert’s general fund covers many town operations like public safety, parks and recreation, planning and zoning. It has several revenue sources.

Development

Recreation

$7M

$5M

$6M

$4M

$5M

$32M State shared income tax

$97M Town sales tax

$3M

$4M

$25.5M State shared sales tax

$3M

$2M

$2M

$13.9M Other

$180M Total revenue for General Fund

$1M

$1M

$6.6M Development services

0

0

Tax hike—or not? Setting the tax levy for the coming scal year was a separate but associ- ated council action. Gilbert does not use a primary property tax to cover the town’s operating expenses. It only has a sec- ondary property tax that covers the debt from voter-approved bonds for streets and the Public Safety Training Facility. The levy covers the year’s obligations to which voters previ- ously agreed. Still, council has debated for sev- eral years whether a higher levy rep- resents a tax hike. Council Member Jared Taylor said it is a tax hike at a time of the worst economic downturn in residents’ lifetimes. “We have a lot of people that are already struggling, and as long as we keep these restrictions on our businesses, more people are going to lose their jobs, and more small businesses are going to close,” Tay- lor said. “And to tell them that we’re

$5M Recreation

Of the additional 82.01 full-time equivalents budgeted, 75.46 are funded through the general fund. However, some of those positions are in identied cuts to be made if reve- nue falls to trigger levels. In building the triggers, the town looked to the Great Recession to see what kind of impact it had on the town, Banger said. “We took the 2008 recession, which is the greatest recession since the Great Depression, and used that as a baseline model for our forecast, that if it should get that bad, what does that look like?” Banger said. “And then we worked some modeling out from there, and we’ll just have to evaluate.” How the town weathered that recession is one of the reasons sta say the town is ready to handle the coronavirus downturn. A study from the Economic Innovation Group of the 100 largest cities in the U.S. showed Gilbert to have the lowest signs of economic distress coming out of the Great Recession.

SOURCE: TOWN OF GILBERTCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

going to raise their taxes for [the Pub- lic Safety Training Facility] that was not scally responsible is completely inappropriate.” Mayor Jenn Daniels pushed back against Taylor’s assertion that the town was raising the secondary prop- erty tax on residents. “Regardless of what the levy is, our community has grown,” Daniels said. “We have far more commercial businesses, far more rooftops, so how that money is spread out is very dierent than it was in 2009. So I’m proud of the work that we’ve done to lower that [tax] rate.” With the rate stable, the amount of property tax a resident or business pays is based on Maricopa County’s valuation of a property. If the valuation goes up, as

generally happens, the amount paid will go up. But if it should fall, the amount paid also will go down. There is a question on whether home and commercial values will continue to rise or experience a fall in the wake of the coronavirus, though the county’s valuation is not strictly tied to market values. “I think without a doubt, we can say that we get a tremendous value in the town of Gilbert for every single dollar,” Daniels said. “I don’t like to compare us to other municipalities, frankly because it’s not fair to them. Gilbert does an amazing job with a lean budget and a lean sta.”

For more information, visit communityimpact.com .

We Are Open

for Take-out, PICK UP, or DELIVERY

Order online at Rustytaco.com & get FREE DELIVERY

1907 E Williams Field Rd, Suite 108, Gilbert, AZ 480-272-8226

Margaritas to-go $12 for 1/2 gallon $20 for gallon

11

GILBERT EDITION • MAY 2020

PAIN & INJURIES Affecting your Quality of Life?

Chiropractic, Acupuncture, Massage Therapy, Shockwave Therapy, CBD Products

We now offer Naturopathic Medical Services with Dr. Tracy Peruch!

Health insurance covers prescriptions, blood tests and imaging ordered by a Naturopathic Medical Doctor (NMD). You can use your HSA card to pay for NMD services. • B12 Injections • Nutrient IV’s • Seasonal Allergy Injections • Medical Marijuana Card Evaluations • Weight Loss/HCG Diet • Food Allergy Testing • PRP Joint Injections • PRP Facials • PRP Hair Restoration • Stem Cell Fluid Facials • Botox Injections

$ 40 INTRO 60-minute CBD Oil Massage Therapy Session

$ 100 NATUROPATHIC NEW PATIENT CONSULT & EXAM OFF

(Reg $70)

We accept Health Insurance, Auto/Work Injuries, Medicare, and the Veterans Community Care Program.

Stop the Suffering and call: 480-377-1226 www.brownchiro.com

Mercy Gilbert Medical Center

HOURS: MON - WED - FRI

Open Saturdays! 9am-1pm

9AM - 1 PM 2 PM - 6 PM

3451 South Mercy Road, Suite 101 • Gilbert

VA PROVIDER PROUDLY SERVING VETERANS

12

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

Building some business

While many professions suer during the pandemic, contractors have navigated it better than most, and some have thrived.

“... I’MABLE TOPUT BREAD ON THE TABLE FORMY FAMILY, AND THAT’S THEMAIN THING.” LUKE CROSTHWAITE , CROSTHWAITE CUSTOM CONSTRUCTION

is subcontracting some of his work out. Part of that, he said, is because some workers are content to stay home and collect unemployment in the current environment, and it can be dicult to nd good workers. “I’ve been painting my [butt] o all last week and this week, too,” he said. “I’m doing a lot of the labor part myself, but that’s what you’ve got to do right now. I’m actually double-booked right now. I’m going to work Saturday and Sunday to try to catch up because I don’t know what’s going to happen next month.” Dave Capko of Gilbert-based Ideal Plumbing said he has seen no slow- down with the pandemic—if anything, business is up. “There’s a percentage, a small per- cent, of people who have tried to do it themselves, and they end up messing it up, so they have to call a plumber,” he said. “But I nd that the people are home more; they’re doing more proj- ects; and they are getting us in there to do their work.” The biggest changes Capko has seen are some extra precautions being taken. “Theonlythingthatwedodierently

CONTINUED FROM 1

while they are in or around their homes. Stayingbusy Crosthwaite, with a varied back- ground in 20 years of professional con- tracting work, traces the recent uptick to the pandemic restrictions. “Home Depot is full,” he said. “People are home more, so they are thinking about doing some home improvement.” He specializes in “super custom stu, the more radical, weird stu that needs to be designed and fabricated.” But he does not just do those projects. “I don’t know if I’m really a handy- man, but I advertise for it because I don’t have an ego,” Crosthwaite said. “So sometimes I’m doing really fancy, technical, radical stu. Sometimes I’m putting in ceiling fans. But I’m able to put bread on the table for my family, and that’s the main thing.” One thing he said he is doing less of

“... THE OLDER FOLKSWERE RELUCTANT TOBRINGUS INWITHGOODREASON.” DALE DAHLGREN, MR. HONEY DO SERVICES

getting A/C Rangers Heating and Cool- ing o the ground. He and his business partner launched the company during the pandemic. “[Starting a business] is tough for any business owner, and then along with [coronavirus], it makes it more dicult,” Rogers said. “But it’s been good. We’ve done our research. We’ve done our homework, and for the most part it’s been a well-calculated risk.” The company is not taking risks when it comes to customers’ health and comfort. “We put masks on; we put gloves on; we put booties on after every sin- gle call,” he said. “We cover our feet, and we try to not go in if we don’t have to. If the problem is outside, we’ll just deal with it outside. … If we have to come in, we have them just show us where we need to be, so that way we’re not searching for things around the house. We try to maintain our distance.” Helping the business as it starts has been the spike temperatures in the Val- ley in late April. “In Arizona, unfortunately air condi- tioning is a necessity,” he said. “It’s not a luxury. And so obviously we are busy, it being Arizona.”

now is gloves, masks,” he said. “I wipe down when I’m done with some clean- ing disinfectant. But other than that, there’s nothing that’s really changed.” Nouniversal increase Gilbert resident Dale Dahlgren is co-owner with his wife of handyman services company Mr. Honey Do Ser- vices. Dahlgren does plumbing, electri- cal, carpentry and painting work, plus makeovers and odd jobs. Dahlgren said his business went down about 50% when the restrictions from the coronavirus pandemic were placed on the town. “Some folks were, the older folks were reluctant tobringus in—withgood reason,” Dahlgren said. “Now I think people are starting to say, ‘OK, money’s coming in again, and we’ve looked at this thing for six weeks. We’ve got to get it xed.’” Dahlgren said he did do some work on people’s do-it-yourself projects where they needed him to nish the job. But business only started to return when restrictions started coming to an end. “I think a lot of people are starting to see that they’re getting back to work and the state is starting to open up,” he said. “I feel like that’s got a lot to do with it.” For Bradley Rogers, it is not a matter of business slowing down but one of

“... I FIND THAT THE PEOPLE ARE HOMEMORE; THEY’RE DOINGMORE PROJECTS; AND THEY’RE GETTINGUS IN THERE TODO THEIRWORK.” DAVE CAPKO , IDEAL PLUMBING

“STARTINGABUSINESS IS TOUGH FORANY BUSINESS OWNER, AND THENALONG WITH CORONAVIRUS, IT MAKES ITMORE DIFFICULT.” BRADLEY ROGERS , AC RANGERS HEATING AND COOLING

For more home improvement guide content, see page 15 .

13

GILBERT EDITION • MAY 2020

DON’T WAIT UNTIL IT’S TOO LATE

Repair your roof now and save money on repairs later!

paynesons.com Learn more at that your roofing system is always properly cared for by performing routine roof inspections. In every service that we provide, our team places customer satisfaction as our highest priority. Your roof is the first line of defense that your home or business has against adverse weather conditions and the elements. When it becomes damaged, the rest of your property becomes susceptible to harm. At Payne Roofing, we can ensure We can take care of all of your roofing needs.

CALL TODAY FOR A 480-988-9250 FREE ESTIMATE!

PRESENT COUPON TO ESTIMATOR FOR DISCOUNT

LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED IN CHANDLER FOR 35 YEARS Quality, experienced roofing services for residential and commercial projects Affordable & Flexible Financing Available • Licensed, Bonded & Insured. Roc 194202

$250 OFF FULL ROOF REPLACEMENTS

- OR - $100 OFF REPAIRS

$50 OFF MAINTENANCE

- OR -

SEE US ONLINE!

VISIT OUR LOCAL GILBERT STORE! WE ALSO OFFER MOBILE SERVICE

AZ’S #1 TRUSTED LOCKSMITH COMPANY WITH PROFESSIONALISM & INTEGRITY. OWNER IS A FORMER POLICE OFFER.

• Residential • Commercial • Auto

• Over 20 years of experience • Licensed & Insured

DON’T GET CAUGHT IN THE SCAM WITH CHEAP PRICES ONLY TO FIND OUT IT’S A SCAM! NO HIDDEN FEE’S WITH US!

CALL OUR STORE TODAY! 480-497-4500 Keys Made • Locks Re-Keyed • Locks Repaired

LICENSED & INSURED

W.

235 E Warner Rd #103, Gilbert, AZ 85296 • www.penningtonlock.com

14

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8 Page 9 Page 10 Page 11 Page 12 Page 13 Page 14 Page 15 Page 16 Page 17 Page 18 Page 19 Page 20 Page 21 Page 22 Page 23 Page 24

communityimpact.com

Powered by