Georgetown | July 2021

CITY& COUNTY

News from Georgetown & Williamson County

COMPILED BY FERNANDA FIGUEROA & TRENT THOMPSON

QUOTEOFNOTE “KENNEL SPACE ISN’T NECESSARILY THE BIGGEST CONCERN. FORUS IT’S ABOUT MAKING SUREWE ARE PROVIDING THE LEVEL OF CARE THAT THE COMMUNITY HASMADE VERY CLEAR THEYWANT US TOBE PROVIDING. IT’SMORE ABOUT LACKOF STAFFING ANDVOLUNTEER ABILITY TO CARE FOR THEM, ANDWE ARE UNDERSTAFFED.” APRIL PEIFFER, COMMUNITY PROGRAMS COORDINATOR AT THE WILLIAMSON COUNTY REGIONAL ANIMAL SHELTER CITY HIGHLIGHTS GEORGETOWN On June 22, City Council approved a request to increase the residential unit cap from 7,500 to 7,775 units that can be developed in the Sun City Texas neighborhood located near 135 Sun City Blvd., Georgetown, according to city documents. WILLIAMSONCOUNTY On June 29, commissioners approved cuts to two parks projects at Berry Springs Park in northeast Georgetown and Champion Park in Cedar Park. At Berry Springs, the county will cut a proposed RV camping site and a new visitors center from the project list to save $1.61 million. At Champion, the county will cut a parking lot expansion and lighting updates to save $232,000. WILLIAMSONCOUNTY About $2 million in federal Community Development Block Grant funding will pay for 10 infrastructure and public facilities projects countywide. About $100,000 will go toward the city of Georgetown’s home repair program and $330,000 to the Georgetown Housing Authority. Georgetown City Council Meets the second and fourth Tuesdays of the month at 6 p.m. 101 E. Seventh St., Georgetown 512-931-7715 • www.georgetown.org Williamson County Commissioners Court Meets Tuesdays at 9:30 a.m. 710 S. Main St., Georgetown 512-943-1550 • www.wilco.org MEETINGSWE COVER

YMCA asks city for $3Mto partner on joint facility GEORGETOWN Representatives from YMCA of Greater Williamson County have asked the city of George- town to participate in a joint facility with Georgetown ISD. POTENTIAL PARTNERSHIP

close to $53 million over a 20-year period [of operating the facility after construction],” YMCA board member Mark Dietz said. “By bringing to the table our operational skills and our ability to cover the cost of equipment and maintenance, we take $50 million o that equation.” The city operates a recreational center on the east side at 1003 N. Austin Ave., Georgetown. Despite this, some council members noted a need for similar facilities on the southeast side. “Although I think this is a great idea, the southeast side desperately needs a recreation center and a pool,” Council Member Tommy Gonzales said. After a lengthy discussion, Council Member Steve Fought said the idea of a partnership is worth exploring, and the location of the facility can be discussed further, an opinion council all agreed on in the end.

The YMCA of Greater Williamson County is proposing a partnership with the city of Georgetown and Georgetown ISD to build a new facility next to McCoy Elementary School.

The proposed location of the facility would be in west Georgetown next to McCoy Elementary School. The YMCA wants to construct a recreational dry area that includes a gymnasium and tness center adjacent to GISD’s chosen site for its $15 million compet- itive outdoor pool. GISD would fund the pool, and the partnership plans to split the cost for a $6 million shared- use area that would also include an indoor pool, a lobby and locker rooms. Together the YMCA and GISD have $26 million to fund the project and are asking for $3 million from the city to help pay for the construction of the dry area. “If this was a city project alone, there would be an expenditure of

DRY AREA RECREATION YMCA & CITY

OUTDOOR POOL GISD

MCCOY ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

ROWAN DR.

NARANJO DR.

N

SOURCE: YMCACOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

GEORGETOWN District 6 Council Member Rachael Jonrowe resigned from her seat for personal reasons, eective July 6. Jonrowe initially announced her intention to resign June 7 via Facebook. In the Facebook video, she cited a few personal reasons for resigning. The city charter and the Texas Constitution require a special election within 120 days of a vacancy, which coincides with the November elec- tion, according to the city. Council member resigns as of July 6 consecutive terms until at least two years have passed. The council is expected to consider the rst reading to call a charter amendment election during its July 27 meeting. If approved, the charter amend- ments would head to voters for the Nov. 2 election. Rachael Jonrowe

City increases its homestead exemption GEORGETOWN City Council unanimously approved June 29 to increase the city’s homestead exemption. The homestead exemption will increase from $5,000 or 1% of market value, whichever is greater, to $10,000 or 2%. The change in the homestead exemption is expected to result in a $389,000 decrease in property tax revenue for the city, Georgetown Finance Director Leigh Wallace said. With the change, homeowners should see a lower tax bill by $20 annually, she added. The new homestead exemption is eective for the 2021 tax year.

EXEMPTION COMPARISON

Other municipalities in Central Texas have property value homestead exemptions. Here is how Georgetown’s exemption compares to them.

GEORGETOWN $10,000 or 2%* LEANDER $5,000 or 1%*

WILLIAMSON COUNTY $5,000 or 1.5%*

CEDAR PARK $5,000

SOURCES: CEDAR PARK, LEANDER, GEORGETOWN, WILLIAMSON COUNTYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER *WHICHEVER IS GREATER

City holds hearing on charter changes GEORGETOWN City leaders held a public hearing July 13 to gather feedback on several proposed city charter amendments. The changes include referendum

and recall requirements, qualica- tions and vacancies of City Council, and adding term limits for council members and the mayor. Council debated term limits at its June 22 meeting. Proposed term limits could include not allowing council members or the mayor to serve more than three

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GEORGETOWN EDITION • JULY 2021

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