Spring - Klein Edition | September 2021

SPRING KLEIN EDITION

VOLUME 8, ISSUE 6  SEPT. 18OCT. 15, 2021

ONLINE AT

DELTA CASES SURGE Vaccine demand dwindles as While the demand for COVID-19 vaccines peaked in the months following its release to the general public, demand has since dwindled over the summer months leaving 50.44% of the Spring and Klein-area’s total population fully vaccinated as of Sept. 13.

PARTINGWAYS After 17 years of partnership, ESD 11’s contract with Cypress Creek EMS ended Sept. 1. Between 2010-20, CCEMS responded to more than 455,000 calls and transported over 275,000 patients.

30%-39.9% VACCINATION RATES

50%-59.9%

70%-79.9%

40%-49.9%

60%-69.9%

Texas 59.05%

Percent of population age 12 and older fully vaccinated as of Sept. 13

Cypress Creek EMS, Harris County ESD 11 forge newpaths after yearslong feud CliWoodward (center), co-founder of Cypress Creek Emergency Medical Services, hands the keys of CCEMS’ rst ambulance to early CCEMS paramedic Richard Beasley (left) in 1975. (Courtesy Cypress Creek EMS)

Fort Bend County 72.99% Montgomery County 54.67% Waller County 41.16%

Liberty County 42.07% Harris County 62.1%

Chambers County 46.37% Galveston County 60.88%

Brazoria County 58.49%

BY WESLEY GARDNER

Now, more than 45 years later, the EMS pro- vider is still going strong, although several years of building acrimony with Harris County Emergency Services District 11, which began contracting with CCEMS upon its creation in 2004, has forced the EMS provider to pursue separate ventures. On Sept. 1, the district launched ESD 11 Mobile Healthcare to take over providing emergency ser- vices to over 600,000 residents across 177 square miles in its service area in north Harris County. CONTINUED ON 20

77389 66.18% 77379 55.45% 77070 48.42%

77373 44.38% 77388 50.25% 77068 54.45% 77090 34.27%

Percent of total population fully vaccinated as of Sept. 13

When Cypresswood resident Dick Eckert had a heart attack in November 1974, his wife, Sheri Eck- ert, immediately called for assistance. It took more than ve hours for help to arrive in the form of a taxicab, and it was too late to save his life. Dick Eckert’s death prompted fellow Cypress- wood residents Cli and Kati Woodward to take action with other residents living near FM 1960 in Spring to form what eventually became Cypress Creek Emergency Medical Services in 1975.

77069 50.4%

77066 49.55%

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SOURCES: TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF STATE HEALTH SERVICES, 2019 AMERICAN COMMUNITY SURVEY 5YEAR ESTIMATES COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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SPRING - KLEIN EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2021

These are challenging times for Greater Houston communities contending with yet another wave of COVID-19. The serious illness and loss of life is a tragedy for affected families, and it is taking a physical and emotional toll on medical professionals. As CEO of St. Luke’s Health, which includes Baylor St. Luke’s Medical Center (the research and teaching hospital for Baylor College of Medicine) and St. Joseph Health in Brazos Valley, I am seeing the number of patients with the coronavirus grow each day. Per data from the Texas state epidemiologist, 75% of new COVID-19 cases are reported to be a result of the highly transmissible Delta variant. The average age for admission in our hospitals has dropped by approximately 15 years, making 40-45 the age range most affected. While we’ve learned from the past COVID-19 surges, the Delta variant poses new challenges to our critical safety net, impacting both the cost of providing care and the number of doctors and nurses needed to staff hospitals. Last year, nearly 21,000 healthcare providers responded to the American Medical Association’s COVID-19 for Caregivers Survey. The respon- dents cited that coping with the fear of exposing themselves and their families to disease, as well as constant work overloads and burnout, are all part of their daily routines. The stress of working during a pandemic has caused many to retire early or leave the healthcare profession entirely. The result is that there are shortages in critical areas, such as nursing, and the overall cost of maintaining our hospital’s labor force has increased dramatically. We are actively working with our insurance companies regarding this escalating cost of providing healthcare and I remain hopeful that we will be able to partner with the payor community to ensure that we are paid fairly for this important work and continue to be in the best position to provide high value care to the communities that we serve. Our patients are the reason we come to work every day. Providing them with exceptional care is a responsibility we welcome and one that we will always honor as we work to ensure the trust of St. Luke’s Health is the best place to give and receive care and while I am always willing to talk about our caregivers and the best-value care and essential services they provide, it is very nice when someone else will do that for you. Caring for the Caregivers

Each year, U.S. News and World Report reports on the nation’s best hospitals and best specialties. Last week, the magazine recognized Baylor St . Luke’s Medical Center (Baylor St . Luke’s) as a Best Hospital nationally for 2021-22. For the 2021-22 rankings and ratings, U.S. News evaluated more than 4,750 medical centers nationwide. Additionally, Baylor St. Luke’s was ranked nationally in the following specialties:

» Cancer (The Dan L Duncan Comprehensive Cancer Center), No. 25 » Cardiology & Heart Surgery, No. 13 nationally and top-ranked in Houston » Gastroenterology & GI Surgery, No. 24 » Geriatrics, No. 46 » Neurology & Neurosurgery, No. 33

Of course, I am proud of the U.S. News and World Report recognition, yet I am even more proud of what we are doing at St . Luke’s to make a positive impact on the health and well-being of our friends and neighbors. And we will continue to do so years into the future.

T. Douglas Lawson CEO, St. Luke’s Health

St. Luke’s Health comprises 16 hospitals located in Houston, Bryan/College Station, and East Texas, including the renowned Baylor St. Luke’s Medical Center (BSLMC). BSLMC is an academic health center providing quaternary care. We are a non-profit health system guided by our values of Compassion, Inclusion, Integrity, Excellence, and Collaboration.

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Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the rst edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and Pugerville, Texas. We have expanded our operations to include hundreds of employees, our own printing operation and over 30 hyperlocal editions across three states. Our circulation is over 2 million residential mailboxes, and it grows each month with new residents and developments.

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

FROMKIM: The rst day of autumn begins Sept. 22. Temperatures will gradually decrease; the days will get shorter; and the leaves will begin to change color. While we may not think of Houston as a destination for fall foliage, there are some incredible places to visit across Texas where vibrant fall colors are visible. Mid-October through November is the perfect time to experience the natural beauty of the changing leaves. Plan your next adventure today! Kim Giannetti, GENERALMANAGER

Community Impact Newspaper teams include general managers, editors, reporters, graphic designers, sales account executives and sales support, all immersed and invested in the communities they serve. Our mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Our core values are Faith, Passion, Quality, Innovation and Integrity.

FROMHANNAH: Four months after the state of Texas extended COVID-19 vaccination eligibility to everyone age 12 and older, fully vaccinated individuals account for just over half of the Spring- and Klein-area population as of mid-September. To learn more about local vaccination trends, see our front-page story in this month’s edition. Hannah Zedaker, EDITOR

Our purpose is to be a light for our readers, customers, partners and each other.

WHATWE COVER

CORRECTION: Volume 8, Issue 5 On the Campus Deep Dive on pages 22-25, the percentages shown for students enrolled in Title I programs actually showed the percentage eligible for schoolwide Title I programs.

MARKET TEAM GENERAL MANAGER Kim Giannetti, kgiannetti@communityimpact.com EDITOR Hannah Zedaker REPORTERS Wesley Gardner, Emily Lincke GRAPHIC DESIGNER Ronald Winters METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Jason Culpepper MANAGING EDITOR Matt Stephens ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Aubrey Galloway CORPORATE LEADERSHIP GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Warner CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES &MARKETING DIRECTOR Tess Coverman CONTACT US 8400 N. Sam Houston Parkway W., Ste. 220, Houston, TX 77064 • 2814696181 PRESS RELEASES sklnews@communityimpact.com SUBSCRIPTIONS communityimpact.com/subscriptions © 2021 Community Impact Newspaper Co. All rights reserved. No reproduction of any portion of this issue is allowed without written permission from the publisher.

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SPRING  KLEIN EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2021

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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Dutch Bros Coee

OLD TOWN SPRING SPRINGWOODS VILLAGE PKWY.

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independent businesses renting spots in the salon park with two more considering leases, Nguyen said. The businesses oer tanning, microblading, waxing, hair styl- ing and makeup application, among other beauty services. 832-559-8579. www.facebook.com/lumierenailstudio 5 Bytes Arcade + Eatery opened Aug. 13 inside Regal Benders Landing, located at 4495 Riley Fuzzel Road, Spring. The new arcade features more than 50 games; an eatery serving pizza, chicken, nachos, and french fries, among other snacks; and a full-service bar. 281-907-0173. www.regmovies.com 6 Following extensive damage caused by Winter Storm Uri in February, Plymouth United Church UCC celebrated its reopening Sept. 5. Located at 5927 Louet- ta Road, Spring, Plymouth United Church UCC was founded in 1978 and is led by senior pastor Mak Kneebone. According to its website, the church is one of the founding congregations of Northwest Assistance Ministries and became an open and arming church in 2006, meaning it is welcoming of all people regardless of ethnicity, sexual orientation, physical or mental abilities, and place of life. Programs oered at the church include a children’s and youth ministry, social jus- tice ministry, music ministry and mental health ministry, among others. 281-251-8147. www.plymouthunited.org 7 First Tech Federal Credit Union is now open in City Place, located at 1701 City Plaza Drive, Ste. G-105, Spring, according to an Aug. 13 news release. Lo- cated in a 2,188-square-foot, street-level space, the 70-year-old nancial insti- tution is based in San Jose, California,

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NOWOPEN 1 Dutch Bros Coee opened its rst Greater Houston-area location Aug. 4 at A 19366 I-45, Spring followed by a second location Sept. 17 at B 5258 FM 2920, Spring. The Oregon- based drive-thru coee company serves specialty coee, smoothies, freezes, teas, a private-label Dutch Bros Blue Rebel energy drink and nitrogen-infused cold brew coee. Both locations are locally operated by Todd Sesock, who is planning to open a third Spring-area location at 8617 Spring Cypress Road Sept. 29. 541-955-4700. www.dutchbros.com

2 The newest location of Mamá Juanita’s Mexican Grill opened July 2 at 5706 Root Road, Spring. The restaurant oers classic Mexican dishes such as fajitas, tostadas and enchiladas as well as mixed drinks and 10 varieties of margaritas. In addition to the new Spring location, Mamá Juanita’s Mexican Grill has ve other restaurant locations in the North Houston area. 346-351-2168. www.mamajuanitasrestaurants.com 3 Chicking Out , located at 23227 Gos- ling Road, Spring, celebrated its grand opening Aug. 20. Chicking Out serves ve dierent marinated grilled chicken BAMMEL N. HOUSTON RD.

options as well as gorditas, chile relleno, and bean and cheese burritos. Side options include rice, beans, macaroni and cheese, mashed potatoes and guacamole. Chicking Out also has a children’s menu and family dinner options. 832-538-4332. www.chickingout.com 4 Lumiere Nail Studios & Salon Park , located at 22490 Hwy. 249, Houston, held a soft opening Aug. 14 and opened to the public in late August. The chief business in the multisalon location— owned by Tuyet “Maria” Nguyen—is Lumiere Nail Studios, which oers man- icure and pedicure services alongside complimentary cocktails. There are eight

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COURTESY MAMÁ JUANITA’S MEXICAN GRILL

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and oers a range of nancial services, including traditional and online banking, mortgages, nancial planning, various consumer loans and insurance services. The new location oers insurance, invest- ment, mortgage and notary services and features an ATM. 855-855-8805. www.rsttechfed.com 8 Do Dollar Plus opened at 21179 Hwy. 249, Houston, on July 10, owner Osita Okafor said. The privately owned store oers discounted party, school and oce supplies; health and beauty prod- ucts; food; and other items. 832-422-3784. https://do-dollar-plus.business.site 9 McDonald’s , the international fast- food chain, opened a new location Aug. 19 at 10611 Grand Parkway, Spring. The new location is locally owned by Laurie Glaser-Swift and features a two-lane drive-thru and an outdoor patio with 10 An anticipated opening date for the Handel’s Homemade Ice Cream coming to Regal Benders Landing at 4495 Riley Fuzzel Road, Spring, has been announced for this October. A representative with Handel’s Homemade Ice Cream said the original opening date had been anticipat- ed for late September, but the corona- virus pandemic caused delays. The ice cream shop was originally announced for the area in late March. www.handelsicecream.com 11 Dutch Bros Coee will celebrate the grand opening of its fourth Spring-area seating. 832-447-7788. www.mcdonalds.com COMING SOON

NOW ENROLLING FOR THE 2021-2022 SCHOOL YEAR Ages 6 weeks to 6 years Low student to teacher ratio Over an acre of outdoor play area Healthy meals prepared by chef daily Before & after care for Elementary students Summer camps The dental practice—located at 10300 Louetta Road, Ste. 132, Houston—oers a variety of services ranging from emergen- cy care and wisdom teeth extractions to Invisalign braces and teeth whitening. The oce is open weekdays from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and by appointment on Saturdays. 281-251-7770. www.vintagesmilefamilydentistry.com location Sept. 29 at 6914 Louetta Road. This location will be locally operated by Amanda Bigam. www.dutchbros.com 12 Starbucks will open a new location this fall in the former location of Slim Chickens, 9850 Louetta Road, Houston, a Starbucks spokesperson conrmed Aug. 30. The Seattle-based coee shop serves both hot and iced coee; tea; and espresso-based beverages, including mochas, frappuccinos, macchiatos and lattes. The new location will employ about 20 people. www.starbucks.com RELOCATIONS 13 Spring Monogramming & Gifts relocated within Spring from 8905 Lou- etta Road to 8515 Spring Cypress Road in mid-September. New owner Lynsey Rea said she purchased the business from for- mer owner Kari Ilg, and the business will continue to oer monogramming services as well as gift items ranging from baby clothes and blankets to candles and bags. 832-559-1689. www.springmonogramming.com ANNIVERSARIES 14 Vintage Smile Family Dentistry celebrated its one-year anniversary Sept. 3.

OMG Burger plans to open its third Greater Houston-area eatery in Spring in September.

COURTESY OMG BURGER

FEATURED IMPACT COMING SOON OMG Burger plans to open in September at 8854 Spring Cypress Road, Spring. The restaurant will oer a variety of burgers, chicken sandwiches, wings, Philly cheesesteaks, salads, wraps, tacos, hot dogs and loaded fries for lunch and dinner. The business has dishes that are 100% organic, fresh and zabiha halal, and it also oers vegetarian and gluten-free options. This is the third Greater Houston-area location for Local nonprot Klein Lacrosse Club Inc. will celebrate its 30th anniversary this year. The club has 14 teams made up of male and female students in grades K-12 from throughout the Spring, Klein and Tomball areas who compete at lacrosse tournaments around the state. Founded by James Perryman in 1991, the club is run by President Kory Pippin. www.kleinlacrosse.org Founded in 1921, the Harris County Public Library system celebrated its 100th anni- versary in June with virtual parties hosted

the family-owned eatery, which also has restaurants in Katy and Sugar Land. www.txomgburger.com

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across its 29 branches. The Harris County Commissioners Court also dubbed 2021 the Year of the Library. In 1921, the rst library of the system was established at Harrisburg School in Harrisburg, and oth- er locations were housed in post oces, businesses and private homes throughout the county, according to the HCPL. Lucy Fuller was named the rst head librarian in 1921. As of January, the HCPL has more than 1.8 million print and digital works in its collection. 713-274-6600. www.hcpl.net

Ages 3 and up Reduce homework stress and test anxiety Build confidence and study skills to help students earn their best grades ever Math & reading success 10105 Louetta Rd., Ste. 108 Houston, TX 77070 (832) 671-4672 Join us for a free Orientation www.kumon.com/houston-vintage-park

17505 Chaseloch, Spring, TX 77379 713.966.6246

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SPRING  KLEIN EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2021

TODO LIST

September & October events

COMPILED BY EMILY LINCKE

OUTDOOR EVENTS CITY PLACE PLAZA 1250 Lake Plaza Drive, Spring www.cityplacenow.com SEPTEMBER 18 Yoga on the plaza, 10 a.m. (every Saturday) 21 Summer trivia night, 7:30 p.m. 25 Houston Center for Photography: “Camera Basics” photography class, 10 a.m. 26 Live music: amenco jazz artist Mark Towns, 5:30-8 p.m. 12 PLAY GOLF FOR YOUTH LACROSSE Compete at a local golf club to raise money for Klein Lacrosse Club, a nonprot that organizes youth lacrosse teams across Spring, Klein and Tomball. A barbecue dinner will be oered, and dinner tickets are $10 per adult and $6 per child age 12 and younger. Player sign-in is at noon, and registration is required by Sept. 28. 1 p.m. $500 (team of four), $150 (one player). Gleannloch Pines Golf Club, 19393 Champion Forest Drive, Spring. 281-225-1200. www.kleinlacrosse.org

Hollywood award show. Dinner will be for sale at the restaurant. 7 p.m. $17 (adults); $14 (per person for groups of 20 or more); $15 (students, seniors, children age 5 and older); free (children age 4 and younger). Old West Melodrama at Puabelly’s, 100 Main St., Spring. 713-364-9190. www.oldwestmelodrama.com 01 THROUGH 31 ATTENDAMEDIEVALMUSICAL Join King Arthur and his knights of the round table in their humorous hunt for the holy grail in a local rendition of the famed broadway musical “Monty Python’s Spamalot.” 3 p.m. (Oct. 3, 10, 17, 24 and 31); 7:30 p.m. (Oct. 1-2, 8-9, 15-16, 22-23 and 29-30). $34 (adults), $30 (seniors), $23 (students). Stageworks Theatre, 10760 Grant Road, Houston. 281-587-6100. www.stageworkshouston.org 09 ROCKOUT TOQUEEN Listen to tribute band Queen Legacy cover some of Queen’s most inuential hits. Attendees can purchase from the venue’s regular menu of Italian entrees, sandwiches and atbreads prior to the concert. Attendees must be age 18 or older. 8-10 p.m. $15 (general admission). Elm & Magnolia, 206 Magnolia St., Ste. B, Spring. 346-382-3014. www.elmnmagnolia.com

SEPT. 27

EAT LASAGNA Lasagna House III

Celebrate the 79th anniversary of local Italian restaurant, Lasagna House III with $0.79 glasses of Chianti wine, live music, prizes and free samples of the eatery’s dishes. 5-9 p.m. Free. Lasagna House III, 217 FM 1960, Ste. D, Houston. 281-580-7797. www.lasagnahouse.com (Courtesy Lasagna House III)

25 PICNICWITH SHAKESPEARE Enjoy the drama of Shakespeare’s play “Othello” performed live by Points North Theatre Co. while munching on food truck snacks and ice cream or a picnic from home. This Shakespeare in the Park event will also feature live music by The Woodlands Jazz Orchestra. 5:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Rob Fleming Park, 6055 Creekside Forest Drive, The Woodlands. 281-210-3800. www.thewoodlandstownship-tx.gov OCTOBER 01 THROUGH02, 0819, 1516 SOLVE AMURDER Gather clues and catch a killer to solve a murder mystery at this live performance event. The theme will be a glamorous

SEPTEMBER 18 TRAVEL THEWORLD Learn about dierent countries and cultures without ever leaving home at a virtual children’s story time session. This monthly event is hosted on the third Saturday of each month via the Barbara Bush Branch Library Facebook page. September’s featured country will be Colombia. 2-3 p.m. Free. 832-927-7800. www.facebook.com/barbarabushlibrary 21 LEARN TO LINE DANCE Grab some dancing shoes for this line-dancing class hosted by instructor Diane Mayes. Beginner classes are oered weekly on Tuesdays, and registration is required. 11 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Free. Big Stone Lodge, 709 Riley Fuzzel Road, Spring. 281-350-1029. www.hcp4.net

Find more or submit Spring and Klein events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES Traffic congestion inHouston area remains among country’sworst

COMPILED BY ANDY YANEZ & HANNAH ZEDAKER

ONGOING PROJECTS

GATEWOOD RESERVE LN.

GOSLING RD.

A study released by the Texas A&M Transportation Institute showed commuters in the Houston area saw decreases to their travel time, costs and stress levels in 2020. When com- pared nationally, however, Houston commuters still dealt with more traffic challenges than other U.S. cities. The TTI released its 2021 Urban Mobility Report on June 29, evaluating the 2020 traffic patterns of 494 cities across the U.S. and focusing on 101 urban areas. One of the urban areas was the Greater Houston area, which comprises Harris County and parts of Fort Bend, Brazoria, Waller, Montgom- ery, Chambers, Liberty and Galveston counties, TTI Senior Research Scientist David Schrank said. According to the national report, Houston ranked third in the number of hours each driver was delayed on the road, second when it came to extra fuel wasted by traffic congestion and fifth in annual congestion costs per driver in 2020. All rankings are increases from 2019. “This was the year where you saw different cities change dramatically,” Schrank said. However, when comparing Hous- ton’s 2020 traffic data to its own from 2019, the delays and congestion costs improved. Drivers traveled fewer hours in 2020 than the year before— from 76 annual hours of delay per commuter in 2019 to 46 hours in 2020. Annual congestion cost—which is a value of time and fuel spent in delays— also dropped from $1,635 per com- muter in 2019 to $1,097 per commuter in 2020, according to the report. “I think Houston’s very diverse economy shows up [in the rankings],”

HOUSTON COMMUTER DELAYS The average commuter spent 27 fewer hours delayed in Houston-area traffic in 2020 than in 2019.

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Gosling Road bridge Gosling Road will be expanded to four lanes between Creekside Forest Drive and Gatewood Reserve Lane, including the Spring Creek bridge. The contract was awarded to NBG Constructors, Inc. on July 20, and a purchase order will be issued in September. Following a preconstruction meeting, an official notice to proceed will be issued for a 429-day contract. Timeline: fall 2021-late 2022 Cost: $8.2 million Funding sources: Harris County Precinct 4 ($4.2 million), Montgomery County Precinct 3 ($4 million)

39.5% per commuter in 2019-2020 Annual congestion cost dropped

27 HOURS

SOURCE: TEXAS A&M TRANSPORTATION INSTITUTE’S 2021 URBAN MOBILITY REPORT/ COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Schrank said. “You have a mix of high tech and manufacturing or all the energy sector jobs. ... So as things change across the nation, I think the Houston area isn’t as dramatically affected by any one change because of diversity.” Pandemic effects Other factors that played into Houston rising in the national rankings for traffic-related issues were stricter and longer lockdown restrictions put in place by other states that kept drivers off the road in cities such as Los Angeles and Seattle, Schrank said. Additionally, continued transpor- tation activity in the Port of Houston as well as other industries such as petroleum during the pandemic were also players in keeping Houston’s roads congested with traffic. Houston ranked fourth in the nation in both hours of delay truck drivers saw and annual truck congestion

cost, which is not only explained by the need to transport goods from those industries, but also the goods needed to reach private residences and businesses, Schrank said. Despite the national rankings, Schrank said Houston has done a good job handling traffic-reducing solutions by diversifying its trans- portation options, which include freeways, high-occupancy vehicle lanes, and public transportation such as the Metropolitan Transit Authority of Harris County’s bus routes and METRORail. “Houston is doing some of the things we have been recommending for decades,” Schrank said. As COVID-19 restrictions continue to lift, traffic issues are expected to rise. How long it takes to reach 2019 levels and surpass them, however, TTI officials are unsure. Factors such as teleworking, the economy and tourism will play a role, Schrank said.

STUEBNER AIRLINE RD.

FARM LEAGUE PARK

THORA LN.

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ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF SEPT. 15. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT SKLNEWS@COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM. operational by late-September. Timeline: July 7-late-September Cost: $230,000 Funding source: Harris County Engineering Department’s Transportation & Planning Division Stuebner Airline Road, Farm League Park intersection improvements Harris County Precinct 4 is installing a traffic signal at Stuebner Airline Road and the entrance to Farm League Park. While there have been some weather delays, the signal is expected to be

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SPRING - KLEIN EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2021

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

DEVELOPMENT UPDATES

Spring-area projects under construction

COMPILED BY EMILY LINCKE

PHOTOS BY EMILY LINCKE/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

HEWLETT PACKARD ENTERPRISE This 440,000-square-foot development located in City Place, 1801 E. Mossy Oaks Road, Spring, will serve as the new global headquarters for Hewlett Packard Enterprise. It has been under construction since February 2020 and is expected to open by spring 2022. When completed, the property will fea- ture two five-story buildings connected by a bridge at each level and enough parking spaces for 2,055 cars, according to Kirby Levey, an account executive with PR Boutique. Space: 440,000 square feet Timeline: February 2020-spring 2022

AMAZONDELIVERY STATION Open the week of Sept. 6, this Amazon delivery station is a 219,000-square-foot facility located at 22300 Northcrest Drive in Spring. Packages ordered through the company’s website are shipped here and then loaded onto trucks for delivery to customers. Construction began in November 2020, and the facil- ity will add at least 200 full- and part-time jobs once all needed roles are filled, according to Daniel Martin, a public relations manager with Amazon Operations. Space: 219,000 square feet Timeline: November 2020-September 2021

THE OFFICES AT VINTAGE MARKETPLACE

Located at 10109 Louetta Road, this office condo project from Read King Commercial Real Estate is complete and open for purchase. The facility totals 9,000 square feet with each office space taking up 2,250 square feet and selling for $595,000. Each office space includes a conference room, break room, restroom and three individual offices. Construction of this project began in the fourth quarter of 2020 and concluded in June. Space: 9,000 square feet Timeline: late 2020-June 2021

99 TOLL

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SPRING - KLEIN EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2021

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

DEVELOPMENT Economic uncertainties slowFM1960management district progress

BY HANNAH ZEDAKER

end of 2021, which would allow the chamber to submit the application to the Texas Commission on Environ- mental Quality by 2022. Factoring in another full year for the application process, Lieb said the management district could launch by 2023. “That’s still the goal, but at this pace, we may not be able to stick to that goal unless I can get some more help,” Lieb said, adding he is in search of a part-time employee to assist with the project. Upon establishment, the manage- ment district would provide security, economic development, landscaping and signage for the corridor, in exchange for an annual assessment rate—similar to a tax—to be paid by commercial property owners. “Thirty years ago, FM 1960 was known as one of the most, if not the most, viable commercial retail corridors in northwest Harris County; that is no longer the case,” Lieb said. “But it’s still a very vital corridor; it just needs a face-lift.”

To create an FM 1960 management district, the Houston Northwest Chamber of Commerce needs to collect signatures from property owners of 50% of the corridor’s commercial property value. FIGHTING FOR FM 1960

The latest attempt to create a management district along FM 1960 has slowed, largely due to uncer- tainties surrounding COVID-19, said Bobby Lieb, who is leading the project as president and CEO of the Houston Northwest Chamber of Commerce. To establish a management district, the chamber needs to collect signa- tures from property owners of at least 50% of the corridor’s commercial property value, which totals about $2.2 billion between Hwy. 249 and I-45. While Lieb initially planned to begin collecting signatures in 2020, that process got pushed to the second quarter of 2021 due to the pandemic. As of Sept. 14, $164 million in signa- tures had been collected, or about 14% of the $1.12 billion goal. “COVID[-19] has brought uncer- tainty to the market, and that’s been a large part of the trepidation with some of the property owners,” Lieb said. Originally, Lieb hoped to have the required signatures collected by the

45

STUEBNER AIRLINE DR.

Proposed district boundary

1960

14.6% of goal

As of Sept. 14, the chamber had collected $164 million in signatures of the $1.12 billion goal.

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Upon creation, the management district’s budget would fund:

Security and public safety

Urban design and mobility infrastructure

Project management and administration

Abatement/ enhancements

Economic development

40%

20%

15% 14% 11%

SOURCE: HOUSTON NORTHWEST CHAMBER OF COMMERCE/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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SPRING - KLEIN EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2021

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMMUNITY Construction on delayedGeorgeH.W. Bush Community Center expected to start inOctober

BY EMILY LINCKE

“Pretty much everything is on target,” Stinebaker said. “Really, the only thing that changed has sort of been the timeline, primarily.” Construction supply shortages during the pandemic have been a big factor in the delay, Stinebaker said, as well as new regulations from the county and the Federal Emergency Management Agency. As reported previously by Community Impact Newspaper , in 2018 and 2019, Harris County Commissioners Court tightened regulations for building in ood-prone zones, requiring a mini- mum elevation of 24 inches above the 500-year ood plain. “The engineering department determined that the building needed to be raised 6 inches after the design phase had already been completed,” Stinebaker said. “So we kind of had to go back, to some degree, to the drawing board.” In spite of the delay, the project is still a priority for Precinct 4 ocials, Stinebaker said. “This community center, I think, will be pretty much the hub of the Cypress Creek Cultural District,” he said. “It’s going to serve the entire community, so it’s important. There’s no two ways about it.”

The opening of a new community center in the Cypress Creek Cultural District has stalled since November 2019 due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, but after two years, construction is expected to resume in October, Harris County Precinct 4 ocials said. The facility, located at 6823 Cypresswood Drive in Spring, was slated to open in 2021, as previously reported by Community Impact Newspaper , but has stood largely unchanged since Precinct 4 purchased it in 2018. Before Precinct 4 purchased the property, it served as a community center for Cypress Creek Christian Church. It has since been closed after ooding during Hurricane Harvey in 2017. However, the designers’ original vision for the project has not changed over the years, according to Joe Stinebaker, director of communications for Harris County Precinct 4. Once completed, the 24,500-square-foot space will be open to the precinct’s more than 1.2 million residents and will include space for local and civic groups to meet. The project will be dubbed the George H.W. Bush Community Center and is now expected to open between October 2022 and January 2023.

The George H.W. Bush Community Center is scheduled to open between October 2022 and January 2023. (Emily Lincke/Community Impact Newspaper) CAPITALIZING UPON CULTURE Upon completion, the new community center will join several other community hubs that comprise the Cypress Creek Cultural District.

Pearl Fincher Museum of Fine Arts

The Centrum

Barbara Bush Branch Library

Harris County Courthouse

Collins Park

Future George H.W. Bush Community Center

Harris County Constable Precinct 4

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SOURCE: CYPRESS CREEK CULTURAL DISTRICT COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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SPRING  KLEIN EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2021

NEWS BRIEFS

News from the Spring and Klein area

Flood control district begins demolition of Raveneaux Country Club inmid-September

BY HANNAH ZEDAKER

Newspaper , the HCFCD purchased 27.6 acres of land in January 2020 from Kera Development LP and Cypress/Raveneaux LLC for the purpose of building a ood risk reduction project on the site, known as the Champions Stormwater Detention Basin. While the clubhouse permanently closed in January, district ocials are still negotiating with the Cypress Forest Public Utility District, which owns the remaining 206 acres of the former site of Raveneaux Country Club. According to the release, the results of these negotiations will determine the extent of future stormwater detention capacity that can be constructed on the site.

The Harris County Flood Control District began demolition of the former site of Raveneaux Coun- try Club Sept. 15, according to Sheldra Brigham, external communications lead for the HCFCD. According to a Sept. 7 news release, the demo- lition will include the removal of the clubhouse, parking lot and other club facilities to prevent vandalism and unlawful entry from occurring on-site. The demolition process is expected to take ve days, while it may take up to three months to haul away material and complete the project. As previously reported by Community Impact

Raveneaux Country Club rst opened in the 1970s. (Hannah Zedaker/Community Impact Newspaper)

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9415 Cypresswood Drive, Spring

Harris County commissioners begin preliminary redistricting discussions, seek public input

Flood Control District to beginmaintenance of Cypress Creek, tributaries in September

BY DANICA LLOYD

BY DANICA LLOYD

lining replacements, excavation and o-site disposal, imported ll, and site restoration. The $3.3 million construction contract was awarded to Serco Construction Group, funded by the HCFCD’s 2018 bond program. Construction is estimated to last just over one year. The construction timeline for each individual site has not yet been determined, but ocials said multiple crews will be working on dierent sites simultaneously. This is the second phase of a larger project slated to take place over six to eight phases. The rst phase began construction in early June in the Spring and Klein areas and is estimated to run through fall 2023.

Based on the 2020 census, each Harris County precinct should have 1.18 million residents. Redrawing boundaries

As Harris County’s population has grown 15.6% in the past 10 years, county commissioners convened Aug. 31 to review the process of redistricting and hear feedback from residents. When the maps were last redrawn in 2011, each precinct had slightly more than 1 million residents; the county’s overall population was about 4.1 million. Matt Angle, the county’s mapping consultant, said at the Aug. 31 meeting that based on the 2020 census, each precinct should have 1.18 million residents. The U.S. Constitution prohibits a deviation of more than 10% from that target number.

Ocials with the Harris County Flood Control District announced Aug. 30 plans to begin construction on the second set of project repair sites on Cypress Creek and its tributaries in September. The goal is to restore channel conveyance capacity across the watershed, and this batch of project repairs includes nine channels that include tributaries of Faulkey Gully and Pillot Gully. According to the construction advisory released by the ood control district, the maintenance project includes the removal of silt from the channel, erosion repair and prevention measures, outfall pipe removal and replacement, manhole replacements, concrete channel

Harris County commissioner precinct population 2020

Target district size

2020 population

SOURCES: HARRIS COUNTY ATTORNEY’S OFFICE, U.S. CENSUS BUREAU, MATT ANGLE COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

Harris County commissioners approve $30million nurse procurement initiative

Lone Star College Systemoers student debt forgiveness for some semesters

BY EMILY LINCKE

BY ANDREW CHRISTMAN

lives as soon as possible.” The SETRAC initiative will provide nurses to Harris County hospitals in need—whether they are nonprot, for prot or state funded—and the expenses will be covered by Harris County stimulus funds. The county will then apply for reimbursement through the Federal Emergency Management Agency, which will be received in about 12 months, County Adminis- trator David Berry said. The $30 million in funding that will be provided is a maximum amount, and the entire pool does not have to be used, Hidalgo said. At the Aug. 24 meeting, county leaders said they did not know exactly how many additional nurses are needed in Harris County or for how long. “At this point, we can’t wait any longer,” Hidalgo said. “The state’s been helpful, but there’s more need.”

“LONE STAR COLLEGE REMAINS DETERMINED TO REMOVE OBSTACLES STUDENTS FACE SO THAT THEY CAN FINISH THEIR EDUCATION." STEPHEN HEAD, LONE STAR COLLEGE SYSTEM CHANCELLOR

A $30 million grant-funded initiative approved by the Harris County Commissioners Court on Aug. 24 aims to place additional nurses in Houston-area hospitals in light of medical personnel short- ages exasperated by the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. Harris County ocials are negotiating a contract to work with regional nonprot Southeast Texas Regional Advisory Council to nd and hire the needed nurses. “We’ve been in touch with hospi- tals over the past few weeks. ... But what they told us is we don’t need more beds; we need more nurses, and it’s not enough what we’ve received so far,” Harris County Judge Lina Hidalgo said. “So SETRAC has been working on identifying where nurses are needed the most, and how to provide those nurses to those hospitals, and begin saving

Lone Star College System announced on Aug. 25 it used federal stimulus funding to forgive $2.5 million in student loans for students who owed money for summer 2020, fall 2020 and spring 2021 terms to allow them to register for fall classes. According to a news release, LSCS was approved for supplementary Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Eco- nomic Security Act funding because it is recognized as a minority- serving institution. These insti- tutions must have an enrollment of undergraduate students that is at least 25% Hispanic with 50% of degree-seeking students receiving need-based assistance under Title IV of the Higher Education Act, or the institution must have a substan- tial number of enrolled students receiving Pell Grants. “Lone Star College remains

determined to remove obstacles students face so that they can nish their education,” LSCS Chancellor Stephen Head said in a statement. “Making these funds available will allow students the opportunity to return to the classroom this fall.” LSCS students should contact the LSC Business Oce on their home campus for additional information.

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SPRING  KLEIN EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2021

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