New Braunfels | September 2020

2020 PUBLIC EDUCATION EDITION ONLINE AT NEWBRAUNFELS EDITION

VOLUME 3, ISSUE 10  SEPT. 4OCT. 1, 2020

Special education students given considerations amid pandemic

TRACKING THE LEARNING CURVE

As Comal ISD and New Braunfels ISD begin the 202021 school year with online and in-person classes, teachers are working to adapt support services for virtual and restricted in-person settings.

BY LAUREN CANTERBERRY

that, here I am trying to give her school work to do, and she’s looking at me like, ‘No mom, this is home; this is when I have my chance to relax and do my own thing,’” she said. For students who are enrolled in special education programs and receiving additional support for dys- lexia and other learning disabilities, in-person and one-on-one instruction are critical, Hamilton said. Data and experience from local education pro- fessionals back up that assertion.

When the coronavirus pandemic began, New Braunfels ISD and Comal ISD students quickly shifted to online learning. Shonnie Hamilton said the transition was especially dicult for her daughter, who is diagnosed with autism and is nonverbal. Hamilton said her daughter, who is now a senior at CISD’s Smithson Val- ley High School, had a dicult time adjusting to the changes to her routine, learning methods and environment. “She really struggled with the fact

SPECIAL EDUCATION

NBISD CISD

Services are provided to those with physical or health impairments, intellectual or learning disabilities, speech impediments and autism.

Students who received special education services during the 201920 school year

10.02%

12.17%

DYSLEXIA

Section 504 of the Individuals with Rehabilitation Act of 1973 outlines disabilities as conditions that signicantly limit activities such as reading, learning and communicating. Among disabilities covered under 504, the Texas Education Agency tracks dyslexia most prominently.

Students who were diagnosed with dyslexia in the 201920 school year

5.29%

4.44%

SOURCES: INDIVIDUALS WITH REHABILITATION ACT, TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

CONTINUED ON 24

River-based economies in Hays, Comal counties struggling tomake ends meet

Because people come to oat the rivers and

to enjoy our community, that is a benet to the restaurants and the entertainment industry and our bars. RUSTY BROCKMAN, NEWBRAUNFELS MAYOR

BY BRIAN RASH

Saturdays between 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. at Rockin’ R in New Braunfels are still rela- tively busy. For the tubing and river outtter business near the Guadalupe River, it remains dicult to tell how acutely the river economy is hurting this season. Cars still ll the lot during peak weekend hours, but the business model has shifted considerably since state-imposed restrictions issued by Gov. Greg Abbott in late June turned the industry on its head. CONTINUED ON 34

Rockin’ R in New Braunfels is a river outtter with a location along the Guadalupe River.

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THIS ISSUE

CONTENTS IMPACTS

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

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Now Open, Coming Soon &more TRANSPORTATION

MARKET TEAM GENERAL MANAGER Heather Demere, hdemere@communityimpact.com EDITOR Brian Rash REPORTER Lauren Canterberry

9 Loop 337 widening is nearly completed CITY& COUNTY 13 Latest from local governments

FROMHEATHER: Hello fellow readers. I have managed the New Braunfels edition of Community Impact Newspaper the last three years, but starting this month I am also managing the San Marcos-Buda-Kyle edition. I am excited to helm the market just north of ours as well as to continue overseeing all of the immersive news coverage right here in the New Braunfels area. This edition contains our annual education focus, which includes a front-page story from Reporter Lauren Canterberry centered on special education protocols amid the pandemic. Education is looking quite dierent these days, and special education is no exception. Heather Demere, GENERALMANAGER

GRAPHIC DESIGNER Rachal Russell ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Kayla Brooks METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Travis Baker MANAGING EDITOR Amy Denney ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Haley Grace CORPORATE LEADERSHIP PUBLISHERS AND FOUNDERS John and Jennifer Garrett GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Warner CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES DIRECTOR Tess Coverman WHOWE ARE John and Jennifer Garrett began Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 in Pugerville, Texas. The company’s mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Today we operate across ve metropolitan areas, providing hyperlocal, nonpartisan news produced by our full-time journalists in each community we serve. BECOMEA#COMMUNITYPATRON Newspaper’s legacy of local, reliable reporting by making a contribution. Together, we can continue to ensure citizens stay informed and keep businesses thriving. COMMUNITYIMPACT.COMCIPATRON CONTACT US 16225 Impact Way, Ste. 1, Pugerville, TX 78660 • 5129896808 PRESS RELEASES nbfnews@communityimpact.com SUBSCRIPTIONS communityimpact.com/subscriptions © 2020 Community Impact Newspaper Co. All Rights Reserved. No reproduction of any portion of this issue is allowed without written permission from the publisher. Please join your friends and neighbors in support of Community Impact SUPPORT LOCAL JOURNALISM

PUBLIC EDUCATION

EDUCATION BRIEFS Information from local districts CAMPUS DEEP DIVE Data from the area’s campuses

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FROMBRIAN: As the new editor for the New Braunfels edition of Community Impact Newspaper , I have already been completely charmed by the community, both with regard to its aesthetic and the people I have met so far. For my rst edition as editor, I have taken a look at how the river recreation economies are doing amid the pandemic—how river outtters have adjusted their strategies and how other local industries reliant on river recreation and tourism are faring. As one example, hotel tax revenue this summer versus years prior has plummeted, which many local leaders say has much to do with restrictions related to COVID-19. Brian Rash, EDITOR

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NEW BRAUNFELS EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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GRUENE LAKE DR.

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RANCH PKWY.

NXTLVL Marine

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COURTESY NXTLVL MARINE

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CREEKSIDE CROSSING

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ELIZABETH AVE.

MAIN PLAZA

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Pom Perfect

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COURTESY POM PERFECT

5 True Texas BBQ had a soft opening Aug. 31 and a grand opening Sept. 2 at H-E-B Plus, located at 2965 N. I-35, New Braunfels. The barbecue chain is owned by H-E-B and oers a wide variety of menu items, including brisket, sandwich- es, pulled pork and more. 830-312-5700. www.heb.com RELOCATIONS 6 In early August, the Crisis Center of Comal County opened its new admin- istrative oces at 1528 E. Common St., Ste. 6, New Braunfels. The original building, located at 1547 E. Common St., New Braunfels, will continue to function as the center’s shelter and care facility. 830-620-7520. www.crisiscenternb.org 7 On Aug. 10, Phyllis Browning Co. re- located its local oce to 448 S. Seguin Ave., New Braunfels, from its previous location on 285 North Castell Avenue. The real estate rm has been operating in South and Central Texas since 1989 and employs more than 200 real estate

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LAKE DUNLAP

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NOWOPEN 1 Extra Space Storage , located at 1360 Ranch Parkway, New Braunfels, held its grand opening July 31. The storage fran- chise oers size options ranging from 5 feet by 5 feet to the larger 10 feet by 25 feet spaces, and monthly rates start at $39. According to its website, Extra Space Storage is the second largest operator of self-storage facilities in the country and was founded in 1977. 830-312-4750. www.extraspace.com

2 On Aug. 23, Laurel Grace Yoga host- ed its rst virtual yoga class in its new studio space located at 351 Main Plaza, New Braunfels. Lauren Welch started the yoga practice in August 2019 with online classes and on-site instruction for groups and will now oer more in-person class- es at the studio. 309-648-5427. www.laurelgraceyoga.com 3 A new boat dealership called NXTLVL Marine opened Aug. 24 at 1980 N. I-35, New Braunfels. The business oers surf

boats, speed boats and more. 830-542-6372. www.nxtlvlmarine.com 4 On June 25, Chesley and Dallas Miller opened Pom Perfect in place of Lil’ Coonies Cottage Children’s Boutique located at 2339 Gruene Lake Drive, New Braunfels. The shop, which is walking distance from Gruene, specializes in chil- dren’s clothing, accessories, gifts and customized clothing. 830-609-9993. www.pom-perfect.com

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY LAUREN CANTERBERRY & BRIAN RASH

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Phyllis Browning Co.

Lucky Ewe Yarns

COURTESY PHYLLIS BROWNING COMPANY

COURTESY LUCKY EWE YARN

agents. 830-302-2199. www.phyllisbrowning.com ANNIVERSARIES

areas, including a Total Men’s Primary Care facility in New Braunfels, located at 272 FM 306. The release states Total Pri- mary Care is only testing asymptomatic people at its Total Men’s Primary Care and Total Primary Care locations at this time. The test is covered by most major insurance plans, and patients should visit the company’s website to set up an appointment. 830-310-6812. www.totalmens.com CLOSINGS 11 Local yarn shop Lucky Ewe Yarns closed its shop located at 647 S. Seguin Ave., New Braunfels, at the end of July. The store specialized in local, hand-dyed yarns and other craft sup- 12 On Aug. 7, New Braunfels Smoke- house closed its restaurant, located at 1090 I-35 Business Loop, New Braunfels. The family-owned smoke- house has been making and selling smoked meats, cheeses and other gourmet gifts since 1945 and opened the restaurant in 1952. According to co-owner Hale Snyder, the company saw demand for home-delivery products grow as the ongoing coronavirus pan- demic led to customers spending more time at home. The restaurant also saw a decrease in foot trac as a result of the pandemic and social distancing re- strictions. The smokehouse’s production plant, located at 441 N. Guenther Ave., New Braunfels, will continue to operate and accept orders online. 800-537-6932. www.nbsmokehouse.com plies. 830-620-0908. www.luckyeweyarn.com

Lone Star Bath Treats oers an extensive line of bath products.

COURTESY LONE STAR BATH TREATS

FEATURED IMPACT NOWOPEN Lone Star Bath Treats , located at 2090 N. I-35, Ste. 4111, New Braunfels, had its grand opening July 29. What began in 2016 as a vendor operation at various farmers markets throughout Central Texas has now expanded into a brick- and-mortar store, according to owner Mandi Jakubowski, a retired police ocer. Jakubowski said that as a result of having two premature babies, she began making bath products such as soaps and scrubs that would be safe for her and her childrens’ skin. According to the company’s website, the goal of Lone Star Bath Treats is to augment speed, convenience, innovation and personalization into the total customer experience. “Our goals are simple: to serve our customers better, to always be relevant in their lives and to form lifelong relationships,” the website states. “And while serving out customers face-to- face is the foundation and hallmark of how we’ve historically served them, today customers seek our services in new ways.” Jakubowski said while she still sells products at several Central Texas farmers markets, her new storefront is also operational by appointment only due to occupancy restrictions brought about by the COVID-19 pandemic.

The shop sells hand sanitizer, disinfectant sprays, various soaps and bath bombs as well as a full men’s line. Among other options, information from the company states Lone Star Bath Treats’ products are available for custom orders, bridal showers, baby showers and more, and they can be acquired for pickup at the storefront or for shipping through the website. Wholesale pricing of the company’s various products is also available for large orders, according to the website. Lone Star Bath Treats will be making an appearance at Old Gruene Market Days, located at 1724 Hunter Road, New Braunfels, on Sept. 19-20 from

8 On Sept. 18, Uwe’s Bakery & Deli will celebrate ve years in business at 1024 W. San Antonio St., Unit B, New Braunfels. The bakery operates a whole- sale operation as well as a dining room and specializes in traditional German breads and pastries that the website describes as made using non-genetically modied ingredients and free from preservatives. 830-632-6585. www.uwesbakerydeli.com IN THE NEWS 9 Patients at Resolute Health Hospital , located at 555 Creekside Crossing, New Braunfels, are now allowed one visitor due to an adjusted visitation policy that went in place Aug. 11. A release from the hospital states patients isolated due to COVID-19 are still not allowed visitors, and two parents are allowed to visit pediatric and NICU inpatients. The updated visita- tion guidelines also state visiting hours are from 9 a.m.-7 p.m. daily. Visitors must adhere to all pandemic-related safety guidelines, including wearing an approved mask, and must be screened upon entry to the hospital. 830-500-6900. www.resolutehealth.com 10 Total Primary Care is now oering rapid COVID-19 antigen tests that deliver results in 15 minutes at its primary care clinics, according to a release issued Aug. 3. The Austin-based primary care provider has locations throughout the Central Texas and Dallas-Fort Worth

10 a.m.-5 p.m. 210-262-8797 www.lsbathtreats.com

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES

COMPILED BY BRIAN RASH

ONGOING PROJECTS

UPCOMING PROJECT

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2 FM 1044 restoration A project to resurface and restore FM 1044 in south New Braunfels is nearing completion. Serold said the nal paving was placed in early August. The project should be complete by mid-September. The work spans 1.4 miles from the Guadalupe County line up to I-35 and costs cost about $1.45 million. Timeline: June 2020-TBD Cost: $1.45 million Funding source: TxDOT 3 FM 725 widening A project to widen a portion of FM 725 in New Braunfels is still in the planning phases. The roadway project will expand FM 725 from County Line Road to Zipp Road from two to four lanes with medi- ans, sidewalks and bike lanes. This project should go under con- tract in the spring of 2023, spans 1.5 miles and will cost more than $10 million. Serold said there is another project planned to widen FM 725 from Zipp Road to FM 78 that will widen the shoulders and add turn lanes, and should go to contract in the summer of 2021. Timeline: Summer 2023-TBD Cost: $10.6 million Funding source: TxDOT

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I-35 access road restoration A project to resurface and restore a nearly 5-mile stretch of the I-35 ac- cess road along the southbound side of I-35 is still in the study phase and will begin construction in the next 10 years, according to Serold. The work to improve that stretch of road spans approximately 4.5 miles and will cost about $7.5 million. Timeline: TBD Cost: $7.53 million Funding source: TxDOT

1 Loop 337 widening A project to expand Loop 337 in New Braunfels from two to four lanes and include a sidewalk and bike accommodation from I-35 at the southern portion to Hillcrest Drive at the northern portion is still underway. Jennifer Serold, public information ocer for the Texas Depart- ment of Transportation’s San Antonio region, said the project contractor is overlaying the northbound and eastbound lanes of Loop 337. Multiple lanes were recently opened between California Boulevard and Rock Street. Work still needed includes erecting two overhead sign bridges be- tween Landa Street and Hwy. 46, which may require full roadway closures soon, Serold said, adding substantial completion of the project is anticipated by early 2021. Timeline: November 2017-August 2021 Cost: $42.31 million Funding source: TxDOT

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF AUG. 24. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT NBFNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

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NEW BRAUNFELS EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

NEWS BRIEFS

Information from the New Braunfels area

HurricaneLauracaused rushonhotel rooms throughoutNewBraunfels

In New Braunfels, a representative at Courtyard by Marriott said though there was a near sellout of rooms, there were still a few rooms avail- able Aug. 26. The representative said COVID- 19 remained a priority despite the uptick in demand, and sta were still enforcing mask wearing in the public areas of all Marriott establishments, among other safety protocols. The uptick could constitute a welcome increase in hotel occupancy tax revenue for communities in Central Texas. In New Braunfels, data from the city’s hotel tax revenue show sharp declines in May, June and July 2020 compared to the same months in 2018 and 2019 due to restrictions brought about by the COVID-19 pandemic.

BY BRIAN RASH

As Hurricane Laura made landfall Aug. 26, the communities of San Marcos and New Braunfels, as well as cities up and down the I-35 corridor in Central Texas, scrambled to accom- modate hotel guests., Siri Sinard, a front desk agent at the Hilton Garden Inn at 2131 N. I-35 in San Marcos, said from San Antonio to Austin, the Hilton hotels had been booked solid since Aug. 25, and guests had to look as far as Waco for accommodations because Hill Country rooms had become so scarce. “On Tuesday we were at 30% capacity, and in about three or four hours we were up to 90% capacity,” Sinard said, adding Embassy Suites and Hampton Inn in San Marcos had also experienced massive upticks in hotel stays since Aug. 25.

The Courtyard byMariott was one of many hotels that experienced high demand in August due to Hurricane Laura. (Lauren Canterberry/Community Impact Newspaper)

In May 2019, for example, hotel tax revenue in New Braunfels was up 3.2% fromMay 2018, but that revenue dropped 79.6% fromMay 2019 to May 2020.

Over the same time period, the same is true in San Marcos, where in July 2020, hotel tax revenue plummeted by more than 62% over July 2019.

Grant fundsawarded toNewBraunfels for its sports complex

TEA announces new COVID19 tracking systemfor schools

A total of 30 community parks throughout Texas received sim- ilar grant funding to create and enhance outdoor recreational opportunities.

contribute $15 million. Currently in its nal phase of design, the new sports complex will include numerous sports elds, facilities for concession vending, restrooms, native landscaping and parking, with construction pro- jected to begin in late 2021. According to Stacey Dicke, New Braunfels parks and recreation director, the TPWC grant will be utilized to add a playground, bird blinds, additional shade structures and more to the sports park.

BY LAUREN CANTERBERRY

A $750,000 grant from the Texas Parks and Wildlife Commission will be used to fund Phase 1 of the Zipp Family Sports Park, a 150-acre com- plex planned for the intersection of Klein Road and FM 1044, according to information released by the city of New Braunfels. Prior to the grant issuance, Phase 1 of the project will cost $26.53 million and was included in Proposition 2 of the 2019 bond. The New Braunfels Economic Development Board will

BY DANICA LLOYD

A new tracking system will mon- itor and report conrmed COVID-19 cases in public schools throughout the state starting in September, according to a joint press statement from the Texas Education Agency and the Texas Department of State Health Services. According to the Aug. 20 press release, school systems will be required to report COVID-19 cases to the DSHS, and this data including cases and outbreaks on campuses will be posted publicly. TEA ocials are still nalizing details of the reporting process. The body is moving forward with the plan with the consideration of feedback from school districts. “Data on the number of cases in schools is of paramount interest to parents, students, teachers, sta, public health experts, policymakers and the larger community,” ocials said in the statement. “This infor- mation will be submitted to DSHS any time there is a positive case in a campus community.”

FUNDING THE COMPLEX

Economic Development Board $15 million

Phase 1 of the sports complex project will be underwritten through multiple sources.

TOTAL AMOUNT $26.53M

2019 Bond Proposition 2 $10.78 million

1044

Texas Parks and Wildlife Commission

KLEIN MEADOWS

$750,000

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SOURCE: CITY OF NEW BRAUNFELSCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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NEW BRAUNFELS EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

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Graphics, photographs and maps shown are representational only and should not be relied upon as depictions of existing or proposed community improvements. Final development may differ from these representations. Subject to change without notice. ASHTON WOODS HOMES • BELLA VISTA HOMES • GEHAN HOMES • HIGHLAND HOMES JUELL HOMES • PRINCETON CLASSIC HOMES • TRENDMAKER HOMES

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY& COUNTY

News from Comal County & New Braunfels

NewBraunfels annexes 44 acres in plan for a new low-density residential development

BY LAUREN CANTERBERRY

development with approximately 140-160 single-family homes. The annexation means the city now takes over responsibility for rst responders, police, solid waste, development, health and animal services for the develop- ment, Looney said. The city will collect property taxes, permit review and applica- tion fees from the future develop- ment, and future residents will be represented by District 1 council members.

NEWBRAUNFELS The city limits will expand to include a 44.02-acre property located on the west side of FM 1044 between Green Valley Road and Weil Road, near the city’s proposed 150-acre sports complex site. The property owners, 1044 Land Partners LLC, requested that the land be annexed into city limits, and City Council approved the request at its Aug. 24 meeting. “[Annexation] would provide the city more inuence in the form of development along this corridor, which is an important corridor because it does lead to the city’s very large investment in the future sports complex,” Planning and Development Services Director Christopher Looney said. New Braunfels’ planned 150-acre sports complex was greenlit through the passage of 2019’s bond Propo- sition 2, which, along with funding from the economic development corp., will help underwrite the $25 million project at the intersection of Klein Road and FM 1044. Looney said the owner of the adjacent land plans to con- struct a low-density residential Je Jewel, the city director of eco- nomic and community development, said the city received 237 applica- tions from local businesses from June 15-19, and 188 were eligible for the program. After two businesses requested to be removed from consideration, 186 applications were presented to a review committee for evaluation, Jewel said. The committee’s selection crite- ria stated that the business must demonstrate at least a 25% decline in year-over-year revenue between March-May 2019 and March-May 2020. Jewel said the median revenue loss of applicants was 63% between 2019 and 2020. Businesses must sign a perfor- mance agreement and remain open for at least 90 days after receiving the grant.

Comal County will soon see the opening of its new jail facility. BRIAN RASHCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Completion of long-awaited $64million Comal County Jail upgrade draws near

BY BRIAN RASH

600 inmates. A representative for the new jail said that once support func- tions are set up and running, inmates can start being transported there, but no specic date has yet been set. Delays have plagued completion of the project for about a year. On May 21, the Comal County Commissioners Court approved its 70th change order for the jail at a cost of $74,376. At that time, the construction contract was valued at $64,359,494.

COMAL COUNTY The Comal County Jail facility that has been in the works for ve years and under construction since 2017 has reached substantial completion as of July 30, according to an update from ocials, but builders are still working on nal completion of the project. The update came during the Comal County Commissioners Court meet- ing Aug. 13. Further information from the county states that nal comple- tion was anticipated to be reached by the end of August. Occupation of the new jail project, which voters agreed to fund as part of a $76 million bond in 2015, should occur soon after the nal comple- tion date. The facility is designed to house

DEVELOPMENT BREAKDOWN

44.02 ACRES

140160 HOMES

Land annexed into New Braunfels

Number of homes planned for the development

"ANNEXATIONWOULD PROVIDE THE CITYMORE INFLUENCE IN THE FORM OF DEVELOPMENT ALONG THIS CORRIDOR." CHRISTOPHER LOONEY, DIRECTOR OF PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT SERVICES SOURCE: CITY OF NEW BRAUNFELS COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER NUMBER TOKNOW of CARES Act funding will be utilized by the Greater New Braunfels Chamber of Commerce to develop marketing tools that will focus on city tourism and safety measures. $290,000 All meetings may be viewed online. New Braunfels City Council Meets second and fourth Monday at 6 p.m. 830-221-4000 www.nbtexas.org Comal County Commissioners Court Meets Thursdays at 8:30 a.m. 830-221-1100 MEETINGSWE COVER

35

New Comal County Jail expansion

337

N

NewBraunfels gives $600K in grant funds to small businesses

In order to be eligible for the program, the business must: MEETING THE REQUIREMENTS

Have 50 or fewer employees

BY LAUREN CANTERBERRY

NEWBRAUNFELS New Braunfels City Council on June 8 adopted the COVID-19 Small Business Resource Grant Program to provide grants to local small businesses heavily impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. At a regular meeting Aug. 24, City Council approved payments of up to $10,000 each to 66 small businesses in New Braunfels totaling $597,262. The average grant amount will be $9,035 per recipient, and city infor- mation states the funds can be used for lease or mortgage payments, utility payments and payroll.

Have been in operation since at least March 1, 2019

Not currently be involved in bankruptcy proceeding

Be current on property, sales and other tax payments Have applied for an Economic Injury Disaster Loan or Paycheck Protection Program loan

www.co.comal.tx.us Guadalupe County Commissioners Court Meets Tuesdays at 10 a.m. 830-303-8869 www.co.guadalupe.us

SOURCE: CITY OF NEW BRAUNFELS COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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2020 PUBLIC EDUCATION EDITION

N EW B R AUN F E L S I S D  COMA L I S D S NA P S HOT DISTRICT DATA Students in the New Braunfels area are served by New Braunfels ISD and Comal ISD. According to the United States Census Bureau, New Braunfels is one of the fastest-growing areas in the country, and both districts have seen enrollment numbers increase signicantly. Data shown below dives deeper into enrollment trends and teacher statistics. SOURCES: COMAL ISD, NEW BRAUNFELS ISD, TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER COMPILED BY LAUREN CANTERBERRY

201920 ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS

38% 30% 60.24%

STATE AVERAGE

STUDENT ENROLLMENT

201920SUPERINTENDENT ANNUAL SALARY

201920 ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS

NEIGHBORING DISTRICT COMPARISON

9.07%

5%

20.26%

STATE AVERAGE

SCHOOL DISTRICT STATS* 1,168.87 2,939.50 *Figure includes part-time employees.

TOTAL NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES TOTAL NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES

2016-17

2017-18

2018-19

2019-20

2020-21 enrollment numbers are not yet released and will not be nalized until October.

15

NEW BRAUNFELS EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

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Our Story

In 2009, local San Antonio couple Geren and Melissa Anderson took a leap of faith. An old childcare center on the west side of San Antonio had just recently came up for sale. The location couldn’t have been better – right off the 1604 Loop on Reed Road. But customers had said at the time that the center had been on a decline over the last few years. The potential, though, was undeniable if someone was willing to work for it. The Andersons were experienced business owners, highly educated and motivated to see their business ventures thrive. Raising two kids of their own, they reflected on what they loved and didn’t love about their own experiences with childcare. From there, they started thinking about what would truly set their new childcare apart from the rest. How was this going to be different? As they dreamed about what it would take to resurrect an old and declining childcare center, a clearer picture started to come into focus: a holistic approach to early childhood education that aims to serve families as a partner in life, faith, teaching, learning, and growing. A philosophy of care built on Development, Compassion, Integrity, and Faith. It was at that moment, in the family car on a highway somewhere between College Station and San Antonio, that The Pillars Christian Learning Center was born. From the beginning, the mission was simple. Love God, love learning, and love children. All three in equal parts driving the heartbeat of the organization and ultimately driving success. For The Pillars, loving God as an organization means weaving faith into every facet of the day – for their teachers and their students. Prayer, Bible story time, devotions, and weekly chapel are just some of the ways Faith formation is prioritized within The Pillars Experience. A love and devotion to God, and the mission every Christian seeks to live out -- to go and make disciples -- is truly what inspired the Andersons to found The Pillars in the beginning. They saw a gap in the childcare industry that they thought needed to be filled: excellent and truly holistic care to nurture the whole child physically,

educationally, socially, and spiritually.

In the aftermath of COVID-19, the childcare industry saw many challenges across the country. As public schools closed and families work life shifted, an estimated 8.1 Million children were left without care. More than ever, families are looking for a partner they can trust to come alongside them and provide their children with a safe, healthy, and happy environment where they can learn and grow. The relationships and trust fostered with their families for over a decade allowed them to remain strong through the COVID-19 crisis, continuing to serve families in new and innovative ways. In addition to taking extraordinary health and safety measures to keep their centers open for essential workers and their families, The Pillars sprang into action to create a brand new online and at-home program so families didn’t have to worry about their children’s developmental progress falling behind. Because of their swiftness to adapt to the ways the world changed due to the pandemic, they’ve come through this unique time stronger than ever, with a renewed focus to serve our communities in ways that meet ever-changing needs.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

EDUCATIONBRIEFS

Public Education Edition 2020

News from Comal & New Braunfels ISDs

Districtsworkwith local health authorities to develop COVID19plans

New Braunfels and Comal ISDs outlined step-by-step plans for how COVID19 cases would be handled in schools.

BY LAUREN CANTERBERRY

A PLAN SET IN PLACE

campus, they will be placed in an isolation room until they can be picked up by their caregiver, and sta will record who that student came into contact with, Briggs said. “Our ideal situation is that each teacher will create a oor plan for their room for where everybody’s sitting,” Briggs said. “The administrator will then gather the oor plans of each of the students who are in the classes where that student attended class and then be able to identify which stu- dents ... needed to be quarantined.” Briggs said anyone who was within six feet of a conrmed or probable case for more than 15 minutes with or without a mask on would need to be quarantined. Briggs and her team hope com- pliance with mask-wearing policies and distancing while on campus will prevent entire classes or grades from having to quarantine. When cases are identied, they will be added to a district database that parents can access to see where cases have occurred and who may have come into contact with that case. For students who require extra learning support or need to see a school counselor during the day, their visits will be recorded and physical distancing with masks will be encour- aged, Briggs said. “This is obviously a very dicult time for everybody,” Briggs said. “My hope is that we are able to keep mental health at the forefront of all decisions—that we maintain that social connection when we can’t have a physical connection.”

Ahead of the 2020-21 school year, New Braunfels ISD and Comal ISD administration and sta met regu- larly with local health authorities to create a plan for handling suspected and conrmed cases of COVID-19 in schools, according to Dr. Emily Briggs of Briggs Family Medicine. Briggs serves as the medical direc- tor for NBISD and CISD and worked with local health authorities and district leaders to develop protocols to address potential cases of the new coronavirus and prevent its spread. “Every week we have a strategic planning meeting, and that’s been going on throughout the summer,” Briggs said. “We want to make sure that we’re using things that are national guidelines as well as things that are tailored to our local facilities.” Both school districts began the school year allowing families to choose between in-person or online learning for the rst nine weeks and to change their decision at the end of each nine-week grading period. Approximately 60% of students in both districts elected to begin the year with on-campus instruction, and all in-person students and faculty will be required to wear a mask and practice social distancing. Campus reopening plans state classrooms will be laid out with desks spaced at least six feet apart, and class schedules were simplied to limit student movement through- out the building. If a student or sta member begins exhibiting COVID-19 symptoms on

Students and sta coming to campus ll out a health screener before arriving.

A student displays COVID19 symptoms during the school day, which include a new cough, new body aches, a fever, loss of taste or smell, among others.

The student is isolated in a designated area that has a door with an assigned stamember (guardians are contacted for immediate pickup).

Sta records who was in contact with the student.

The student is escorted to the guardian’s vehicle (the guardian must remain in the vehicle and call the campus upon arrival).

If a lab-conrmed COVID19 case is identied on campus, all teachers, sta and families of all students in a school are notied via the district case tracker. A conrmed case in a class does not necessarily mean every child must quarantine if masks were used.

“THIS IS OBVIOUSLY A VERY DIFFICULT TIME FOR EVERYBODY, MY HOPE IS THATWE ARE ABLE TO KEEP MENTAL HEALTH AT THE FOREFRONT OF ALL DECISIONS THATWE MAINTAIN THAT SOCIAL CONNECTION WHENWE CAN’T HAVE A PHYSICAL CONNECTION.” DR. EMILY BRIGGS, NEW BRAUNFELS AND COMAL ISDS HEALTH AUTHORITY

To return to school, an individual must meet the following criteria:

RETURNING TO SCHOOL

At least 24 hours need to have passed with no fever over 100 degrees without the use of fever-reducing medications.

Respiratory symptoms brought about by the virus need to have improved.

Ten days need to have passed since symptoms rst appeared; individuals who have had close contact with a lab-conrmed case must stay home for 14 days before returning.

SOURCES: COMAL ISD, NEW BRAUNFELS ISDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

MEETINGSWE’RE COVERING

NBISD board passes FY 202021 tax rate

PREVIOUS TAX RATES In the last ve years, NBISD’s tax rate changed several times.

$100 valuation and decreased the maintenance and operations tax rate to $0.8975 per $100 valuation. The rate is about $0.10 lower than that of Comal ISD’s $1.32 per $100 of valuation. The total tax rate for the coming year will be $1.2233 per $100 valua- tion, which is $0.0725 less than the current rate. The board previously adopted the scal year 2020-21 budget June 29, which included anticipated local, state and federal revenue of $104.23 million and $104.09 million in the operating budget.

Comal ISD Meets Sept. 10, Sept. 24 and Oct. 22 at 6 p.m. at the CISD District Oce, 1404 N. I-35, New Braunfels • 830-221-2000 www.comalisd.org New Braunfels ISD Meets Sept. 14 and Oct. 12 at 7 p.m. at the NBISD Administration Center, 1040 N. Walnut Ave., New Braunfels • 830-643-5705 www.nbisd.org

$1.33910/$100 valuation 2017-18 $1.33910/$100 valuation 2016-17 $1.30508/$100 valuation 2019-20 $1.36580/$100 valuation 2018-19 $1.2233/$100 valuation 2020-21

BY LAUREN CANTERBERRY

NEWBRAUNFELS ISD The New Braunfels ISD board of trustees approved the proposed property tax rate for scal year 2020-21 at roughly $0.07 less than the previous year. The decision came during the board’s Aug. 17 meeting. Ahead of the Oct. 1 start of the scal year, NBISD maintained the debt service tax rate of $0.3258 per

Check websites for latest on meeting attendance policy.

SOURCE: NEW BRAUNFELS ISD COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

17

NEW BRAUNFELS EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

AN I NS I DE LOOK AT NEW BRAUNFELS I SD DATA AND DEMOGRAPH I CS BY CAMPUS CAMPUS DEEP DIVE COMPILED BY LAUREN CANTERBERRY & BRIAN RASH With over 9,000 students, 13 campuses and an early childhood center, New Braunfels ISD traces its roots back to 1856 with the founding of The New Braunfels Academy. In 2012 the district implemented its one-to-one technology initiative, which provides personal learning devices for all students. SOURCES: NEW BRAUNFELS ISD, TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

ACCOUNTABILITYRATINGS All Texas school districts and campuses will receive a Not Rated: Declared State of Disaster label for their 2020 accountability ratings, according to the Texas Education Agency. Texas students take the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness each year to measure standards in reading, writing, math, science and social studies and are traditionally given letter grades ranging from A-F based on performance. Although the coronavirus pandemic is ongoing, the state has said all students will be required to take the STAAR exam in 2021, as of press time. The ratings are based on several categories, including Student Achievement, School Progress and Closing the Gaps, all of which compare student performance. FOR 2020 AND BEYOND

B NEW BRAUNFELS ISD OVERALL RATING Exemplary performance Recognized performance Acceptable performance In need of 2019 RATING

improvement Unacceptable performance

DEMOGRAPHICS

ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 201920 DATA

2 0 1 8  1 9 S T U D E N T  T E A C H E R DEMOGRAPHIC BREAKDOWN

Feeder schools

1 Carl Schurz 2 County Line 3 Klein Road

399 195 0 <10 0 252 0 >10 139

11

407 146 <10 <10 <10 160 0 17 214 10

632 282 0 <10 <20 319 0 25 267

10

DISTRICTWIDE STATE AVERAGE

4 Lamar

359 139 <10 <10 0 156 <10 <10 196 11

5 Memorial

408 210 <10 <10 <10 180 0 23 191

10

6 Seele

319

137 <10 <10 <10 135 0 11 163

11 11

STUDENTS

TEACHERS

7 Veramendi 8 Voss Farms

804 241 <10 <10 15 315 0 23 442 672 244 <10 <10 11 388 0 21 242

10

2.03%

12.6%

0.74%

10.6%

9 Walnut Springs

351 128 0 <10 <10 145 0 18 176 10

AFRICAN AMERICAN

DEMOGRAPHICS

0.29%

0.4%

0.18%

0.3%

AMERICAN INDIAN

MIDDLE SCHOOLS 201920 DATA

ASIANPACIFIC ISLANDER

1.06%

4.7%

1.11%

1.9%

Feeder schools

10 NB Middle 11 Oak Run

1,223 476 <10 15 24 643 <10 44 494 12, 13 970 344 <10 10 <10 443 0 21 483 12, 13

47.56%

52.6%

19.19%

27.7%

HISPANIC

DEMOGRAPHICS

2.47%

2.4%

0.18%

1.1%

MULTIPLE RACES

HIGH SCHOOLS 201920 DATA 12 NB Ninth Grade

46.59%

27.4%

78.59%

58.4%

WHITE

682 216 <10 <10 12 303 0 22 336 N/A 1,893 506 <10 <30 52 815 0 29 972 96.6%

13 NB HS

SOURCE: TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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