Lake Houston - Humble - Kingwood Edition | August 2021

LAKE HOUSTON HUMBLE KINGWOOD EDITION

2021 P U B L I C E D U C A T I O N E D I T I O N

ONLINE AT

VOLUME 6, ISSUE 4  AUG. 27SEPT. 23, 2021

Local educators push enrollment in early education programs

Getting a jump start While the state and local school districts have invested in early education programs in recent years, data shows COVID-19 slowed enrollment. Nearly 25,000 children in Texas who were eligible for kindergarten in the 2020-21 school year did not enroll.

BY HANNAH ZEDAKER

In June 2019, Gov. Greg Abbott signed House Bill 3 into law, expanding full-day pre-K statewide for eligi- ble 4-year-olds to provide more students with strong early education foundations. In the following 2020-21 school year, however, nearly 25,000 children in Texas who were eligible for kindergarten did not enroll, according to Texas Education Agency data. Locally, Lake Houston-area school districts also experienced decreases in student enrollment in some of the earliest grade levels last school year, and CONTINUED ON 17

SOURCE: TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Whilemany students returned to the classroom in the 202021 school year, like the pre-k student shown above, 70 fewer students enrolled in Humble ISD’s early education, pre-K and kindergarten programs than in the 201920 school year. (Courtesy Humble ISD)

Greater Houston-area oce vacancies force developers to rethink strategies

RETURNING TO THE WORKPLACE Kastle Systems data shows Houston and other major Texas metropolitan areas are leading the nation in returning to the oce since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. Houston Average top 10 U.S. metros

BY WESLEY GARDNER

At the end of July, about 50.7% of Houstonians were scanning into work- places with security systems managed by Kastle Systems, which oers secu- rity services to more than 40,000 busi- nesses nationwide. That number is up from roughly CONTINUED ON 21

100% 75%

Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, roughly 4% of Houstonians worked remotely, according to 2019 U.S. Cen- sus Bureau data. However, lingering pandemic fears have forced some employers to rethink strategies related to working in an oce.

25% 50%

0

March 2020

July 2020 November 2020 March 2021

July 2021

SOURCE: KASTLE SYSTEMSCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

EDUCATION EDITION 2021 PUBLIC SPONSORED BY • iSchool High - Atascocita

City of Humble proposes new senior center

• Lone Star College • San Jacinto College

DISTRICT DATA

9

IMPACTS

NEWS BRIEFS

CHICKEN HEADZ

5

7

23

SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL J OURNALISTS

COMMUNITY IMPACT PATRON PROGRAM

Want to learn more? Scan the QR code to watch our video.

DONATE TODAY! COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM CIPATRON

without joint pain KEEP YOU MOVING

Live life without joint pain. At Houston Methodist Orthopedics & Sports Medicine, we know that joint pain affects every part of your life. With treatment plans customized for you, our specialists offer a full range of advanced nonsurgical and surgical techniques. Our expert joint care includes: • Innovative pain control methods

Conroe

The Woodlands

Willowbrook

Towne Lake

Memorial City

• Physical therapy to improve mobility and range of motion • The latest technology, including minimally invasive surgical techniques that help reduce recovery time

West Houston-Katy

Bellaire

Baytown

Texas Medical Center

And, with enhanced safety measures in place, you can rest assured your safety is our priority.

Clear Lake

Sugar Land

Pearland

Schedule an appointment: houstonmethodist.org/jointpain 713.441.9000

2

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

ABOUT US

Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the rst edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and Pugerville, Texas. We have expanded our operations to include hundreds of employees, our own printing operation and over 30 hyperlocal editions across three states. Our circulation is over 2 million residential mailboxes, and it grows each month with new residents and developments.

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

FROMKIM: This year marks the 20th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks against the U.S. Thousands of lives were lost on Sept. 11, 2001, when four airplanes were hijacked and own into the Twin Towers in New York City; the Pentagon in Washington, D.C.; and a eld in Shanksville, Pennsylvania. That day forever changed our lives. Let us never forget those we lost, the sacrices of rst responders and the patriotism that followed, bringing Americans together like never before. Kim Giannetti, GENERALMANAGER

Community Impact Newspaper teams include general managers, editors, reporters, graphic designers, sales account executives and sales support, all immersed and invested in the communities they serve. Our mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Our core values are Faith, Passion, Quality, Innovation and Integrity.

FROMHANNAH: Research shows that 95% of a child’s learning foundation is laid during the rst ve years of their life, making early education programs critical to the long-term success of a student. However, Texas Education Agency data shows roughly 25,000 students who were eligible for kindergarten in the 2020-21 school year did not enroll. See our front-page story to learn more about how local school districts are working to combat this trend in the 2021-22 school year. Hannah Zedaker, EDITOR

Our purpose is to be a light for our readers, customers, partners and each other.

WHATWE COVER

Sign up for our daily newsletter to receive the latest headlines direct to your inbox. communityimpact.com/ newsletter DAILY INBOX Visit our website for free access to the latest news, photos and infographics about your community and nearby cities. communityimpact.com LIVE UPDATES

MARKET TEAM GENERAL MANAGER Kim Giannetti, kgiannetti@communityimpact.com EDITOR Hannah Zedaker REPORTER Wesley Gardner GRAPHIC DESIGNER Ronald Winters ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Lagala Doran METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Jason Culpepper MANAGING EDITOR Matt Stephens

BUSINESS &DINING Local business development news that aects you

TRANSPORTATION &DEVELOPMENT Regular updates on area projects to keep you in the know

SCHOOL, CITY & COUNTY We attend area meetings to keep you informed

ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Aubrey Galloway CORPORATE LEADERSHIP GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Warner CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES &MARKETING DIRECTOR Tess Coverman CONTACT US 8400 N. Sam Houston Parkway W., Ste. 220 Houston, TX 77064 • 2814696181 PRESS RELEASES lhknews@communityimpact.com SUBSCRIPTIONS communityimpact.com/subscriptions © 2021 Community Impact Newspaper Co. All rights reserved. No reproduction of any portion of this issue is allowed without written permission from the publisher.

HOWWE’RE FUNDED

Join your neighbors today by giving any amount to the CI Patron program. Funds support our PATRON PROGRAM

ADVERTISING

Our local teams customize advertising

campaigns for all business sizes and industries wanting to reach their customer base and accomplish their goals. A third-party Readex survey proved 78% of paper recipients read three of the last four editions, and from what they read, 83% “took action” of some kind. We ask our readers to thank our advertisers by shopping locally.

$20 average donation choose to give monthly 35% edition newsletter called The InCIder and occasionally reach out with other opportunities to directly engage. hyperlocal, unbiased journalism and help build informed communities. As a thank you, we’ll include you in a special Saturday

communityimpact.com

facebook.com/impactnewslhk

@impactnews_lhk

Proudly printed by

COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM ADVERTISING

COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM CIPATRON

WE’VE TEAMEDUP TOBRING YOUMORE OF THE STORIES YOU CARE ABOUT

T I L E • COUNT ERTOPS • WOOD F LOOR ING • CARPE T • CAB INE TRY • S INKS • L I GHT ING • PLUMB ING • APPL I ANCES • HARDWARE

CONTACT US FOR AN APPOINTMENT

450 LOCKHAVEN DRIVE, HOUSTON, TX 281-784-1700

INFO@MCSURFACESINC.COM WWW.MCSURFACESINC.COM

LOOKING TO ENHANCE YOUR HOME? With nearly 30 years in the home surfaces industry, we have experienced estimators, project managers and contractors ready to help you tackle any job.

HOME ENHANCEMENT FULL SERVICE REMODELING HOUSTON, TEXAS

3

LAKE HOUSTON  HUMBLE  KINGWOOD EDITION • AUGUST 2021

Thank You, Teachers!

At First Financial Bank, we understand how important teachers are to our community. Teachers shape the future and set the tone for future generations. Our local teachers putting others First is a source of inspiration, and something we should all aspire to. So to all teachers, we simply say, “thank you.”

YOU FIRST | FFIN.com

AS KIDS HEAD BACK TO SCHOOL WE ARE HERE FOR ALL YOUR MEDICAL EMERGENCIES.

23330 US Hwy 59 North, Kingwood, TX 77339 • www.kingwood247er.com • 832-777-6165

4

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

IMPACTS

COMPILED BY WESLEY GARDNER & HANNAH ZEDAKER

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

1

VALLEY RANCH PKWY.

1485

LAKE HOUSTON WILDERNESS PARK

1

MARKET PLACE DR.

59

2

WALTON AVE.

99 TOLL

4

5

VALLEY RANCH CROSSING DR.

99 TOLL

96 Cafe will feature live entertainment and Southern Creole cuisine.

PORTER

Russo’s New York Pizzeria

1314

COURTESY 96 CAFE

COURTESY THE SIGNORELLI CO.

FEATURED IMPACT COMING SOON 96 Cafe plans to celebrate its grand opening Sept. 3 at 20026 Hwy. 59 N., Humble. The restaurant will feature live music and handcrafted cocktails paired with Southern Creole cuisine. Menu items range from seafood gumbo and crawsh bisque to Cajun seafood pasta and jambalaya. In addition to lunch and dinner throughout the week, the restaurant will also serve brunch on Sundays from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Reservations can be made online. 346-567-2233. www.the96cafe.com

with the new Humble location focusing on family and pediatric health. Additional services oered include wellness checks, behavioral health, treatment for chronic conditions, COVID-19 care, fevers and sick visits, sports physicals, vaccinations and telemedicine. 281-812-3736. www.facebook.com/getwellclinichumble 4 The Mail Box Store of Porter cele- brated its grand opening Aug. 2 at 21898 FM 1314, Porter. The business oers packing and shipping services to areas throughout the world as well as copying, printing and document services. Addi- tionally, the store oers private mailbox rentals that can be accessed 24 hours a day; fax services; business card, postcard and yer printing; and an on-site notary. 832-432-2322. www.shipportertx.com 5 A new Texas Department of Public Safety driver’s license satellite oce opened in New Caney on July 12 inside the East Montgomery County Courthouse Annex located at 21130 Hwy. 59, New Caney. The new satellite oce oers driver’s license renewals and replace- ments and allows individuals to update information on their licenses. Ocials noted no written or driving exams will be administered at the new location. 281-446-3391. www.dps.texas.gov COMING SOON 6 Raising Cane’s Chicken Fingers is opening a new Houston-area location in November at 7351 FM 1960, Humble. The new restaurant will feature the brand’s new design, which includes a double drive-thru and patio with outdoor seating. Raising Cane’s oers a selection of chicken ngers and chicken sandwiches as well

O R T

D R

.

SORTERS MCCLELLAN RD.

494

KINGWOOD

7

D

W. FORK OF THE SAN JACINTO RIVER

1960

6

H AIRPORT

F I R S T S T .

3

ATASCOCITA

HUMBLE

W. LAKE HOUSTON PKWY.

59

LAKE HOUSTON

59

MAP NOT TO SCALE N TM; © 2021 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER CO. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

1960

NOWOPEN 1 Russo’s New York Pizzeria opened a new location in late June at 21572 Market Place Drive, Ste. 100, New Caney. Locat- ed in Valley Ranch Town Center, the New York-style restaurant oers specialty pizzas, pastas, calzones and sandwiches with menu items including a burrata pizza and true mushroom pasta. The Italian eatery—located in the space formerly occupied by RC’s NYC Pizza & Pasta—also features an outdoor patio. 281-354-4815. www.nypizzeria.com 2 Titus Express Car Wash celebrated its grand opening July 31 at 23685 Walton N . L A K E H O U S T

Ave., New Caney. According to owner Terry Schmidt, the business oers four dierent car wash packages, allowing customers to stay in their car as it moves through a tunnel. Customers then have access to free vacuums, towels and an air pressure machine to clean the inside of the vehicle after the wash. 346-340-7007. www.tituswash.com 3 Medical provider Get Well Clinic celebrated the grand opening of its new location June 15 at 19020 W. Lake Houston Parkway, Humble. According to Jouvonna Gray, Get Well Clinic family nurse practitioner, each of the practice’s three locations in Humble is equipped to deal with minor medical emergencies

N

tailgate options, which include as many as 100 chicken ngers. www.raisingcanes.com 7 Freebirds World Burrito is planning to open a new location at 3112 W. Lake Houston Parkway, Kingwood, in September. The Austin-based Tex-Mex chain oers build-your-own burritos, bowls, tacos, quesadillas, nachos and salads. The company is looking to hire more than 30 employees to sta the new Kingwood location and details about the eatery’s grand opening celebration are forthcoming. www.freebirds.com

WHEN EXP E R I ENCE COUNT S

Family Law Business Formation & Operation Wills, Trusts & Probate Employment Law Litigation Real Estate

NEED LEGAL COUNSEL? CALL CWMPK TODAY!

800 ROCKMEAD DR., SUITE 220 KINGWOOD, TX 77339 cwmpk.com (281) 359-0100 info@cwmpk.com 69

LYLE RUDOLPH RANDY ROWNEY

DEBBY CURRIN

GREGG MIELKE

KRISTI STANLEY

TAMARA PAUL

CHARLES WUEST

KINGWOOD DR.

5

LAKE HOUSTON  HUMBLE  KINGWOOD EDITION • AUGUST 2021

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES

COMPILED BY WESLEY GARDNER

ONGOING PROJECTS

UPCOMING PROJECT

SORTERS MCCLELLAN RD.

TIMBER FOREST DR.

59

MADERA RUN PKWY.

1

W. LAKE HOUSTON PKWY. UNION PACIFIC CORP. RAILROAD

UNION PACIFIC CORP. RAILROAD

59

COMMUNITY DR.

99 TOLL

494

3

Future Edgewater Park

2

RANKIN RD.

Centennial Elementary

4

59

494

LAKEWOOD PINES BLVD.

N

N

N

N

1 Rankin Road widening The city of Humble broke ground in March on the Rankin Road improvement project. The project will widen and repave the roadway between the Union Pacific Corp. railroad and South Houston Avenue. It will also install a new storm sewer, replace the existing water line and install a pedestrian bridge on the south side of the road running across Garners Bayou. Construction is estimated to take roughly one year to complete. Timeline: March 1, 2021-March 2022 Cost: $3.65 million Funding source: city of Humble

2 Community Drive expansion Construction began March 10 on Montgomery County Precinct 4’s Community Drive improvement project in New Caney. The two-lane road is being expanded to have two lanes with a continual turning lane between the Hwy. 59 service road and Loop 494. New storm sewers will also be constructed to improve drainage. The project is expected to take 180 days to complete once construction begins. Timeline: March 10-September Cost: $1.61 million Funding source: Montgomery County Precinct 4

3 Timber Forest Drive extension Harris County Precinct 2 is partnering with Harris County Precinct 1 and Humble ISD to extend Timber Forest Drive south of Madera Run Parkway. The project will create a four-lane bridge over the Union Pacific Corp. railroad with a median and sidewalks and create a thoroughfare to HISD’s Centennial Elementary. Officials expect project construction to take 15 months. Timeline: December 2020-February 2022 Cost: $7.6 million Funding sources: Harris County Precinct 1, Harris County Precinct 2, Humble ISD

4 Hamblen Road realignment Harris County Precinct 4 is studying a project to realign Hamblen Road. The project will include a grade-separated crossing over the Union Pacific Corp. railroad. Precinct 4 also plans to include a sidewalk along the south side of Hamblen and along both sides of the railroad crossing to connect to the future Edgewater Park. The study phase is set to wrap up by the second quarter of 2022. Timelines for the remaining project phases will be determined thereafter. Timeline: TBD Cost: $14 million Funding source: Harris County Precinct 4

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF JULY 29. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT LHKNEWS@COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

Neighbors Emergency Center is open 24/7 - including weekends & holidays - for all adult and pediatric emergencies. But did you know we provide

WE ARE ALSO IN-NETWORK WITH BLUECROSS BLUESHIELD, CIGNA, & AETNA! INCLUDING EKG! $20 SPORT PHYSICALS NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY

6

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

NEWS BRIEFS

Humble budget proposes newsenior activity center, fire station

BY HANNAH ZEDAKER

an increase from the city’s FY 2020-21 tax rate of $0.258693. Among capital project funds included in the FY 2021-22 budget are $4.5 million to build Fire Station No. 2, $90,000 to remodel the former Parks Department Building to accommodate the building maintenance department, $2 million to build a new senior activity center and $300,000 to rebuild an existing water department building. The proposed budget also includes funds for infrastructure projects, including $2 million for the Rankin Road and bridge project and nearly $2 million for the South Bender Avenue reconstruction project. The city will also add seven positions to the fire, police, building and fire marshal departments. In a 5-0 vote, the council approved an amendment to the budget proposing a 3% cost-of-living increase to be paid to all employees

Harris County to challengeGov. Abbott’s maskmandate ban as a one-time payment. Council Member David Pierce was not present at the budget workshop. Stuebe added the possibility of step increases will be revisited midyear after the city’s performance management system is implemented. A public hearing will be held Sept. 9 at 6:30 p.m. PRIORITY PROJECTS Humble’s proposed budget includes funding for several projects, among which are: $4.5 million to build Fire Station No. 2; $90,000 to remodel the former Parks Department Building; $2 million to build a new senior activity center; and $300,000 to rebuild an existing Humble Water Department building. SOURCE: CITY OF HUMBLE/ COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

The city of Humble is planning to build a new fire station and senior activity center in the coming year, among other capital improvement projects outlined in the city’s proposed fiscal year 2021-22 budget. According to City Manager Jason Stuebe, the city’s total estimated beginning balances and revenue amount to roughly $136.6 million with total planned expenditures adding up to approximately $85.6 million. City officials are estimating a total budget surplus of about $51 million, including about $39.5 million in general fund surplus, which Stuebe said will be used as the city’s rainy day fund and for future projects. While Humble City Council will not approve a tax rate for FY 2021-22 until later this year, the proposed budget is built on a proposed tax rate of $0.262115 per $100 assessed value, which, if approved, would be

Lone Star Groundwater ConservationDistrict board votes to keep 2022water fees stagnant

BY JISHNU NAIR

rate for groundwater from the Catahoula aquifer—an alternative water source for Montgomery County—at $0.06 per 1,000 gallons for nonagricultural use. Agricultural use rates are set at $1 per acre-foot for groundwater produced from any aquifer. Fees for the Chicot, Evangeline and Jasper aquifers have remained constant since 2020, when the board decreased them from the 2019 rate of $0.105 per 1,000 gallons. The rate for the Catahoula aquifer has remained constant since 2016, when directors lowered it, hoping to encourage development of the deeper aquifer.

Water fees in Montgomery County will remain stagnant in 2022 following a Lone Star Groundwater Conservation District board vote Aug. 11. The district’s board of directors approved a resolution to keep fees at a rate of $0.085 per 1,000 gallons for groundwater produced from the Chicot, Evangeline and Jasper aquifers for nonagricultural use, according to an Aug. 12 news release. The Chicot, Evangeline and Jasper aquifers are part of the Gulf Coast aquifer, which runs from Louisiana to Mexico. The resolution also sets the

BY DANICA LLOYD

Harris County Judge Lina Hidalgo announced Aug. 10 that the Harris County attorney had been authorized to take legal action challenging Gov. Greg Abbott’s executive order that prohibits local government entities frommandating face masks. This announcement comes in the wake of multiple area school district leaders discussing mask mandates ahead of the 2021-22 school year despite the governor’s May 18 order, including Houston and Spring ISDs. The county also raised its COVID-19 threat level to red—signifying severe risk for unvaccinated individuals—on Aug. 5 due to rising coronavirus cases as the delta variant spreads. “I commend everyone—school superintendents and elected judges alike—who are taking whatever steps are needed to protect the lives of the people they serve,” Hidalgo said. “Protecting the community during an emergency is a duty, not an option, for government leaders.”

RATE RUNDOWN Water fees in Montgomery County will remain the same rate in 2022 as they were in 2021.

USE

AQUIFER

RATE

$0.085 per 1,000 gallons of groundwater $0.06 per 1,000 gallons of groundwater

Nonagricultural

Chicot, Evangeline & Jasper

Nonagricultural

Catahoula

$1 per acre-foot

Agricultural

Any aquifer

SOURCE: LONE STAR GROUNDWATER CONSERVATION DISTRICT/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

7

LAKE HOUSTON - HUMBLE - KINGWOOD EDITION • AUGUST 2021

2021 PUB L I C EDUCAT I ON ED I T I ON COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER IS PROUD TO SAY THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS

GOLD SPONSOR

iSchool High - Atascocita is a tuition-free dual-credit high school where students can earn a diploma and receive up to two years of college credit. Instead of a one-size-ts-all approach, iSchool High - Atascocita's mastery- based courses are tailored to support the individual learning needs of each student. Additionally, each college credit earned in our program helps eliminate future college expenses and debt.

GOLD SPONSOR

Lone Star College is fully open and ready to welcome you for the fall semester. Lone Star College delivers aordable, high quality education that is close to home. They can help you get your associate or bachelor’s degree, earn credits that transfer to universities, or get trained for in-demand workforce careers. In person, online, or a mix of both, Lone Star College has the perfect program for you. Registration is underway, so if you’re looking for a fresh start, check out LoneStar.edu today!

GOLD SPONSOR

Want to study at a Top 5 community college in the nation? Now you can with San Jacinto College’s Generation Park Campus near Summerwood. Take your basics and transfer or earn an associate degree. With San Jac, you get aordable, high-quality education -- plus grants and scholarships so you can earn your degree with little to no debt. Let our counselors help chart your course today! Contact us at 281-998-6150 or genpark@sjcd.edu.

Whether you're a business or a reader, there is a way to support Community Impact Newspaper 's mission of hyperlocal, unbiased journalismwhich builds informed communities.

JOURNALISM

JOIN CI PATRON WITH A DONATION OF ANY AMOUNT AT COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM CIPATRON

8

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

DISTRICT DATA

COMPILED BY WESLEY GARDNER & HANNAH ZEDAKER

HUMBLE ISD

New Caney ISD had about 2,222 employees in the 2020-21 school year. About half of these employees were full- time teachers, who earned an average salary of $66,236. NCISD’s enrollment increased by about 1% from 2019-20. NEWCANEY ISD

45 campuses 45,528 students 3,123 teachers

18 campuses 16,274 students 1,050 teachers

Humble ISD had about 5,910 employees in the 2020-21 school year. About half of these employees were full-time teachers, who earned an average salary of $60,866. HISD’s enrollment increased by about 1% from 2019-20.

SOURCES: TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY, HUMBLE ISD, NEW CANEY ISDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Student enrollment

Stang, salaries and substitutes Total number of teachers* Starting teacher salary

Superintendent salary

Substitute daily pay**

Percent change from 2017-18

2017-18

2018-19

2019-20

2020-21

45,528

45,078

43,553

42,391

$80- $100 $100- $125

+7.4%

16,274

16,110

+8.16%

15,381

15,046

*TOTAL IS THE FULLTIME EQUIVALENT AND MAY INCLUDE PARTTIME POSITIONS. **RANGES VARY BASED ON EXPERIENCE AND OTHER FACTORS.

202021 student statistics English learners Economically disadvantaged students

COVID19’s eects on education

Student safety strategies for 2021-22 • HISD will notify parents if there is a COVID-19 case in their child’s elementary classroom. • HISD will inform parents of all COVID-19 cases by campus on the COVID-19 dashboard. • Upon receipt of an individual on a campus who tests positive for COVID-19, NCISD will send a classroom letter of notication to all parents of students in the aected classrooms.

Special education students

Fall 2020

Spring 2021

40.36% 10.03% 9.53% 65.86% 31.16% 9.71%

In person: 59.8% Remote: 40.2%

In person: 73.7% Remote: 26.3%

Statewide

60.19% 20.64%

11.26%

In person: 61% Remote: 39%

In person: 80% Remote: 20%

School bond updates

New school updates

202021 revenue sources 202122 revenue sources

TOTAL REVENUE:

TOTAL REVENUE:

TOTAL REVENUE:

TOTAL REVENUE:

2018 $575 MILLION • Charles Street Stadium renovations • Construction of new Kingwood Ag Barn • Construction of transportation center • Rebuild of three campuses • Construction of three new campuses 2018 $200 MILLION • Construction of one new campus • Rebuild of two campuses • Woodridge Forest Middle School addition

LAKELAND ELEMENTARY REPLACEMENT 1101 Rustic Timbers Drive, Humble Opened: August 2021 AUTUMN CREEK ELEMENTARY 14910 Woodland Dawn Trail, Humble Opened: August 2021 KEEFER CROSSING MIDDLE SCHOOL REPLACEMENT 21460 Gene Campbell Road, New Caney Opened: August 2021

$539.7M

$198.9M

$550.6M

$206.4M

LOCAL

$79.1M LOCAL

LOCAL

$87.5M LOCAL

$276.4M

$288.9M

STATE

$111.6M STATE FEDERAL

STATE

STATE

$249.5M FEDERAL $13.8M

$247.8M FEDERAL $13.9M

$108.1M FEDERAL $10.9M

$8.2M

9

LAKE HOUSTON  HUMBLE  KINGWOOD EDITION • AUGUST 2021

LoneStar.edu/Start

10

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

AT THE CAPITOL

2 0 2 1 P U B L I C E D U C A T I O N E D I T I O N

87th Texas Legislature passes public school curriculum, state testing bills Hundreds of bills aecting public education were led during the 87th Texas Legislature, which concluded its regular session at the end of May. Advocates with the statewide public education nonprot Raise Your Hand Texas applauded lawmakers for main- taining public school nance reforms passed in the 86th legislative session in 2019, not penalizing school districts for pandemic-related enrollment declines and committing to sending schools federal stimulus funding for pandemic recovery eorts. Some education bills failed or did not make it to the governor’s desk in time for nal approval. Legislators reconvened Aug. 7 for a special session with plans to revisit items such as a one-time payment for retired teachers. The following education-related bills passed during the regular 87th legislative session. Topics included school nance, curriculum devel- opment and school absences as well as changes to athletics eligibility for homeschooled and disabled students. COMPILED BY DANICA LLOYD

ACADEMICS &TESTING

CURRICULUM

SCHOOL FINANCE

HOUSE BILL 1603 Rep. Dan Huberty, R-Houston The bill removed the 2023 expiration date for individual graduation committees, which may allow students who failed up to two end-of-course exams to graduate if they have otherwise successfully completed all course requirements. HOUSE BILL 4545 Rep. Harold Dutton, D-Houston It removed the requirement that fth- and eighth-graders must pass certain State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness to move to the next grade level. Districts must provide accelerated learning to students who fail these exams.

HOUSE BILL 3979 Rep. Steve Toth, R-The Woodlands

HOUSE BILL 1525 Rep. Dan Huberty, R-Houston

The bill outlines what can and cannot be taught in public school social studies courses. Teachers cannot be required to discuss controversial public policy or social issues. Concepts that one race or sex is superior to others or that one is inherently racist, sexist or oppressive based on their race or sex cannot be taught in public schools. SENATE BILL 801 Sen. Lois Kolkhorst, R-Brenham The bill requires the Texas Education Agency to develop an agriculture education program for elementary students.

Known as the “cleanup bill” for the 86th session’s House Bill 3, HB 1525 adjusted various allotments and allows compensatory education funds to be used for social-emotional learning, instructional coaches and attendance ocers. It also prohibits the reduction of teacher salaries from 2019-20 levels. HOUSE BILL 3610 Rep. Barbara Gervin-Hawkins, D-San Antonio The bill exempts open-enrollment charter schools from paying property taxes on properties purchased, leased, built or renovated with state funds after Sept. 1, 2001.

DISTRICT EMPLOYEES

HEALTH

ATHLETICS

HOUSE BILL 547 Rep. James Frank, R-Wichita Falls HB 547 allows public schools to allow home- schooled students who meet eligibility standards to participate in University Interscholastic League activities. SENATE BILL 776 Sen. Eddie Lucio Jr., D-Brownsville The bill requires the UIL to ensure students with intellectual disabilities have the opportunity to participate in team athletic activities. The UIL must establish, maintain and expand an inclusive sports program.

SENATE BILL 179 Sen. Eddie Lucio Jr., D-Brownsville SB 179 requires school boards to adopt policies requiring counselors spend at least 80% of total work time on duties included in the school’s comprehensive counseling program. A copy of the policy must be available in the school oce for employees, parents and the public. SENATE BILL 1356 Sen. Bryan Hughes, R-Mineola The bill created a program to facilitate public school tutoring by active and retired teachers. Teachers can tutor on a for-hire or voluntary basis.

HOUSE BILL 699 Rep. Jon Rosenthal, D-Houston The bill requires school districts to excuse absences when a student cannot attend school due to a serious illness or related treatment. The student’s parent or guardian must provide documentation from a licensed Texas physician specifying the illness and anticipated length of absence. SENATE BILL 279 Sen. Chuy Hinojosa, D-McAllen SB 279 requires student IDs for grades 6-12 and higher education institutions include contact information for suicide prevention hotlines.

SOURCES: TEXAS LEGISLATURE, RAISE YOUR HAND TEXAS, TEXAS PTA, TEXAS ASSOCIATION OF SCHOOL ADMINISTRATORSCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Adulting is H�R�!

N

8

Banking doesn’t have to be.

Make back-to-school worry free with a Texas Bay low interest rate credit card or personal loan.

12310 W. Lake Houston Pkwy. Houston, TX 77044 713.852.6700 TexasBayCU.org

NMLS: #280545

This credit union is federally insured by the National Credit Union Administration.

11

LAKE HOUSTON  HUMBLE  KINGWOOD EDITION • AUGUST 2021

Generation Park Campus NOW OPEN Located off West Lake Houston Parkway in Summerwood

Not sure how to pay for college? San Jacinto College can help! Grant money is available so you can earn your certificate or degree with little or no debt.

Cash for College

DON’T MISS OUT! YOU CAN STILL ENROLL FOR FALL!

Learn more and apply for assistance at sanjac.edu/grants.

An Equal Opportunity Institution

12

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

EDUCATIONBRIEFS

News from Humble & New Caney ISDs

2 0 2 1 P U B L I C E D U C A T I O N E D I T I O N

Humble ISD board of trustees will meet at 7 p.m. Sept. 14 at 20200 Eastway Village Drive, Humble. 281-641-1000. www.humbleisd.net New Caney ISD board of trustees will meet at 6 p.m. Sept. 20 at 21360 Valley Ranch Parkway, New Caney. 281-577-8600. www.newcaneyisd.org MEETINGSWE COVER SCHOOL HIGHLIGHTS HUMBLE ISD Returning Humble ISD employees will receive a COVID-19 retention stipend on or before the Sept. 30 paycheck, following approval by the HISD board July 20. All eligible full-time teachers, nurses, librarians and counselors will receive a one-time payment of $2,000, while all other eligible sta will receive a one-time payment of $1,000. NEWCANEY ISD Superin- tendent Matt Calvert accepted a $55,000 donation from the New Caney ISD Education Foundation on Aug. 16, which he said will be split into $1,000 scholarships and used to support continued education for teachers and sta.

Humble ISD tooer virtual learning in202122

formed based on parent requests that were submitted at the end of the 2020-21 school year and over the summer. As class sizes are limited, parents may place their children on the virtual learning waitlist online. Students with medical conditions may qualify for homebound instruc- tion; families with extenuating circumstances prohibiting on-campus instruction should contact the student’s principal. BUDGET BASICS The New Caney ISD board of trustees approved a $206.4 million budget for scal year 2021-22 on Aug. 16. The approved budget: • includes a 2% raise for all full-time NCISD employees; • increases the starting teacher salary from $58,000 to $59,000; and • lowers NCISD’s tax rate from

BY HANNAH ZEDAKER

from the state for remote learners. As a result, HISD Superintendent Elizabeth Fagen said HISD could face an $8 million-$10 million loss. “We did it because we believed that it was best and that ... we had the savings to weather the storm once again,” Fagen said. Roughly 2,000 students have chosen virtual learning. Classes were

HUMBLE ISD Despite the state Legislature not passing legislation that would have funded virtual learning in 2021-22, Humble ISD began the fall semester Aug. 10 with both in-person and remote learning options. Without the legislation’s passage, public school districts will not receive average daily attendance funding

NewCaney ISDapproves $206.4Mbudget for FY 202122, including 2%general pay increase for sta

BY WESLEY GARDNER

executive director of public relations for NCISD, the adopted budget includes a 2% salary increase for all full-time sta members based on the control point, or the midpoint salary, of each position. Powers also said full-time employees will receive a $1,000 stipend paid out in two installments in the fall and spring. NCISD raised its starting teacher salary from $58,000 to $59,000.

NEWCANEY ISD On Aug. 16, New Caney ISD trustees approved a $206.4 million budget for the 2021-22 school year that includes a 2% raise for all full-time district employees. Trustees also approved a tax rate of $1.4603 per $100 valuation for the 2021-22 school year, down from last year’s rate of $1.4761. According to Scott Powers,

$1.4761 per $100 valuation to $1.4603 per $100 valuation. SOURCE: NEW CANEY ISD COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

One Application. Multiple Lenders. There’s A Way with A & K!

Kristen T. Bradley, CPA, MBA, MLO President | Mortgage Broker 25404 Hwy. 59, Ste 204 Porter, TX 77365 (833) 425-6678 akmortgage.net • info@akmortgage.net

NMLS# 1958373 NMLS# 1739090

Let us shop for you!

Mon. – Fri. 9am – 5pm

Cameron H. Hayes, AAMS , CRPC Financial Advisor 19701 Kingwood Dr., Bldg 1 Suite A Kingwood, TX 77339 832-644-2117 cameron.hayes@edwardjones.com

edwardjones.com

13

LAKE HOUSTON  HUMBLE  KINGWOOD EDITION • AUGUST 2021

CAMPUS DATA

A closer look at campus-level data from local districts CAMPUS DEEP DIVE COMPILED BY HANNAH ZEDAKER Harris County Common School District No. 50 was converted into Humble ISD in 1919. Today, as a fast-growth district, HISD serves more than 45,500 students in grades pre-K-12 across 45 campuses. HUMBLE ISD

Texas school districts and individual campuses will not receive accountability ratings for 2020-21 from the Texas Education Agency due to the pandemic, according to the TEA. It is unknown if accountability ratings will return for 2021-22. WHERE ARE THE ACCOUNTABILITYRATINGS? New Caney ISD 202021 DISTRICT DEMOGRAPHICS Students Humble ISD Statewide

American Indian/Alaska native

ENROLLMENT 202021 STUDENT POPULATION

0.27% 0.34% 0.35% 3.05% 4.73% 1.89% 4.39% 23.09% 12.69% 37.42% 52.89% 61.99% 0.18% 0.53% 0.15% 2.57% 2.68% 2.34% 28.86% 33.07% 26.51%

ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 1 Atascocita Springs 2 Autumn Creek 3 Bear Branch 4 Centennial 5 Deerwood 6 Eagle Springs 7 Elm Grove 8 Fall Creek 9 Foster 10 Greentree 11 Groves 12 Hidden Hollow 13 Humble 14 Jack M. Fields Sr. 15 Lakeland 16 Lakeshore 17 Maplebrook 18 North Belt 19 Oak Forest 20 Oaks 21 Park Lakes 22 Pine Forest 23 Ridge Creek 24 River Pines 25 Shadow Forest 26 Summerwood 27 Timbers 28 Whispering Pines 29 Willow Creek 30 Woodlands Hills

Asian

2010 2021 1977 2020 1985 2006 1978 1971 1981 2017 1990 1930 1995 1960 2009 2001 1968 1995 1979 2006 1985 2013 2007 1993 2004 1981 1991 1988 1975

882 -4.2% 24.3% 4.3% 9.5% 5.2% 30.6% N/A 33, 37, 38 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 39 598 -3.6% 17.6% 2.2% 11% 7.5% 24.3% N/A 32, 34 635 N/A 28.8% 7.2% 7.9% 2.8% 33.1% 1.6% 38, 39 636 +0.5% 18.4% 7.1% 9.6% 4.7% 26.4% N/A 35 -4.9% 20.1% 4.5% 9.1% 4.2% 26.3% N/A 37 586 +0.7% 46.9% 8% 13.1% 7% 35.8% N/A 34 661 556 -6.7% 44.6% 11% 11.7% 8.1% 40.3% N/A 34 653 -6.6% 18.5% 3.4% 11.8% 8.3% 29.4% N/A 32 1,087 +3.1% 16.8% 5.3% 7.2% 2.9% 31.7% N/A 38 448 -6.1% 25.5% 5.1% 12.5% 3.8% 17% N/A 32 +1% 66.1% 32% 10% 3.3% 57.2% 100% 36 504 -12.5% 80.4% 26.8% 18.7% 5.8% 61.3% 100% 33, 36 746 -2% 84.5% 34.2% 8.5% 2.4% 62.9% 100% 36 674 -39% 33.1% 6.4% 7.7% 4.5% 46.3% N/A 38, 39 633 -6.8% 41.1% 5.2% 11.5% 4.9% 47.2% N/A 31 675 -6.3% 85.3% 46.5% 11.6% 2.8% 72.7% 100% 33 601 736 -1.9% 55.3% 29.1% 13.9% 7.7% 57.1% 2.2% 37 579 -4.9% 64.9% 4.2% 16.2% 4% 39.6% 100% 37 748 -5.1% 66.6% 38.6% 8.3% 2.9% 63.2% 100% 33 594 -8.9% 36.9% 4.7% 10.6% 4.2% 35.9% N/A 31, 32 1,140 +9.9% 65.3% 17.5% 9.4% 3.3% 49.4% 100% 38, 39 963 +4.1% 76.3% 39.3% 10.3% 4.1% 65.9% 100% 36 605 -0.8% 11.1% 3.1% 11.9% 5.1% 23% N/A 35 676 -8.9% 25.2% 3.9% 9.9% 5.6% 31.7% N/A 39 653 +0.6% 50.7% 12.9% 1.8% 5.8% 44% 1.8% 31 695 -7.7% 66.8% 10.4% 9.8% 4.9% 48.2% 100% 33 505 +5.4% 3.6% N/A N/A 7.1% 19.2% N/A 35 524 +1% 44.1% 8% 10.3% 6.7% 37.6% N/A 34

Black or African American

2008 1,052 -4.2% 22.6% 5.3% 4.5% 6% 30.5% N/A 39

Hispanic/Latino

Native Hawaiian/other Pacic Islander

Two or more races

White

ENROLLMENT 202021 STUDENT POPULATION

ENROLLMENT

202021 STUDENT POPULATION

MIDDLE SCHOOLS 31 Atascocita 32 Creekwood 33 Humble 34 Kingwood 35 Riverwood 36 Ross Sterling 37 Timberwood 38 West Lake 39 Woodcreek

HIGH SCHOOLS

1983 1981 1972 1977 1991 2007 1998 2018 2010

1,130 -3% 41.9% 6.7% 11.3% 8.5% 52.2% 0.9% 40 1,181 +4.3% 17.8% 2.2% 8.8% 7.5% 34.9% 0.9% 42, 43 1,358 +7.8% 73.4% 27.1% 13.1% 5.9% 71.7% 100% 41 969 -3.3% 36.3% 4.8% 10.8% 8.8% 44.6% N/A 43 1,060 +1.8% 7.6% 2% 4.9% 4.9% 24.6% N/A 42 -4.9% 79.2% 22.7% 10.2% 6.6% 73.9% 100% 41 1,189 -2.6% 43.7% 5.2% 10.5% 7.7% 52.9% 1.3% 40 1,474 +18.1% 24.6% 3.3% 7.4% 5.9% 40.9% 1.2% 40, 45 931 1,711 +3.9% 40.9% 5.8% 9.1% 5.9% 49.6% 1.3% 45

40 Atascocita 41 Humble 42 Kingwood

2006 3,686 +1.8% 32.7% 3.1% 8.4% 5.4% 52.8% 0.5% 81.6% 2,734 +4.7% 67.2% 16.5% 9% 3.7% 70.8% 1.7% 83.3% 1979 2,807 +0.5% 13.2% 1.2% 6.3% 3.9% 36.1% 0.5% 80.5% 2007 1,876 +0.1% 25.6% 2.1% 12.2% 6% 49.2% 1.4% 78.3% 1918 -1.4% 44.2% 5.7% 3.1% 3.3% 35.6% N/A 42.8% 2009 2,927 +10% 39.9% 4.9% 8.2% 3.3% 53.9% 1.2% 66.6% 1995 421

43 Kingwood Park 44 Quest Early College 45 Summer Creek

NOTE: NA INDICATES THAT THE COUNT IS UNAVAILABLE TO COMPLY WITH THE FAMILY EDUCATION RIGHTS AND PRIVACY ACT. THESE NUMBERS ARE TYPICALLY SMALL, ACCORDING TO THE TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY.

21522 FM 2100 RD, Crosby,TX 77532 | 281-764-5377 | theranchvenuecrosby.com at Mud Bugs Celebrations include Weddings · Bridal Showers · Gender Reveal · Retirement · Anniversaries THE RANCH

Graduations · Birthdays · Baby Showers · Holiday Parties Celebrations of Life · Team Building Events · and more.

14

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

2 0 2 1 P U B L I C E D U C A T I O N E D I T I O N

Understanding the table The tables below compare campuses within their districts across a variety of categories dened by the Texas Education Agency.

COMPILED BY WESLEY GARDNER

Originally organized as a common school district in 1938, New Caney ISD was converted to an independent school district in 1957. Today, the fast-growth district serves more than 16,200 students in grades pre-K-12 across 18 campuses. NEW CANEY ISD

ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED Students who are eligible for free or reduced-price meals, come from a family with an income below the poverty line or are eligible for other specic assistance or benets ENGLISH LEARNER Identied by the Language Prociency Assessment Committee, students who have another primary language and are learning English DYSLEXIC Students identied as having dyslexia or other related disorders SPECIAL EDUCATION Students participating in a special edu- cation program or another program us- ing special education support services, aids or other special arrangements

AT RISK Students identied as at risk of dropping out of school based on state-dened criteria, which can include performance, alternative education enrollment, expulsion and homelessness, among other factors TITLE I Students in Title I programs under the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, which provide funding for students of low-income families CTE Students enrolled in a state-approved career and technical education course as electives or in a district’s CTE program; percent shown is for 2019-20, the most recent year available

ENROLLMENT 202021 STUDENT POPULATION

ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS

1 Bens Branch

2004 2018 2017 2001 1968 2011 1965 1997 2007 2015 2006

638 -7.1% 43.1% 24.5% 9.4% 8.6% 54.5% 100% 14, 15 764 -3.7% 74% 49.5% 9.8% 6.8% 74.2% 100% 15 706 +0.7% 86.3% 68.8% 11.8% 8.1% 87.7% 100% 12 679 -0.3% 39.5% 19.4% 8.8% 8.8% 47.7% 100% 15 628 -6.1% 82.5% 41.9% 15.4% 5.7% 70.9% 100% 12 763 -6% 82.6% 50.3% 8.9% 5.8% 75% 100% 12, 13 635 -9.2% 82.8% 36.7% 11.2% 6.5% 67.7% 100% 13, 15 612 +9.9% 71.9% 45.4% 10.6% 8.3% 65.4% 100% 14 714 -1% 66.7% 50.4% 11.6% 6.6% 72.8% 100% 14 668 +3.4% 65.7% 32% 10.9% 6.9% 65.9% 100% 12 775 -6.7% 56% 25.8% 13.7% 8.9% 57.4% 100% 13

2 Brookwood Forest

3 Dogwood 4 Kings Manor 5 New Caney

6 Oakley 7 Porter

8 Robert Crippen 9 Sorters Mill

10 Tavola

11 Valley Ranch

ENROLLMENT

202021 STUDENT POPULATION

SOURCES: TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY, TEXAS LEGISLATURECOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

MIDDLE SCHOOLS 12 Keefer Crossing 13 Pine Valley

ENROLLMENT

202021 STUDENT POPULATION

HIGH SCHOOLS 17 New Caney 18 Porter

1959 1972 2004 2014

966 +6% 77.8% 37.6% 8.8% 8.4% 67.6% 0% 17 987 +4.9% 72.9% 28.6% 10.4% 8.3% 62.2% 0% 17 871 -10.6% 64.1% 30% 10.8% 8% 63.7% 0% 18 1081 +18.7% 55.6% 19.7% 8% 7.5% 53.4% 0% 18*

14 White Oak

15 Woodridge Forest

16 Innity Early College 2017

395 +15.5% 60.8% 8.1% N/A N/A 37.5% 0% 21.3% 2131 +5.4% 69% 20.5% 9.1% 8.8% 73.3% 0% 88.2% 2218 +3.8% 52.4% 17.3% 7.6% 5.9% 52.4% 0% 91.4%

1986 2010

*STARTING IN THE 202223 SCHOOL YEAR, WOODRIDGE FOREST MIDDLE SCHOOL STUDENTS WILL FEED INTO WEST FORK HIGH SCHOOL.

Economy Dentures (set)

Extractions

now starting at $ 95 PER TOOTH WITH DENTURE PURCHASE

now starting at $ 670 CUSTOM REPLACEMENT SET

Dental Implants (each)

Consult & X-Ray

now starting at $ 1,095 DOES NOT INCLUDE FINAL RESTORATION

FREE FOR NEW PATIENT ONLY ($160 VALUE)

9360 N SAM HOUSTON PARKWAY E , SU I TE 800 • HUMBLE , TX 7 7396

MAKE AN APPOINTMENT TODAY! 1-866-980-4033 AFFORDABLEDENTURES.COM

Delivering a smile for every budget.

Affordable Dentures & Implants – Texas, PLLC - Your Humble Location - William E. Balderas, DDS GENERAL DENTISTRY

Go Ahead & Smile

TM

15

LAKE HOUSTON  HUMBLE  KINGWOOD EDITION • AUGUST 2021

ATASCOCITA

Early College Program | Personalized Instruction Now Enrolling Grades 9–10 | Tuition-Free

Visit iSchool-Atascocita.com Or Call 832-306-3603 TO ENROLL TODAY!

16

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CONTINUED FROM 1

2 0 2 1 P U B L I C E D U C A T I O N E D I T I O N

Both locally and statewide, enrollment in early education, pre-K and kindergarten programs remained steady over the past decade until the 2020-21 school year, when ocials said many parents opted to delay the start of their child’s education due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. AN ENROLLMENT ANOMALY

+4.82% +15.23% Humble ISD New Caney ISD Texas +29.73%

OVERALL CHANGE

2011-12 to 2019-20

2019-20 to 2020-21

-1.78%

-6.88%

-12.1%

emotional support as well as the aca- demic support our state’s early child- hood programs can provide.” HISD oers half-day pre-K at 17 ele- mentary campuses and full day pre-K at two elementary campuses. Sim- ilarly, NCISD oered full-day pre-K at four campuses in 2020-21, and the district will add full-day pre-K to three more campuses this fall. Both districts plan to oer full-day pre-K at all elementary campuses by 2022-23. Encouraging enrollment Heading into the 2021-22 school year, local school district ocials said they are optimistic pre-K and kin- dergarten enrollment will return to pre-pandemic levels without spiking. In HISD, ocials are projecting 4,050 early education, pre-K and kin- dergarten students for the 2021-22 school year, while NCISD ocials are projecting 1,755. To further bolster student enrollment, Powers said NCISD began reaching out to parents of pre-K- and kindergarten-eligible students last spring. Powers said the district has also been working to ensure that all pre-K classrooms meet the High- Quality Prekindergarten Standards outlined by the TEA by implementing classroom technology, maintaining a student-to-teacher ratio of 11-1 and providing teachers with professional development that directly relates to early childhood practices. For HISD’s young learners, the district has invested in interactive technology; hands-on, engaging materials that promote creativity, collaboration, communication and play; age-appropriate classroom furniture; and online platforms for family engagement and virtual learn- ing. The district will also be imple- menting its new curriculum, “Three Cheers for Pre-K!,” this fall. “We are excited about the imple- mentation and cannot wait to see the progress our students make this year,” said Hailey Haynes, director of early childhood education for HISD.

June 11, 2019: Gov. Greg Abbott signs House Bill 3 into law, expanding full-day pre-K statewide for eligible 4-year-olds.

Total enrollment in early education, pre-K and kindergarten programs

Humble ISD

New Caney ISD

4,000

3,500

March 2020: The COVID-19 pandemic hits the Greater Houston area, prompting schools to switch to remote learning for the remainder of the 2019-20 school year.

3,000

2,500

2,000 1,500

1,000

0

SOURCE: TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER 2013-14 2012-13 2011-12

2014-15 2015-16

2016-17

2017-18

2018-19

2019-20

2020-21

ocials said the trend is directly tied to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. “It’s reasonable to attribute enroll- ment declines last year to the pan- demic, particularly in early education, pre-K and kindergarten, for which enrollment is optional,” said Scott Powers, executive director of public relations for New Caney ISD. “[How- ever], the enrollment decline in these grades in NCISD was less sharp than was generally reported statewide by the Texas Education Agency.” In the 2020-21 school year, stu- dent enrollment in early education programs, pre-K and kindergarten dropped by nearly 2% in HISD and by nearly 7% in NCISD. By com- parison, enrollment in these pro- grams increased by more than 15% and nearly 30% in HISD and NCISD, respectively, from 2011-12 to 2019-20. “Across the state and nation, some parents chose to keep their children at home due to the pandemic,” HISD Chief Communications Ocer Jamie Mount said. However, experts such as Kristi Martin-Smith, the director of edu- cation and training for Children’s Lighthouse, said delaying a child’s education could further exacerbate learning loss inicted by the pan- demic. The Fort Worth-based early education company has a franchise in the Lake Houston area. “Delaying the start of a young child’s education can only be a pro if the child ... can engage in explor- ing, develop creativity and a sense

have better academic outcomes and are less likely to be retained or repeat a grade level, participate in special education programs, drop out of high school or use public services. In addition to heightened literacy skills, Martin-Smith said children who enter kindergarten with positive emo- tional and interpersonal skills within a group of children have a greater chance of succeeding in school. “Young children that are allowed to develop higher-level thinking skills through preschool activities … develop healthy executive func- tioning skills … [such as] memory, exible thinking and self-control, all of which are key to healthy, daily living and most of which are dicult to learn through remote learning,” Martin-Smith said. Research also indicates early child- hood education programs are import- ant for economically disadvantaged students, who accounted for more than 40% of HISD students and more than 65% of NCISD students in 2020- 21, according to the districts’ data. Similar research is part of what prompted the Texas Legislature to pass HB 3 in 2019, mandating full-day pre-K programs for those who qualify. “Full-day pre-K provides opportu- nities for working families to access quality pre-K for their children,” said Bob Popinski, director of policy for Raise Your Hand Texas, an Austin- based public education advocacy group. “Especially after COVID[-19], our early learners need the social and

of inquiry, learn the skills needed to be part of a learning community and be around other children to learn positive social interactions,” she said. “This type of environment can be done at home, but it takes a fully engaged adult to scaold learning.” As the 2021-22 school year begins, district ocials are hoping to see enrollment in early education pro- grams return to pre-pandemic levels. Pre-K perks The long-term benets of eective early childhood education programs have been well documented, local educators said. According to an April 2015 pol- icy brief from the Child & Family Research Partnership, children who attend a Texas public pre-K program EVALUATING EARLY EDUCATION According to an April 2015 policy brief from the Child & Family Research Partnership, research shows children who attend a Texas public pre-K program: • are less likely to be retained or repeat a grade level; • are less likely to participate in special education programs in rst, second or third grade; • have better academic outcomes; • are less likely to drop out of high school; and • are less likely to use public services.

For more information, visit communityimpact.com .

SOURCE: CHILD & FAMILY RESEARCH PARTNERSHIP APRIL 2015 POLICY BRIEF COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

17

LAKE HOUSTON  HUMBLE  KINGWOOD EDITION • AUGUST 2021

Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8 Page 9 Page 10 Page 11 Page 12 Page 13 Page 14 Page 15 Page 16 Page 17 Page 18 Page 19 Page 20 Page 21 Page 22 Page 23 Page 24 Page 25 Page 26 Page 27 Page 28 Page 29 Page 30 Page 31 Page 32

communityimpact.com

Powered by