Richardson March 2021

RICHARDSON EDITION

VOLUME 3, ISSUE 7  MARCH 29APRIL 25, 2021

ONLINE AT

A historic ask The bond package slated to go before voters in May is the largest in RISD history. 2021 L O C A L V O T E R G U I D E

RISDbond package headed for voter approval inMay

55 campuses aected 0% tax rate increase

$694M Proposition A for buildings, buses and safety

BY WILLIAM C. WADSACK

Richardson ISD parent Matt Jacob said he looks at the $750 million bond package on the May 1 ballot as an investment for his rst-, fth- and eighth-graders and the rest of the district. Jacob, who served on the district’s 2021 bond steering committee, said he believes the measures would pro- vide “equity across the board” for all students. CONTINUED ON 12

$750M bond package

$56M Proposition B for technology devices

SOURCE: RICHARDSON ISDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Berkner High School STEM Academy students work on their laptops pre-COVID19. The bond package includes millions of dollars in technology upgrades and improvements. (Courtesy Richardson ISD)

course of the pandemic, the average number of fam- ilies seeking help increased from 170 per week to 170 per day. And while the nonprot’s need for more space predates the coronavirus, the crisis hastened the search for a more adequate facility, Network Pres- ident and CEO Cindy Shafer said. “The newbuildingwill provide room for us to really Network’s new facility to address shifting needs in the community BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER

Following nearly two years of unprecedented demand, the nonprot Network of Community Min- istries plans to relocate to a larger facility in Richard- son that will allow it to better meet the needs of the community. The call for Network’s services skyrocketed begin- ning with the October 2019 tornado. Then, over the

600%.

Donated food is dropped o daily at Network. Since March 2020, Network has increased food distribution by

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LOCAL VOTER GUIDE 2021

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RICHARDSON EDITION • MARCH 2021

Infrastructure maintain and modernize We can’t lose sight of the fact that our city has been around for decades, and we have a constant need for maintaining, and where possible, modernizing our streets, alleys, medians, water lines, street lights, and other amenities. Involvement promote engagement with our neighbors and co-workers. The best way to invoke change in our community is to get involved. Volunteer for a non-profit organization, attend your neighborhood association meetings, or find a cause that inspires you.

Innovation support and promote a spirit of innovation and exploration – this is already interwoven in Richardson’s history. From some of the early corporations who created the institution that is now called UTDallas, to the city’s focus on creating an Innovation Quarter, Richardson thrives on new and creative ideas. Inclusion Richardson has a diverse population with respect to age, race, religion, language, and thought. We must keep Richardson a place all are proud to call home.

Get more info here!

burdetteforrichardson.com | daniel@burdetteforrichardson.com | fb.com/ BurdetteForRichardson Pol. Adv. paid for by Daniel Burdette Campaign Fund

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Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the rst edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and Pugerville, Texas. We have expanded our operations to include hundreds of employees, our own printing operation and over 30 hyperlocal editions across three states. Our circulation is over 2 million residential mailboxes, and it grows each month with new residents and developments.

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FROMLEANNE: As evidenced by the emergence of political signs throughout the city, there is a lot of passion for local government service in Richardson. I hope this passion extends to the polls, where Richardson’s turnout in the May 2017 city and school board elections was just over 9%. We encourage residents to be informed. We provide a list of candidate names and resources on Page 11. For full Q&As from candidates, visit www.communityimpact.com/ric-2021-candidate-QAs. Leanne Libby, GENERALMANAGER

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FROMOLIVIA: In this issue, we do a deep dive on Richardson ISD’s record-breaking $750 million bond package, set to go before voters in May. We also take a look at the recent surge in demand for services provided by local nonprot Network of Community Ministries, which plans to relocate to a larger facility in September. Olivia Lueckemeyer, EDITOR

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RICHARDSON EDITION • MARCH 2021

IMPACTS

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COMING SOON 9 A restaurant called bb.q Chicken is expected to open at 1312 E. Belt Line Road, Richardson. An opening date has not been announced. The business will oer Korean fried chicken in a variety of avors, including golden original, hot spicy, honey garlic, gang-jeong and more. Kimchi fried rice, french fries, cheese sticks and other side items are also on the menu. 972-373-4719. www.bbdotqchicken.com 10 Junbi Matcha & Tea plans to open in mid-April at 326 W. Campbell Road, Richardson. The business will sell a variety of dierent matcha and loose- leaf tea drinks, espresso, rice balls and merchandise. Junbi is headquartered in California and imports its matcha green tea from a farm in Japan that has operat- ed for 100 years. The Richardson location will be the rst Junbi store in Texas. www.junbishop.com 11 Spectrum is expected to open a new store April 1 at 1450 E. Belt Line Road, Richardson, according to a sign on the door. The location will allow custom- ers to view and purchase Spectrum mobile, television, internet and voice services as well as shopping mobile phones and accessories. 888-406-7063. www.spectrum.com RELOCATIONS 12 Texadelphia relocated Jan. 8 to Richardson Restaurant Park at 746 S. Central Expressway, Ste. 100, Richardson. The restaurant oers a variety of original

5 Top Notch Dentistry opened in Jan- uary at 670 W. Campbell Road, Ste. 120, Richardson. The practice’s dental team of Dr. Pouya Golbandi and Dr. Sanaz Haroun- pour oers preventive care services, dental implants, teeth whitening, emer- gency services and more. 469-709-8222. http://topnotchdentistryofdallas.com 6 Black Friday Discount Store opened in December at 1750 E. Belt Line Road, Richardson. The store oers a new assortment of merchandise each week with prices dropping daily from Fridays to Wednesdays as items are purchased. Items for sale include electronics, home decor, toys, clothing and more. The store is closed on Thursdays for restocking. 469-372-7882. www.facebook.com/ blackfridayhotdealsdfw 7 V/O Med Spa opened in early De- cember at 1417 E. Renner Road in the CityLine development in Richardson. The all-inclusive spa oers a host of services for men and women, including body contouring, injectables, skin rejuvenation and facial treatments. 214-214-4846. https://viomedspa.com 8 Kids Montessori Academy began accepting enrollment applications March 1 at 1521 E. Arapaho Road, Richardson. The early-learning and child care center operates in a Montessori environment, which promotes lively, purposeful engagement, according to Kids Montessori Academy’s social media pages. The center’s website is still under construction but will be accessible soon at www.kidsrichardson.com. 972-235-6930. www.facebook.com/ kidsrichardsonmontessori 78

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3 Scooter’s Coee opened its rst Richardson location Feb. 8 at 1451 E. Buckingham Road. The drive-thru coee shop oers a variety of hot and iced coee drinks, including seasonal specialties, in addition to teas, smoothies, breakfast foods and bakery items. The Nebraska-based brand has opened more than 300 locations nationwide since its founding in 1998. The Richardson loca- tion does not yet have a phone number. www.scooterscoee.com 4 Monster Bodybuilding Sports & Fit- ness held a soft opening March 1 at 235 N. Central Expressway, Richardson. The business features a 14,000-square-foot facility and oers a variety of training styles for a range of ages. Clients can choose from traditional free weights and exercise equipment, multiple mixed martial arts disciplines, exercise boot camps, one-on-one personal training and more. Prospective members can sign up on the website. 855-204-0004. www.monstertnessclub.com

NOWOPEN 1 Benders Sports & Spirits opened March 19 at 300 N. Coit Road, Ste. 130, Richardson. The sports bar oers aord- able food and drinks as well as wall-to- wall TVs for sports spectators. Benders oers happy hour every day from 11 a.m.- 7 p.m. The business is seeking to open one location per year in the metroplex, according to its website. 972-925-0301. www.benderssportsandspirits.com 2 Sticky Rice opened March 15 at 120 W. CityLine Drive, Ste. 500, Richardson. The family-owned restaurant serves authentic, fresh Thai and Laos cuisine. In addition to its new Richardson restaurant, Sticky Rice also has a location in Murphy. The Richardson location is oering limited dine-in seating. 972-803-5962. www.stickyricetx.com COMPILED BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER, LIESBETH POWERS &WILLIAM C. WADSACK

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Alamo Drafthouse in Richardson is temporarily closed but expected to reopen.

COURTESY ALAMO DRAFTHOUSE CINEMA

Texas cheesesteaks, such as the Found- er’s Favorite, which is a beef cheesesteak served with grilled onions, mozzarella, mushrooms and jalapenos. Texadelphia also oers a selection of salads, burg- ers and sandwiches. The restaurant was formerly located in the Richardson Heights Shopping Center. 214-484-9363. www.texadelphia.com/richardson RENOVATIONS 13 The Chick-l-A restaurant at 603 S. Plano Road, Richardson, closed for renovations Feb. 11. The work being done includes upgrades to its interior and drive-thru enhancements to improve eciency, a company representative said. Chick-l-A is known for its original chick- en sandwich and wae fries as well as for its salads, lemonade and milkshakes. The location, which is in the Richardson a theater in Kansas City, Missouri, all locations are set to remain open. League, who founded the theater franchise in Austin in 1997, said he expects business to pick up at remaining theaters this year. FEATURED IMPACT IN THE NEWS Alamo Drafthouse Cinema led for Chapter 11 bankruptcy March 3 and announced the closure of two Texas theaters in New Braunfels and Austin; however, the Richardson location at 100 S. Central Expressway, Ste. 14, is expected to reopen. Through the ling, the company will sell its assets to a group of investors, including Altamont Capital Partners, Fortress Investment Group and Tim League, Alamo Drafthouse founder and executive chair, among others. A statement by the company attributed the ling to nancial challenges related to the coronavirus pandemic and its “outsized impact” on the movie theater industry. “We want to ensure the public that we expect no disruption to our business and no impact on franchise operations, employees and customers in our locations that are currently operating,” Alamo Drafthouse CEO Shelli Taylor said in the statement. Aside from those Texas locations and

“Because of the increase in vaccination availability, a very exciting slate of new releases, and pent-up audience demand, we’re extremely condent that by the end of 2021, the cinema industry—and our theaters specically—will be thriving,” he said in a statement. Alamo Drafthouse also announced March 2 that it will keep its mandatory mask policy and 6-foot social distancing protocols in place following Texas Gov. Greg Abbott’s decision to lift the statewide mask mandate and pandemic-related business capacity restrictions. “We are only following the guidance of the [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention] and medical experts, not politicians,” the company said in a tweet. “Right now, at what we hope is the beginning of the end of COVID[-19], the health of our teams and our guests remains the company’s top priority.”

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Square development, is expected to reopen in late spring. 972-480-0090. www.facebook.com/cfarichardsonfsu CLOSINGS 14 Walmart plans to close its Super- center location just south of Richardson at 13739 N. Central Expressway, Dallas, on March 30. The location will be con- verted into a market fulllment center for online delivery and pickup items, Walmart spokesperson Charles Crowson said. The store’s approximately 200 employees will be eligible to transfer to other Walmart stores while the location is being converted, Crowson said. Employ- ees will also have the opportunity to return to working at the North Central Expressway location once it reopens in spring 2022, according to Crowson. 972-656-2501. www.walmart.com

It will be my honor to serve as the Mayor of the City of Richardson once again. Voting in this local election on May 1 st is your chance to participate. Please make sure your voice is heard. I look forward to leading the new City Council as we continue to “Plan Our Work and Work Our Plan. ”

www.PaulForRichardson.com

Political advertisement paid for by the Paul Voelker campaign, Ken Southard, Treasurer.

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RICHARDSON EDITION • MARCH 2021

TODO LIST

March & April events

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THROUGH MAY 31

‘A CELEBRATIONOF FRIENDSHIP’ EISEMANN CENTER FOR PERFORMING ARTS

This exhibit pays tribute to Maryann Wegloski, the late friend of Dallas artist Melanie M. Brannan and an Eisemann Center employee, who died in March after a battle with nodular melanoma. The exhibit includes more than 20 paintings that chronicle stories from Brannan and Wegloski’s friendship. Proceeds from the show and Eisemann Center commission on works sold will be donated in Wegloski’s name to AIM at Melanoma Foundation. The exhibit can be seen in person and on Brannan’s website at www.melaniembrannan.com. The Mezzanine Gallery is open Mon.-Fri. noon-5 p.m. and during all public events. Free. Eisemann Center for Performing Arts, 2351 Performance Drive, Richardson. 972-744-4650. www.eisemanncenter.com. (Courtesy Melanie M. Brannan)

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summer programming, which includes “Camelot,” “Big Fish” and “The Wizard of Oz.” 7:30 p.m. (April 16-17, 23-24), 2 p.m. (April 18, 25). $35. Repertory Company Theatre, 770 N. Coit Road, Richardson. 972-690-5029. www.rcttheatre.com 17 RICHARDSON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA SEASON FINALE CONCERT This concert includes works by Mozart, Saint-Saens and Tchaikovsky. Daniel Hsu, the 2017 Van Cliburn International Piano Competition bronze medalist, is featured on piano. 8 p.m. $15-$60. Hill Performance Hall at the Eisemann Center for Performing Arts, 2351 Performance Drive, Richardson. 972-744-4650. www.eisemanncenter.com 24 TRASH BASH This year’s city of Richardson annual Trash Bash oers residential cooking oil and grease disposal as well as free compost, mulch and other recycling opportunities. Due to COVID-19 restrictions, the event is limited to drive-thru activities at City Hall and the Richardson Square Mall. The city is also providing supplies for small groups who choose to pick up litter. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. (City Hall), 10 a.m.-2 p.m. (Richardson Square Mall). Free. City Hall, 411 W. Arapaho Road; Richardson Square Mall, 501 S. Plano Road, Richardson. 972-744-4080. www.cor.net/trashbash

COMPILED BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER APRIL 02 THROUGHMAY 28 CITYLINE LIVE Live music is returning to the CityLine development. Each Friday and Saturday, a new artist performs from 6-9 p.m. Guests can enjoy music from nearby restaurant patios or from the plaza. Free (attendance). CityLine Plaza, 1150 State St., Richardson. www.citylinedfw.com/events 09 CITYLINE NIGHT MARKET CityLine is hosting the CityLine Night Market in partnership with The Boho Market every second Friday of the month from April to July. At each event, more than 25 local vendors will be on the plaza selling handmade, vintage and fair trade goods. Live music is featured at every event; the performer on April 9 is Chris Raspante. 6-10 p.m. Free to attend. CityLine Plaza, 1150 State St., Richardson. www.citylinedfw.com/events. 16 THROUGH 25 “BROADWAY’S BEST: THENANDNOW” This celebration of musicals from Broadway’s Golden Age to today features two dierent casts of performers during its run in Richardson. Proceeds from the event support the theater’s planned

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Find more or submit events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES Aging streets network

COMPILED BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER

STREETAGEDISTRIBUTION More than 70% of the city’s streets are upward of 40 years old.

ONGOING PROJECT

early ’80s. All of those streets are now 40-plus years old.” A good chunk of the $269 million in repairs identied in the assessment will need to be addressed in the upcoming municipal bond package, Magner said. The bond will not be sucient in covering the expense in full, but sta has isolated projects considered crucial enough to include. “These projects are too large to tackle in any other way [besides a bond program],” he said, noting that streets in this condition have not been the focus of prior bond programs or annual maintenance. Sta is proposing $98 million in projects be included in the package. Some of the biggest projects include $20 million for reconstruction of Custer Parkway between Campbell and Renner roads, about $12 million for West Shore Drive between Camp- bell and Arapaho Road, and about $9 million for Greenville Avenue between Huines Street and Centennial Boulevard. Bond-worthy candidates are those in which a full reconstruction is the best option, Magner said. These

to be addressed in upcoming city bond The condition of streets in Rich- ardson is getting worse, according to a citywide analysis conducted in 2020. More than 70% of the city’s streets are more than 40 years old, Deputy City Manager Don Magner told City Council during a March 15 brieng. The expected useful life of a street is 25 years, he added. Annual and preventive mainte- nance has helped the city safeguard streets in good and satisfactory condition, Magner said, but those categorized by the assessment as poor or fair have declined since the last analysis in 2014. “The reason why we are having less success with that [category] is because of the story of our growth as a community,” he said, noting that the overall streets network remains classied as satisfactory. “We had a lot of streets come on ... in the late ’60s, through the ’70s and even the

50+ years old 40-49 years old 30-39 years old 20-29 years old 10-19 years old 0-9 years old

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ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF MARCH 22. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT RICNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM. Campbell Road widening at US 75 Sidewalks continue to be installed on the north side of Campbell and the southbound US 75 frontage road. Work is expected to shift to the median in late March once the existing streetlights in conict with the pro- posed median work are removed by Oncor. The median work will narrow the median and improve access at several openings. Once the median work is completed, Oncor will reinstall the streetlights. Timeline: May 2021 Cost: $2 million Funding sources: city of Richardson, Texas Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration

10% 3% 3%

SOURCE: CITY OF RICHARDSON COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

streets have higher trac volumes, are in need of drainage improvements or have infrastructure damage below the street’s surface. There are also $10 million in proposed sidewalk projects included in the proposal. There may be an opportunity to fund some of these projects with money from the recently passed federal stimulus package. The package may be reworked based on that option, Magner said. Sta plans to return to council in April to resume talks on the specics of the streets proposition, Magner said.

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RICHARDSON EDITION • MARCH 2021

CITY& COUNTY

News from Richardson

CITYHIGHLIGHT RICHARDSON Miss Belle’s House, a historic landmark in Richardson, will move to a temporary location in the coming weeks, according to city sta. The structure, which has been located on the Owens Farm property since 1979, will be moved to the Fire Training and Emergency Operations Center on Lookout Drive. The total budget for the move and site improvements is $100,000. The city expects Miss Belle’s House to stay at this location for about two years. Richardson City Council Meets April 5, 12 and 19 at 6 p.m. at City Hall, 411 W. Arapaho Road, Richardson. www.cor.net. The meetings are open to the public and are streamed live on the city’s website. Richardson ISD Meets April 5 and 19 at 6 p.m. at the RISD Administration Building, 400 S. Greenville Ave., Richardson. www.risd.org Plano ISD Meets April 6 and 20 at 7 p.m. at the PISD Administration Center, 2700 W. 15th St., Plano. www.pisd.edu MEETINGSWE COVER

Retirement imminent for local police chief

Eight redevelopment projects pitched for municipal bond

BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER

RICHARDSON Chief Jimmy Spivey will step down May 31 after more than 26 years with the Richardson Police Department. Spivey was hired as captain of the department in 1995, according to a March 9 city news release. He became chief in August 2009. “I am proud of the work we have accomplished during my service, and I take comfort knowing that the great work done by the depart- ment is going to continue well into the future,” Spivey said in the statement. Spivey’s retirement coincides with his 50th year of policing. He served with the Dallas Police Department for almost 25 years before he came to Richardson, per the release. In the coming weeks, City Man- ager Dan Johnson will establish a process to select a replacement for Spivey, the release stated.

BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER

A conceptual image shows a potential redesign of the Polk Street alley.

RICHARDSON Projects intended to enhance areas targeted for redevelopment could be included in the city’s upcoming bond package. The projects would aect the Core District and the Richardson Innovation Quarter and would be generally concentrated east of US 75 between Campbell and Spring Val- ley roads, according to a March 15 presentation to council by Deputy City Manager Don Magner. The total estimated cost for all eight projects would be $29.1 million; however, previous voter-approved bond funds and contributions by Dallas County would bring the cost down to $19.6 million, Magner said. Projects include intersection improvements on Belt Line Road/Main Street and US 75; the

conversion of the Polk Street alley into an enhanced pedestrian walk- way; the reconstruction of McKin- ney Street in the historic downtown area; the addition of center turn lanes along Main Street; a complete reconstruction of Glenville Drive to accommodate bicycles and automated vehicles; intersection improvements at Arapaho Road and US 75; mobility improvements on the Collins Boulevard bridge over US 75; and enhancements along the Duck Creek Trail corridor. Sta will rene plans before returning in April for further guid- ance from council. Bond proposi- tions are expected to be nalized by July, and the election is tentatively scheduled for November.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER GUIDE L O C A L V O T E R G U I D E 2021 For full candidate Q&As, visit www.communityimpact.com/ric-2021-candidate-QAs

D A T E S T O K N O W

W H E R E T O V O T E

April 19 First day of early voting April 20 Last day to apply for ballot by mail (received, not postmarked)

April 27 Last day of early voting May 1 Election day and last day to receive ballot by mail (unless late-arriving deadline applies)

Registered voters in Dallas and Collin counties can vote at any countywide voting center in their respective counties during early voting and on election day. Richardson City Hall, 411 W. Arapaho Road, is an early voting location for residents of both counties.

S A M P L E B A L L O T

*Incumbent

Trustee, Place 2 Dayna Oscherwitz Ajikwaga Felli Angela Powell* Trustee, Place 3 Nancy C. Humphrey* Lynn Walling

Council member, Place 6 Daniel Burdette Marilyn Frederick Aren Shamsul Mayor Paul Voelker* RICHARDSON ISD BOARD OF TRUSTEES Trustee, single-member District 1 Tony Casagrande Vicky Suárez Megan Timme

Trustee, at-large Place 7 Amanda Clair Nicole Foster Gavin Haynes Nicholas Frank LaGrassa Christopher J. Poteet Blake Sawyer Eric Stengel PLANO ISD BOARD OF TRUSTEES Trustee, Place 1 Lauren Tyra Shak Ben Guesmia Semida Voicu

RICHARDSON CITY COUNCIL Council member, Place 1 Bob Dubey* Council member, Place 2 Jennifer Justice Council member, Place 3 Janet DePuy* Council member, Place 4 Joe Corcoran Kyle Kepner* Council member, Place 5 Ken Hutchenrider*

COLLIN COUNTY COMMUNITY COLLEGE DISTRICT Trustee, Place 7 Jim Orr* Helen Chang Trustee, Place 8 Misty Irby Bob Collins* Trustee, Place 9 Andy Hardin* Jacoby Stewart Sr.

Trustee, Place 6 Marilyn Loughray Jeri Chambers*

P R O P O S I T I O N S

Richardson ISD bond

Proposition A The issuance of $694 million of school building bonds for acquiring, constructing, renovating, improving and equipping school buildings, for the purchase of necessary sites for school buildings, the retrotting of school buses with emergency, safety, or security equipment, and for the purchase of retrotting of vehicles to be used for emergency, safety, or security purposes and for the purchase of new school buses; and the levying of a tax sucient, without limit as to rate or amount, to pay the principal of and interest on the bonds and to pay the costs of any credit agreements executed or authorized in anticipation of, in relation to or in connection with the bonds. This is a property tax increase.

Proposition B The issuance of $56 million of school building bonds for acquiring and equipping technology infrastructure, including computers, tablets and other technology devices; and the levying of a tax sucient, without limit as to rate or amount, to pay the principal of interest on the bonds and to pay the costs of any credit agreements executed or authorized in anticipation of, in relation to or in connection with the bonds. This is a property tax increase.

SOURCES: CITY OF RICHARDSON, RICHARDSON ISD, COLLIN COUNTY ELECTIONS DEPARTMENTCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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RICHARDSON EDITION • MARCH 2021

CONTINUED FROM 1

“We are making a concerted invest- ment in our schools, in our leader- ship and especially in the future of our students,” he said. “We did not go into this process lightly. ” A recent facilities audit of RISD’s campuses found the district’s build- ings to be 53 years old on average. The age of many of those buildings has created challenges for educators, as instruction is delivered very dier- ently today than it was in the 1950s and 1960s, Assistant Superintendent Sandra Hayes said. “At some point, renovating stops being an eective manner for xing schools,” Hayes said. “We need dif- ferent kinds of spaces.” To address those needs and tackle projects ranging in focus from tech- nology to safety, the RISD board of trustees called the $750 million bond for the May 1 election. While that bond package is the largest in dis- trict history, Superintendent Jean- nie Stone said it has the potential to have “huge impacts for generations to come,” in part because of how it would move sixth-graders to junior high campuses. “This allows for us to free up the space [for pre-K classes] by this tran- sition to [a] middle school [model],” Stone said. The bond package includes two separate propositions. Proposition A totals $694 million and would cover infrastructure and safety projects, con- struction and renovation plans, and projects to support teachers and stu- dents. Proposition B totals $56 million and would cover updates to district technology devices. RISD has brought a bond package before voters every ve years since 1996. Each of the ve previous bonds have been approved by voters; the

Proposed Bond Projects Projects related to buildings, buses and safety make up more than 92% of the proposed bond. The remainder will be used on technology devices for students, teachers and sta.

$237M: repair and replacement of roong, HVAC systems and oors $30M: equipment for schools, cafeterias and maintenance $11M: school buses, maintenance and security vehicles $8M: safety/security upgrades, cameras, vape detection and health services

E xpansions at Pearce High, Mohawk Elementary and Brenteld Elementary E xpansions at Lake Highlands Junior High and Forest Meadow Junior High S tudent safety renovations at Brenteld Elementary and Hamilton Park Magnet R enovations at Northrich Elementary and Stults Road Elementary

$59M: instructional materials and digital applications $43M: digital network equipment and enterprise applications $14M: career and technical education materials $12M: ne arts instruments and equipment $11M: athletics turf, locker room renovations and uniforms

SOURCE: RICHARDSON ISDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

adjustments at junior high campuses over the course of several years to make room for sixth-graders. The goal is to have construction completed at all campuses by school year 2030-31. Lake Highlands and Forest Meadow junior highs would be the rst schools addressed: The former would be com- pletely rebuilt and the latter thor- oughly renovated. Lake Highlands scored the worst on the district’s facil- ities audit, according to Hayes. Stone said the school has “reached the end of its useful life.” Branum said discussion of the mid- dle school transformation dates back to 2019, when the district formed a committee that studied RISD’s cur- rent junior high model and compared it to the middle school model used by 95% of Texas school districts. One of the reasons for recommending a traditional middle school model,

Mohawk Elemen- tary School and Brenteld Ele- mentary School. Another $140 million from the

Proposition A

most recent, in 2016, received nearly 67% support. That $437.1 million bond package was the largest in district his-

proposition is earmarked for teaching and student support, including $59 million for instructional materials and teaching apps. Deputy Superintendent Tabitha Branum said the bond has a strong instructional component. “Without bonds, we wouldn’t be able to necessarily provide [certain things, such as graphing calculators and microscopes,] at the same level

tory at the time. Plannedprojects

Nearly $300 million of the proposed bond funds in Proposition A have been earmarked for upgrades related to dis- trict infrastructure and security, such as repair and replacement of oor, roong, and heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems. More than $250 million from the proposition is set aside for construc- tion and renovation projects, including additions at J.J. Pearce High School,

that we do now,” Branum said. Middle school transformation

Using a phased construction approach, the middle school trans- formation plan calls for facility

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

2 0 2 1 L O C A L V O T E R G U I D E

Learn more

More information about the bond can be found at www.risd.org/bond2021. The following resources include dates for upcoming public forums, both in person and virtual.

M O R E T H A N A D E G R E E It's the knowledge to address community mental health needs.

April 12 & 20

April 15 & 21

In-person public forums at 6 p.m. at the Richardson ISD Administration Building, 400 S. Greenville Ave., Richardson Virtual public forums hosted on Zoom; links to the forums will be created in April The Let’s Talk platform on the bond website allows people to ask questions and get responses. RISD Executive Assistant Lisa Andrews can schedule informational meetings for groups at 469-593-0301 or lisa.andrews@risd.org . SOURCE: RICHARDSON ISDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Branum said, is because Texas cur- riculum is built for it. “Thematerials and the resources are designed with the understanding that sixth grade sits and lives in the middle school,” she said. Another reason for the recommen- dation is that sixth-graders would receive more social and emotional support in middle schools, she said. “While we know that, sometimes, our elementary parents fear their sixth-graders moving to middle school, there was a strong belief that giving our students one more year in a middle school model at that really crit- ical transition time during [their] ado- lescence, …was critical,” Branum said. Themiddle school model would also benet the district’s ne arts and ath- letics programs, she said. Under the current conguration, teachers have to travel between schools to oer pro- grams, such as band, to sixth-graders, Branum said. “Our elementaries were not designed for that,” Branum said. Projects at the district’s remaining six junior highs are expected to be included in the 2026 bond. “We believe at this point that we should be able to aord very close to another $750 million in 2026,” Chief Financial Ocer David Pate said. “But there are certainly many variables at The portion of RISD’s tax rate put toward paying o the district’s accrued debts is $0.35 per $100 of taxable prop- erty value. If the bond is approved, Pate said that rate should be enough for the district to add another $750 million in debt over the next ve years without increasing the tax rate. “We will not be issuing all $750 play in that analysis.” No tax rate increase

million at once,” Pate said. “We will issue [it] in portions over the next ve years.” The expected growth of property values in the district also plays a role in RISD not needing to increase its tax rate, Pate said. RISD has averaged 3.7% annual property value growth over the last 25 years, he added. “With the eect of COVID on the economy, we were very conservative in our property tax growth assump- tions,” Pate said. “It was 2.5% for this upcoming year and then 1% value growth every year thereafter.” Although RISD is not planning to change its tax rate, voters could still see an increase in their tax bills if their property values were to go up. However, because of recent state leg- islation, language on the ballot must state “This is a property tax increase,” which was not a requirement for any of RISD’s previous bond packages. If only one of the propositions were approved, Hayes said funds from that proposition could not be used for proj- ects in the failed proposition. If neither proposition is passed, Pate said district sta would likely discuss the possibility of calling another bond election for November. The district and the board of trustees could also look into covering bond expenditures through RISD’s operat- ing funds. However, that would not include the middle school transfor- mation plan, Stone said. “It couldn’t be funded [separately from the bond],” Stone said. “The vast majority of the projects that are part of the package could not and would not be funded [without the bond].”

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RICHARDSON EDITION • MARCH 2021

BUSINESS FEATURE

BY WILLIAM C. WADSACK

Kim Garrison opened Painting With a Twist in Richardson in December 2016. (Liesbeth Powers/Community Impact Newspaper)

Skye Kennedy and 7-year-old Jillian Kennedy begin an Easter-themed painting during a free-paint session March 12. (Liesbeth Powers/Community Impact Newspaper) PaintingWith a Twist Studio oers variety of classes, opportunities to give back to the community A fter she spent 25 years working in human resources, Kim Garrison cats, hamsters, rabbits, a raccoon, geckos—we actually had a goldsh once,” she said. The business has also done several

PaintingWithATwist 819 W. Arapaho Road, Richardson 469-802-6333 www.paintingwithatwist.com/ studio/richardson Hours: Tue.-Sun. hours vary, closed Mon. then provide step-by-step instruction during the class. The next Paint Your Pet class is scheduled for April 24. PAINT YOUR PET People can send in a photo of their animals, and Painting With a Twist’s artists will sketch it on canvas. The artists will Ashley Pruskowski and Janet Dieter display their work froma recent “Paint Your Pet” class. (Courtesy PaintingWith A Twist)

“The Richardson community sup- ported us amazingly,” she said. “We were very impressed with what they did … to take care of us and keep us in business during that time.” That support meant a lot to Gar- rison, who said she was also drawn to Painting With a Twist because of how it promotes giving back to the local community. “We do what we call ‘Painting With a Purpose’ fundraisers, and we have raised a lot of money for the community,” Garrison said. Garrison, who also owns a Paint- ing With a Twist location in Man- seld, said her studios have held fundraisers for victims of Hurricane Harvey; Operation Kindness and other animal rescues; breast cancer charities and more.

said she opened Painting With a Twist in Richardson because she wanted to do something fun. “I want people to come in to escape from the problems of their world or their life,” Garrison said. “[Painting With a Twist] is a good opportunity for carefree escape.” Classes and events are BYOB, but the business provides customers with all other supplies, Garrison said, from paints and canvases to glasses and corkscrews. While Friday and Saturday nights are usually the busiest evenings, Garrison said the studio’s most popular oering, hands down, is its “Paint Your Pet” class. “We’ve had [people paint] dogs,

Texas-themed evenings and even oered a Galentine’s Day session featuring nude male models, which sold out, Garrison noted. She said the company’s next big holiday is Mother’s Day. “[People] can paint with Mom, they can give gift certicates, or they can just buy a class for Mom, send her and be her designated driver,” Garrison said. The coronavirus pandemic could have been a real crisis for Garrison’s business, but Painting With a Twist was successful in pivoting to virtual events and kits for painting at home last year, she said.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

Ethiopian food guide

F

G

E

A Doro Wot: chicken leg in red pepper sauce B Ayib: Ethiopian cheese C Fosolia: green beans and carrots

H

D

I

A

D Tekil Gomen: cabbage E Siniq: stued jalapeño F Shiro: chickpea curry G Yebeg Tibs: sautéed lamb with onion and jalapenos H Awaze Tibs: lamb stew I Injera: sponge-like atbread that doubles as a scooping utensil

C

J

J Kitfo: spiced steak tartar K Gomen: collard greens

B

K

DINING FEATURE

Ethiopian food is eaten communally, with groups gathering around a plate of food. (Photos by Olivia Lueckemeyer/Community Impact Newspaper)

Addis Abeba Ethiopian eatery brings communal cuisine to Richardson T ucked away in the Richardson Heights Shop- ping Center is one of only a few Ethiopian restaurants in the city. Addis Abeba, which BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER

Addis Abeba owner Eizet Hussien demonstrates a traditional Ethiopian coee ceremony.

a sponge-like atbread that doubles as a utensil. Food in Ethiopia is eaten communally. As one of nine children, Hussien said he and his family would gather around a plate of food every meal, often inviting neighbors and friends to eat with them. This element of his culture was dampened during the pandemic, when sharing food was discouraged. “Most people don’t eat by themselves,” he said. “I was surprised by how [Ethiopia] managed it—it’s a very dense community.” COVID-19 was crippling for Addis Abeba, Hussien said. The restaurant still owes thousands in rent and was forced to shut down for the entire month of January when Hussien and his sta became infected with the virus. Despite these challenges, Hussien remains optimistic. He said he believes business will pick up again over the next fewmonths. In the meantime, he has installed touchless features in the restrooms and a new air purier to make customers feel more comfortable. “I hope people come back once they are vac- cinated,” he said. “It’s been tough, but we are surviving.”

Addis Abeba 100 S. Central Expressway, Ste. 65, Richardson 972-480-0100 www.addisabebarestaurant.com Hours: Wed.-Mon. 11 a.m.-9 p.m., closed Tue. During one Ethiopian coee ceremony, incense is burned to ward o evil spirits. The coee, which is served from a black clay pot, is similar to Arabic blends in its thickness and deep avor. Some Ethiopians add salt to coee, while others add butter, Hussien said. Traditional coee ceremony As one of Ethiopia’s primary exports, coee is an integral part of the African nation’s culture.

opened in 2006, oers authentic food from Ethiopia, a landlocked country on the eastern edge of Africa. Owner Eizet Hussien purchased the restaurant from a relative in 2017. He immigrated to the United States in 2000 after a border conict between Ethiopia and its neighbor nation, Eritrea, made it dangerous for Ethiopians with familial ties to Eritrea to remain in Ethiopia. Hussien’s father is from Eritrea, and his mother is from Ethiopia, he said. Hussien worked as a hardware engineer at Toshiba before he developed his own point of sales systems, which he sold to restaurants in the Dallas area. Upon becoming owner of Addis Abeba, Hussien made some tweaks to the menu, but for the most part, he said, it looks the same as it has for 15 years. Menu items at Addis Abeba include the hallmarks of Ethiopian cuisine, including shiro, a chickpea curry; kitfo, a spiced steak tartar made from lean ground beef; and doro wot, which is a chicken leg in a red pepper sauce. All dishes are served with injera,

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RICHARDSON EDITION • MARCH 2021

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