Chandler Edition - November 2020

CHANDLER EDITION

VOLUME 2, ISSUE 4  NOV. 17DEC. 20, 2020

ONLINE AT

City Council resolves to preserve Chandler's history

IMPACTS

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TRANSPORTATION

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The Silk Stocking neighborhood is one of the oldest neighborhoods in Chandler and residents are hoping to protect it with a new city ordinance.

Chandler USD tracks COVID19 cases

BY ALEXA D’ANGELO

has been on a mission for the last sev- eral years to protect her neighborhood from redevelopment, and now, with a new city ordinance, she nally can. Chandler property owners can now establish historic preservation dis- tricts on their properties and in their neighborhoods to protect histori- cally signicant parts of the city from

redevelopment. Chandler City Council approved a new ordinance Nov. 2 that amends the city code for historic preservation eorts. The historic preservation code was born out of conversations that had occurred years prior with residents of the Silk Stocking neighborhood who

Dorothy Ruo’s house in Chandler’s Silk Stocking neighborhood has been occupied by a member of her family for the last eight decades. Sitting in her living room, she can call upon memories of when Silk Stocking was like Mayberry from the “Andy Grif- th Show”—idyllic and quaint. Ruo

EDUCATION

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CONTINUED ON 12

Chandler increases funding to prevent homelessness

COMBATING HOUSING WOES Much of the city’s annual budget for serving people experiencing homelessness is spent on pre-emptive measures designed to keep people from ever reaching the streets.

75 Number of people in Chandler who are unsheltered homeless 3,767 Number of people in Maricopa County who are unsheltered homeless

210 Number of families in transition in Chandler USD

BY ALEXA D’ANGELO

SIBLEY’SWEST

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Chandler is investing more in services for people in need this scal year than normal—in part to curb an inux of peo- ple suddenly at risk of losing their homes due to the nancial hardships inicted by the pandemic. The city has a relatively low number of people experienc- ing homelessness compared to neighboring cities. According to the annual Point-In-Time Homeless Count conducted in January, the city last had 75 people experiencing home- lessness. The annual Point-In-Time count is conducted in a four-hour window and does not serve as a comprehensive

$843K $2.6M

JULY 2019 JUNE 2020 JULY 2020 PRESENT

1,717 rent or utility assistance payments* 1,967 rent or utility assistance payments*

+208.42% increase

*PAYMENTS MADE BY CHANDLER NONPROFIT AZCEND SOURCES: CITY OF CHANDLER, AZCENDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

CONTINUED ON 14

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THIS ISSUE

CONTENTS IMPACTS

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

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Now Open, Coming Soon &more TODO LIST Local events and things to do TRANSPORTATION

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MARKET TEAM EDITOR Alexa D’Angelo GRAPHIC DESIGNER Isabella Short ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Michelle Johnson

FROMAMY: Part of our mission is to help local businesses thrive. As we enter the holiday season, I encourage you to shop local whenever possible and to support your neighbors who have poured their hearts and souls into their businesses. You can nd places to support in our business and dining proles (see pages 9, 11) as well by looking at the ads from our advertising partners. Amy Ellsworth, PUBLISHER

6 Latest transportation project updates

METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Amy Ellsworth,

aellsworth@communityimpact.com MANAGING EDITOR Matt Stephens ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Aubrey Galloway CORPORATE LEADERSHIP PUBLISHERS AND FOUNDERS John and Jennifer Garrett GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Warner CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES DIRECTOR Tess Coverman WHOWE ARE

FROMALEXA: One of my favorite things about the last year and a half that I’ve been with Community Impact Newspaper has been learning about our community’s history. Chandler has such a rich story to draw from. In our cover story this month, we delve into a new ordinance that allows for historic designations in the city. Alexa D’Angelo, EDITOR

EDUCATION

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Updates from Chandler schools

John and Jennifer Garrett began Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 in Pugerville, Texas. The company’s mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Today, we operate across ve metropolitan areas providing hyperlocal, nonpartisan news produced by our full-time journalists in each community we serve. BECOMEA#COMMUNITYPATRON

CITY& COUNTY

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Updates from the city of Chandler BUSINESS FEATURE

THIS ISSUE BY THE NUMBERS

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Sibley’s West

Local sources 8

Community events 4

Road projects 4

New businesses 5

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DINING FEATURE

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Residential market data IMPACT DEALS

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CHANDLER EDITION • NOVEMBER 2020

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

COMPILED BY ALEXA D’ANGELO

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Aldi

Inchin’s Bamboo Garden

W. PECOS RD.

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COURTESY ALDI

ALEXA D’ANGELOCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

4 Pasta78 , Arizona’s rst build-your- own pasta concept, opened in Chandler on Nov. 2. The Italian fast-casual concept allows customers to customize their pasta, sauce and protein. The restaurant is located at 2780 W. Chandler Blvd., Ste. 6, Chandler. 480-287-4416. www.pestoeatery.com 5 Salt & Smoke Mesquite Seafood Grill opened Nov. 2 in Chandler. It occupies the space formerly occupied by Humble Pie in downtown Ocotillo at 2547 W. Queen Creek Road, Chandler. The restaurant is owned by the same people who own The Living Room, also in downtown Ocotillo. 480-534-7621. www.saltandsmokechandler.com COMING SOON 6 Inchin’s Bamboo Garden , a Chinese and Indian restaurant, is coming soon to downtown Chandler. The restaurant will be located at 17 E. Boston St., Chandler. There is also a location in Scottsdale as well as more than 20 other locations nationwide. As of press time, an open- ing date had not yet been announced. https://bamboo-gardens.com RELOCATIONS 7 The Chandler Chamber of Commerce is moving across the street. Ocials announced Nov. 4 that the Chandler

Chamber of Commerce would relocate by the end of the year to a stand-alone oce space located at 101 W. Common- wealth Ave. in downtown Chandler— right across the street from its current location. Chamber ocials said they hope to complete the move by December. The building currently housing the chamber— at 25 S. Arizona Place—was purchased and is undergoing renovations. 480-963- 4571. www.chandlerchamber.com EXPANSIONS 8 The city of Chandler announced Oct. 26 that VB Cosmetics Inc. signed a 40,000-square-foot lease to expand and relocate its corporate headquarters, research and development, and man- ufacturing operations in Chandler. The company will move into the Lotus Project near Kyrene Road and Loop 202. The company is a manufacturing company engaged in the creation and sale of cosmetics and personal care products. 480-814-8300. https://dazzledry.com ANNIVERSARIES 9 The Doughnuttery celebrates its one-year anniversary at Chandler Fashion Center in November. Located at 3111 W. Chandler Blvd., Chandler, the eatery oers an array of doughnuts and dipping

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TM; © 2020 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER CO. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

NOWOPEN 1 Aldi opened in Chandler on Nov. 5. The new store is located at 2844 S. Alma School Road, Chandler. The grocery store will be open 9 a.m.-9 p.m. and will oer delivery and curbside pickup. 855-955-2534. www.aldi.us/en 2 Banner Ocotillo Medical Center , Chandler’s newest hospital, opened Nov. 2. The hospital opened with 120 beds and hired 250 sta to start. The

new hospital is located at 1405 S. Alma School Road, Chandler. 480-256-7000. www.bannerhealth.com 3 Born Again Vintage opened in Chan- dler on Nov. 11. Owned by a mother-son duo, the store is an upscale thrift bou- tique. All prots from Born Again Vintage will go toward assistance for foster kids aging out of the system and the general homeless population. The store is located at 590 N. Alma School Road, Ste. 30, Chandler. 602-321-1271. www.bornagainvintage.com

sauces. 480-530-0064. www.doughnuttery.com

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TODO LIST

December events

COMPILED BY ALEXA D’ANGELO

DECEMBER 05 TUMBLEWEED TREE LIGHTING The city of Chandler celebrates the holidays every year with the ceremonial lighting of the tumbleweed tree. 4:30-9 p.m. Free. Downtown Chandler, 3 S. Arizona Ave. The Chandler Fire Department is hosting a toy drive for children in need for the holidays. There will be a special destination built by Chandler reghters called Santa’s Enchanted Fire Village where visitors can meet Fire Santa and see his re truck. The toy drive will be from 2-8 p.m. Dec. 5 at the Chandler Fashion Center, located at 3111 W. Chandler Blvd., Chandler. The toy collection point will be in the parking lot west of the south-facing entry point of Chandler Fashion Center. 12 LEGENDARY LADIES OF SOUL The Chandler Center for the Arts www.chandleraz.gov 05 TOY DRIVE continues its virtual event series with a performance by three vocalists singing the hits of music legends Etta James, Ella Fitzgerald, Tina Turner, Aretha Franklin and Whitney Houston. 7 p.m. Free. www.chandlercenter.org

A new interactive display of holiday decorations called Sugarland debuts this winter. (Courtesy Downtown Chandler Community Partnership)

FEATURED EVENT Sugarland

spilling out of a life-size cup of hot chocolate and dance through the candy canes any time, all with social distancing guidelines in place, according to a news release from the DCCP. “Sugarland is the perfect backdrop for family photos and overall enjoyment as you stroll the downtown shopping and dining,” DCCP Executive Director Mary Murphy-Bessler said in a news release. “We are so proud to be able to oer a safe and whimsical option for visitors to Downtown Chandler, and [we] are

excited to build upon the display in the years to come.” 3 S. Arizona Ave., Chandler 480-782-2727 https://downtownchandler.com

This holiday season, the Downtown Chandler Community Partnership is launching a new, free interactive display of holiday decorations in downtown Chandler called Sugarland. The display will be located in Dr. A.J. Chandler Park West from Nov. 28-Jan. 3. Downtown Chandler visitors can snap a photo in the candy sleigh next to the Tumbleweed Tree, slide down the fruit roll-up slide, climb over marshmallows

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Find more or submit Chandler events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

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CHANDLER EDITION • NOVEMBER 2020

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES

COMPILED BY ALEXA D’ANGELO

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Cost: $4.04 million Funding sources: federal grant, local match 2 Val Vista Drive widening The town of Gilbert is widening Val Vista Drive from Appleby Road—about where Val Vista narrows to one lane in each direction—to Riggs Road. The result will be a six-lane section from Ocotillo Road to Merlot Street with a raised landscaped median, bike lanes, sidewalks and street- lights. Status: Traffic is still one lane in each direction, shifted away from the work zone. Work continues for installation of block walls north of Ocotillo. Concrete crews constructed driveways on the east side of Val Vista at Via Del Rancho, Via Del Palo and Val Vista north of Brooks Farm. The bottom layer of asphalt is scheduled to be put down just before Thanksgiving. Timeline: March 2020-July 2021 Cost: $25.96 million Funding sources: Gilbert bonds, town of Gilbert funds and Maricopa Association of Governments funds 3 Alma School Road improvements Construction is underway on a yearslong project to expand Alma School Road to four lanes from Chandler Boulevard to Queen Creek Road.

Status: The project began Aug. 20, and crews were working in both the north and southbound directions on Alma School from Loop 202 to Kingbird Drive. Timeline: Aug. 20-Nov. 20 Cost: $2.74 million Funding source: city of Chandler 4 Gilbert Road widening Chandler City Council on Sept. 17 approved a $4.77 million contract with Sunland Asphalt and Road Construction Inc. for the second phase of improve- ments on Gilbert Road from Ocotillo Road to Chandler Heights Road. The project will widen Gilbert Road to three through lanes northbound and southbound from Ocotillo to Powell Place. The first phase of work took place earlier this year. Status: Crews began work on Gilbert Road from Ocotillo to Powell on Nov. 9. Construction was in the north and south- bound directions. Timeline: November-Jan. 29, 2021 Cost: $4.77 million Funding sources: city of Chandler, Chandler USD

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ONGOING PROJECTS 1 McClintock Drive, Kyrene Road bike lane additions The city of Chandler is planning to con- struct two new segments of bike lanes along A McClintock Drive and B Kyrene Road that will connect to the existing

bike lane system at the Tempe city limits. Status: Crews began work on the project July 13 and started with tree removal and utility potholing on the road, according to the city. The work is on both the north

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UP TO DATE AS OF NOV. 9. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT CHNNEWS@ COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

and south lanes of the roads. Timeline: July-March 5, 2021

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

EDUCATION BRIEFS

News from Chandler USD

COMPILED BY ALEXA D’ANGELO

According to the Maricopa County Department of Public Health, an educational institution with two or more COVID-19 cases is considered to be having an “outbreak.” Health officials are tracking the number of current and closed outbreaks across Maricopa County. NUMBER TOKNOW 2

Chandler USD reports COVID-19 cases districtwide

CHANDLER USD More than 50 coronavirus cases were reported across Chandler USD’s 45 schools as of Nov. 9. Multiple schools have at least one case, according to the district data that is updated at least once a week. Perry High School had three confirmed COVID-19 cases, Hamilton High School had five confirmed cases and Casteel High School had 22 confirmed cases. As such, the three schools are each experiencing an “outbreak,” which is defined by the Maricopa County Department of Public Health as when a school site has more than two confirmed cases. Several other schools fell into that category as of Nov. 9. Chandler USD spokesperson Terry Locke said the district is being careful not to provide identifiable information on

individuals within the data. Chandler USD junior high and high schools went back to in-person learning Oct. 13 after spending the first quarter learning remotely. Elementary school students in the district returned in late September in a staggered approach. Students and staff are required to wear masks while on campus, and social distancing and enhanced sanitizing proto- cols have been put in place across the district. “It’s important that students, staff and parents collaborate to ensure safety,” Superintendent Camille Casteel said. “This includes staying home when not feeling well, reporting cases to the schools and employing safety precautions, including social distancing, wearing masks and washing hands properly.”

CHANDLER USD COVID-19 DATA District officials have been releasing data on the number of COVID-19 cases across CUSD since students returned

to campuses. A comprehensive list is available at www.cusd80.com.

Kirk D. Minkus, MD. Dr. Minkus has over 16 years of collective interventional radiology practice and training, and has performed over 40,000 procedures. Call Today! (480) 945-4343 Chandler USD board Nov. 18, 6 p.m. 1525 W. Frye Road, Chandler 480-812-7000 • www.cusd80.com MEETINGSWE COVER CHANDLERUSD On Oct. 14, the governing board approved the use of $2.34 million from the district’s 2019 bond for security cameras at elementary schools. The cameras, cabling, network switches, fiber optic pull-ins and services are included as part of the project cost. It has been 10 years since the last camera systems were installed at elementary sites. CHANDLERUSD The Chandler USD governing board was told Oct. 28 that due to COVID-19 costs and decreased enrollment, the budget for 2020-21 will need to be heavily revised in December. CHANDLERUSD At its Oct. 28 meeting, the Chandler USD governing board approved the district’s enrollment stabilization grant agreement. The grant program supports education agencies in Arizona with coronavirus relief funds. The district will be notified of the amount in November. CHANDLERUSD The Chandler USD governing board approved changes to the secondary school attendance boundaries Oct. 14. The new boundaries account for the opening of a new high school in 2021. Boundaries are available on the district website at www.cusd80.com. MEETING HIGHLIGHTS

NUMBER OF COVID-19 CASES*

Basha High Accelerated Middle School

5

Casteel High

22

Chandler High

2

Hamilton High

5

Perry High

3

Rice Elementary

2

Ryan Elementary

2

San Marcos Elementary

2 *AS OF NOV. 9

SOURCE: CHANDLER USD/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Chandler High aquatic center named after coachwho died CHANDLER USD The Chandler USD governing board voted Oct. 28 to rename the Chandler High School Aquatic Center after Kerry Croswhite, a former coach at the high school who died this summer of COVID-19. “Kerry Croswhite is remembered for his kindness, compassion and calm demeanor in everything he does in the classroom, at the pool, on the softball field and in life,” read the resolution. “Kerry Croswhite had a posi- tive impact on everyone in the Chandler High commu- nity. [He taught] us all how to be honest and learn from hard situations, but more importantly, [to] find a bright side when life is getting too hard.”

District’s elementary school playgrounds to get upgrades CHANDLER USD At a meeting Oct. 28, the Chandler USD governing board approved spending $3.65 million to upgrade the playgrounds at nine elementary schools. The playgrounds, which have not been updated since around 2002 or 2003, need updates to their playground structures, new swing sets, rubber surfacing and more. Andersen Elementary, Frye Elementary, Galveston Elementary, CTA-Goodman, Hartford Elementary, CTA-Humphrey, Knox Gifted Academy, Shumway Learning Academy and Weinberg Gifted Academy are the schools listed in Phase 1 of the effort to redo all the playgrounds in a multi-phased project.

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Indications: • 50 years old or older • Previous/Current Smoker • Diabetic • High Blood Pressure

TWO CONVENIENT LOCATIONS GILBERT (Next to Mercy Gilbert Hospital) 3420 S Mercy Rd., Ste# 300 MESA (Just North of Banner Baywood Hospital) 140 S Power Rd., Ste# 102

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CHANDLER EDITION • NOVEMBER 2020

CITY&COUNTY

News from Chandler & Maricopa County

COMPILED BY ALEXA D’ANGELO

NUMBER TOKNOW

City Council approves three zoning changes, denies one CHANDLER At a Chandler City Council meeting Nov. 5, the council approved the introduction of three ordinances for three multifamily development projects. The projects are located at the southwest corner of Chandler and Parklane boulevards, the northeast corner of Elliot Road and Arizona Avenue, and the southeast corner of Elliot Road and Loop 101. City sta held one mul- tifamily project located at the southeast corner of Riggs and Gilbert roads until the council’s December meeting. For more information on the developments, visit www.chandleraz.gov. The agenda items approved were for rezoning the land in the areas for multifamily residential. The vote was unanimous. The council also denied an amendment to the Chandler Airport Area Plan from commercial, oce and business to high-density residential.

County allocatesmoney for school district hot spots

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The Chandler City Hall complex rst opened 10

years ago on Oct. 25, 2010. The complex houses city departments and divisions, City Council Chambers, Vision Gallery and the Visitor Center.

MARICOPA COUNTY The Maricopa County

HOT SPOTS FOR SCHOOLS 58 county school districts 29,279 hot spots SOURCE: MARICOPA COUNTY COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER $6.8M overall cost

CITY HIGHLIGHTS

Board of Supervisors allocated $6.8 million in federal coronavi- rus relief dollars to address the digital divide in the county’s school districts,

Chandler City Council Dec. 7 and 10, 6 p.m. 88 E. Chicago St., Chandler 480-782-2181 • www.chandleraz.gov MEETINGSWE COVER on Chandler Heights Road from McQueen Road to Gilbert Road. CHANDLER Chandler City Council approved a project agreement Nov. 5 for $243,913 to replaster the Nozomi Aquatic Center play pool during a regular meeting. CHANDLER On Nov. 5, Chandler City Council approved the spending of $2,483,240.51 on body-worn cameras for Chandler police ocers. The police department will be able to buy 334 cameras with the funding—replacing the cameras currently in use in the department and adding more. CHANDLER Chandler City Council on Nov. 5 approved the removal of easements no longer needed for public use on property located at the northeast corner agreement with UBM Enterprise Inc. for park restroom cleaning for the period of Dec. 1, 2020, through Nov. 30, 2021, in an amount not to exceed $151,844.02. CHANDLER Chandler City Council approved an ordinance Nov. 2 granting a no-cost irrigation and facilities easement to Roosevelt Water Conservation District for an improvement project of Gilbert and Riggs roads. CHANDLER Chandler City Council approved Nov. 5 an

according to a news release. The digital divide—the gap between those with access to the internet and computers—was made even more apparent as millions of students across the country were forced online due to the coronavirus. The county reached out to all 58 of the county’s school districts to determine the technology needs. Maricopa County purchased 29,279 hot spots for 32 school districts. The county also footed the bill for the rst year of service. “As we navigate through this pandemic, our students should not be denied an opportunity for learning just because it is virtual,“ said Supervisor Jack Sellers, District 1, in a news release. “We want students and teachers to have the tools they need to stay engaged during this challenging time.” The hot spots will be delivered directly to the school districts by the cellular vendors in early December.

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City launches newway to engagewith Chandler services

CHANDLER Mayor Kevin Hartke announced Nov. 2 a new initiative to promote civic engagement. The city created CIVIC to better engage residents and future leaders, according to the mayor’s video announcement on social media. The 10-session program is

interactive and oers residents a “behind-the-scenes” look at city services, Hartke said. This free programwill launch in January, and in each session, partici- pants will meet with city leaders, tour facilities that keep the city running, participate in interactive sessions,

and learn how to stay engaged with the city and in the community, Hartke said. Sessions will generally take place every other Wednesday from 4:30- 6:30 p.m. at various locations through- out Chandler. More information is available at www.chandleraz.gov.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

BUSINESS FEATURE Sibley’sWest Store oers one-stop-shop for all things Arizona S ibley’s West in downtown Chandler is a love letter to Arizona. Each item is carefully pottery or candles. They are just not doing it on a mass-production scale, and so you won’t see them every- where you go,” John said.

BY ALEXA D’ANGELO

curated by co-owner Michelle Wolfe and comes from an Arizona artisan. Everything—from the prickly pear hot sauce to the art for sale to the handcrafted jewelry—is made by Arizonans. Michelle and John Wolfe opened Sibley’s West in December 2010. Back then, the store was half the size it is today and featured a much smaller amount of inventory, the couple said, but they wanted to bring more retail to downtown Chandler. “We were coming down here to go to the restaurants, but there really wasn’t much retail,” Michelle said. other business owners what they would want to see down here, and they all said retail. I thought it would be nice to have a little shop but not just the same thing that you could nd everywhere.” They started with 55 suppliers, and they now have more than 230, Michelle said. There are cards placed on the displays throughout the store identifying artists and the story behind their work. The cards also highlight which artists have worked with Sibley’s West since it opened. “These people in Arizona are doing quality items, whether it’s art or “Saba’s was here, but there was not much retail. We were asking the

When the coronavirus pandemic forced the store into a temporary six-week closure, John and Michelle said they were still at the store every day, building up an online inventory for people to peruse. “Being a mom-and-pop, we applied for and got some of the grant funding, which helped carry us through,” John said. “Our online store now has about 500 items; it used to have 170. The nice thing is that we can get sales 24

John and Michelle Wolfe started Sibley’s West in December 2010. (Photos by Alexa D’Angelo/Community Impact Newspaper)

hours a day, and it’s from people placing orders all around the country. So that helped us to get through. You try to adjust and serve the customer and help and hope that things work out and

“WHENYOU SHOP HERE, YOU SEE THE ARTISTS. THEYARE PEOPLE. THEYARENOT SOME CORPORATION. ” MICHELLE WOLFE, COOWNER

One section of the store is dedicated to prickly pear-themed items.

There are sections of handmade art crafted by Arizonan artisans.

HISTORY OF SIBLEY’S The name “Sibley’s West” comes from a long family history. From 1868 to 1990, there was a Sibley’s department store in upstate New York, John Wolfe said. Wolfe’s great- grandfather, Rufus Sibley, was one of three men in 1868 who started selling dry goods on Main Street in Rochester. “So we are ‘Sibley’s West,’” John said.

get better.” They said supporting the local com- munity is at the crux of their business and that they hope others will shop local to help businesses like Sibley’s West recover from the economic impact of the pandemic. “Every dollar we take in stays in the state,” Michelle said. “I only buy from people I can write a check to in Arizona. When you shop here, you see the artists. They are people. They are not some corporation I am buying a bunch of tchotchkes from; [they] are people we’ve known and met and gotten through a lot together with.”

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W. BUFFALO ST.

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CHANDLER EDITION • NOVEMBER 2020

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

DINING FEATURE

DISHES TO TRY

GARDENSKILLET $10.95

Owner Setkia Memishovski describes the menu as “homestyle” food.

BANANAPECANPANCAKES $9.95

BERRY SPECIAL CREPES $11.95

Everything at BlackBerry Cafe is locally sourced and homemade, according to the owners. (Photos by Alexa D’Angelo/Community Impact Newspaper)

The breakfast dishes are among the favorites of regulars, according to the owners.

BlackBerry Cafe Breakfast and lunch spot oers homestyle cooking, family feel S etkia and Reggie Mem- ishovski have been in the restaurant business together the nest quality of everything. Everything here is homemade. It’s a lot of work, but it’s worth it.” Setkia and her husband have BY ALEXA D’ANGELO

Setkia Memishovski and her husband, Reggie, own BlackBerry Cafe.

a tumultuous several months due to the coronavirus pandemic. The business was shut down for a time and then had to move to a reduced capacity with curbside pickup as an option as well. “It hasn’t been easy,” Setkia said. “You wonder how much longer family-owned places can go on. Our regulars are what kept us going in those dicult months. I don’t know what we would have done without them. The regulars kept us aoat; we wouldn’t be here without them. It’s so important to support local, little shops. You know the owners, and you know they have a family to feed and that their business is their life.”

Blackberry Cafe 2090 N. Dobson Road, Chandler 480-454-3917 www.blackberrycafeaz.com Hours: Mon.-Sun. 7 a.m.-2 p.m.

for years. They rst started back in Chicago where the husband- and-wife duo ran a full-service restaurant—serving breakfast, lunch and dinner. The pair decided that they no longer wanted to endure the harsh Chicago winters and moved to Ari- zona a little over two years ago. Now the couple owns BlackBerry Cafe in Chandler, which serves breakfast and lunch. “No one who comes to eat here leaves hungry; that’s our goal,” Set- kia said. “We source local and only

worked in the two years BlackBerry Cafe has been open to cultivate rela- tionships with regulars and create an environment where everyone feels like family. “We’re family-owned,” Setkia said. “When someone walks in, I want them to see a smiling face. I care about how you feel. I want you to feel comfortable and welcomed because we so appreciate everyone who walks in the door. I want it to feel like family.” The restaurant—like so many locally owned businesses—has faced

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11

CHANDLER EDITION • NOVEMBER 2020

Chandler an past and present

W. ERIE ST.

Chandler High School

W. CHANDLER BLVD.

1

On Nov. 2, Chandler City Council approved an ordinance allowing for zoning overlays and the creation of historic designations in an eort to protect the city’s history.

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McCullugh-Price House + Chandler Museum

W. FRYE RD.

E. SARAGOSA ST.

Suhwaro Hotel

Historic places Locations already considered historic would need to apply with the city under the new ordinance. 1 Silk Stocking District: The Silk Stocking neighborhood is the rst master-planned neighborhood in Chandler. It was known for being the place where more auent families lived. 2 Historic Commercial District: Some buildings in the Commercial District include: The Bank of Chandler Building built in 1925, The Monroe Building, Chandler Post Oce and Chandler Arizonan Building. 3 Goodyear Village: The Goodyear Tire and Rubber Corp. bought 8,000 acres in December 1916. The next year the town of Goodyear was under construction. 4 Goodyear Canal: The town of Goodyear featured a palm tree-lined boulevard that ran along an irrigation canal. A main square was built just to the east of this boulevard. Along the boulevard near the square was a grocery store, a movie theater, a pool hall and a church.

S. CHANDLER VILLAGE DR.

E. PECOS RD.

E. BUFFALO ST.

Winn School

San Marcos Hotel and Golf Course

202

2

E. BOSTON ST.

Arizona Railway Museum

McCullugh-Price House + Chandler Museum COURTESY CHANDLER MUSEUM

E. RYAN RD.

3

4

3

CONTINUED FROM 1

San Marcos Hotel and Golf Course COURTESY CHANDLER MUSEUM

SOURCE: CITY OF CHANDLER COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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wanted tools to preserve the historic character of their neighborhood. The city recognized that certain architec- tural and cultural resources need to be preserved from destruction or devel- opment—especially as the city reaches build out, according to ocials. Across Chandler, about 12% of city land is vacant for development, according to city ocials. “The city of Chandler is committed to the preservation and enhancement of our neighborhoods,” Chandler Mayor Kevin Hartke said. “The historic preservation ordinance will allow gen- erations to come to celebrate the rich history that has shaped the growth of our community. I thank the many residents that provided feedback to sta to ensure our neighborhoods can maintain their distinct character while also continuing to be safe, diverse and vibrant.” Chandler’s history Chandler was founded by Dr. A.J. Chandler in May 1912 with much of the development at that time in what is now the downtown area. The San Marcos Hotel, Chandler High School, several downtown buildings and more all stem from the earliest days of Chan- dler, according to documents from the Chandler Museum. Ruo remembers when train pas- sengers would disembark in down- town Chandler andwalk straight to the

San Marcos Hotel. Ruo, 84, now lives in the same house she grewup in along Washington and Colorado streets north and east of the intersection of Chandler Boulevard and Arizona Ave- nue—and has watched the city change over the years. “When [World War II] broke out in the ‘40s, the governments decided that Hwy. 87 [Arizona Avenue] that goes to Tucson had to cut through Chandler park; there was material that had to be moved and all that kind of thing,” Ruo said. “Prior to that the park was a circle the way Dr. Chandler had designed it. It was heavily wooded; I mean it was like a forest down there when I was a kid.” City ocials said Ruo and some of her neighbors in Silk Stocking were instrumental in getting the historic preservation ordinance through coun- cil. Ruo said itwas her goal tonot only preserve her home and those of her neighbors, but also to keep the charac- ter of one of the oldest neighborhoods in Chandler intact. The neighborhood, with its proximity to downtown, was once home to some of the most prom- inent families in Chandler and was considered auent. Business owners, the school district superintendent and others called the neighborhood home, Ruo said. “There’s a lot of interest in the city’s

development,” Horn said. “Some of us thought it was tragic that this canal, as cool as it is, would disappear.” The historic preservation ordinance creates four designations: heritage sites, historic conservation districts, historic preservation districts and landmarks. The ordinance incorpo- rates processes to discourage demoli- tion of eligible and designated historic properties and encourages their pres- ervation through consultation with city sta and by exploring alternatives, Horn said. The historic preservation districts for neighborhoods—such as Silk Stocking—are applicable only to structures that are more than 50 years old. All places that have a historic rec- ognition now will have to go through an application process with the city to get designation under the new ordinance. The ordinance also establishes a his- toric preservation commission, a his- toric preservation ocer and a historic property register for the city. A property owner would need to get a majority of the residents in the neighborhood to agree to the preserva- tion district and the parameters of the ordinance and then take it to the city’s historic preservation ocer. From there the application would move to the planning and zoning commission for approval and then ultimately to

history, but there are so many people moving into town that don’t have any history or knowledge of what was here before,” Ruo said. “This was a sleepy agricultural city when I was small. Up until the time I got married in 1959, Chandler didn’t have more than 5,000 people as residents. There are still a lot of us on boards and commissions in the city who were born and raised here who have that knowledge. Some of us were farm kids that rode the bus to school, and other kids were the city kids who walked. We are still active, and we still know what’s going on.” Creating theordinance Development Services Director Derek Horn said conversations within the city about the idea of historic pres- ervation got more serious in spring 2019 when the city acquired the right of way over the northern segment of the historic Goodyear Canal on Basha Road with the objective of preserving the open canal. The canal, Horn said, once served the Goodyear farming community during World War I. The land was full of Egyptian cotton that was used to make Goodyear tires, Horn said. “There was a feature you can see when you drive by it of a double row of palm trees lining the canal and that was in danger of being destroyed by

12

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

Four classications of historic designation The city of Chandler has split up the ordinance into four dierent areas that can receive historic designation.

Chandler nearing build-out Inll and redevelopment are among the top priorities for Chandler City Council and the city of Chandler. Ocials said they are not worried about redevelopment eorts clashing with historic preservation.

Heritage site: The location of a past event, structure or district that no longer physically exists that was signicant to the history of Chandler Historic conservation district: An area of the city that contains one or more designated properties or historic preservation districts or is associated with signicant events or persons of the city’s past where preservation and conservation of

Landmark: A structure or site that contains an outstanding or unique example of an architectural style and/or is associated with a major historical event, activity or person or is of historical or cultural importance to the city; a landmark will also be in a historic preservation district SOURCE: CITY OF CHANDLER COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

the remaining historic structures and context is encouraged Historic preservation district: A zoning overlay of an area of the city documented by historic boundaries that contains at least one historic property; overlay includes regulations governing maintenance, alteration and demolition of designated historic properties within the district

12% of the city’s overall land is vacant

88% of the city is built out

SOURCE: CITY OF CHANDLERCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

City Council. “The ordinance would help preserve Chandler’s historic resources from development and celebrate Chandler’s history by preserving historic neigh- borhoods,” Horn said. “It really could promote neighborhood preservation.” With the city so close to build-out, and with an emphasis from the mayor and City Council on inll and redevel- opment, Horn said the city must strike a balance between new development, redevelopment and preservation. “We have to nd that balance with new development and redevelopment with residents’ ability to exercise prop- erty rights,” Horn said. “We want to preserve what we can. Of course, not every old building is historic, but it provides some criteria for designation. We also need to raise awareness of Chandler’s history. It’s about balancing everything.” Rick Heumann, chair of the city’s planning and zoning commission, said he believes the new ordinance is an important piece in maintaining the city of Chandler’s history. “The ordinance is trying to protect small pieces of older Chandler,” Heu- mann said. “Arizona doesn’t have a lot of that. For certain places, the ordi- nance is designed to help protect some of these older areas. There are not a lot of them, but they exist and they should be preserved and maintained.”

Heumann said he is not worried about any implications to develop- ment or redevelopment in the city due to the ordinance. “The thing about it iswhenyoudon’t protect your past, that’s a challenge,” Heumann said. “If something is dilap- idated and falling down, there’s a dif- ference. But there are well-maintained buildings that need to be protected so you don’t lose that history. There are plenty of inll parcels around the city that aren’t historic but need some help. We are not at a point where this would be hurting redevelopment at all.”

it down and turn it into multifamily housing. “We see lots of new young people wanting to buy houses and restore them and live here with the close proximity to downtown,” Ruo said. “There’s a longevity thing about peo- ple wanting to be in the neighborhood with a lot of history.” The earliest houses were built in 1919 in Silk Stocking. The neighbor- hood got its name, Ruo said, because “if you could aord to buy your wife silk stockings, you could aord to buy a house in the neighborhood.” Ruo’s family moved into the house in March 1937, a year after Ruo was born. The impetus of Ruo and her neigh- bors getting involved in the push for historic preservation was they were unaware the zoning in the area is not just for single-family homes, but for multifamily homes as well. A devel- oper was buying a house on Colorado with the intent of demolishing it and putting up a triplex. “It triggered everyone here into wanting to do something,” Ruo said. “We can’t change the zoning, but we can maybe protect the demolition of the homes and see if we can’t come up with a design for multifamily that will t within the neighborhood.” Martin Sepulveda, president of the Chandler Historical Society and a for- mer Chandler City Council member,

said the conversation around histori- cal preservation has been going on for decades. He said he was glad the ordi- nance was nally passed. “Chandler is one of the original charter cities in the state of Arizona,” Sepulveda said. “We have been around a long time. We were one of the rst cities that had a master plan. The Silk Stocking neighborhood wasn’t the rst neighborhood, but it was the rst upscale custom subdivision. It’s a point of pride. We should seek tomain- tain that part of the city’s culture and heritage as something positive.” Sepulveda said that neighborhoods like Silk Stocking are what create the character of a city and need to be maintained to preserve that character. “The oldest parts of the city have been more run down, and people are bringing it back,” Sepulveda said. “Silk Stocking isn’t in a new part of town, and consequently people have come and purchased property with no intention of maintaining the historical character of the neighborhood. I’m a property rights guy, but I would say that Dorothy and her neighbors pur- chased their homes in that area for a reason and have a right to protect what matters to them.”

“THE HISTORIC PRESERVATION ORDINANCEWILL

ALLOWGENERATIONS TOCOME TOCELEBRATE

THE RICHHISTORY THAT HAS SHAPED THE GROWTHOF OUR COMMUNITY.” MAYOR KEVIN HARTKE

PreservingChandler’s history Ruo began pushing historic preser- vation to the city years ago when she rst heard that a developer wanted to acquire a Silk Stocking home, tear

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