Keller - Roanoke - Northeast Fort Worth Edition | May 2021

KELLER ROANOKE NORTHEAST FORTWORTH EDITION

VOLUME 3, ISSUE 1  MAY 20JUNE 23, 2021

ONLINE AT

FortWorth, Keller libraries to cut ties Residents of Fort Worth and Keller will see changes this summer in how their libraries operate as a long-term agree- ment to share resources expires this fall. The libraries for Fort Worth, Keller and ve other cities that are part of this MetrOPAC agreement are already working to ease the transition. Changes will roll out for library patrons in June, according to state- ments from Keller and Fort Worth. Residents of each city will still be able to request books and other materi- als from other libraries as interlibrary loans, but Keller Public Information Ocer Rachel Reynolds said getting items could take longer to receive them. Daily deliveries to Keller from partner libraries will be phased out. “Is it going to take me longer to get the materials that I want? We don’t really know,” Reynolds said. “If you want something that used to have a CONTINUED ON 12 BY KIRA LOVELL

The MetrOPAC agreement let Fort Worth and Keller residents use their library cards in seven cities for free. When the agreement expires this summer, readers in Fort Worth and Keller will see the following changes to access with their library cards. S HELVING ACCESS

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Residents: Eligible for free library cards valid only at Fort Worth libraries

Runoelection in FortWorth is set for June 5 IMPACTS

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Nonresidents: Can purchase Fort Worth library cards for $50 a year

Golden Triangle branch library

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Residents : Eligible for free library cards valid only at the Keller library

Nonresidents: Can purchase Keller library cards for $25 a year

CITY & SCHOOLS

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PHOTOS BY KIRA LOVELLCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER Keller Public Library

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Library services will not change, as Roanoke was not part of MetrOPAC. Nonresidents can purchase a card for $25 a year.

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SOURCES: CITIES OF FORT WORTH, KELLER AND ROANOKE COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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NewAlliance Park addresses community need for green spaces

BY SANDRA SADEK

SUMMER 2021 Timeline for completion:

$7.3M Cost:

160ACRES Acreage:

A new $7.3 million park coming to the Alliance area in late summer will fulll a community need for more rec- reational space. Alliance Park is the city of Fort Worth’s latest project in District 7, which covers a portion of North- east Fort Worth. It will sport mul- tiple elds, courts, a playground, a picnic pavilion and a concrete trail. Phases I and II are currently CONTINUED ON 15

BUSINESS FEATURE

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The multimillion dollar Alliance Park will bring new amenities. (Courtesy city of Fort Worth)

DINING FEATURE

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THIS ISSUE

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Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the rst edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and Pugerville, Texas. We have expanded our operations to include hundreds of employees, our own printing operation and over 30 hyperlocal editions across three states. Our circulation is over 2 million residential mailboxes, and it grows each month with new residents and developments.

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FROMVALERIE: Our cover stories this month outline changes in the works for some of the libraries and parks, two amenities that help make the Keller, Roanoke and Northeast Fort Worth area a great place to call home. Tell us what else you would like to learn about in your community. We would love to hear from you. Email krnnews@communityimpact.com. Valerie Wigglesworth, MANAGING EDITOR

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KELLER  ROANOKE  NORTHEAST FORT WORTH EDITION • MAY 2021

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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Pokey O’s Cookies and Ice Cream

Hoots Wings

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3 LongHorn Steakhouse opened March 23 at 9369 I-35W, Fort Worth. The restaurant was initially expected to open in 2020, but the grand opening was delayed. LongHorn Steakhouse was founded in Georgia in 1981 and is known for its steaks as well as other popular dishes, including chicken and seafood. 817-847-7007. www.longhornsteakhouse.com 4 Infrared Mind and Body , which incorporates infrared light energy into sauna and facial treatments, opened April 1 in Alliance Town Center at 3062 Texas Sage Trail, Fort Worth. Single ses- sions, monthly plans and package deals are available. 817-750-4622. www.infraredmindbody.com 5 Pokey O’s Cookies and Ice Cream opened in the Oak Street Food and Brew food hall at 206 N. Oak St., Roanoke, on April 3. The shop, which specializes in gourmet cookies and ice cream sandwich- es, is one of four Pokey O’s storefronts. The shop also provides catering and a food truck for events. 817-917-1628. www.pokeyos.com 6 Cheeky Monkeys , an indoor play- ground and birthday party venue for kids, opened a third Texas location at 9160 I-35W, Fort Worth, in April. The compa- ny provides social and educational play space for children up to 8 years old. 817-750-1005. www.cheekymonkeys.us 7 Alex’s Pizza and Pasta opened at 5800 N. Tarrant Parkway, Fort Worth, in March. The restaurant serves several kinds of pizza, including deep dish, as well as a variety of entrees, appetizers

and desserts. 817-396-7337. www.alexspizzafw.site

ROANOKE

8 LA Fitness opened May 10 at 5901 Golden Triangle Blvd., Fort Worth, in the former site of 24 Hour Fitness. The gym oers personal training as well as group tness classes, an outdoor pool, bas- ketball courts and more. 682-268-5021. www.latness.com COMING SOON 9 Starbucks will open a new drive-thru location at 2451 Westport Parkway, Fort Worth, in fall 2021. The Seattle-based coee company is known for its espresso drinks, such as blended Frappuccinos. The company recently closed a long- time Southlake location but has plans for further Dallas-Fort Worth expansion, including opening another Northeast Fort Worth cafe on North Beach Street in the fall. 800-782-7282. www.starbucks.com 10 Construction is now underway on the new Truck Yard entertainment venue and beer hall in Alliance Town Center at 9550 Sage Meadow Trail, Fort Worth. The venue will cover two acres of indoor and outdoor space, featuring a 38-foot Ferris wheel, stages for live music and a variety of food trucks. Truck Yard plans to open in Fort Worth in fall 2021. Other locations are currently open in Dallas, The Colony and Houston. https://truckyard.com 11 Jonny’s Pizza , a New York-style pizza restaurant, plans to open a second location in May in the new commercial development at 5301 Golden Triangle Blvd., Fort Worth. In addition to build- your-own and signature pizzas, the restaurant serves subs, calzones, strom-

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WESTERN CENTER BLVD.

NOWOPEN 1 A 7-Eleven convenience store and gas station opened at 3001 Alliance Gateway Freeway, Fort Worth, on April 22. 7-Elev- en oers self-serve coee, snacks, hot food and Slurpee drinks. 682-328-9314. www.7-eleven.com 820

2 Papo Joe Grilling Supplies opened at 3529 Heritage Trace Parkway, Ste. 133, Fort Worth, on April 23. The store sells sauces, seasonings, grills and other grilling necessities online and at its three storefronts in Fort Worth, Hutto and Azle, the original location. 817-694-6354. www.papojoe.com

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

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FlannelJax’s locations are also open or coming soon in Michigan, Minnesota, Washington and Wisconsin. Roanoke is the rst Texas location.

COURTESY FLANNELJAX’S

bolis and desserts. The original Jonny’s Pizza is in Aubrey. 214-305-5040. www.jonnyspizzany.com 12 Supercuts , the nationwide hair salon chain, plans to open in June or July at the commercial development at 5301 Golden Triangle Blvd., Fort Worth. Supercuts salons oer cuts, coloring, waxing and more. 888-456-2887. www.supercuts.com 13 Hoots Wings , a franchise spun o of the Hooters company, will open in late summer at 5301 Golden Triangle Blvd., Fort Worth. Hoots Wings restaurants are a fast-casual alternative to Hooters’ restaurants and sports bars. The menu focuses on chicken wings and sandwich- es, and the restaurants do not provide table service. Owners Cary and Jackie Albert of Albert Enterprises plan to open 60 Hoots Wings locations in Austin and the Dallas-Fort Worth area over the next six years. www.hootswings.com FEATURED IMPACT NOWOPEN FlannelJax’s, a lumberjack sports destination, opened May 13 at 1212 US 377, Ste. 103, Roanoke. At FlannelJax’s, guests can try their hand at Thump the Stump, crosscut sawing or a variety of other ax- throwing games. Thump the Stump is a game in which players compete to see who can drive a nail into a log with the fewest hits, while crosscut sawing lets players work together to saw through a log. Guests are guided through the ax- throwing experience by a lumberjack coach who helps ensure safety and tailors games to dierent skill levels and the number of guests. Franchise owners Cyndy Brown and Ryan Fuller said that the business is designed to accommodate large groups for

FULL SERVICE PLUMBING

corporate events and parties as well as smaller, more casual groups. “We’ve been in corporate America for a long time, and we’re experienced with facilitating corporate events,” Fuller said. “We thought it would be a great opportunity to bring the brand down here and oer that premiere experience for businesses in the area.” 682-200-3130. www.anneljaxs.com

N E 20 Y E A R S R

Water Heaters • Slab Leaks Remodels • Yard Leaks Sewer Stoppage • Hose Bibs Outdoor Faucets (817) 431-8929 WWW.LEAKGEEKS.COM

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14 Goody Goody Liquor is coming to 730 South Main St. in Bear Creek Plaza, Keller. It will be the city’s second liquor store, following Spec’s Wines, Spirits & Finer Foods. Goody Goody Liquor is a family-owned liquor store chain founded in Dallas in 1964. Keller City Council ap- proved a specic use permit for the store May 4. www.goodygoody.com 15 Anderson Distillery and Grill plans to open at 400 S. Oak St., Roanoke, in the fall. The business will make and sell a variety of spirits. www.andersondistillery.com NEWOWNERSHIP 16 Meadowview Place Residential Care Home , at 2000 Meadowview Drive, Keller, was purchased by Lewisville-based Liberty Senior Residential Care Homes in February. The facility oers assisted living services for seniors. 817-337-5496. www.meadowviewplace.com

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KELLER  ROANOKE  NORTHEAST FORT WORTH EDITION • MAY 2021

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES Keller Parkway improvements nowunderway

COMPILED BY KIRA LOVELL & SANDRA SADEK

ONGOING PROJECTS

TxDOT will be adjusting turn lanes on Rufe Snow Drive and Keller Smitheld Road throughout summer 2021. CHANGING LANES

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The Texas Department of Transpor- tation began upgrades on two Keller Parkway intersections. The project involves repainting to create new turn lanes and adjusting medians, crosswalks and curbs where needed. Southbound and northbound lanes on Rufe Snow Drive will be adjusted, which will give the intersection two left turn lanes, one right turn lane and one center lane. Northbound lanes on Keller-Smitheld Road will be adjusted in the same way. South- bound lanes will be split into three lanes: one left turn lane, one right turn lane and one center lane. Drivers should expect intermittent lane closures, according to the city of Keller. Timeline: spring-fall 2021 Cost: $740,000 Funding source: TxDOT

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ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF MAY 10, 2021. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT KRNNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM. Ramp closures continue on I-35W Construction along I-35W continues with more ramp closures. According to Hillwood, a commercial developer, the on-ramp to southbound I-35W from Westport Parkway will close in mid-May through early 2023. Trac will be redirected to the next entrance at SH 170. The previous entrance at Alliance Boulevard will also be open. This is part of TxDOT’s expansion for the I-35W corridor to help alleviate trac congestion. Timeline: mid-May to early 2023 Cost: $1.6 billion (for the whole project) Funding source: public and private sources

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SOURCE: CITY OF KELLERCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY& COUNTY

COMPILED BY KIRA LOVELL & SANDRA SADEK

News from Keller, Roanoke, Fort Worth, Tarrant County & Northwest ISD

HIGHLIGHTS NORTHWEST ISD Northwest ISD will no longer require masks on campuses starting at the beginning of summer school June 7, following recommendations from the district’s COVID-19 Task Force. Campuses will be open to visitors, and facilities will be available to rent after June 7. The NISD board of trustees voted to amend the district’s COVID-19 health and safety protocols at its May 10 meeting. KELLER City Council gave Matrix Consulting Group approval on May 4 to study the feasibility of consolidating the fire departments for Keller and Westlake. Matrix Consulting Group will analyze each department’s operations, staffing, station locations and more. Its report will also present options and financial considerations. TARRANT COUNTY Commis- sioners approved a contract May 4 with consulting firm Freese and Nichols to help a committee rank transportation projects for a $400 million bond election in November. The rankings are expected to be done by August. Fort Worth City Council Meets at 7 p.m. three times each month on Tuesdays. www.fortworthtexas.gov Keller City Council Meets at 7 p.m. the first and third Tuesdays of each month. Meets at 7 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month. www.roanoketexas.com Keller ISD Meets monthly; dates, times and locations may vary. www.kellerisd.net Northwest ISD Meets monthly at 6:30 p.m.; dates may vary. www.nisdtx.org www.cityofkeller.com Roanoke City Council MEETINGSWE COVER

Two FortWorth races headed to runoffelection

FORTWORTH Two city races—one for mayor and one for council mem- ber of District 7—will be heading to a runoff election June 5 after none of the candidates secured at least 50% of the votes. Deborah Peoples and Mattie Parker received the most votes out of the 10 candidates originally on the ballot running for mayor. Peoples served as the Tarrant County Democratic Party chair and worked as a vice-president at AT&T. Parker is the former chief of staff for former Fort Worth Mayor Betsy Price. She is also the founding CEO of Fort Worth Cradle to Career and the Tar- rant To & Through (T3) Partnership. Mayor Betsy Price, who has served

since 2011, decided not to run again. Another runoff is set for the Fort Worth District 7 seat, previously held by Dennis Shingleton, who did not seek another term. Zeb Pent and Leonard Firestone were the top two vote-getters in the 10-way race for the council seat. Pent is an entrepreneur while Fire- stone is co-founder of Firestone & Robertson Distilling Co. and member of the Mayor’s Task Force for COVID- 19 Recovery. Early voting runs May 24-30 and June 1. Visit www.tarrantcounty.com/ en/elections.html for details. Q&As for the candidates in both Fort Worth races are available online at communityimpact.com Local election results Tarrant and Denton counties report the following candidates were elected to city council and school board seats on May 1:

ON THE FORT WORTH BALLOT Two races will be decided in a June 5 runoff election. MAYOR

C I TY COUNC I L DI STR I CT 7 Deborah Peoples Mattie Parker

Zeb Pent

Leonard Firestone

3 of 4NISDbond propositions pass NORTHWEST ISD Voters rejected a proposition on the May 1 ballot to restore the 70-year-old Texan Stadium but approved the other three bond measures totaling $737.5 million. Assistant Superintendent for Facilities TimMcClure said that the district will continue to monitor the aging stadium for safety concerns, and the project will be considered for the next bond election. Renovations would have replaced bleachers and fencing, resurfaced the track and made other safety improvements. McClure said that

WHAT VOTERS SAID

PROP A: $712.4 MILLION for growth, renovations and other capital improvements PROP B: $8.2 MILLION for stadium refurbishment PROP C: $5.7 MILLION for school campus athletic facilities PROP D: $19.4 MILLION for technology replacements

Fort Worth City Council District 4: Cary Moon* Keller City Council Place 1: Shannon Dubberly Place 2: Sean Hicks* Keller ISD board of trustees Place 6: Charles Randklev Place 7: Ruthie Keys* Northwest ISD board of trustees

*incumbent

if the facility becomes a safety concern, the district may have to limit use. Texan Stadium currently hosts track and field competitions and middle school sports events. The measure would have also replaced stadium lights with energy- and cost-saving LED lights, according to the district.

Place 2: Mark Schluter* Roanoke City Council Mayor: Carl E. “Scooter” Gierisch Jr.* Ward 1: Hogan Page Ward 2: Bryan Moyers Ward 3 (unexpired term): David Brundage Ward 3: David Thompson*

R ODNEY E I LAND R EALTOR . COM

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KELLER - ROANOKE - NORTHEAST FORT WORTH EDITION • MAY 2021

BUSINESS

HEB expands North Texas presence with land purchase inAlliance area

BY SANDRA SADEK

we continue to look for the best real estate opportunities to serve all communities in the metroplex.” Cary Moon, Fort Worth District 4 City Council member, who announced the purchase on his campaign’s Facebook page, said this is “a big win for the area.” “The far north area of Fort Worth continues to see tremendous growth,” he said. “The school districts are good, the infrastruc- ture is getting built, jobs are close by, and there are plenty of retail options. Expect many more retail and entertainment options to become available to the far north of Fort Worth.” In late March, HEB announced two stores will be opening in Frisco and Plano by fall 2022. According to Moon, deed restric- tions require HEB to build within ve years of purchasing the land.

Texas-based grocery store chain HEB has purchased land from Hill- wood, a property developer, at the northwest corner of Heritage Trace Parkway and North Riverside Drive in the Alliance area of Fort Worth, an HEB spokesperson conrmed on April 22. The property is located near the Alliance Town Center. The land sale was nalized Feb. 4. No plans or timeline for a possible grocery store at that site have been announced. However, according to Mabrie Jackson, director of public aairs for HEB’s Central Market, the company often purchases land in anticipation of future needs. “The [Dallas-Fort Worth] metro- plex is an important market for us,” she said. “Our desire is to serve as many new DFW shoppers as we can in the future, and, as in prior years,

HEB adds to its presence in North Texas with recently purchased land in the Alliance area of Fort Worth. (Community Impact Newspaper le photo)

PLANNING FOR THE FUTURE Grocer H-E-B has purchased land in north Fort Worth as a possible store site in the future. The company that originated in Kerrville has slowly moved into the Dallas-Fort Worth area with its Central Market brand. There are currently two Central Market locations in Tarrant County. POTENTIAL LOCATION 1 Land purchased: February 2021 EXISTING LOCATIONS 2 Fort Worth Central Market: Opened 2001 3 Southlake Central Market: Opened 2006

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SOURCE: HEBCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

FIRST LOOK

Metroport Chamber of Commerce unveils newoce space inRoanoke

BY SANDRA SADEK

“I DOBELIEVE THATWE NEED TOBE ABLE TO PROVIDE RESOURCES FOR PEOPLE THAT WANT TO START A

The Metroport Chamber of Commerce unveiled its new 8,400-square-foot oce building May 6 in Roanoke. The chamber, which represents the communities of Argyle, Haslet, Jus- tin, Northlake, Roanoke, Trophy Club and Westlake, now oers coworking space, oce lease space and confer- ence rooms to chamber members. Chamber sta oces are also housed in the same building. “I do believe that we need to be able to provide resources for people that want to start a business,” said Sally Aldridge, president of the Metroport Chamber of Commerce. Available space includes two open coworking spaces, seven fully furnished oces available for lease and three conference rooms. According to a chamber press release, the new space will allow chamber

BUSINESS.” SALLY ALDRIDGE, PRESIDENT OF THE METROPORT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

There are two open workspaces available with a day pass. (Sandra Sadek/Community Impact Newspaper)

WHO IS REPRESENTED? The Metroport Chamber of Commerce represents seven communities.

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• Argyle • Haslet • Justin

• Northlake • Roanoke

• Trophy Club • Westlake

LITSEY

members to benet from enhanced organic networking as well as give them access to chamber programs, work- shops and social events. The coworking spaces are $50 for a day pass or $150 per month. Small oces are $650 a month. Conference rooms start at $25 an hour for smaller ones and $250 per half-day for the larger boardroom.

W. BYRON NELSON BLVD.

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KELLER  ROANOKE  NORTHEAST FORT WORTH EDITION • MAY 2021

DIVERSE SELECTION Roanoke Trading Co. oers a variety of merchandise, from jewelry to home decor to baby clothes.

OUR STORE HAS ONEOFAKIND FINDS. WEWORKREALLYHARD NOT TOHAVEWHAT EVERYONE ELSE DOES. LAURA HANLEY, COOWNER OF ROANOKE TRADING CO.

Men’s: trucker hats

$35

$42

Patio: coordinate signs that can be customized for any city

Jewelry: Katie B earrings

$24

BUSINESS FEATURE

Roanoke residents Chase and Laura Hanley own Roanoke Trading Co. (Photos by Karen Chaney/Community Impact Newspaper)

Home decor: hand-carved wooden candle holders

Roanoke Trading Co. ‘You shop here for the people who are hard to shop for,’ co-owner says

$48

Baby/kids: organic bamboo pajamas

W hen Laura Hanley started working at Roanoke Trading Co. almost six years ago, she said she fell in love with everything about it. As time passed, Hanley took on more responsibility. She and the previous owner, Kristin Brittan, started talking about the future. And when Brittan decided to step back, Hanley and her husband, Chase, purchased Roanoke Trading Co. in August 2020. Hanley said the business started out selling mostly clothing. Over time, she said she started displaying more home interior items. The sale of those items quickly bypassed the BY KAREN CHANEY

amount of clothing sold. The store is now geared to reect the demand for decor items, she said. The store is subtly divided into categories—patio, men’s, jewelry, home interiors, kitchen and baby/ kids—but it is not unusual for the categories to blend into one another. At RTC, creativity is encouraged. A pale blue 1970s van serves as a display case for baby items while a rustic farm table boasts a menagerie of home interior pieces. “Our store has one-of-a-kind nds. We work really hard not to have what everyone else does,” Hanley said. “We want a diverse selection, yet cohesive. I like to think of it as you shop here for the

people who are hard to shop for.” Chase explained that due to the pandemic, they added a new facet they had not considered in the past. “We now have an internet pres- ence, which was a direct result of having to pivot and change gears,” he said. “As a nonessential business, we couldn’t let people in.” This added revenue stream will continue since it has allowed them to increase their reach. Chase said it is great to send packages to places such as Virginia or New Hampshire. Hanley said she is very particular when deciding which items to buy. “I don’t get online and scroll,” Laura said. “I want people to have quality things frommy store.”

$24

Roanoke Trading Co. 115 N. Oak St., Roanoke 682-237-7896 www.roanoketradingcompany.com Hours: Mon.-Fri. 11 a.m.-6 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.-6 p.m., closed Sun.

377

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10

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

DINING FEATURE

BY STEPHEN HUNT

THREE THINGS TO TRY

The Ham&Cheese Empanada ($3.49) includes ham, fresh mozzarella, parmesan, ricotta and oregano.

The Banutella ($2.99) empanada combines banana and Nutella served up in a pastry.

Andrea Cacho-Gigante (left) and her daughter Rebeca Gigante (right) help run the family business Del Campo Empanadas in Fort Worth. (Photos by Stephen Hunt/Community Impact Newspaper) Del Campo Empanadas Family celebrates shop’s rst anniversary in Fort Worth On May 20, Del Campo Empana-

She considers working alongside her husband, three children—Lau, Rebeca and Sebastian—and employ- ees, who are also considered part of the family, to be a huge blessing. “Having my husband and my children with me and my friends, it’s very important,” Andrea said. “My family are big supporters every day, every morning. I am so grateful to my three kids.” Del Campo oers an array of empanadas lled with beef, chicken, shrimp and other meats or vegetables, but the Argentine-style oerings are their most popular. The sweet empanadas also have their share of fans. “The Banutella is something my

mom used to make for us back in the day. Now it’s one of the most popular sweet ones we have,” Rebeca said. “It’s a little pastry with banana and Nutella inside.” In December 2000, the family moved to Fort Worth from Buenos Aires, Argentina. And when the time came to realize their dream of owning their own empanada spot serving the same foods they grew up on back home, opening in their own neighborhood was a no-brainer. “The community is the best. They support us every day, every week, every month,” Andrea said. “The people are so nice and support us. We are blessed.”

Del Campo Empanadas sells Argentine coee ($2.50) served like a cappuccino with plenty of foam.

das’ owners celebrate one year of their Fort Worth shop oering savory and sweet empanadas, coee and imported grocery items from their native Argentina. “It’s been really good,” said Rebeca Gigante, a daughter of co-owners Andrea Cacho-Gigante and her husband, Leo. “We opened in the middle of the pandemic, but it’s gone so smoothly. We’ve been surprised by the outcome and love we’ve received.” Andrea chose the name Del Campo, which means country or rustic in Spanish, to honor her grandmother, who taught her how to cook as a child in Argentina.

Del Campo Empanadas 10724 N. Beach St., Fort Worth 817-562-5888 www.delcampoempanadas.com Hours: Mon.-Sat. 9 a.m.-8 p.m., Sun. 9 a.m.-3 p.m.

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KELLER  ROANOKE  NORTHEAST FORT WORTH EDITION • MAY 2021

D IVIDING COSTS

Burleson: $ 18,899

CONTINUED FROM 1

Haltom City: $ 21,625

really long waiting list coming from other cities’ residents, you might sud- denly have a much shorter waiting list.” Last year about 40% of check- outs at the Keller library were by nonresidents, according to the city. Only 18% of the items that Keller residents checked out came from other libraries, the city stated. MetrOPAC began in 1991, and over the next decade, Benbrook, Burleson, Haltom City, Keller, Richland Hills and Watauga signed contracts with Fort Worth, Fort Worth Public Library Director Manya Shorr said. This is the rst time Fort Worth proposed exten- sive changes to the contract, she said, and the six smaller cities decided not to renew the agreement. MetrOPAC allowed residents of one city to easily borrow materials from the partner cities. The cities also share a records management system man- aged by Fort Worth, and Fort Worth provides trucks and couriers to trans- port materials, Shorr said. According to a report given to Fort Worth City Council on April 6, Fort Worth library branches make up 16 of the 22 libraries in MetrOPAC in 2020,

Number of libraries per city

Benbrook: $ 13,725

SOURCE: CITY OF FORT WORTHCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER Fort Worth proposed changes that would have moved the agreement to a service provider model, similar to the way cities buy water from Fort Worth, and Keller and other libraries chose to end their contracts. In scal year 2019-20, Fort Worth taxpayers shouldered a greater portion of the MetrOPAC expenses, which totaled $862,857 (see chart for breakdown).

Fort Worth: $ 764,015

Keller: $ 21,666

Richland Hills: $ 8,678

Fort Worth is home to of MetrOPAC libraries, but covered 72.7% 88.5% of MetrOPAC’s costs in FY 2019-20.

(16 LIBRARIES )

Watauga: $ 14,249

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

but the city paid 89% of the costs. “It was really important that what- ever contract we move forward with, that it reected the reality of what we were already doing,” Shorr said. Under the agreement, each city held a contract with Fort Worth but not with each other. Shorr said that put administrative pressure on Fort Worth and left other cities with little power to make decisions. The pro- posed changes to the contract would have codied the way MetrOPAC actually operates, she said. “The issue was not the partnership. We loved being partnered with these cities,” she said. “The issue was the contract itself. It was an unsustain- able model that hadn’t been looked at in many years.” Necessary changes Keller Library Services Manager Kelly Holt said Keller acted to ensure the library would have exibility and autonomy in the future. “We’re excited about the possibil- ity of being a little more exible and a little more dynamic and a little more responsive to unique needs of our community,” she said. To make up for the loss of immedi- ate access to other library collections,

Fort Worth and Keller are expanding their collections based on residents’ interests. Holt said for Keller, that means consumer health information and best-selling nonction. Keller and Fort Worth also both have online sys- tems that let patrons request mate- rials for the library to purchase. For those who live outside each city, the libraries will continue to oer library cards for a fee. The Fort Worth library system is also committed to bridging geo- graphic gaps. In August, Fort Worth opened a new library on Golden Tri- angle Boulevard, an area that had been closer to the Keller library than other Fort Worth libraries. According to the City Council report, the number of Fort Worth residents who used the Keller library decreased by 36% between July 2020 and February 2021. Ocials attributed

and networking for the com- mission. Those materials vastly increase the library’s specialty reference topics, from genealogical resources to arts and crafts guides. Fort Worth also oers Tex- Share cards, which residents can request and use in-person at participating libraries across the state, including the Roanoke Public Library. Peters said the state can nego- tiate for cheaper access than individual libraries could, and the cost can vary based on city population. For example, Keller paid $1,742 for TexShare access in scal year 2019-2020, while Fort Worth paid $22,888. Access to those digital databases would have otherwise cost Fort Worth over half a million dollars. “We denitely value part- nership,” Holt said. “Whenever we can partner with other com- munities, we do.”

that decline to residents now using the Golden Triangle library. Shorr said agreements with other cities have become less vital for Fort Worth as the city opens new branches. “I am committed to breaking down barriers to access, and I know that we can continue to serve everyone, even though this particular agreement will no longer be in place,” Shorr said. Valuable partnerships Though MetrOPAC is ending, the Keller and Fort Worth libraries have other ways to give residents access to materials not on the libraries’ shelves. They both participate in the TexShare program by the Texas State Librar- ies and Archives Commission, which grants library patrons access to data- bases that contain more than 16 mil- lion digital items, according to Jennifer Peters, director of library development

“I KNOW THAT WE CAN CONTINUE TO SERVE EVERYONE , EVEN THOUGH THIS PARTICULAR AGREEMENT WILL NO LONGER BE IN PLACE .” MANYA SHORR, FORT WORTH LIBRARY DIRECTOR

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KELLER  ROANOKE  NORTHEAST FORT WORTH EDITION • MAY 2021

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

Fi ll ing a need for �reen space

LITSEY RD.

1 A ll ia ce Park

The creation of Alliance Park will add another 16 acres of green space, and upgrades to North Park will help fulll a need for recreational facilities in the area.

Concrete trail Parking, driveways, and security lighting

Competition soccer eld Multiuse eld (soccer, football, etc.) Multiuse court (basketball, tennis, etc.)

According to the Trust for Public Land, the need for parks in areas of a city outside of a 10-minute walk to a park are based on three demographics: population density, density of children and density of low-income households.

PICNIC PAVILLION

PLAYGROUND AREA

Park need

High

Very high

Moderate

WATER DETENTION BASIN

LITSEY RD.

HENRIETTA CREEK

ROANOKE

114

NORTHEAST FORTWORTH

SOURCES: TRUST FOR PUBLIC LAND, CITY OF FORT WORTH COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

1

35W

$1M land purchase $ 650K planning and design $400K administration $250K contingency $5M construction budget

the park may bring even more ameni- ties. However, he said those plans will depend on whether funding can be secured. “We hope that what we install is what the citizens ask for,” Lyness said. “We like to build things that people are proud of, that they’re happy to have.” Catering a community need With the area’s closest recreational space being North Park, the upcoming Alliance Park will help ll that com- munity need. North Park is currently undergoing renovations to address drainage issues on the soccer elds using funds from the 2018 bond. District 4 City Council Member Cary Moon spearheaded the North Park upgrades and said the low quality of park facilities drove sports leagues to neighboring cities like Keller. North Park and Alliance Park are “giving people a place to live, work and play in open space,” Moon said. “76244 is your most congested, most densely populated ZIP code in DFW, and any open space that we can retain and improve for parkland is a benet to the people that live there,” Moon said. Shawn Eldred, president of the North Fort Worth Alliance Soccer Association, said adding new elds can only help local sports groups. “The more people that we can bring into the area, the more events that we can bring in,” Eldred said.

Total Alliance Park project budget: $ 7.3M

2

KELLER

287

2 North Park

With soccer elds expected to be operational late August 2021, North Park upgrades include:

377

• Upgraded restrooms and concessions • Improved athletic eld lighting

• Improved soccer elds • Additional parking • Universal playground

N

820

where the [sports] programs can be brought back into Fort Worth.” A vision comes alive Alliance Park’s master plan was rst approved in 2017. The park funding includes $1 million for the land pur- chase, $400,000 for administration tasks, $650,000 for planning and design and $250,000 for contingen- cies, which came from the parks and recreation’s dedication fees fund and gas lease capital project fund, said Bryan Lyness, landscape architect for the city’s Parks and Recreation Department. Two $1 million Texas Parks and Wildlife Department Urban Outdoor

Recreation Grants and $3 million from the city of Fort Worth’s 2018 Bond Program were used for construction. “The city of Fort Worth and the parks department are very aware of trying to spend every dime we can on actual built items,” said Lyness. Once nished, it will include three irrigated competition soccer elds and one multiuse eld large for two soccer elds. There will be one mul- tiuse court for sports such as bas- ketball and tennis. It will have one playground area, a picnic pavilion, about ½ mile of concrete trail, park- ing, security lighting, and two water fountains. Lyness said future developments in

CONTINUED FROM 1

underway. Located on the Southwest corner of Cleveland Gibbs and Lit- sey Road, Alliance Park comes at the same time the city is spending over $4 million to renovate North Park, at the corner of North Beach Street and Shiver Road. “The sports facilities that Alliance Park brings are really vital to the northeast because we haven’t had playing elds here,” said Rusty Fuller, president of the homeowner associ- ation North Fort Worth Alliance. “So with the improvement of North Park … and the creation of Alliance Park … we will now have available parks

For more information, visit communityimpact.com .

15

KELLER  ROANOKE  NORTHEAST FORT WORTH EDITION • MAY 2021

REAL ESTATE

Snapshot of the market

COMPILED BY VALERIE WIGGLESWORTH

MARKET DATA FOR APRIL

NUMBER OF HOMES UNDER CONTRACT 2020 2021

HOMES SOLDAVERAGE DAYS ON THEMARKET 76177 76244

76248

76262

$900,000-$999,999

-

-

3/17

15/81

30 50 94 110 35 72 62 79

76177

$800,000-$899,999

-

-

1/1

5/67

76262

114

$700,000-$799,999

-

1/4

6/26

4/109

76177

$600,000-$699,999

-

-

8/3

7/15

76244

35W

170

$500,000-$599,999

1/3

9/3

14/7

13/40

$400,000-$499,999

4/16

13/7

10/6

19/23

377

76248

$300,000-$399,999

24/5

37/6

7/15

12/5

76248

76244

$200,000-$299,999

11/6

28/5

5/3

6/41

76262

$199,999 or less

-

-

-

1/296

N

NUMBER OF NEWLISTINGS 2020

AVERAGE DAYS ON THEMARKET 2020 2021

MEDIAN PRICE OF HOMES SOLD WITHYEAROVERYEARPERCENTAGE CHANGE

2020

2021

2021

76177

76244

76248

76262

Sale price

38 60 128 138 71 95 92 96

46 6 35 6 38 9 47 44

76177

76177

$500,000 $550,000 $600,000

+22.61%

+31.15%

76244

76244

$450,000

+12.92%

$400,000

+12.11%

76248

76248

$350,000

$300,000

76262

76262

$250,000

$0

PERCENT OF ASKING PRICE RECEIVED

MEDIAN SALES PRICE 2020

2020

2021

WITHYEAROVERYEARCHANGE

2021

76177

76244

76248

76262

$289,900 $325,000 $300,000 $338,750 $428,200 $525,000 $394,600 $517,507

+5.9

76177

106%

+6.2

104%

+2.9

+2.3

102%

76244

100%

98%

76248

96%

0%

76262

MARKET DATA PROVIDED BY GREATER FORT WORTH ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS, COURTESY NORTH TEXAS REAL ESTATE INFORMATION SYSTEMSCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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