Chandler Edition - July 2020

CHANDLER EDITION

VOLUME 1, ISSUE 12  JULY 30AUG. 26, 2020

ONLINE AT

Schoolswork to adapt to COVID19 challenges

As Chandler USD prepares for the start of the school year Aug. 5, the district prepared and unveiled its 2020-21 proposed budget.

BY ALEXA D’ANGELO

When schools shuttered in March across Arizona in an attempt to stymie the spread of COVID-19, district ocials had no way of knowing that it would become a monthslong uphill battle they were still ghting ahead of the fall semester. The virus has permeated nearly every facet of Chandler USD between March and July. From the implementation of distance learning to crafting a budget for the 2020-21 school year, district ocials are having to nd new and creative ways to educate students and not break the bank. “Educators and school districts across the state—and across the country—are building the plane as they y it,” said Chris Kotterman, director of governmental relations with the Arizona School Board Association. Chandler USD announced plans July 1 for all students to return to school Aug. 5 in some online format—either the district’s Chandler Online Academy for the students that would remain online for at least one quarter or Google Classroom for students who would start online then return to brick-and-mortar classrooms when schools reopen. The announcement came after an order from the governor delayed the start of in-person classes until at least Aug. 17. Both options have signicant impacts on the district’s proposed 2020-21 budget, Chief Financial Ocer Lana Berry said. The district was given $3.2 million from the CONTINUED ON 14

“There is no one way that is less expensive, in my opinion. [Online learning is] going to take creativity, resources, time and money.” CAMILLE CASTEEL,

IMPACTS

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Chandler Unied School District superintendent

Tax rate

Tax rate

6.4698

6.4224

-0.73%

$355,357,869 Total aggregate school district budget

$378,239,828 Total aggregate school district budget

SWEETIES CANDY

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+6.44%

Average teacher salary

Average teacher salary

$59,575

$62,315

2020 EDI T ION REAL ESTATE

+4.6%

Elementary and secondary school emergency relief from CARES ACT $3.2million

Applying for state reimbursement program

$1 million

SOURCE: CHANDLER USDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

MARKET AT A GLANCE

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2020 EDI T ION REAL ESTATE

SUPPORT LOCAL JOURNALISM

OVERALL CHANGES IN RESIDENTIAL REAL ESTATE MARKET Local real estate experts say that Chandler is low on housing inventory. 405 Active listings across six Chandler ZIP codes JUNE 2020 804 Active listings across six Chandler ZIP codes JUNE 2019 -49.63% PERCENT CHANGE

Chandler sees fewer homes on themarket

BY ALEXA D’ ANGELO

the pandemic, but some experts think diculties could arise in the coming months. “We are seeing tight inventory at all levels,” said Mark Stapp, real estate expert and director of the Master of Real Estate Development program at Arizona State University’s W.P. Carey School of Business. Stapp said buyers looking for homes may be forced to look at the top of or above their price range, while in con- trast people who are facing foreclosure or evictions may not nd lower-priced CONTINUED ON 12

The city of Chandler is seeing record-low housing inventory, which is due primarily to the coronavirus pandemic, according to local residen- tial real estate experts. The Valley—Chandler in particu- lar—was already seeing less than what experts consider a “healthy” level in the number of homes available on the market prior to March when the pandemic and closures began to grip Greater Phoenix and the nation. The market, aside from low inventory, has not faced signicant trouble due to

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THIS ISSUE

CONTENTS IMPACTS

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

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Now Open, Coming Soon &more TRANSPORTATION

MARKET TEAM EDITOR Alexa D’Angelo

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Local road projects CITY& EDUCATION 7 Chandler and local school district news BUSINESS FEATURE 8 Sweeties Candy

FROMAMY: For those of you who are Realtors, have Realtor friends or family, or have bought or sold a house recently, you probably already know that the housing market remains hot here—much like the temperatures on our thermostats these days. Our Real Estate Edition content provides information about the current trends in real estate, even in the midst of the impacts of the COVID-19 virus on the community.

GRAPHIC DESIGNER Damien Hernandez ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Michelle Johnson METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Amy Ellsworth, aellsworth@communityimpact.com MANAGING EDITOR Krista Wadsworth ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Aubrey Galloway CORPORATE LEADERSHIP PUBLISHERS AND FOUNDERS John and Jennifer Garrett EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Warner GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES DIRECTOR Tess Coverman WHOWE ARE John and Jennifer Garrett began Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 in Pugerville, Texas. The company’s mission is to build informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Today we operate across six metropolitan areas, providing hyperlocal, nonpartisan news produced by our full-time journalists in each community we serve. BECOMEA#COMMUNITYPATRON Please join your friends and neighbors in support of Community Impact Newspaper’s legacy of local, reliable reporting by making a contribution. Together, we can continue to ensure citizens stay informed and keep businesses thriving. COMMUNITYIMPACT.COMCIPATRON CONTACT US 610 N. Gilbert Road, Ste. 205, Gilbert, AZ 85234 • 4804824880 PRESS RELEASES chnnews@communityimpact.com SUBSCRIPTIONS communityimpact.com/subscriptions © 2020 Community Impact Newspaper Co. All Rights Reserved. No reproduction of any portion of this issue is allowed without written permission from the publisher.

Amy Ellsworth, PUBLISHER

FROMALEXA: This paper features a story on the start of the school year, which looks very dierent than any rst day of school in years past. We talked to district leaders and school experts about how districts are facing an uphill battle on several levels—between dierent modalities of instructing kids and guring out how to budget for COVID-19 expenses. We hope that you will follow our updates on communityimpact.com and by signing up for our newsletter as COVID-19 updates continue to change parts of our community. Alexa D’Angelo, EDITOR

DINING FEATURE

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West Alley BBQ & Smokehouse

Real EstateEdition REAL ESTATE GUIDE June residential market data INSIDE INFORMATION

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S DOBSON RD.

3050 S Dobson Rd, Chandler, AZ 85248 (SW Corner of Dobson & Queen Creek)

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CHANDLER EDITION • JULY 2020

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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La Ristra NewMexican Kitchen

PHOTOS BY ALEXA D'ANGELOCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

press time. The restaurant will be located at 2081 N. Arizona Ave., Ste. 129. https://hello-vietnam.ordrsliponline.com 5 Medmetrics Pharmacy is expected to open in the spring of 2021 in Chandler. The business has one other location in Chandler and is a compounding phar- macy. The new location will be at 1075 W. Queen Creek Road. 480-883-3800. https://medmetricsrx.com RELOCATIONS 6 Protea Medical Center relocated June 29 to a dierent space in Chandler. The new location is at 1747 W. Frye Road, Ste. 140. The medical center specializ- es in regenerative medicine, men and women’s health, weight loss and more. 480-557-9095. http://protealife.com ANNIVERSARIES 7 Purge, Love and Peace Rage Rooms oers a location in downtown Chandler where people can smash and destroy things to release tension and stress. The establishment celebrated its one-year anniversary this summer. The business is located at 106 S. Oregon St. in Chandler. 480-857-0022. https://purgelovepeaceragerooms.com 8 The Hidden House is celebrating its one-year anniversary this August in downtown Chandler. The restaurant is located in a home built in 1939. The building, now repurposed as a restaurant and bar with a patio area, is located at 159 W. Commonwealth Ave. in Chandler. 480-275-5525. www.hiddenhouseaz.com

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NOWOPEN 1 La Ristra New Mexican Kitchen , a family-owed and operated restaurant, opened in Chandler this summer at the downtown Chandler Overstreet develop- ment. The restaurant specializes in New Mexican cuisine and is located downtown at 140 N. Arizona Ave., Chandler. This marks the second location for the restau- rant, the rst being in Gilbert. 480-590- 0002. http://laristraaz.com

2 Tropical Sno is now open in Chandler. The business, which specializes in shaved ice, ice cream and sodas, opened in late May at 950 E. Pecos Road, Ste. 3, Chandler. Shaved ice avors include ba- nanaberry, candy apple, citrus cooler and more. 480-349-2444. www.tropicalsnochandler.com COMING SOON 3 A new Aldi location is expected to open in Chandler in November. The

location of the discount grocery store will be at 2844 S. Alma School Road. The store has been in the works for months in Chandler. Another store will also open in Gilbert and two others will open in 2020 in the Valley. https://www.aldi.us 4 Hello Vietnam Pho & Roll is coming soon to Chandler. The Vietnamese restau- rant has locations across the Valley, with locations in both the east and west por- tions of the Valley. It was not clear when the business was expected to open as of

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY ALEXA D’ANGELO

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The Hidden House

9 The Parlay Kitchen + Cocktails , a gastropub with a menu oering American food and craft cocktails, is celebrating its one-year anniversary in Chandler this Au- gust. The restaurant is located at 1245 S. Price Road and oers a variety of specials during the week. 480-500-5427. https://theparlayaz.com CLOSINGS 10 McMahon’s Ice Cream announced it would close its doors July 19. The old-fashioned ice cream shop specialized in homemade ice cream and created a family-friendly, fun environment. The business had been struggling after the coronavirus pandemic forced closures and restrictions in the middle of the ice cream shop’s peak season. It was located at 960 E. Warner Road, Ste. 4. 480-292-7255. www.mcmahonsicecream.com

It is not yet known when the Amazon facility will open in Chandler. (Alexa D’Angelo/Community Impact Newspaper)

COMING SOON AMAZON DELIVERY STATION Amazon will open a new delivery station in Chandler. Crews are working on construction at the delivery station, located at 2550 N. Nevada St. “We are excited to increase our investment in Chandler with a new delivery station to provide fast and ecient delivery for customers, and provide hundreds of job opportunities for the talented local workforce,” said

an opening date or the exact number of employees the delivery station would have.

Lisa Guinn, a spokesperson for Amazon, in an email. According to the city of Chandler, a building permit for the canopy was issued June 5, and a building permit for the interior work on the existing building was issued June 10. A permit for site work was issued June 19, according to the city. The building was an existing structure, but it appears as though Amazon is making modications. The city’s economic development team could not yet provide information on

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CHANDLER EDITION • JULY 2020

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES

BY ALEXA D'ANGELO

E. QUEEN CREEK RD.

License platesmay now look dierent Most specialty plates help fund charitable causes in Arizona. In addition to making it possible for more causes to be represented,

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GUADALUPE RD.

The Arizona Department of Trans- portation Motor Vehicle Division now issues plates with random sequenc- ing, increasing the number and type of plates that can be distributed. “We’ve had some questions about these new plates because it is a big change, and it looks so dierent fromwhat people are used to,” MVD Stakeholder Relations Manager Jennifer Bowser Richards said in a news release. “One of the benets of the new computer system now used by the MVD is that we have a lot more capac- ity to manage how plates are issued,” she said. “That’s a big deal when we have so many dierent types of plates for trailers, commercial vehicles, motorcycles, the standard plate and all the specialty plates we oer. Random sequencing means we have a virtually unlimited supply of letters and numbers to put on plates, and one result will be the ability to add more specialty plates when authorized by the Legislature.”

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random sequencing will also allow for more plates to be sized for motorcycle usage, which was a limitation of the old MVD computer system. This change also aects the tempo- rary plate issued when someone buys a vehicle. The temporary document will display the sequence contained on the permanent plate being sent to the customer. Plates are no longer available at MVD or Authorized Third Party oces; they are sent to the customer by mail.

Val Vista Drive widening The town of Gilbert is widening Val Vista Drive from Appleby Road to Riggs Road. The result will be a six- lane section from Ocotillo Road to Merlot Street with a raised landscaped median, bike lanes, sidewalks and street lights. Trac signals will be installed at Appleby, Ocotillo and Chandler Heights roads. Status: Construction has started at Appleby, and crews will work their way south. Hard closures on Val Vista from Appleby to Chandler Heights are nearly nished, but local trac and businesses within the closure will be accessible in the meantime. Timeline: March 2020-July 2021 Cost: $25.96 million Funding sources: bonds, town funds and Maricopa Association of Govern- ments funds

Loop 101 widening The Arizona Department of

Transportation is widening Loop 101 by adding a travel lane in each direction on a stretch of the freeway through Chandler, Mesa and Tempe. Status: Crews were working in mid- July on extending the diamond grinding of the freeway further north between US 60 and Rio Salado Parkway. Diamond grinding is used to preserve and rehabilitate the concrete pavement surface of a highway. Timeline: May 2019-summer 2020 Cost: $76 million Funding sources: half-cent sales tax, federal highway funds

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UP TO DATE AS OF JULY 20. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT CHNNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY&EDUCATION News from Chandler & Chandler USD Data: Chandler unemployment rate up fromMay to June; 85225 ZIP code sees highest number of claims

BY ALEXA D'ANGELO

and increasing the city’s technology infrastructure. Just under 34% of the total relief allocation will be placed in the city’s reserve fund—about $10.13 million. “I think this is a good rst step,” Mayor Kevin Hartke said. “It would be helpful for us to move expedi- tiously to get these dollars out in the community.” The details on who is eligible for funding and how to apply is available at www.chandleraz.gov. session July 16, the Chandler City Council discussed the potential of a bond election in November 2021. The council was expected to appoint a bond exploratory committee in August. No ocial decision was made on a bond. CHANDLER The Chandler City Council approved an agreement with Stanley Consultants Inc., for design services to install a new trac signal at Warner Road and Nevada Street for $78,247.86. Chandler City Council Aug. 13, 27, 6 p.m. 88 E. Chicago St., Chandler 480-782-2181 • www.chandleraz.gov Chandler USD Board Aug. 12, 7 p.m. 1525 W. Frye Road, Chandler 480-812-7000 • www.cusd80.gov MEETINGSWE COVER CITY HIGHLIGHTS CHANDLER City Council approved a rst-mile, last-mile pilot program aimed at getting residents to and from bus stops easier and cheaper through a partnership with Lyft. The one-year pilot program is set to begin in September. Residents will get 50% o the cost of Lyft trips to and from bus stops in the service area. The program is expected to cost the city less than $50,000, according to city documents. CHANDLER USD Two Chandler USD board members, David Evans and Lindsay Love, signed on to a letter the week of July 13 with other school board members across the state asking the governor to push the start of in-person school to after the end of the rst quarter. CHANDLER During a work FORRESULTS FROM AUG. 4 PRIMARY ANDCITY ELECTIONS, GOTO COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CHANDLER The city of Chandler saw its highest unemployment rate in history in April, but May data from the Arizona Commerce Authority showed the rate trending down. In June, the city saw yet another increase from the May unemploy- ment rate. The city’s unemployment rate as of June was 8.7%. May was 7.5%, down from 11.9% in April—but still a stark contrast to the 3.5% unemployment rate the city saw in January. The change from January to June represents a 148.57% increase in unemployment. The jump fromMarch to April was also the largest jump in the 30 years of data the authority has published. The economy was thrown into havoc amid the closures and restric- tions in place for much of March, April and the rst half of May due to the coronavirus pandemic. As

closures persisted, unemployment claims soared not only in Arizona but nationally as well. April was the rst full month of business closures in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic, with Gov. Doug Ducey’s “Stay home, stay healthy, stay connected” order in place from 5 p.m. March 31 to May 15. Chandler’s labor force as of June was 151,118. Of that number, 13,141 people were unemployed, according to the data. In April, the number of unemployed people in Chandler was 18,247. Chandler’s latest unemployment rate is below the overall Arizona unemployment rate, at 10.3%, as of June, according to the data, with 359,509 Arizonans unemployed. The statewide unemployment gure is down from April, when it reached 13.1% and saw more than 464,122 Arizonans out of work.

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Prior to April, Chandler last saw its highest unemployment rate in January 2010, with a rate of 8.2% and 10,985 unemployed. Chandler’s 85225 ZIP code saw the highest unemployment claims of any other city ZIP code between March 14-June 11, according to the Maricopa Association of Governments, with 7,060 claims.

4 candidates qualify to run for 3 open Chandler USDboard seats

CHANDLER Four candidates qualied to run for three available seats on the Chandler USD governing board in the November election. David Evans, Barb Mozdzen, Jason Olive and Joel Wirth submitted state- ments of interest and the number of signatures required to appear on the ballot. Evans and Mozdzen are incum- bents, and Karen McGee, whose seat on the board will also be on the November ballot, told Community

Impact Newspaper she felt there were enough candidates that she did not want to run again after serving a decade on the board. “It has been a very rewarding experience. I have been honored to serve the members of our great school district, and hope that in some small way my contributions have helped to better the lives and educational expe- rience of our community members, students and sta,” McGee said. “For personal and family reasons I have

chosen not to run in this election cycle. I am pleased to see there are some qualied candidates on the ballot for the CUSD Governing Board, and I’m sure if elected they will carry on the mission of our outstanding school district.”

NOV. 3 GENERAL, LOCAL ELECTION

Chandler City Council allocates $29.98million in coronavirus relief to the community

unemployment data. The city is also looking to allocate $1.65 million to community services, including community outreach, food and basic needs, homeless and housing support, senior and special populations, youth and after-school services, and personal protective equipment and cleaning supplies. The city’s plan also proposes a $7 million investment in increasing mobility at the city: replacing desktop computers with laptops

CHANDLER Local businesses and nonprots can receive grant funding from the city of Chandler after the city allocated $29.98 million in coronavirus relief. Chandler City Council approved the allocation July 16. In the city’s plan, $9.5 million of the city’s funding would go toward

business grants. The grants would be capped at $10,000 per business or $1,300 per full-time employee. The city would be able to support around 900 businesses if each received the maximum amount possible in fund- ing. The programwould be limited to businesses in industries most impacted by the coronavirus based on

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CHANDLER EDITION • JULY 2020

BUSINESS FEATURE

BY ALEXA D’ANGELO

“GOD, EXCELLENT STAFF, EXCELLENT CUSTOMERS, EXCELLENTMANUFACTURERS AND THE QUALITY PRODUCTS ALLWRAPPEDUP INA 13,000SQUAREFOOT, FUN ATMOSPHERE AREWHAT KEEPUS INBUSINESS.” MIKE MANZO, MANAGER OF SWEETIES CANDY

Candy, soda and toys can be found on Sweeties’ shelves.

WHATMAKES SWEETIES CANDY ORIGINAL?

Family-owned and -operated Sweeties has been in Chandler for 10 years and has had a chance to expand and create a unique experience for customers.

Sweeties Candy has been in Chandler for a decade, steadily expanding into the store it is today. (Photos Courtesy Sweeties Candy)

4,000+ candy items

190 candy manufacturers

Sweeties Candy Family-owned shop brings generations together with candy M ike Manzo started working at Sweeties Sweeties location in Chandler, they had outgrown their space and later moved into what is now its current location. “We have plenty of regulars who come to the

300+ glass bottle, cane sugar style sodas

300+ items in

Candy back in Cleveland as a kid. The shop was family-owned, and Tom, who ran the old-fashioned candy emporium, would go on to become Manzo’s father-in-law. Manzo married Tom’s daughter, and the couple decided after a rough Ohio winter to move to Arizona. They started Sweeties Candy in Chandler. Now, years after Manzo got his start stocking shelves at Sweeties in Ohio, his two kids come into work with their dad at Sweeties in Chandler. “I absolutely have sugar running through my veins all day,” said Manzo, Sweeties manager. “Candy—there’s jut something special about it. We sell happiness, one piece at a time. Everyone’s got a lot going on, but people walk through the door, and you have grandma and grandpa and mom and dad and kids, and there’s candy from all generations. Time just stops, and everything goes away, and everyone is happy.” The business took root in Chandler in July 2010, Manzo said. Within the rst fewmonths at the rst

Sweeties' Toytopia

Philemon Spencer, MD & Robin Spencer, FNP-C Manzo said even as the business has fallen on hard times in the past, during the COVID-19 pandemic and subsequent business closures, he has remained steadfast in his faith and in the business. “Coming to Sweeties is worth a trip from any- where,” Manzo said. “We get people coming in from all across the Valley.” store,” Manzo said. “We have a very loyal customer base, and we couldn’t do it without them and be as successful as we have been.” Manzo said the entire operation is a team eort. Even his kids pitch in with the family business, which Manzo said would be impossible without the help and support of his wife and family. “They come in and help out quite a few times. They come in and stock the shelves,” Manzo said. “It’s really cool to see them running around like— well, like kids in a candy store.”

Sweeties Candy 1986 N. Alma School Road, Chandler 480-899-4245 www.sweetiescandyaz.com Hours: Tue.-Sat. 9 a.m.-4 p.m., closed Sun.-Mon.

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610 N ALMA SCHOOL RD, STE 48 WWW.PINONFAMILY.COM CALL 480.248.2440

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

DINING FEATURE

BY ALEXA D’ANGELO

JimDandy is the resident West Alley BBQ pit boss, bringing the smoked meats to life.

TENNESSEESTYLE BARBECUE Tennessee-style barbecue was started in Memphis and features vinegar-based sauces, according to the West Alley BBQ website. All of the restaurant’s barbecue is cooked outside, in a pit, on Kingsford charcoal. Jim “J.D.” Dandy is the company’s pit boss, with decades of experience. He was the one who cooked almost 1,000 pounds of meat for customers during the BBQ & Beer festival in Chandler.

West Alley BBQ got its start in Jackson, Tennessee. But the Brantley family decided to branch out to Chandler a few years ago. (Photos courtesy West Alley BBQ)

West Alley BBQ&Smokehouse Restaurant blends Southern tastes and hospitality C hristian Brantley said his family started West Alley BBQ & Smokehouse in Chandler on a whim.

The family-owned business got its start in Brant- ley’s home state of Tennessee about eight years ago with pit boss Jim Dandy, who has been barbecuing for more than 40 years. The smoked meats are at the heart of the restaurant’s menu, Brantley said, but the Southern charm and hospitality is at the heart of the business. “We pride ourselves on customer service,” Brantley said. “We love that we have great food, but what we love more is that we always give the best customer service possible, and Southern hospitality is what we are going for. We are a family-owned business, and we want it to feel that way.” Brantley said he has gone from not knowing where on a map Chandler was to loving the city and its residents. “I went from, ‘I don’t know what Chandler is; let’s take a visit,’ to loving it,” Brantley said. “Ever since then, the community has been amazing; the city has supported us so much.”

The family had come to Arizona from Jackson, Tennessee—where they began the rst West Alley BBQ location—to visit a family member when they heard about Chandler’s annual BBQ and Beer Festival. Brantley said they decided to enter and stayed up for several days preparing. “We were grilling out of my brother’s house,” Brantley said. “But we all thoroughly enjoyed it; it was such a good time even though no one had any sleep. We had an amazing day out there.” They then got in touch with a landlord in down- town Chandler, and the rest is history. The restau- rant opened just over two years ago in downtown Chandler. “It’s crazy how just a little bit of work and coming out here for a vacation turned into where we are now,” he said.

West Alley BBQ 111 W. Boston St., Chandler 480-248-8819 www.westalleybbq.com Hours: Mon.-Sun. 11 a.m.-9 p.m.

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Committed to making Chandler the best place to CALL HOME

COMING SOON

WILL GO FAST ($335,000)

SOLD

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9

CHANDLER EDITION • JULY 2020

2020 EDI T ION REAL ESTATE

2020 REAL ESTATE EDITION

COMPILED BY ALEXA D'ANGELO

Home prices have increased across all Chandler ZIP codes in the last year while the number of homes sold has decreased in some ZIP codes. Homes in Chandler have an average sales price that is comparable to that of homes in neighboring Gilbert. 201920 CHANDLER REAL ESTATE MARKET AT A GLANCE

DAYS ON THEMARKET AVERAGE July 2018-June 2019

July 2019-June 2020

101

32

29

27.5

27

85224

85225

85224

+7.41%

-14.06%

85226

85225

202

46.5

46

85286

35.5

28.25

85226

85248

10

-20.42%

-1.08%

85248

85249

43.25

42

39.5

31.5

85249

85286

N

SOURCE: WESERVCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

-2.89%

-20.25%

HOMES SOLD NUMBER OF

July 2018-June 2019

July 2019-June 2020

HOME SALES PRICE AVERAGE

704

1,104

July 2018-June 2019

July 2019-June 2020

+17.76%

-0.72%

829

1,096

$277,750 +10.98% $308,250 $299,750 +15.43% $346,000 $431,417 +7.05% $461,833

$264,333 +10.62% $292,416 $387,833 +6.68% $413,750 $395,833 +6.42% $421,250

704

928

-14.06%

+10.45%

605

1,025

1,044

749

-5.56%

+7.08%

986

802

TOTAL HOMES SOLD IN CHANDLER

July 2018-June 2019

July 2019-June 2020

15%

15%

14%

13%

Studying the stats

homes sold 5,233

homes sold 5,343

21%

18%

20%

20%

34.04 the average number of days on the market in Chandler between July 2019 and June 2020

890.5 the average number of homes sold in Chandler between July 2019 and June 2020

19%

11%

19%

13%

10

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

REAL ESTATE 2020EDITION

INSIDE INFORMATION

COMPILED BY ANNA LOTZ & ALEXA D'ANGELO

When interest rates are low, homeowners may look to save money by renancing, which means getting a new mortgage with a better term or interest rate to lower payments. Mortgage rates have steadily declined since November 2018, according to weekly data from Freddie Mac, also known as the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. Matt Frankel, a certied nancial planner and mortgage analyst at The Ascent by Motley Fool—a general personal nance advice resource—shared advantages and disadvantages of the renancing process. REFINANCING U N D E R S T A N D I N G WHAT TOCONSIDER 1. 2. Is the current market rate at least 1% lower than your existing mortgage rate? Are you planning to stay in the same home for at least 5 more years ?

HOWTO START

• Always consult multiple lenders to nd the best mortgage rate. Start with a current lender. • Multiple inquiries from mortgage lenders aect an individual’s credit score no more than a single inquiry , Frankel said.

Renancing isn’t free. … It becomes amath problemof whether the savings you’re going to get fromyourmortgage payment are going to bemore than you’re paying.

MATT FRANKEL, MORTGAGE ANALYST AT THE ASCENT

TRACKINGMORTGAGE RATES

Pros • Can lower monthly mortgage payments • May eliminate private mortgage insurance Cons • Can be costly, as homeowners must pay lender and closing fees again • Paperwork THE INS ANDOUTS OF REFINANCING

Although the U.S. weekly average rate for a 30-year mortgage is trending downward, mortgage rates vary by credit score, Frankel said.

0 3.1% 3.2% 3.3% 3.4% 3.5% 3.6% 3.7% 3.8% 3.9% 4.0%

3.82%

3.73%

3.56%

3.13%

ANOTHER OPTION

3.36%

A homeowner can also choose cash-out renancing, meaning an existing mortgage is replaced with a new home loan totaling more than the remaining debt. The dierence is paid in cash and can be helpful in paying other debts, as a mortgage is often the lowest-interest loan available, Frankel said.

March 12, 2020 Dec. 12, 2019

June 25, 2020

June 13, 2019 Sept. 12, 2019

SOURCE: FREDDIE MACCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

REAL ESTATE

Data provided by Daniel Ochoa West and SouthEast REALTORS® of the Valley (WeSERV) 1733 E. Northrop Blvd., Chandler • 480-833-7510 • https://weserv.realtor

Featured neighborhood

FULTON RANCH CHANDLER, 85248 Chandler’s Fulton Ranch is located in the 85248 ZIP code.

MARKET DATA FOR JUNE 2020

101

NUMBER OF ACTIVE LISTINGS 2019

NUMBER OF HOMES UNDER CONTRACT 2019 2020

85225

85224

85226

2020

Median home value $587,750 Homes on the market* 2 Homes under contract* 8 Median annual property taxes $4,800 Median price per square foot $206 Average days on the market* 69 *AS OF 072020

70 26 119 74

57 65 96 205 53 59 66 106 79 128 78 80

85224

85224

202

85286

85225

85225

10

81

45

85226

85226

85248 85249

193 107 205 86 136 67

85248

85248

85249

85249

N

85286

85286

Build-out year: 2018 Builders include: Fulton Square footage: 1,246–7,766 Home values: $429,500 - $2,821,500 HOA dues (estimated): $1,860 - $7,008 annually Schools: Ira J Fulton Elementary, Bogle Middle School, Hamilton High School Annual property taxes (per $100 valuation): $11.50 Amenities: Proximity to San Tan Mountain Regional Park and South Mountain Park and Preserve

MEDIAN PRICE OF HOMES SOLD WITHYEAROVERYEARPERCENTAGE CHANGE

2019 2020

85224 85225

85226 85248 85249 85286

$600,000 Sale price

$550,000

+12.09%

$500,000

+12.9%

$450,000

+9.1%

+12.5%

$400,000

+12.4%

+7.5%

$350,000

$300,000 $250,000 $0

NEIGHBORHOOD DATA PROVIDED BY SHARYN YOUNGER COPPER SUMMIT REAL ESTATE 4805892347 WWW.COPPERSUMMITREALESTATE.COM

11

CHANDLER EDITION • JULY 2020

CONTINUED FROM 1

CHANDLER'S HOUSING INVENTORY Chandler’s housing market already faced an inventory shortage prior to the coronavirus gripping the city and state. Experts say the low inventory has created a seller’s market.

“If you don’t have enough inven- tory to pick up the changes, there is a push downward, and those who can least aord it are forced out and are forced to pay more,” Stapp said. “That’s what I think is going to hap- pen, and it doesn’t sound like a rosy picture.” Week one of 2020 had 11,593 homes on the market compared to week 27, which had 8,495— about a 27% decrease, according to Realtor Kathleen Bannister, who works at Mountain Sage Realty. The 8,495 homes on the market in week 27 of this year are about 41% less than the same time in 2019, Bannis- ter said. Local Realtors, like Bannister, are seeing bidding wars and multi- ple oers coming in on the day the house is listed. They have also had to grapple with changes—like clean- ing and technology—in their elds due to concerns around the spread of COVID-19. “People are in the mood to buy homes today,” Bannister said. “... Some economists say we are o- cially in a recession, but that hous- ing is in good shape to weather the storm.” Potential impact on themarket Stapp said while the real estate market in the Valley appears stable now, he fears it will not stay that way as the months go by. “My big concern at the moment is that we are being kept alive in an induced coma,” Stapp said. “We have been in an induced coma kept alive by medication and that medication is stimulus money. So long as the stimulus money exists and goes to people, we will be OK. But because that money runs out, we are going to

inux of people looking to move to Phoenix, a lower-density region than Chicago, New York City or Los Angeles. “It’s not like ‘Grapes of Wrath’— people aren’t pouring out of Califor- nia—but they are moving at a greater percentage, andbecause our housing inventory is so tight to begin with, that has helped us look good and has kept prices up,” Stapp said. Stapp predicts it will take through the end of the calendar year to gure out what is really going on in real estate in the Valley. “You simply aren’t able to add the number of units to get ahead of this,” he said. “It’s easy to pick up and move, but it takes years to build a house, and it takes years to put an apartment unit into the marketplace.” Local expertsweigh in Sharyn Younger, broker and owner of Copper Summit Real Estate, said the pandemic did not have the impact on the industry everyone had initially thought. “It’s not at all what I think the industry really expected,” Younger said. “Before COVID-19 hit, we were in a very strong seller’s market, and we were expecting to see a little bit of a shift in that, but we haven’t.” Younger said at the beginning of the pandemic in March, Chandler saw a slight bump in inventory. “There was a lot of panic among investors, particularly people who had Airbnb’s, they were holding mortgages and had no one willing to be in the home to pay the mortgage,” Younger said. Bannister said April is typically right in the middle of the Valley’s

MAR.

APR.

MAY

JUNE

85224

71 69 77 70 61 67 45 26

2019

MAR. APR. MAY JUNE 83 82 86 81

85226

2019

2020

63

60

55

45

2020

MAR.

APR. 130

MAY

JUNE

85225

151

127 136

119

2019

101

132 74

166

2020

202

MAR. 160

APR.

MAY 149

JUNE

85286

157

136

2019

10

72

67

89

96

2020

N

MAR. APR. MAY JUNE

85248

MAR.

APR.

MAY 210

JUNE 205

85249

2019 252 242 203 166 193 207 208 107 2020

218 126

217

2019

86

125

150

2020

SOURCE: WESERVCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

see an impact. The other part is that most of the governor’s orders that were focused on prohibition against foreclosures and evictions are set to expire simultaneously. What we see today, I don’t think, is indicative of the real economic conditions. This isn’t looking bad now, but you can’t have millions of people out of work and not think that it is going to have an economic impact.” Nationally, the unemployment rate as of May was 11.1%, and in Ari- zona that gure was at 8.7%. Both the state and national unemploy- ment numbers decreased from April

to May. In Chandler, the unemploy- ment ratewas 7.5% inMay, according to data from the Arizona Commerce Authority. Stapp said it will not be com- pletely clear for some time how resi- dential real estate is impacted by the coronavirus. “We won’t really know what’s happening until early August when we see how lenders are going to deal with missed payments and how landlords deal with missed rents when people can’t go back to work,” Stapp said. He said there has also been an

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

REAL ESTATE 2020EDITION

UNEMPLOYMENT RATE One real estate expert said the Valley’s unemployment rate could have an eect on the market as will evictions and foreclosures. CHANDLER STATE NATIONAL MARCH 2020 MARCH 2020 MARCH 2020 4.8% 6.1%

hottest homebuying season, but the pandemic put a “drag on the market” during that time—meaning the market slowed down. “Unemployment, which in turn caused a tightening of lending prac- tices because of forbearance and the potential for default, shelter-in-place orders and uncertainty caused con- sumer condence to decline, and sellers didn’t want the public coming through their homes,” Bannister cited as reasons for the drag in the market.

customers right now that want to sell directly to us than ever before,” Read said. “People can sign everything online and close on their timeline. We believe we are more of a benet now to provide certainty and safety during this time. We are still very, very busy. We haven’t seen a decrease in volume at all. We have a lot of people reach out to us a day.” Younger and Bannister said they have not seen a signicant change in prices, but the low inventory bidding wars are driving selling prices up, especially homes under $400,000. “If—starting July 3—no more homes were listed to sell, in 1.28 months Chandler would have sold every house in our market,” Bannister said. “On July 3, Chandler had 272 active listings on the market, and that includes single-family homes, con- dos, townhouses, mobile homes and duplexes—everything.”

4.4%

13.4%

11.9%

14.7%

APRIL 2020

APRIL 2020

APRIL 2020

8.7%

7.5%

13.3%

MAY 2020

MAY 2020

MAY 2020

10.3%

8.7%

11.2%

JUNE 2020

JUNE 2020

JUNE 2020

“PEOPLE ARE IN THE MOOD TO BUY HOMES” KATHLEEN BANNISTER, REALTOR

3.5%

4.7%

3.7%

2020 AVERAGE

2020 AVERAGE

2020 AVERAGE

SOURCES: ARIZONA DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMIC SECURITY, ARIZONA COMMERCE AUTHORITY COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

solid loan pre-qualication, and the agents are providing a lot more online and upfront information to the buyers before they decide to go see a house.” But Younger said with so much eco- nomic uncertainty as the number of COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations continue to climb in Arizona, sellers may be hesitant to list. “When you have economic uncer- tainty, people who were going to

sell might change their minds and decide to wait and see what happens,” Younger said. Oerpad, a home-selling company headquartered in Chandler, is seeing even more business than before due to its model of cash oers for houses— eliminating the need for showing the home or putting it on the market, spokesperson Courtney Read said. “We are more of a benet for

“Now that our spring buying season has been pushed into the middle of summer, buyers and agents are very goal-oriented,” Bannister said. “With the heat and a shortage of houses for sale, people are motivated to get the job done. Now, more than ever, it’s important for the buyers to have a

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CHANDLER EDITION • JULY 2020

The district received supplemental funding in March to last it through the 2020-21 school year for COVID-19 expenses. Chandler USD used that on technology.

DISTRICT RECEIVED

DISTRICT SPENT

$3.38M on computers

$3.2M in state CARES Act dollars

Other places the district will need to expend more than before: » Chandler Online Academy (cost unknown) » Elementary Connect-Chandler Online Academy (cost unknown) » Teacher training (cost unknown) » Hand sanitizer ($300,000)

students. With the new executive order, districts will not receive less funding if a student is enrolled online. The governor’s oce stipulated that a stu- dent receiving Arizona Online Instruction will still count for less than a student attending school in person, but that the state will backll the dierence with coronavi- rus relief dollars. Berry said that stabilizationwas cru- cial for districts. “The reality is there is not a lot of additional dollars,” Berry said. “We are just hoping to maintain average daily membership.” If a district drops below 2% of the previous year’s average daily mem- bership, the state will use the previous year’s numbers to allocate funding. The 2020-21 budget is $378.24 mil- lion, according to documents from the district. The board approved the budget July 15. That budget gure is an increase from the previous year’s budget, which was $355.36 million. The 2020-21 budget accounts for an increase to teacher salaries, bringing the average up from$59,575 to $62,315. But the district has had to face expenses due to COVID-19 aside from the purchase of technology. The dis- trict has spent thousands of dollars on hand sanitizer, hand sanitizer stands, partitions, personal protective equip- ment and more in preparation for stu- dents to return to schools. The district is also needing to train its teachers to teach in virtual formats

CONTINUED FROM 1

coronavirus relief to be used at the end of the 2019-20 school year and through the 2020-21 school year—and expended all of that and then some purchasing of laptops for distribution and use. The school board approved the pur- chase of 2,600 laptops for a total of $3.38 million in June, using both coro- navirus relief funds and funding from the district’s 2019 bond. “My opinion is that the virtual, or online option, is even more expen- sive than in person,” Superintendent Camille Casteel said. “When you are making sure children all have access to devices and internet and bandwidth in a home—those are even more costly items. It’s just going to cost more money no matter what direction we move. We have to have training for our teachers for virtual or online options; it’s a dierent way of teaching and engaging students. There needs to be a lot of training, and that doesn’t come cheap. There is no one way that is less expensive, in my opinion. [Online learning is] going to take creativity, resources, time and money.” Budgeting for onlineand in-person Gov. Doug Ducey in late June signed an executive order oering exibility in how a district’s average daily mem- bership is calculated. The average daily membership is how the state of Arizona calculates how much money to allocate to a school district and is based on in-person attendance of

Chandler USD is planning on raising its primary property taxes over the current level to pay for increased expenditures related to the new high school. The increase is for one year only.

TAX RATE PER $100,000 IN PROPERTY VALUE

$0.34

$12.93

2019-2020

2020-2021

SOURCE: CHANDLER USDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

via Chandler Online Academy and the district’s newest option—Elementary Connect via Chandler Online Acad- emy, which is the online option avail- able for elementary-aged students. It was unknown as of press time the full cost of utilizing these programs and curriculum for the 2020-21 school year, according to a district spokesperson. “It is a balancing act because dis- tricts are sensitive to community relations—you don’t want to be the public institution where everyone else is enduring a lot of strife and you complaining feels tone deaf and inap- propriate,” Kotterman said. “Districts have a tendency to buckle down and make it through. They have received a lot of investment in coronavirus relief funding, but they are having to switch to an entirely new instructional model in the middle of the semester and keep

it going. It’s a very stressful time.” Rep. Jennifer Pawlik (LD-17), who represents Chandler in the State House of Representatives, said she thinks the funding stabilization will be ade- quate to address coronavirus-related expenses—but said she would always promote more school funding. “We know that schools are funded based on the number of students in attendance, and we are suspecting that some students won’t come back and will move to a dierent district or The CUSD governing board voted June 24 to delay the start of the school year by two weeks and approved options for parents sending their stu- dents to school. Under the reopening schools plan, charter,” Pawlik said. Returning to school

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