Franklin - Brentwood Edition - April 2021

FRANKLIN BRENTWOOD EDITION

VOLUME 3, ISSUE 2  APRIL 15MAY 10, 2021

ONLINE AT

Supporting Black-owned businesses Supporting businesses

To help highlight Black-owned businesses in the area, Williamson Inc. has partnered with local business leaders to create the Black Business Coalition, which aims to connect Black business owners with resources as they network and form relationships. I think it’s going to be exciting. I think it gives businesses a voice and representation, and I think they’re excited that there’s an avenue that says, ‘Hey, we want to listen to what you’re having issues with

What I’m hoping is to have these businesses be able to get a loan or be able to get these resources to build up these businesses themselves and not for people to have to travel 45 minutes to get what they need. TARA BLUE, COCHAIR OF THE BLACK BUSINESS COALITION

or where you’re having barriers.’ ROBERT BLAIR, COCHAIR OF THE BLACK BUSINESS COALITION

INSIDE

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PHOTOS BY WENDY STURGESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Funding process Williamson County Schools requested more than $35 million for the 2021-22 scal year.

Williamson County to invest $35M in schools Ocials stress future capacity needs despite enrollment drop

rapid growth of the county’s population. Planning for student population growth in Wil- liamson County has long been part of the district’s strategic plan. From 2015-19, WCS saw a 12% increase in student population, according to WCS. In that same time frame, the district has also added eight new schools. However, for the rst time in at least the past 20 years, WCS saw a decline of 1,475 students at the start CONTINUED ON 16

School additions and renovations: $18M Repairs and maintenance: $10.07M Land purchases: $5M New schools: $2M

Total: $35.07M

BY WENDY STURGES

While students and stahave seen dramatic changes over the past two academic years due to the coronavi- rus pandemic, at least one thing has been business as usual for Williamson County Schools: planning for the

SOURCES: WILLIAMSON COUNTY, WILLIAMSON COUNTY SCHOOLSCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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THIS ISSUE

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Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the rst edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and Pugerville, Texas. We have expanded our operations to include hundreds of employees, our own printing operation and over 30 hyperlocal editions across three states. Our circulation is over 2 million residential mailboxes, and it grows each month with new residents and developments.

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

FROMLACY: Many residents have chosen to make the Franklin and Brentwood areas home to take advantage of the area’s high-ranked school district, Williamson County Schools. Our front-page story this month looks at what new campuses and facilities are coming down the line at WCS as the county works to invest in the district’s future students. Lacy Klasel, PUBLISHER

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FROMWENDY: For residents in Brentwood, 2021 is an election year in which residents have the chance to elect those who represent them at the level closest to home. In May, Brentwood residents will cast their ballots for three new commissioners—see our Local Election Guide for more information on candidates and where to vote. Wendy Sturges, EDITOR

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FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • APRIL 2021

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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BRENTWOOD

Fresh 96 Kitchen

Duck Donuts

COURTESY AMY WHIDBYA. MARSHALL HOSPITALITY

COURTESY DUCK DONUTS

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NOWOPEN 1 Fresh 96 Kitchen , a virtual kitchen operating out of Scout’s Pub in Westhaven, opened March 17 at 158 Front St., Ste. 120, Franklin. The delivery- and to-go-only restaurant is the third virtual kitchen for A. Marshall Hospitality, which also opened Burger Dandy in Franklin and NASHi Noodles in Nashville earlier this year. The eatery oers lighter options with coastal, Southwestern and Japanese inuences, according to an announce- ment from the company. Dishes include ceviche salad, a taco Caesar wrap and 2 Dr. Amanda Ryden opened Four Health Medicine in early February at 330 Mallory Station Road, Ste. 15, Frank- lin. The business oers functional medi- cine, which focuses on the whole person, including body, mind, spirit and emotions, according to Ryden. Care options include hormone replacement as well as treat- ment for headaches, brain fog, traumatic brain injury, abdominal pain, fatigue, stress related symptoms, mental health, post-COVID-19 syndrome, nutrition and weight management. 615-631-7315. www.fourhealthmedicine.com 3 Joining a number of virtual loca- tions in the U.S., Guy Fieri’s Flavortown Kitchen launched a virtual kitchen operating from Cool Springs in Febru- ary. The delivery-only service oers a number of dishes created by the Food Network personality, including Cajun chicken Alfredo, cheesesteak eggrolls, cheeseburgers and sandwiches. While the eatery’s physical location is listed at poke made with saku tuna. www.fresh96kitchen.com

1722 Galleria Blvd., Franklin, there are no dine-in options. Food can be ordered directly from the kitchen’s website or through other food delivery apps. http://guysavortownkitchen.com 4 The Parker House on Main opened in March at 341 Main St., Franklin. The salon oers haircuts and styling services for men and women, as well as blow- outs, color and highlight service and special occasion services. 615-780-8003. www.instagram.com/ theparkerhouseonmain 5 Portis Family Dental opened in March at 554 Franklin Road, Ste. 104, Franklin. The dental oce oers routine exams, cleanings, X-rays, orthodontics, teeth whitening and cosmetic dentistry. 615-465-8030. https://portisfamilydental.com 6 My Pet Wellness opened early this year at 5070 Carothers Parkway, Ste. 112, Franklin, near CubeSmart Self Storage. The business oers veterinary services, including wellness care, diagnostics, surgery and dental care. 629-216-3262. www.mypetswellness.net 7 Oak Hill Furniture opened a pop-up shop in March inside the CoolSprings Galleria at 1800 Galleria Blvd., Franklin. The shop, located on the lower level of the mall next to Dillards, oers a selec- tion of Amish-made furniture, including tables, Adirondack chairs, coat racks and barrel furniture. 615-771-2050.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY WENDY STURGES

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Chase

Williamson County Fair

WENDY STURGESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

COURTESY WILLIAMSON COUNTY FAIR

Franklin, according to the company. The restaurant, which also operates a location in Nashville, oers breakfast and lunch, serving signature dishes, such as shrimp and grits, chicken and waes, biscuits, and breakfast skillets. Big Bad Breakfast also oers a house coee blend, cocktails and local craft beers. https://bigbadbreakfast.com 9 Duck Donuts will open its third Tennessee location later this spring at 101 Creekside Crossing, Ste. 1000, Brent- wood. The locally owned franchise, set to be operated by Matt and Allison Daven- port, will oer made-to-order doughnuts with a viewing area where customers can watch their order be made. Specialty toppings include graham crackers, salted caramel, marshmallows and Oreos. In addition to customizable doughnuts, Duck Donuts also oers coee, doughnut sundaes, milkshakes and breakfast sand- wiches. www.duckdonuts.com 10 Chase is slated to open a new branch location at 1015 Center Point Place, Franklin, in the former location of Backyard Grill in the Watson Glen Shop- ping Center. The bank has existing loca- tions in Green Hills and Nolensville. An opening date has not been announced. 800-935-9935. www.chase.com 11 Bu City Soap will open a location in May at 4091 Mallory Lane, Franklin, according to a social media post from the company. The store oers soaps, scrubs, bath bombs, lotions, laundry soap and Epsom salts made from natural ingre- dients that are free of animal products. Soap scents include Good Morning Sunshine, Island Nectar, and Honey and

Oatmeal. Bu City Soaps also operates locations in Columbia and Nashville. www.bucitysoap.com 12 Salons by JC will open a new location in downtown Franklin’s First and Main building at 95 E. Main St., Franklin. The business oers suites for independent stylists, makeup artists, aestheticians and massage therapists to open individual suites. The business has existing locations in Cool Springs and Murfreesboro. 615-815-4142. 13 Waves Inc. relocated its administra- tive oces from 145 Southeast Parkway, Ste. 100, Franklin, to 1325 W. Main St. Ste. 104, Franklin, in March. The nonprot organization oers learning programs and employment opportunities for children and adults with intellectual disabilities. Waves will also hold a ribbon-cutting for its new location April 15. 615-794-7955. www.wavesinc.com NAME CHANGES 14 Owner Gigi Butler announced March 9 that her Brentwood shop, Pies by Gigi, has rebranded to become Gigi’s Kitchen . The bakery and cafe, which opened in August at 330 Franklin Road, Ste. 906D, Brentwood, will now also operate as a restaurant, according to an announcement from the business. The eatery will continue to oer baked goods, pies and pastries but will now also oer breakfast, lunch and dinner oerings. 615-678-8434. www.gigiskitchenandbakery.com www.salonsbyjc.com RELOCATIONS

Narrow Gate Coee Co. launched in March on Beasley Lane in Franklin.

WENDY STURGESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

FEATURED IMPACT NAME CHANGES Joining other artisans at Narrow Gate Trading Co. in Franklin, the owners of E&B Coee Roasters announced March 12 that the company has rebranded as Narrow Gate Coee Co. Owners Erin and Bethany McAtte have partnered with Narrow Gate Foundation founders Bill and Stacy Spencer to begin roasting operations at the nonprot’s location at 200 Beasley Drive, Franklin. Coee options include organic beans from Costa Rica, Honduras and Peru. The space is also home to Narrow Gate Trading Co. and TN Box Beams. The coee roastery now distributes to local retailers such as Herban Market in IN THE NEWS 15 Ocials with the Williamson County Fair announced March 19 a plan to move forward with in-person events for its 2021 fair, set to be held at the Ag Expo Park at 4215 Long Lane, Franklin. The fair is slated to run Aug. 6-14, and event organizers said they are currently working with vendors and health ocials to establish safety protocols. Crowd favorites, including the Piccolo Zoppe Circus, Jurassic Kingdom, Robocars and the XPogo Stunt Team, are set to return, and ocials are expected to announce more information about agricul-

Franklin and also sells online at www.narrowgate.coee.

According to the company, 10% of sales go toward funding operations at Narrow Gate, which helps provide opportunities and training for young men. 615-212-9053. www.narrowgate.coee

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tural and livestock events later this year. 615-794-4386.

www.williamsoncountyfair.org On March 24, ocials with the

Williamson County Health Department announced that all adults age 16 and older are now eligible to receive the COVID-19 vaccine at public and private providers, such as Walmart, Sam’s Club, Kroger, CVS and Walgreen’s, throughout the county. Residents, regardless of age bracket or phase, can nd a vaccine provider near them at www.vaccinender.com. 615-595-4800. www.williamsonready.org

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FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • APRIL 2021

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES

COMPILED BY WENDY STURGES

BRENTWOOD

ONGOING PROJECTS

nals on Cool Springs Boulevard, Mallory Lane, Galleria Boulevard and Bakers Bridge will use new technology to auto- matically adjust the timing of lights to reflect traffic conditions, according to the city of Franklin. When complete, the new lights will be in place at 19 intersections. Timeline: through June 21 (testing), TBD (implementation) Cost: $1.6 million (estimated) Funding sources: city of Franklin (20%), Federal Surface Transportation Block Grant (80%) FUTURE PROJECT 3 Long Lane bridge As part of Franklin’s Major Thoroughfare Plan, the city is working on plans for improvements to Long Lane on the south side of Franklin that would create a new roadway over I-65 and connect Long Lane with Old Peytonsville Road. The overpass would not connect with I-65, giving drivers an alternate to the Goose Creek Bypass.

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1 Franklin Road improvements This project will widen a stretch of Frank- lin Road from the Harpeth River bridge to Harpeth Industrial Court near downtown Franklin from two to three lanes with side- walks on both sides of the roadway. The corridor will also feature bike lanes and traffic signal upgrades as well as decora- tive street lighting and new trees. Timeline: June 2020-December 2021 Cost: $18.17 million Funding source: city of Franklin 2 Cool Springs adaptive signals The city of Franklin is in the process of testing new adaptive traffic signals along four roadways in Cool Springs. New sig-

FRANKLIN

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Timeline: 2024-26 Cost: $22.28 million Funding source: city of Franklin

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ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UP TO DATE AS OF APRIL 7. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT FRBNEWS@COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

DEVELOPMENT UPDATES

Developments in the Franklin & Brentwood areas

COMPILED BY WENDY STURGES

PHOTOS BY WENDY STURGESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

TRADER JOE’S Exterior building work has begun on a new location of Trader Joe’s, set to be located at 545 Cool Springs Blvd., Ste. 115, Franklin. The grocery store is slated to open this year in the Thoroughbred Village shopping center, according to the company. This will be the rst Williamson County location for the company.

WILLIAMSON COUNTY ANIMAL CENTER

BERRY FARMS TOWN CENTER Construction to complete the next phase of buildings at Berry Farms is ongoing. Additions will include Two Town Center, which will feature oce space as well as multifamily buildings and retail units. The mixed-use development is already home to a Publix-anchored shopping center.

A new facility for the Williamson County Animal Center is under construction along Old Charlotte Pike in Franklin. The new center is expected to be complete late this year, according to WCAC.

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CAROTHERS CROSSING Southstar has begun construction on a new building at Carothers Crossing, located near the Lifetime Athletic Club near Liberty Pike and Carothers Parkway. The building, set to be completed later this year, will feature suites with between 5,000-42,578 square feet of space for lease.

SULLIVANDENTAL PARTNERS

A new building for Sullivan Dental Partners is under construction in Brentwood along Harpeth Drive and Franklin Road, near its existing location. The new oce building is expected to open in mid-to-late summer, according to an update from the practice.

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FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • APRIL 2021

CITY& COUNTY

News fromWilliamson County, Franklin & Brentwood

Parents call formasks to be optional as district ocials lift some COVID19 restrictions

other districts in other parts of the country. “It hasn’t been perfect; there have been some times where we haven’t been able to be on campus, but the eort has been there, and I think it’s been worth it so far,” he said. Golden said the district is also working to imple- ment new guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that reduces social distanc- ing requirements from 6 feet to 3 feet. He also said the district is working to lessen restrictions inside schools and around sports. Furthermore, tempera- ture checks are no longer required for students. However, Golden said the district will likely require mask use through at least the end of the 2020-21 school year, per CDC guidance. “I think it’s extremely important for us to re-em- phasize as clearly as I can that we will continue to follow the CDC and state health department guidelines and listen to those health authorities as much as we can, and that includes this year plus next year,” Golden said.

WILLIAMSON COUNTY SCHOOLS Roughly one year after the coronavirus pandemic upended the 2019-20 school year, some area parents are calling for a return to normal school practices. WCS families were asked to register for in-person or virtual learning for the 2021-22 school year by March 23, which prompted many parents to ask what the next school year will look like. Several parents spoke during the public comment portion of the WCS board of education meeting March 22 to ask that the district make mask use optional for sta and students for the 2021-22 school year. “Based upon the declining cases and the avail- ability of the vaccine, I think it is time that the

school system exits this pandemic mentality,” WCS parent Rebekah Parker said. Case counts in Williamson County have been on the decline in recent weeks, down frommore than 2,000 active cases at the start of the year to below 500 as of early April, according to data from the Tennessee Department of Health. Parents also called for the district to remove quarantine requirements and contract tracing protocols for students, which are conducted by the Tennessee Department of Health. The district has not yet announced what COVID- 19 protocols will look like during the 2021-22 school year; however, Superintendent Jason Golden has said that WCS has been less restrictive than many

FSSDDirector David Snowden forgoes retirement, signs on for twomore years

Franklin sets new timeline for CityHall engagement plan FRANKLIN During the March 23 Franklin Board of Mayor and Aldermen meeting, city sta mem- bers presented a new website, www.complete-the-square.com, which lays out the framework for how the city will develop a plan for its new City Hall. The public engagement process will include two rounds of public outreach with surveys and public meetings. A preliminary master plan for the new building, which will include community feedback, is expected to be complete in mid- August, according to the city.

PATH TOA NEWCITY HALL The city of Franklin will work over the next few months to gather public input on what residents would like to see in a new City Hall building. APRIL First round of stakeholder interviews First online community survey MAY Second round of stakeholder interviews JUNE Second online community survey Residents can nd more information on the public engagement process at www.complete-the-square.com. SOURCE: CITY OF FRANKLINCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

FRANKLIN SPECIAL SCHOOL DISTRICT David Snowden, director of schools for Franklin Special School District, has signed on for another two years with the district despite initially indicating his intentions to retire at the end of the 2020-21 school year. Snowden accepted a two-year contract extension, which was unanimously approved by the FSSD board of education during its March 8 meeting. “If you start something with a group of people, then you should be willing to nish that work— around COVID, especially—and I still love what I’m doing,” Snowden

said. “I have a passion for it, the Lord has continued to bless me with good health, and I work with some of the

David Snowden

greatest people—a great board, and our parent community is so sup- portive—so I’m excited to continue our work.” According to contract doc- uments from FSSD, Snowden will receive an annual salary of $206,214. This represents a 6.7% increase from Snowden’s previous contract in 2019.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY WENDY STURGES

CITY HIGHLIGHT FRANKLIN&BRENTWOOD Ocials with both cities declared a state of emergency following storms March 27 that brought several inches of rain and ooded several area homes. In accordance with an executive order from Gov. Bill Lee, municipal meetings may be held virtually until at least April 28. Franklin Board of Mayor and Aldermen Meets April 27 and May 11 at 7 p.m. Workshop meetings are always held two hours prior. 615-791-3217. www.franklintn.gov MEETINGSWE COVER Brentwood City Commission Meets April 26 and May 10 at 7 p.m. 615-371-0060. www.brentwoodtn.gov Williamson County Schools board of education Meets April 19 at 6:30 p.m. 615-472-4000. www.wcs.edu Franklin Special School District board of education Meets May 10 at 6:30 p.m. at Franklin Elementary School at 501 Figuers Drive, Franklin. 615-794-6624. www.fssd.org

FSSD tomove forward on $5M land purchase on Eddy Lane in Franklin

Transit authority oers free rides to receive vaccines FRANKLIN In an eort to help remove access barriers for those who want to receive a COVID-19 vaccine, the Franklin Transit Authority announced March 25 it will oer free rides to vaccine sites located along its regular routes. “Ensuring people can securely reach their COVID-19 vaccine appointments is an extension of our ongoing eorts to provide equitable access in Williamson County as well as protect the health and safety of its residents,” said Debbie Henry, executive director of The TMA Group, which operates and manages the transportation service. According to the FTA, residents with a scheduled vaccine appoint- ment can receive a free ride during regular service hours from 6:30 a.m.- 6 p.m. on weekdays and from 8:30 a.m.-6 p.m. on Saturdays.

FRANKLIN SPECIAL SCHOOL DISTRICT During a special meet- ing March 29, the Franklin Special School District board of education gave approval for sta to begin the process of purchasing a roughly 4.7-acre property at 205 Eddy Lane, Franklin, to create a new central district oce complex. The new property would be home to district oces as well as to oces for the district’s MAC before- and after-school care programs. David Esslinger, FSSD associate director of schools for nance and administration, said some of the district’s existing facilities have outlived their useful lives and would cost millions to repair. The new property would replace the district’s central oce annex, which is located on Cannon Street near Battle Avenue. “We have a current situation with a building that is in great need

of repair and a lot of work if it’s going to be used by our district in any way,” Esslinger said. The Eddy Lane property includes an existing oce building that could be utilized by district sta, Esslinger said. The purchase amount for the new land has been estimated at approximately $5 million, according to the district. To help pay for the land pur- chase, the district will consider selling the land currently occupied by the district’s central oce annex as well as an additional property on Fairground Street.

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FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • APRIL 2021

GUIDE L O C A L V O T E R G U I D E 2021

D A T E S T O K N O W

Registered voters in Brentwood will be able to vote for three of the four candidates for the open positions on the Brentwood City Commission. The three candidates who earn the most votes will win seats on the commission. C A S T I N G A B A L L O T

May 4 Election day

April 29 Last day of early voting

April 14 First day of early voting

P O L L I N G L O C A T I O N S

V O T E R T U R N O U T

Brentwood 2019

Hours: Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-6 p.m. FRANKLIN 3 Election Commission Oce 1320 W. Main St., Ste. 140, Franklin Hours: Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-6 p.m., Sat. 8 a.m.-noon

Turnout

Registered voters

BRENTWOOD 1 John P. Holt Brentwood Library 8109 Concord Road, Brentwood Hours: Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-6 p.m., Sat. 8 a.m.-noon 2 Brentwood Municipal Building 5211 Maryland Way, Brentwood

254

MARYLAND WAY

4,047

31,573

2

2017

431

3,836

31,420

1

31

2015

3,782

28,490

65

3

2013

4,253

28,586

96

N

SOURCE: WILLIAMSON COUNTY ELECTION COMMISSION COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CANDIDATE Q&A

Get to know the candidates running in the local election

2 0 2 1 L O C A L V O T E R G U I D E

Incumbent

COMPILED BY WENDY STURGES

Brentwood City Commission

Occupation: retired health care executive, owner-operator MARK GORMAN

GINA GUNN

RHEA LITTLE

REGINA SMITHSON

Occupation: partner at John Smithson and Associates, Primerica Financial Services Relevant Experience: former mayor; planning, historic, environmental, park and library boards www.facebook.com/ keepingbrentwoodontrack While serving on the commission, we have worked diligently to keep Brentwood the best place to live in Middle Tennessee. Trac concerns remain high on our priority list. Brentwood has 20,000 nonresidents commuting into Brentwood for work daily. We have continued to address trac issues with the state, county, Franklin, Nashville and other municipalities. One of our latest improvements was to coordinate signals along Old Hickory Boulevard from I65 to Granny White Pike with Metro Nashville. We continue to look for innovative ideas like these to ease trac in the future. Good government cannot be managed in terms of months. As commissioner for 26 years now, I have always considered myself to be someone who works for the residents of Brentwood. My rst year on the commission, we had $600,000 in our general fund, and our water department was a nancial disaster. Today, we have $43 million in our general fund. I will continue to work with the residents and business leaders for the good of Brentwood. Having lived in here since 1982 and having my three children and their families living in the city, it is important for me to work for future generations.

Occupation: medical practice manager

Occupation: owner- operator of Rhea Little Tire & Auto Repair Inc. Relevant experience: mayor; vice mayor; planning, park, tree and environmental boards 615-373-5868 https://rhealittle.com

Relevant experience: public school teacher; community leader 615-497-4973 https://ginagunn2021.poliengine.com

Relevant experience: nance and operations of multisite and regional operations 615-438-5599 www.votemarkgorman.com

What do you believe is the biggest issue currently facing Brentwood residents, and how would you address it?

One of the biggest issues is the lack of diversity in the Brentwood city government. There is a lack of diverse voices and ideas among our leaders. I’d like to change that with my election to the city commissioners seat. I’d like to do community outreach to the residents of Brentwood to identify the needs of the diverse population and provide a way for them to speak up and become a part of this community.

With the rapid, high-density development happening on adjacent communities, pres- sure is mounting to abandon our tried and true blueprint of 1-acre-per-house lot size, generous park lands and family-centered activities. With the mega growth Nashville is experiencing, their property taxes are also ballooning to keep pace with demands. Our growth and scal policies must be managed or risk the same fate. Since we outsource all sewer and water services, it is important to stand strong against the pressure to allow upzoning and apartment complexes. These would only further exasperate our schools and negatively impact property taxes.

Brentwood is a unique and wonderful city, I think it is the greatest community in the world! Our biggest challenge continues to be growth, especially in how to deal with the growth of communities surrounding us. I would continue to address this challenge by maintaining prudent, thoughtful and methodical growth and continuing our strict requirements of 1-acre density and having high development standards. With commu- nities around us rapidly growing, it is vital we continue with experienced leadership that understands Brentwood’s past, the present challenges and has the vision to see that Brentwood’s future will be even better.

If elected, what would you most want to accomplish in the rst few months of your term?

Fix the potholes, for one. After that, I would like to do better outreach for the parks and library. They already do a fabulous job, but I think during this pandemic, we need to nd ways of using these institutions in a more nurturing way; events that speak to all and not just a few. I’d also like to see that the inclusive playground is appropriately funded so that all can nd pleasure in the great outdoors.

I will continue the excellent budgeting process to ensure no property tax increase, which this will be our 31st straight year without a tax increase, and I will continue to maintain our tremendous reserves. With faithfulness, I will see the successful opening and operations of our new centrally located police headquarters. It will be with prayers and wisdom and great joy that we will be able to safely have our many Crockett Park outdoor events. We will also begin planning for our newest Park, Windy Hill, work with Franklin to keep the McEwen Drive extension moving forward and work toward Fire Sta- tion No. 5 on Split Log Road.

During my tenure, I worked hard to encour- age community collaboration, professional- ism and commitment to area residents that had been missing in city government. If you choose to re-elect me, I will contin- ue championing the ban on high-density residential housing in Brentwood, keep property taxes low, preserve the city’s credit rating high and protect the 1-acre-per-house requirement. Mega growth is a challenge, and keeping our proven suburban blueprint is necessary for Brentwood to continuing being a very sought-after suburban address.

Answers may have been edited for length. Read full Q&A’s at communityimpact.com .

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FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • APRIL 2021

“WE JUST KINDOF ALWAYS HAVE BEENA LITTLE BIT CRAFTY, DOITOURSELVES KINDOF THING, AND SO ITWAS SUPER FUN TO MAKE OUROWNPROJECTS.” TORI COZERT, COOWNER OF ARWORKSHOP FRANKLIN

BUSINESS FEATURE

Co-owners Tori Cozert, left, and Tammy Ringenberg took over ownership of ARWorkshop Franklin in Cool Springs in July 2020. (Photos by Wendy Sturges/Community Impact Newspaper)

ARWorkshop Franklin Mother-daughter teammakes creative environment for crafting in Cool Springs W hen Tori Cozert and her mother, Tammy Ringen- berg, took ownership of AR BY WENDY STURGES

Pieces can be customized with dierent colors and stencils.

for children, such as string art and smaller painting projects. AR Workshop Franklin’s summer camps will return later this year with day programs for children ages 7-14. For those who do not consider themselves naturally crafty, Cozert said, each class features an instructor to help with everything from picking colors to painting and stencils. “We’re not just telling you how to do it; we’re also helping you and giving you color suggestions, if you want them,” Cozert said. “All of our girls who teach classes are really good about kind of intuitively seeing what level of help people want.” AR Workshop Franklin also features a small retail section with locally themed items. Another popular item is the shop’s DIY To-Go kit, which includes all the materials needed for a small project. Ringenberg and Cozert said their favorite part of the workday is shar- ing their love of crafts and seeing the sense of accomplishment people feel. “You started out thinking you can’t do it, and then, when you’re done, and it, like, looks really good, … that’s probably my favorite part—is seeing people realize that they can do it,” Cozert said.

CRAFT CAMP AR Workshop will hold multiple summer camps at which campers ages 7-14 will make craft projects each week. Classes are held Mon.-Thu. from 9:30 a.m.-noon, with an optional Friday add-on. Camps cost $195 per child. DATES May 24-July 26 (no camps the week of June 28) PROJECTS Campers will choose from dierent projects, including the following.

Workshop Franklin last July, they said they saw an opportunity to turn their hobbies into careers. “We’re just a crafty family,” Cozert said. “My mom sews, and she does all kinds of DIY stu on her own home, and I knit. We just kind of always have been a little bit crafty, do-it-our- selves kind of thing, and so it was super fun to make our own projects.” The shop’s space features walls lined with projects as well as workbenches and a paint bar where crafters can pick custom colors for their projects. Projects at the workshop include wood items, such as painted boards, planters, pillows and lazy Susans, as well as soft items, such as pillows, canvas tote bags and knit blankets, a popular item in colder months. Each workshop is scheduled in advance to give staers time to make customized stencils and prepare project materials. However, Cozert and Ringenberg said the shop is open for corporate events, parties, bridal showers and date nights. The shop also oers projects

Popular projects include wood boards and chunky knit blankets.

Canvas pillow

Tie-dye

Paint and string art

Game boards

Rainbow wreaths

Macramé and yarn weaving

The shop also oers kits to make projects at home.

ARWorkshop Franklin 101 International Drive, Ste. 105, Franklin 615-285-4292 www.arworkshop.com Hours: appointment only

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

DINING FEATURE Cool Café Franklin eatery focuses on from-scratch fare F or Cool Café chef and owner Tim Ness, home cooking means cooking from scratch, which includes everything frommaking salad dressings to hand-peeling the 250 pounds of potatoes the restaurant goes through daily. “I’ve been cooking Southern food for several years. I mean, I’ve been here below the Mason-Dixon for over 30 years,” Ness said. “I make everything from scratch—I don’t buy [premade food]; I buy ingredi- ents. Everything is made in-house from scratch.” The restaurant, which opened in Franklin in 2005 as a classic meat-and-three, has expanded its Southern-inspired menu over time to include fresh sh and Steak Night—Ness’ favorite—on Fridays and Saturdays. “Steak Night rocks. It puts a light in my re again because it’s something totally o the meat-and- three,” Ness said. “I hand-cut all the steaks myself. We get them all kind of ready to go, and we cook them in a cast iron skillet with rendered bacon fat, so they got a bit of a crunch to them on the outside.” However, diners can still nd their favorite com- fort dishes on a daily basis. The weekly lunch menu features a number of home cooking-inspired dishes such as mashed potatoes, meatloaf, casseroles, pork chops, banana pudding and Cool Cafe’s signature fried chicken. “We are renowned for our fried chicken,” he said. Ness said the daily lunch menu is posted each day on Cool Café’s Facebook page for the regular lunch crowd, which was well-numbered until last spring. However, when the coronavirus pandemic hit the region last March, Ness said, the eatery closed for several weeks, and it is still working to adapt after a large portion of its lunch clientele, which mostly comprised people who worked in the area, stopped coming in as often. “It’s coming along really well, but it’s not going along as fast as I want it to be,” Ness said. “My Steak Night is probably the most up-and-moving thing now because the meat-and-three’s not all the way back yet because of the people not working or ... still working from home.” Ness said the restaurant has also stayed aoat by oering to-go meals at Miss Daisy’s Kitchen, which is located just next door to Cool Café. Those looking for a quick meal can stop by and pick up a dish, such as macaroni and cheese or spaghetti and meatballs. When diners do come back, Ness said, his rst priority will be to serve them a lling meal. “I like to put the best plate possible on the table for anybody to dive into and eat,” he said. “When you’ve got a clean plate coming back, we know they enjoyed it.” BY WENDY STURGES

3 DISHES TO TRY 1 The Cool Cafe Burger ($14) features a cast iron-cooked beef patty topped with fried onions, provolone cheese and a house-made steak sauce. 2 Diners can also ask about fresh sh options (price varies) , which are served with a signature side. 3 The eatery hosts Steak Night on Fridays and Saturdays from 4-9 p.m., featuring hand-cut steaks, from a 6-ounce let mignon ($29) to a 14-ounce ribeye ($34) .

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COURTESY COOL CAFÉ

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COURTESY COOL CAFÉ

COURTESY COOL CAFÉ

“I’VEBEENCOOKINGSOUTHERN FOODFORSEVERALYEARS. IMEAN, I’VEBEENHEREBELOWTHEMASON DIXONFOROVER30YEARS. IMAKE EVERYTHINGFROMSCRATCH I DON’TBUY PREMADE FOOD; I BUY INGREDIENTS. EVERYTHING IS MADE INHOUSE FROMSCRATCH.” TIMNESS, OWNER OF COOL CAFÉ

Owner and chef TimNess opened Cool Cafe in 2005 on Hillsboro Road in Franklin.

WENDY STURGESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

31

Cool Café 1110 Hillsboro Road, Ste. B200, Franklin 615-599-0338 www.facebook.com/coolcafefranklin Hours: Tue.-Fri. 10:30 a.m.-2 p.m., 4-9 p.m.; Sat. 4-9 p.m.; Sun. 10:30 a.m.-2 p.m.; closed Mon.

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FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • APRIL 2021

Buy Local The area is home to more than 70 Black-owned and -operated businesses in a variety of sectors, which the Black Business Coalition is looking to highlight. Automotive Retail 1 Citizen Food 2 Big Shake’s Hot Chicken & Fish Nonprofit Beauty & hair care 5 Cuts N Blessings Health & human services

Missing demographics Much of the demographic information from these businesses in Franklin and Brentwood who received loans from the Paycheck Protection Program was not collected, a gap in data the Black Business Coalition is looking to fill through its online survey.

White-owned: 3.75% (194) Black-owned: 0.27% (15) Hispanic-owned: 0.23% (12)

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6 Roundtree Napier & Ogilvie Funeral Home 7 Waters

3 I Love Juice Bar 4 Just Love Coffee Cafe McEwen Finance & business Housing & real estate

Unanswered: 95.5%

Funeral Home Entertainment Other

S

COOL SPRINGS BLVD.

Asian/Pacic Islander- owned: 0.21% (11) American Indian/ Alaskan Native-owned: 0.01% (1)

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NOTE: SEVERAL BUSINESSES IN THE DIRECTORY ARE HOME- OR IN-HOME SERVICE-BASED AND ARE NOT MAPPED. SOURCE: WILLIAMSON INC./ COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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SOURCE: U.S. SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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said. “We just had a really candid conversation on what we could do as a chamber of commerce when it came to supporting Black businesses in our county and in our community.” Creating a coalition While the organization was offi- cially rolled out this spring, area busi- ness leaders have been working in the background for the past several months. Coalition Co-Chair Robert Blair said stakeholders have been meeting every week for the past six months to form a group with a frame- work and sustainable goals. “My initial ask to Matt [was that] I wanted to make sure this was some- thing that when the tide floated in or floated out, they would still be there. We were looking at something that was long-term, not something that was temporary, just because of the climate in our country or in our city,” Blair said. The group is served by four co-chairs: Blair, owner of a local media company and chair of the Franklin Special School District board of education; Tara Blue, executive director of the Community Child Care Center in Franklin and board member of Williamson Inc.; Jemond Daughtry, co-owner of The Good Food Group; and Jeffery McGruder, chief relation- ship officer with Citizens Banking & Trust Company. The coalition has already cre- ated a Black Business Directory, an online resource that lists more than 70 Black-owned and -operated busi- nesses in Williamson County. Entries range from local artists and medical professionals to restaurateurs and financial experts. Through the coalition, the group

hopes to increase Black membership in the chamber by 10%, which would provide more Black representation for Williamson County businesses. “For us, the goal is to seek to help underrepresented businesses and organizations grow and prosper,” Largen said. “That’s really the bot- tom line: helping Black businesses who have not been represented in our organization.” Tabitha Sanders, co-owner of I Love Juice Bar on Carothers Parkway, said the coalition has been needed for a while. “It is something that we have not had; it is something that is well over- due,” Sanders said. “It should have been around a long time ago. A lot of people don’t know that there are these Black businesses, they think of them as just businesses. So having that coali- tion with help bring life to the fact that there are small Black businesses in the Franklin area.” Finding resources, data While many small businesses have struggled in the past year, businesses owned by people of color have often had to deal with concurrent chal- lenges, including a lack of financial support. More than 5,000 businesses in Franklin and Brentwood received financial support through the fed- eral Paycheck Protection Program approved by U.S. Congress in March 2020. But of the 233 businesses for which demographic information was available inU.S. Small BusinessAdmin- istration loan data from 2021, just 15 Black-owned businesses received loan funds, or less than 7%.

MACK C. HATCHER PKWY.

NewBlack Business Coalition aims to support local Black owners

BY WENDY STURGES

and having the invitation but actually showing people that whether it was stereotypes that people have or biases or [it’s] unfamiliar, [they’re welcome].” McLemore’s experience is just one of many seen in the Williamson County community and nationwide. Last summer, the effects of the coro- navirus pandemic were compounded by calls for social justice following the killings of George Floyd, Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor and several other Black Americans. That summer’s wave of collective action and protests sparked an idea for local business leaders to create a network for Black business owners in the area to find support and resources while lifting up their individual busi- nesses in the community. In February and March, the area chamber of commerce, Williamson Inc., rolled out the launch of the Black Business Coalition, a group wherein Black business owners can network and find resources for capital and pro- fessional development. “In the wake of the George Floyd tragedy, I called a number of Black business leaders in Williamson County and Middle Tennessee,” Wil- liamson Inc. President Matt Largen

For Cuts N Blessings owner Anthony McLemore, working in a barbershop was never about cutting Black or white customers’ hair but rather about mak- ing whoever is sitting in his chair look and feel their best. “I’m a Black owner, and the busi- ness is Black-owned, but the business is not a Black business,” McLemore said. “I don’t want my shop to be a Black shop or [for] just Black people to go there because that means I’m limiting my skills; I’m limiting my cli- entele; I’m limiting my availability for people to want to come in. So, I don’t want that—I want to be diverse.” However, he said, some people enter his shop, take one look around and leave. McLemore said he often fol- lows them out to give them a business card and let them know his shop cuts all types of hair—because whether it is from unintentional bias or unfamil- iarity, that person had a preconceived notion the shop was not for them. “Half the ones that didn’t know— they actually came back into the shop,” he said. “And they’re still cus- tomers to this day. … So I’ve also tried to make a difference in a community with diversity by not only opening

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