San Marcos - Buda - Kyle | June 2021

SANMARCOS BUDA KYLE EDITION

2021 H E A L T H C A R E E D I T I O N

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VOLUME 11, ISSUE 2  JUNE 14JULY 11, 2021

Central Texas community comes together to drive up vaccination rates

herd immunity

Reaching for

Many health ocials, including those at Austin Public Health, are using 67% of the total population fully vaccinated as the minimum benchmark to reach herd immunity. Here’s how many people in each county would need to receive vaccines to provide the community at large with collective protection against COVID-19. Numbers are updated as of June 8.

Additional fully vaccinated individuals needed:

Hays County

213,366

51,207

43%

BY OLIVIA ALDRIDGE, AMY RAE DADAMO & WARREN BROWN

67%

Kendra Wright received early access to the coro- navirus vaccine in January as an essential caretaker to her elderly father. Walking out of the appoint- ment, Wright said she felt immediate relief. “It was like this weight was lifted that I didn’t even know I had,” Wright said. “I instantly wanted everyone to feel that way.” She began by helping a dozen Bee Cave commu- nity members nd appointments for themselves and their loved ones. Wright was soon ooded with messages from residents, some looking for appoint- ments and some asking how they could help. In late January, Wright launched Kendra’s COVID Coaches—one of several Central Texas volunteer groups working to aid the region in the pursuit of reaching herd immunity, or the status at which a com- munity at large will have collective protection against a virus. Since January, grassroots groups such as Kend- ra’s COVID Coaches have helped connect tens of thou- sands of Central Texans with vaccine appointments. Incoming requests to the groups have dwindled across April and May, however, and the groups’ CONTINUED ON 34

Guadalupe County

POPULATION FULLY VACCINATED POPULATION FULLY VACCINATED POPULATION NEEDED FOR HERD IMMUNITY

158,966

50,531

35.21%

67%

Comal County

141,642

35,483

41.95%

67%

Travis County

1,226,805

223,791

48.76%

67%

Student Dulce Medina receives a vaccine at an Austin Community College clinic.

SOURCES: AUSTIN PUBLIC HEALTH, THE TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF STATE HEALTH SERVICES, U.S. CENSUS BUREAUCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

OLIVIA ALDRIDGECOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

2021

HEALTHCARE EDITION

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SAN MARCOS  BUDA  KYLE EDITION • JUNE 2021

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

1

BLANCO RIVER

35

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CHESTNUT ST.

3

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COTTER AVE.

1

RIVERWAY AVE.

35

The Dough Do

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COURTESY THE DOUGH DO

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grand opening June 3 at its newest location at 8920 N. I-35, New Braunfels. The location is just south of the border between New Braunfels and San Marcos. Because of its proximity to the city, the company is now servicing clients in San Marcos. The company also provides home services that include plumbing, electrical work, window work and smart home auto- mation. 512-953-1070. www.jonwayne.com 6 Laura’s Cocina had its grand opening May 17 at 1701 RR 12, San Marcos. The food truck uses family recipes passed down through multiple generations and sells tacos, soups and entrees such as chalupas, enchiladas and fajitas. Delivery is available, and Laura’s also oers early bird and all-day specials. 512-429-4452. www.laurastacos.com 7 Sundance Record Lagoon opened in late May at 241 N. LBJ Drive, San Marcos. The business is a revitalization of the well-known San Marcos record store Sun- dance Records, which closed permanently in 2012. Thomas Escalante, owner of Sig’s Lagoon Record Shop in Houston, revived the San Marcos record shop under the new name. www.sigslagoon.com 8 Handcrafted boot and western wear company Tecovas on May 21 opened a hybrid full-price and outlet pop-up store at the San Marcos Premium Outlets, 3939 I-35, Ste. 1355, San Marcos. The shop will be open through Labor Day, Sept. 6, and sells a variety of boots, apparel, bags and accessories. 512-931-1321. www.tecovas.com COMING SOON 9 A new location of Floor King at

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15

1984

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WONDER WORLD DR.

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SAN MARCOS RIVER

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LEAH AVE.

1102

SANMARCOS

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1979

OLD BASTROP RD.

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NOWOPEN 1 The Dough Do , which opened May 28, is planning to have its grand opening June 14 at the Red Bus Food Park at 801 Chestnut St., San Marcos. The shop oers a variety of cookie dough and de- livers to New Braunfels and surrounding areas. Packs of cookie dough are avail- able with avors such as chocolate chip, birthday cake, fudge brownie and more. 806-702-4344. www.thedoughdo.com 2 Fastsigns opened June 3 at 209 N. Edward Gary St., San Marcos. The locally and independently owned and operated

franchise provides signs, graphics and visual communications to customers of all sizes and industries, whether to attract attention, share a message or sell a product. Fastsigns oers products ranging from point-of-sale materials and signage to trade show booths and digital displays. 737-266-5077. www.fastsigns.com/2337 3 Hawaiian Bros opened a new loca- tion June 8 at 1439 N. I-35, San Marcos. The chain restaurant oers traditional Hawaiian cuisine, including Huli Huli Chicken, Luau Pig, seasoned vegetables and the Pacic Island Salad. It is the sec- ond brick-and-mortar location opened by the company in Texas, with the rst

being in Kyle on May 11. 737-204-2628. www.hawaiianbros.com 4 Apartment complex Hawthorne at Blanco Riverwalk , located at 191 Cotter Ave., San Marcos, held its ocial rib- bon-cutting April 30. The complex began receiving tenants in August 2020 and has availability for various oor models rang- ing from one to three bedrooms. Ame- nities at Hawthorne include open oor plans, gourmet kitchens, custom cabinetry and walk-in closets. 512-714-9241. www.hawthorneatblancoriverwalk.com 5 Heating and air conditioning business JonWayne Service Co. held its ocial

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COMPILED BY WARREN BROWN & BRIAN RASH

8

10

Tecovas

Jams Music

COURTESY TECOVAS

BRIAN RASHCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

2200 I-35, San Marcos, has delayed its opening to mid-July. The business has been operating since 1986 and performs installations of several dierent types of ooring, including carpet, hardwood, tile, natural stone, laminate and vinyl. www.oorking.net 10 Jams Music plans to reopen at a new location in mid-June at 118 S. LBJ Drive, San Marcos. Jams closed April 30 because its building was put on the market by its owner. Founded in 2018, the store sells musical instruments and equipment and oers on-site repairs, set- ups and restrings as well. 512-557-4480. www.sanmarcosjams.com EXPANSIONS 11 The San Marcos Public Library dis- continued curbside service May 21, but it opened its new expansion May 24 at 625 E. Hopkins St., San Marcos. A dedication ceremony is planned for June 18 at 9:30 a.m. The new building more than doubles the library’s oor space and fea- tures a teen room, a makerspace, a tech- nology hub and an enclosed children’s area. Other features of the expansion include study rooms and conference rooms as well as a meeting room with a 240-person capacity. 512-393-8200. www.sanmarcostx.gov/586/library ANNIVERSARIES 12 On July 6, Fat Shack will celebrate its one-year anniversary at 350 N. Guada- lupe St., San Marcos. The franchise spe- cializes in burgers, sandwiches and wings. Other menu items include shakes and deep-fried desserts, such as cheesecake,

cookies and funnel cake. Fat Shack also oers daily lunch specials. 512-667-9380. www.fatshack.com 13 In-N-Out Burger will be celebrat- ing its fth anniversary at 1437 I-35, San Marcos, on June 16. The California chain is known for its Double-Double burger and secret menu, some of which is listed on the company’s website and includes Animal-Style burgers and french fries; a root beer oat; and a lettuce wrap, called Protein Style. 800-786-1000. www.in-n-out.com NEWOWNERSHIP 14 Formerly called Corridor Primary Care, TexanCare FamilyMedicine at 106-A Leah Ave., San Marcos, was purchased by Dr. Adriana Castillo from Dr. Gregory Moore. The clinic held its ribbon cutting April 22. TexanCare oers preventive care, geriatrics, women’s health, wound care and general family medicine. The clinic also performs in-house procedures and dermatological care. 512-396-1000. www.texancarefamilymedicine.com COMMUNITY 15 The city of San Marcos was ocially designated the “Mermaid Capital of Texas” on May 24. The designation was conrmed during the 87th Texas legislative session to highlight the role San Marcos plays in preserving water resources and to encourage continued public interest in protecting the environ- ment, according to a news release from the city. City Hall is located at 630 E. Hopkins St., San Marcos. 512-393-8000. www.sanmarcostx.gov

The Hays County Child Protective Board recently debuted the Remme Rainbow Room.

COURTESY HAYS COUNTY CHILD PROTECTIVE BOARD

FEATURED IMPACT IN THE NEWS In early April, the Hays County Child Protective Board, or HCCPB, debuted the Remme Rainbow Room , the new facility where Child Protective Service caseworkers comfort children who were recently removed from unsafe situations. Both organizations partnered with Hays County and private donors to fund the room’s creation in an existing county building. According to a news release, the county matched a $100,000 donation from Brenda and Kaare Remme. The room provides a safe space for children to clean up and receive clothing, hygiene products, blankets and other supplies. Board ocer June Hankins said the previous facility’s limited capacity and facilities were inadequate to meet the growing county’s needs. “What CPS had for its Rainbow Room was one small oce room where they stored the emergency supplies and some clothing, hygiene [products] and so on,” she said of the previous facility. A number of other county and resident volunteers contributed to the room’s construction, while others provided supplies to ensure the room would have a well-stocked refrigerator and pantry. The Hays County Master Gardeners Association also participated by guiding

the design of the exterior landscaping, which features perennial owers and brightly painted benches and planters on a patio area. “The community response has been tremendously gratifying,” Hankins said. The Remme Rainbow Room’s playroom will provide children with toys, puzzles and books, and the HCCPB now has the space to accept large donations of diapers, formula, clothing, car seats and beds. ”What we are able to oer to meet emergency needs of abused and neglected children has been expanded exponentially,” Hankins said. “It makes much more ecient use of caseworkers’ time to have this expanded Rainbow Room.” www.hccpbtx.org. board@hccpbtx.org Hays County Child Protective Board 605 Rogers St., San Marcos

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SAN MARCOS  BUDA  KYLE EDITION • JUNE 2021

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

5

6

MCKINNON LOOP

1626

967

35

45 TOLL

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12

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1

6

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Valentina’s Tex Mex BBQ

Louie’s Craft BBQ

BUDA

COURTESY VALENTINA’S TEX MEX BBQ

COURTESY LOUIE’S CRAFT BBQ

RELOCATIONS 6 Louie’s Craft BBQ , located at 122 N. Main St., Buda, is officially moving from a food truck to a brick-and-mortar location at 108 N. Main St., Buda. Owner Matt Carver made the announcement May 10 and stated he will be working with the city of Buda to complete the project. Louie’s first opened in Buda in 2019, and aside from brisket, pulled pork, sausage and ribs, serves sandwich- es and various types of loaded potatoes. Carver said the anticipated opening time frame is spring 2022, and in the mean- time Louie’s will continue operations in the food truck. 512-649-2727. www.louiescraftbbq.com EXPANSIONS 7 A new coffee shop called Burgundy Star Espresso , which was inspired by similar businesses throughout the Pacific Northwest, added a permanent drive-thru in late May to its location at 1710 FM 1626, Buda. The shop sells specialty lattes, mochas, cold brews, frappes, macchiatos and more. 360-324-9567. www.burgundystarespresso.com 8 Starting June 1, Hays County Physical Therapy andWellness , a locally owned and operated physical therapy and wellness clinic located in Plum Creek at 140 Kirkham Circle, Kyle, expanded its programming to include a variety of yoga and Pilates classes that are open to all levels. The clinic also offers physical ther- apy and virtual physical therapy as well as treatment for pelvic pain. 512-268-9130. www.hayscountypt.com

er Big Rob’s Burgers at 905 N. Old Hwy. 81, Kyle, closed in late November. 737-414-7000. www.bigrobsburgers.net 3 Boss Orthodontics , located at 844 Kohlers Crossing, Ste. 220, Kyle, planned its grand opening event for June 11. The orthodontia practice offers braces, retainers, Invisalign and other services that are done in-house. Boss Orthodontics also helps patients with therapy for TMJ, a joint disorder that affects the lower jaw. 512-549-4405. www.bossorthodontics.com 4 State Farm Insurance opened a new office June 1 at 1300 Dacy Lane, Ste. 160, Kyle. State Farm agent Jesse Thom- as brings multiple years of experience to the location and will offer a variety of insurance plans, which include auto, home, renters and life insurance. 737-404-5038. www.insurekyle.com COMING SOON 5 Valentina’s Tex Mex BBQ announced May 10 that it will relocate its food trailer and restaurant to Buda within the next year. Currently operating at 11500 Manchaca Road, Austin, the restaurant plans to open in the Buda Mill and Grain Co. facility at 306 S. Main St., Buda. According to a company spokesperson, the space will require a full build-out with the hopes of opening within the next year. The business made the official announcement on Instagram. Valentina’s Tex Mex BBQ serves breakfast and lunch tacos, barbecue sandwiches, meat plates and sides. The new location will also have a full bar. 512-221-4248. www.valentinastexmexbbq.com 2001 21

1626

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KOHLERS CROSSING

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150

WINDY HILL RD.

3

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KIRKHAM CIRCLE

4

9

KYLE

35

150

MAP NOT TO SCALE N TM; © 2021 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER CO. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

NOWOPEN 1 A new 7-Eleven convenience store opened May 22 at 1309-A Main St., Buda. The new location is one of several in Buda, and the convenience store franchise offers a variety of food and drink items that include beer and wine, healthy options, sandwiches, Slurpees, bottled water, soda, candy and pizza as well as gas. 737-999-4852. www.7-eleven.com

2 Big Rob’s Burgers began serving customers May 5 in The Bread Basket con- venience store at 1290 Bebee Road, Kyle. The shop sells quarter-pound burgers served on Hawaiian buns, and the new lo- cation will have a more limited menu than the original location at 130 Kirkham Circle, Kyle, but will offer a breakfast menu that includes tacos, French toast and biscuits. The business began in 2014 as a food truck in Martindale before moving into its first brick-and-mortar location in 2016. Anoth-

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY WARREN BROWN & BRIAN RASH

NOWOPEN The Hill Country Farmers Market opened in May on the grounds of Dreamland, 2770 W. Hwy. 290, Dripping Springs. The market is locally owned and -operated by Laurel Robertson and is open Sundays from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. In addition to the selection of locally grown produce, meats, specialty foods and artisan crafts, the community farmers market features events that include live music, kids activities, and appearances by local nonprofits and service organizations. www.hillcountryfarmersmarket.com REGIONAL IMPACT

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Hays County Physical Therapy and Wellness

Burgundy Star Espresso

The Brick and Mortar District

COURTESY BURGUNDY STAR ESPRESSO

COURTESY HAYS COUNTY PHYSICAL THERAPY AND WELLNESS

RENDERING COURTESY THE BRICK AND MORTAR DISTRICT

ANNIVERSARIES 9 Kidz Korner Drop-In Child Care will celebrate five years of business in early July at 21195 I-35, Ste. 301, Kyle. The day care center offers full-time and part-time care for children between 6 weeks and 12 years of age. Kidz Korner is a drop-in child care facility, and parents can drop a child off at their convenience. Extended hours allow parents to enjoy date nights and other happenings. Prices are based on an hourly rate, which is prorated in 10-minute increments. 512-504-9831. www.kidzkornertx.com 10 Texas State Optical-Buda celebrated the one-year anniversary of its location at 1245 Main St., Ste. 330, Buda, on June 1. The optometry business offers eye exams, personalized optical and medical eye care services, eyeglasses, contacts and

early 2022, and funding will come from the Uptown Tax Increment Reinvestment Zone No. 2. www.thebrickandmortardistrict.com COMMUNITY 12 The Old Garison Windmill was re- stored and relocated by the city of Buda in early April. Sandra Grizzle, the owner of Old Main Street Station, located at 122 Main St., Buda, a local landmark business formerly known as the Garison Filling Station, donated the windmill to the city. The historic preservation commission worked with the tourism department and used a Main Street improvement grant to fund the revitalization, according to a Buda news release. The windmill, roughly a century old, is now located near the future location of the downtown Buda Welcome Center. www.ci.buda.tx.us

sunglasses. Texas State Optical has oper- ated since 1936 and now offers telehealth

appointments. 512-398-3553. www.tsosouthaustinbuda.com IN THE NEWS

11 Construction has begun on the first phase of a 138-acre mixed-use project called The Brick and Mortar District in Kyle’s 2,200-acre Plum Creek develop- ment located along Kohlers Crossing and FM 1626, according to a May 19 news release. The project, previously known as Uptown at Plum Creek, will eventually include 2,500 homes, 150,000 square feet of retail space, 250,000 square feet of office space, and 35 acres of public parks and trails. The city of Kyle will invest $13 million in park and trail amenities for the project’s first phase, slated to open

290

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SAN MARCOS - BUDA - KYLE EDITION • JUNE 2021

Wisdom through Wonder

NEW K-12 TUITION-FREE CHARTER SCHOOL Opening in Kyle!

OPENING FALL 2022 WITH GRADES K-8

133

Classical Education Character Formation Advanced Math & Science

205

I-35

2001

149

131

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Join Valor’s interest list for updates at www.valorpublicschools.org

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TODO LIST

June-August events

COMPILED BY WARREN BROWN

LIVEMUSIC BUCK’S BACKYARD 1750 FM 1626, Buda 512-312-9456 www.bucksbackyard.com JUNE 18 Dylan Wheeler 19 Asleep at the Wheel 26 Shenandoah JULY 02 Aaron Watson 03 Stars and Stripes July Bash 10 Johnny Rodriguez 17 Pop Punk’s Not Dead Fest 2021 CHEATHAMST. WAREHOUSE 119 Cheatham St., San Marcos 512-353-3777 www.cheathamstreet.com JUNE 18 Red Shahan 23 Kent Finlay’s Songwriter’s Circle JULY 02 Kasey Thornton Band THEMARC 120 E. San Antonio St., San Marcos 512-757-5443 www.themarcsm.com JUNE 18 Marauda 19 Mark Normand 26 Atliens JULY 16 Armnhmr RILEY’S TAVERN 8894 FM 1102, New Braunfels 512-392-3132 www.rileystavern.com JUNE 17 Mike Ethan Messick and Friends 18 The Homebodies, Tom Gillam and the Kosmic Messengers 24 MC Young 26 Sophia Johnson JULY 01 Manzy Lowry 02 Lance Lapinski, Danny B Harvey 08 Hartley Hall 09 Mark Jungers WILLIE’S JOINT BAR&GRILL 824 Main St., Buda 512-295-0483 www.williesjoint.com JUNE 19 Suede 20 Shawn Hart 26 Blevins 27 Treble Soul JULY

JUNE 130

JUNETEENTH CELEBRATION THROUGHOUT HAYS COUNTY

JUNE 25

SIP N STROLL DOWNTOWN BUDA

Events will be held throughout June to celebrate Juneteenth, which memorializes the end of slavery in Texas, the last Confederate state to do so, on June 19, 1865. The San Marcos Juneteenth Foundation will host a barbecue cooko June 19 at San Marcos’ Plaza Park from 11 a.m.-6 p.m., and the Dunbar Heritage Association will host an event the same day at the Dunbar Community Center from 10 a.m.-8 p.m. A Peace and Progress discussion will be held virtually and in person at Kyle City Hall from 7-9 p.m. June 18. More information about these events and others is available online. Free. Hays County Courthouse, 111 E. San Antonio St., San Marcos. 512-393-2277. www.hayshistoricalcommission.com

The biannual Buda Sip N Stroll event returns this month in what the Downtown Buda organization said will be the biggest one yet. Enjoy adult beverages and snacks with friends while exploring Main Street amid performances from local musicians. Flowers and ribbon chandeliers will adorn Main Street, and attendees are encouraged to wear oral patterned outts to pair with a complimentary ower crown and custom tote bag. A commemorative wine glass will be provided, and a limited number of tickets will be available for the event, which features 15 downtown businesses. 5:30-9 p.m. $30. 331 Main St., Buda. www.downtownbudatx.com/sip-n-stroll

26 RUNFIELD RACE SERIES 10K Outsider Anonymous is holding a series of running events in Buda in 2021, and this 10K will be the second. Participants will receive a T-shirt, nishers medal, bib, swag bag and refreshments with their registration. A safety plan has been created with the University of Texas School of Public Health, and the event will not be canceled, according to the race series’ website. 8 a.m. $25 (single race), $100 (four remaining races). Pavilion behind Lazy River Activity Center, 6910 Suneld Parkway, Buda. www.outsidersanonymous.org/runeld JULY 03 THEMERMAID BAZAAR An eclectic gathering of vendors is brought together monthly by the Mermaid Society. In addition to being an arts and farmers market with live music, attendees can also take cave tours and train rides at Wonder World Cave & Adventure Park. The Soulful Creations food trailer will also be available to oer barbecue dishes and fried chicken. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Free. Wonder World Cave & Adventure Park, 1000 Prospect St. San Marcos. 512-825-2819. presented by the San Marcos Public Library, meets virtually using Zoom. Adults share their thoughts on a book chosen by the group. The July book is “The Eighty-Dollar Champion” by Elizabeth Letts, a novel about a jockey climbing his way to the top of the equestrian racing circuit with his horse, Snowman. 1-3 p.m. online. Free. 512-393-8200. www.sanmarcostx.gov/586/library www.mermaidsocietysmtx.com 07 SANMARCOS LIBRARY BOOK CLUB The First Wednesday Book Club,

JUNE 03 THROUGHAUG. 12 SANMARCOS SUMMER IN THE PARK

navigational aides. Noon. Free. San Marcos Downtown Square, 111 E. San Antonio St., San Marcos. 800-989-7223. www.greatrace.com 20 RAMONAYALA Mavericks Dance Hall Buda presents norteño music star Ramon Ayala. Known as “king of the accordion,” Ayala, 75, has recorded more than 100 albums and garnered four Grammy Awards. His group will perform for one night only during the venue’s Tejano Night. 8 p.m.- midnight, doors open at 7 p.m. $30-$500. Mavericks Dance Hall Buda, 275 Old San Antonio Road, Buda. 512-529-2565. www.buda.mavericksdancehall.com 20 SANMARKET SUNDOWN Presented by Studio San Martian and KHuck Productions, sanMARKET SUNdown is held on the rst and third Sundays of the month. The event features a local market with crafts, raes, art and food as well as an open stage showcasing musicians, comedians and poets. Attendees may bring their own beverages and are asked to be conscious of COVID-19 precautions. 5-10 p.m. $10. Studio San Martian, 1904 RR 12, San Marcos. 512-757-8666. www.studiosanmartian.com 26 COME &TUBE ITMUSIC FEST Austin reggae band Audic Empire has partnered with river outtter Texas State Tubes and nonprot TX River Clean-up. This eco-friendly music festival will provide tubers with reggae, rock, hip-hop, funk and indie music as they oat down the San Marcos River. No plastic cups will be allowed. Growler cups and mini kegs will be available for purchase or may be brought from home. 11 a.m.-11 p.m. $50-$120. Texas State Tubes, 101 River Park Drive, Martindale. 512-638-7165. Search “Come & Tube It Music Fest” on Facebook.

Launched by the San Marcos Performing Arts Association in 1987, Summer in the Park returns in June and will occur on Thursdays through Aug. 12. Upcoming performers include The Georges, Shelley King, Brave Combo, Aztex and Sue Foley. The series is held in Plaza Park, where attendees can sit by the San Marcos River. 7:30 p.m. Free. Plaza Park, 206 N. CM Allen Parkway, San Marcos. 512-393-8400. www.summerintheparksm.org 11 THROUGH 27 ‘SEUSSICAL THEMUSICAL’ The Central Texas Theatre Academy presents “Seussical the Musical,” a performance of Dr. Seuss’ “Horton Hears a Who” with a twist. Directed by Bridget Gates, Horton the elephant discovers a speck of dust populated by the Whos and must protect them from dangers and naysayers because, “a person is a person no matter how small.” From June 11-27, shows begin at 7:30 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays, and 2 p.m. on Sundays. $10 (seniors, veterans, students and children with “Discount$5” code at checkout), $15 (adults). The Chambers Theatre, 121 N. Main. St., Buda. 512-537-3987. www.inspiredminds.art 19 GREAT RACE Hagerty Drivers Club presents the Great Race, a 2,300-mile trip featuring some 120 vintage automobiles traveling from San Antonio to Greenville, South Carolina. Racers competing in cars built no later than 1974 will stop in downtown San Marcos, where their cars will be on display. Vehicles built as early as 1907 have completed the journey, which is done without GPS and other modern

03 Keen Country Band 10 Zach Day Acoustic

Find more or submit San Marcos, Buda and Kyle events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

11

SAN MARCOS  BUDA  KYLE EDITION • JUNE 2021

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATION Buda considers transportation bond package for November

A LOOK AT THE BOND The city of Buda is considering calling a bond referendum for the November election. Officials say some $50 million in bonds could be raised without increasing taxes, but the bond package may go higher. The park-related aspects of the bond were still in early development in May, and some road and drainage projects may be eliminated before the potential election is called, which must happen by Aug. 16.

increase in taxes now in order to both prepare for the future and prevent a larger increase later down the road,” Barton said. There are $63,385,000 in road and drainage projects with projected costs listed in city documents and nine others without prices. This total is also missing the cost of any parks projects, which could include new parks or improvements to existing ones. However, the list of projects has not been finalized and is still subject to change. City Council will receive an update on the bond package June 15, and the BBAC will hold more meet- ings to refine the list of projects and their priority. The biggest draw on funding would be reconstruction and maintenance of roads across 12 projects. Among them are the reconstruction of Cole Springs Road for $14.3 million, Old Goforth Road and Old FM 2001 for $6.8 million, and Old Black Colony Road for $6.1 million. There are also safety improve- ments to the downtown railroad crossing for $8.4 million. Downtown streetscape improvements are budgeted at $1.23 million. Additional meetings in late June, July and early August will further develop the project list. Information about the meetings can be found on the city’s website. City Council must call the election by Aug. 16 but will likely do so Aug. 3 if the bond referendum is to move forward, Barton said. “[Buda] continues to be one of the fastest-growing cities in Texas,” he said. “This [bond referendum] helps catch the city up, but also the city is trying to plan ahead for the growth they expect to come and they’re seeing in the pipeline.”

BY WARREN BROWN

residents about their priorities and what should be included. Some residents who responded to a 2020 survey conducted by Texas State University voiced concerns over debt incurred by bond elec- tions, but Grau said the city econ- omy had remained strong through the pandemic. “We’re certainly cognizant and aware of the financial impacts of COVID-19 and what is happening to individual families here, but we are still seeing a robust economy here in Buda,” Grau said. “Our sales tax num- bers are strong. Our hotel occupancy tax numbers were probably impacted the most, but they’re starting to rebound as well.” Gap Strategies co-founder Jeff Barton also noted a much more substantial number of participants voiced support for the projects in spite of potential tax increases. For the 2014 bond, there was a projected tax rate increase of $0.135 per $100 of assessed property value. However, Grau said the actual tax rate increase from the election was less than $0.05 due to increased property values, growth and other factors. According to Barton, new proper- ties developed in the city will provide some protection from tax rate increases through new tax revenue. Grau said the city could issue as much as $50 million in bonds without triggering a tax increase. “Looking to the future, it may make sense to go beyond that thresh- old in ways that could create a small

The city of Buda is developing a bond package in preparation for November’s election, and it would include funding for a series of road, drainage and transportation projects. If called, the bond referendum is also likely to include money for parks, but that portion of the bond is not as far along in the development process. Buda’s last bond election was in 2014, and taxpayers approved $55 million to build a municipal facility and public safety facility while also providing for street, drainage and park improvements. With funds and projects from the previous referendum in short supply after seven years, Assistant City Man- ager Micah Grau said city leadership believes it is an opportune time for new projects and funding. The Buda Bond Advisory Commit- tee was tasked by City Council with outlining what a new bond package should look like. The city also hired Gap Strategies to consult on the bond package and facilitate conversations with “THIS [BOND REFERENDUM] HELPS CATCH THE CITY UP, BUT ALSO THE CITY IS TRYING TO PLANAHEAD FOR THE GROWTH THEY EXPECT TO COME AND THEY’RE SEEING IN THE PIPELINE.” JEFF BARTON, CO-FOUNDER OF CONSULTING FIRM GAP STRATEGIES

ADDED CAPACITY (NEW ROADS) PROJECTS $3,720,000 RECONSTRUCTION AND MAINTENANCE PROJECTS $46,333,000

INTERSECTION AND AUXILIARY LANE PROJECTS $3,700,000 OTHER CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS AND MASTER PLAN PROJECTS $9,632,000 NINE MISCELLANEOUS TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS TBD

PARK PROJECTS TBD

TOTAL FOR PROJECTS SO FAR: $63,385,000

SOURCES: CITY OF BUDA, GAP STRATEGIES/ COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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SAN MARCOS - BUDA - KYLE EDITION • JUNE 2021

EDUCATION BRIEFS

News from Hays & San Marcos CISDs

District seeks $16M in grants to help safely reopen schools

The American Rescue Plan’s Elementary and Secondary School Emergency Relief program is designed to help safely reopen and sustain the safe operation of schools. SMCISD is eligible for about $16 million in ESSER III funding. Some requirements of the funding include:

ABOUT THE ESSER

At least 90% 5% 1% 1%

must be subgranted to local education agencies to help meet needs that arose from the COVID-19 pandemic must be used to address learning loss, including summer and after-school programs

BY BRIAN RASH

“Keep in mind, the grant has just rolled out, literally two, three weeks ago,” Doyle said. “This is just the notification piece.” In June, Doyle plans to return to the board of trustees with an established plan to submit the grant request. Doyle said his team is now under- taking a needs assessment that involves consulting with various community stakeholders that include local businesses and organizations, parents, students, faculty and staff. As part of the ESSER III grant, a minimum of 20% of the funding must go toward evidence-based inter- ventions that respond to students’ academic and emotional needs. “As of right now, the way we have said. “It’s very encouraging that they want to work with us.” Wozniak also said May 21 marked the completion of the second round of Pfizer vaccines for students ages 16-18 as part of a program that began in April. Staff have been working with the Texas Department of Emergency Management as well as local fire- fighter organizations to help vaccinate SMCISD’s 16-, 17- and 18-year-old students with the Pfizer vaccine. Wozniak did not disclose how many students would be vaccinated after May 21 but said once that is done, the district will focus on a vaccine program for students age 12 and older.

SANMARCOS CISD The district is seeking about $16.4 million through a new grant that will aid in the district’s recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic. Mike Doyle, the district’s director of federal programs, told board members May 17 that SMCISD will seek the funding through the American Rescue Plan’s Elementary and Secondary School Emergency Relief program, or ESSER III, that was passed in March. Doyle said the grant is designed to help safely reopen and sustain the safe operation of schools and address the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on students.

must be used for summer enrichment programs

must be used for comprehensive after-school programs

SOURCE: U.S. DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

planned it, we are well above that 20%,” Doyle said. “We are in the pro- cess of finalizing our needs assess- ment through surveys. We’ve sent out student surveys, parent surveys, faculty and staff, and stakeholder surveys.”

The grant plan should be com- plete and submitted to the Texas Education Agency by July, Doyle said, adding the money would be spread out over a three-year period with carryover that would extend to September 2024.

Vaccinationeffort to go throughsummer

Boardmembers sworn in, board leadership chosen

BY BRIAN RASH

SANMARCOS CISD The district will partner with health infrastruc- ture company Curative Inc. as part of an ongoing effort to vaccinate students and staff within the district against COVID-19. Doug Wozniak, the district’s direc- tor of transportation and safety, said during the May 17 board of trustees meeting that Curative is open to customizing the process for SMCISD. “We mentioned mobile sites to the schools as well as fixed sites throughout the summer,” Wozniak

From left: Will McManus, Commissioner Mark Jones and Courtney Runkle are seen May 17.

BY WARREN BROWN

HAYS CISD The board of trustees swore in two members during a May 17 meeting and also appointed new leadership roles. Will McManus was sworn in for his second term as one of the district’s two at-large trustees. He was previously elected in May 2018. Courtney Runkle became the new trustee for District 3. Runkle went on to say special education and Section 504, which

WARREN BROWN/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

provides accommodations for disabled students, would also be among her priorities. Additionally, Vanessa Petrea was chosen to become the school board’s new president; Raul Vela became its vice president; and Meridith Keller became the board secretary.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

QUOTEOFNOTE “LIKE …ALMOST EVERY SCHOOL IN OUR NATION, WE ARE FACING THE RECOVERY OF COVID[-19], BOTH ON THE SIDE OF MENTAL HEALTH AND ON THE SIDE OF ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE.” DENISHA PRESLEY, PRINCIPAL OF SAN MARCOS HIGH NUMBER TOKNOW unanimously May 24 to approve the purchase of 14 buses for roughly $1.6 million from Longhorn Bus Sales using voter-approved bond funding. The district plans to purchase 14 more buses in 2022. $1.61M SCHOOL, SPEAKING ON THE SCHOOL’S NEW SCHEDULES Hays CISD June 21 and June 28 at 5:30 p.m. at Historic Buda Elementary Campus 300 N. San Marcos St., Buda 512-268-2141 • www.hayscisd.net San Marcos CISD June 21 at 6 p.m. at San Marcos High School, 2601 Rattler Road, San Marcos • 512-393-6700 www.smcisd.net MEETINGSWE COVER DISTRICT HIGHLIGHT HAYS CISD During a May 17 meeting, Hays CISD announced Chief Academic Officer Sandra Dowdy will retire. Dowdy, whose career spans more than 40 years, was credited by Superintendent Eric Wright with starting all-day pre-K, a phonics program and implementing virtual learning. Her successor, Marivel Sedillo, will transition from being director of human resources July 1. Hays CISD’s board of trustees voted

HCISDsetsbudget for newBudaelementaryschool

BY WARREN BROWN

classrooms are expected to have an average of 28 students. Documents comparing Sunfield Elementary School to Uhland Elementary School show a roughly 30% smaller gym at the new school. However, Sunfield will have slightly larger library and dining spaces but will have substantially more adminis- tration space. The new elementary school will also have more rooms for life skill instruction and special education. Additionally, it will have six collab- oration spaces to Uhland’s two and seven teacher planning rooms, which Uhland does not have any of. The school will be situated on some 16.5 acres, and the facility will be roughly 114,000 square feet.

SUNFIELD ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

HAYS CISD The board of trustees voted unanimously to approve a $38.49 million budget for the con- struction of a new elementary school in Buda’s Sunfield development. The budget total is the guaranteed maximum price from contractor Bartlett Cocke, which is based in San Antonio but has an office in Austin. District documents estimate construction will be completed July 29, 2022, and it will be able to serve as many as 900 students. The school was expected to accept its first students in the 2022 fall semester. According to district documents, the average classroom size for pre-K through first grade is expected to be 19, and second- through fifth-grade

Hays CISD broke ground on a new school in Buda’s Sunfield Development on June 1. Here is what to expect at the new campus.

$38.49M

Price

July 29, 2022

Completion

Fall semester 2022

Opens

900

Student capacity

Class size for pre-K through first grade Class size for second through fifth grade

19

28

SOURCE: HAYS CISD/ COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Officials discuss potential November bond election for district’s failed propositions

issue when it came to the administra- tion building. “The general feedback that I heard was that people didn’t really fully understand the need for the admin- istration building. It wasn’t clearly explained,” he said. The curriculum and instruc- tion department is housed in a 26,500-square-foot section of Live Oak Academy. The new administration building would also include a renovation of the former district transportation headquarters for additional space at the same location. If the election is called by the board by the August deadline, and if voters approve it, construction on the new administration facility would be expected to begin in January 2022.

BY WARREN BROWN

combined $46,873,599, did not pass. Central to the discussion with members of the facilities and bond oversight committee, or FBOC, was a proposed central administration build- ing valued at roughly $29.8 million, which was not supported by 52.8% of voters in the last election. During the meeting, trustee Will McManus shared his belief that com- munication to voters was the main

HAYS CISD During a May 24 meeting, Hays CISD’s board of trustees discussed a potential bond referendum for this year’s Nov. 1 election. The district received voter approval for three bond prop- ositions during the recent May election, totaling $191,585,092, but three other propositions valued at a PASS / NO PASS On May 1, voters did not approve all of a proposed bond proposition for Hays CISD. Those amounts break down as follows:

Approved: $191,585,092 Not approved: $46,873,599

SOURCE: HAYS CISD/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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