Southwest Nashville | June 2020

SOUTHWEST NASHVILLE EDITION 2020 HEALTHCARE EDITION

ONLINE AT

VOLUME 2, ISSUE 3  JUNE 20JULY 24, 2020

Black Lives Matter protests inNashville

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IMPACTS

4 RECENT HIGHLIGHTS

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CONTINUING CARE DURING COVID19 Local health care providers are worried that the COVID-19 outbreak is keeping people experiencing symptoms of life-threatening health conditions away from emergency rooms.

Coronavirus eects on the health care industry continue Area hospitals see drop in emergency visits, expand telehealth reach in pandemic

There are some signs and symptoms of medical emergencies for which patients should always seek immediate treatment, according to health ocials. WHEN TO SEEK EMERGENCY CARE

Diculty breathing or shortness of breath

Diculty speaking

Chest or upper abdominal pressure or pain

Sudden or severe pain

Confusion

“MANY TIMES, SYMPTOMS CAN FLUCTUATE, ANDUNLESS THEYARE REALLY INTENSE AND SEVERE, PEOPLE FORGO SEEKINGHELP FOR THOSE IMMEDIATELYNOW IN LIGHT OF THIS PANDEMIC. ... IF YOUHAVE THOSE SYMPTOMS, IT’S TIME TO COME BACKANDRECEIVE THE CARE THAT YOUNEED.”

BY DYLAN SKYE AYCOCK

As health care systems nationwide adapt to ongo- ing challenges caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, hospitals in Southwest Nashville are working to ensure patients continue to receive emergency and preventive care. Hospitals in Nashville and statewide are see- ing record numbers of patients through telehealth and other services, but physicians are nding that patients are slow in returning to emergency rooms— or, in some cases, avoiding care altogether. Nearly 45% of adults in Tennessee surveyed in the U.S. Census Bureau’s Household Pulse Survey reported delayingmedical care between April 23-May 26 because of COVID-19. While the survey does not specify whether resi- dents have postponed emergency care, physicians at TriStar Centennial and Ascension Saint Thomas said they have seen a sharp decrease in the number of patients seeking emergency services since the start of the pandemic. As of early June, hospitals had yet to see a return to the level of ambulance trac they were experiencing before coronavirus hit the region in March. “Emergency room visits have not rebounded back to the pre-COVID levels,” said Dr. Chris Jones, chief of sta at TriStar Centennial. “We’re seeing an CONTINUED ON 16

DR. GREG JAMES, ASCENSION SAINT THOMAS CHIEF CLINICAL OFFICER

Hospitals in Southwest Nashville have safety protocols in place to help prevent infection. WHAT TO EXPECT UPON ARRIVAL

Masks must be worn inside facilities.

Patients and visitors will be screened for symptoms.

Waiting room chairs will be spaced 6 feet apart.

Visitation restrictions may be in place.

“WE USE ENHANCEDPRECAUTIONS NOWFOR EVERY PATIENT THAT COMES IN. FOR EXAMPLE, IF I CAME INWITH CHEST PAIN, ... IT’S STILL POSSIBLE IT COULDBE BOTH COVID19ANDAHEART ATTACK. WE ASSUME THAT EACHPATIENT COULDHAVE COVID19, AND INDOING SO, WE AVOIDANYRISKOF CONTAMINATIONAND SPREAD.”

DR. CHRIS JONES, TRISTAR CENTENNIAL CHIEF OF STAFF

SOURCE: U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES, ASCENSION SAINT THOMAS, TRISTAR CENTENNIAL, VANDERBILT UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTERCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Open for appointments

Fully prepared for your safety in our care At Ascension Saint Thomas, the care you need is available today. From routine visits and health screenings to surgical procedures and specialty care, our caregivers are fully prepared for your arrival. As we all embrace a new care experience, Ascension Saint Thomas will continue to maintain strict precautions for your safety in our care including screenings, social distancing and protective equipment. Yet our compassionate, personalized care remains unchanged. When you enter our open doors, you’ll be greeted by the Ascension Saint Thomas caregivers you know and trust. We are now open to schedule appointments for your heart screenings, mammograms, colorectal screenings, back surgery, joint surgery, bariatric surgery and more. And as always, our emergency rooms and care centers are here for your urgent and primary care needs.

Schedule now. Ask about virtual visits. GetSTHealthcare.com

Your care is our calling. TM

© Ascension 2020. All rights reserved.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

CONTENTS

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

IMPACTS

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Now Open, Coming Soon &more TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES 6 News, data on local projects

FROMMARY ELLA: From budget hearings and protests to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, local news in Nashville has never been more important. Our June issue is lled with the news you need to know to keep you informed through it all. Have an issue you want to know more about? Send an email to mhazelwood@communityimpact.com. I’d love to hear from you! Mary Ella Hazelwood, GENERALMANAGER

MARKET TEAM GENERAL MANAGER Mary Ella Hazelwood, mhazelwood@communityimpact.com EDITOR Wendy Sturges REPORTER Dylan Skye Aycock GRAPHIC DESIGNER Chelsea King METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Lacy Klasel MANAGING EDITOR Krista Wadsworth ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Aubrey Galloway CORPORATE LEADERSHIP PUBLISHERS AND FOUNDERS John and Jennifer Garrett GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES DIRECTOR Tess Coverman WHOWE ARE John and Jennifer Garrett began Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 in Pugerville, TX. The company’s mission is to build informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Today we operate across six metropolitan areas, providing hyperlocal, nonpartisan news produced by our full-time journalists in each community we serve. BECOMEA#COMMUNITYPATRON Please join your friends and neighbors in support of Community Impact Newspaper’s legacy of local, reliable reporting by making a contribution. Together, we can continue to ensure citizens stay informed and keep businesses thriving. COMMUNITYIMPACT.COMPATRON CONTACT US 3401 Mallory Lane, Ste. 112 Franklin, TN 37067 • 6159742060 PRESS RELEASES swnnews@communityimpact.com SUBSCRIPTIONS communityimpact.com/subscriptions © 2020 Community Impact Newspaper Co. All Rights Reserved. No reproduction of any portion of this issue is allowed without written permission from the publisher. SUPPORT LOCAL JOURNALISM

HealthCareEdition

FROMWENDY: As the coronavirus pandemic continues, doctors in the Nashville area are reporting a troubling trend of patients postponing care. Our special Health Care Edition cover story delves into the importance of watching for key symptoms and the dangers of postponing that trip to the doctor. Wendy Sturges, EDITOR

HEALTH CARE DIRECTORY News, data and local resources BUSINESS FEATURE

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THIS ISSUE BY THE NUMBERS

Local sources 20

New businesses 5

Health care developments 4

Pages of health care news 6

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CORONAVIRUS COVERAGE All content in this print publication, both editorial and advertisements, was up- to-date as of the press deadline. Due to the fast-changing nature of this event, editorial and advertising information may have changed. Please visit communityimpact.com and advertiser websites for more information. CORRECTION: Volume 2, Issue2 On Page 4, Aquinas College was listed as an institution that received funding from the CARES Act. The school did not receive any CARES Act funding.

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SOUTHWEST NASHVILLE EDITION • JUNE 2020

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

SOUTHWEST NASHVILLE

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Maple Street Biscuit Co.

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COURTESY MAPLE STREET BISCUIT CO.

27TH AVE. N.

rebrand as Maple Street Biscuit Co. www.maplestreetbiscuits.com 5 Clothing boutique Beau & Burch opened June 6 inside The Mall at Green Hills, 2126 Abbott Martin Road, Nashville. The shop specializes in athletic leisure wear, according to its website. Beau & Burch also sells bags, shoes and various fragrances. www.beauandburch.com REOPENINGS 6 Cheekwood Estate and Gardens, lo- cated at 1200 Forrest Park Drive, Nashville, reopened May 22, two months after closing due to the coronavirus pandemic, according to a news release. The reopening coincided with Cheekwood’s 60th anniversary. All 55 acres of Cheekwood’s botanical gardens are open for visitors, including the Blevins Jap- anese Garden and the Ann & Monroe Carell Jr. Family Sculpture Trail. 615-356-8000. www.cheekwood.org 7 Colts Chocolates reopened its kiosk inside The Mall at Green Hills, 2126 Abbott Martin Road, Nashville, on June 2, according to a news release. The com- pany, which offers various chocolates and other desserts, opened a new retail store on the same day at its factory in Ingle- wood at 3611 Gallatin Pike, Nashville. 615-251-0100. www.coltschocolates.com 8 Tacos With a Twist reopened June 2 in Berry Hill at 810 Gale Lane Ste. 104, Nashville, after temporarily closing all restaurant operations in mid-March. The restaurant serves specialty tacos, includ- ing hot chicken, coconut shrimp, smoked fish and other varieties, as well as salads, quesadillas and customizable dishes. 615-649-8118. www.tacoswithatwist.com

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NOWOPEN 1 Red’s 615 Kitchen opened a brick-and- mortar location May 23 near Centennial Park at 115 27th Ave. N., Nashville. The restaurant, which also operates as a food truck in the region, serves hot chicken, vari- ous sides and more. Hog Heaven previously occupied the space but closed in November after more than 30 years in business. 615-400-1454. www.reds615kitchen.com

2 Meal-prep company Twisted Foods opened for meal registration June 1 in Hillsboro Village at 2111 Belcourt Ave., Nashville. The business will begin serving dine-in and takeout options on June 22,

sides, desserts and weekend brunch specials, according to its website. www.bellemeadeplantation.com 4 Maple Street Biscuit Co. opened June 2 in Berry Hill at 2407 8th Ave. S., Ste. 105, Nashville, according to a social media post from the company. The restaurant’s menu features biscuits, waffles, house- made jams and more. The location was most recently home to Holler & Dash, which closed all locations in January to

according to its website. www.twistedfoods.menu

3 Belle Meade Meat and Three opened June 1 on the grounds of the Belle Meade Plantation, 5025 Harding Pike, Nashville. The restaurant offers smoked meats,

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY DYLAN SKYE AYCOCK

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Colts Chocolates

Frist Art Museum

Kenect Nashville

COURTESY COLTS CHOCOLATES

COURTESY FRIST ART MUSEUM

COURTESY KENECT NASHVILLE

FEATURED IMPACT KENECT NASHVILLE Kenect Nashville, an apartment building designed for working professionals, will open its rst round of units July 1, according to the company. Along with studio, one- and three-bedroom units, the 20-story building doubles as a coworking space for residents and nonresidents. “People want to be a part of something bigger in their community,” Kenect Nashville Executive Director Carroll VanHook said. “Because the way people live and work is changing, we oer curated networking opportunities and hospitality-style on-site amenities for our residents and members. ... Music City is the perfect market for us to introduce this concept.”

9 The Frist Art Museum will reopen in phases at 919 Broadway, Nashville, beginning June 22 for members and July 1 for the general public, according to a news release. All exhibitions that opened before the Frist closed March 15 will be extended past their original closing dates. 615-244-3340. www.fristartmuseum.org CLOSINGS 10 After three decades in Green Hills, Shalimar Fine Indian Cuisine permanent- ly closed May 26 at 3711 Hillsboro Pike, Nashville, according to a social media post from the restaurant. The owner cited the economic impact of COVID-19 as well as an intersection alignment project planned in the area of the restaurant as reasons for closing. According to the post, the owner hopes to reopen Shalimar

at a new location. 615-269-8577. www.shalimarnashville.com

According to VanHook, all residents will have access to the building’s amenities. An opening date for the coworking space will be announced at a later date.

11 Tuesday Morning announced March 27 that it has filed for Chapter 11 bank- ruptcy protection. As a result, the com- pany plans to close its Green Hills store at 4108 Hillsboro Pike, Nashville. While a closing date has not been announced, the company said it will begin closing one third of its stores over the summer. 615-383-7213. www.tuesdaymorning.com 12 Douglas Corner Cafe owner Mervin Louque announced May 28 that he will permanently close the music venue at 2106 8th Ave. S., Nashville. Douglas Cor- ner Cafe has been closed since mid-March, when city officials ordered bars and music venues to close. 615-298-1688. www.douglascorner.com

800 19th Ave. S., Nashville 615-649-8943 www.kenectnashville.com

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5101 harding pike • cindiearl.com • (615) 353-1823

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SOUTHWEST NASHVILLE EDITION • JUNE 2020

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES Local driver services centers reopen by appointment SAFETY PRECAUTIONS Before reopening Driver

BY WENDY STURGES

ONGOING PROJECTS

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Customers are encouraged to use online services. Customers are required to wear face coverings. Sanitation frequency has increased.

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Capacity is limited to enforce social distancing. Protective screens have been installed at service counters.

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Service Centers to the public, the Tennessee Department of Safety & Homeland Security has put measures in place to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

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As the state works to reopen busi- nesses across the state and drivers return to the road, the Tennessee Department of Safety & Homeland Security has issued new deadlines to renew and apply for new driver’s licenses. While residents are still encour- aged to use the state’s online portal, the state’s Driver’s Services Appoint- ment system for in-person service relaunched May 16 and appointments began May 26, according to the department. “We continue to encourage cus- tomers to utilize our e-Services portal to complete numerous transactions such as renewals, duplicates, paying reinstatement fees, and completing the new resident application,” TDOSHS ocials said via the depart- ment’s website. “We ask the public to please be patient and understanding

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ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF JUNE 11. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT SWNNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM. of temporary barriers have been removed from along the roadway, with the exception of those near the bridge at I-65, which are expected to be removed over the next few weeks, according to TDOT. Timeline: fall 2018-August 2020 Cost: $152.9 million Funding source: TDOT I-440 reconstruction Work is nearing completion on I-440 improvements, which will recon- struct the roadway from I-40 to I-24, creating three lanes of trac in each direction, repairing noise walls and completing other safety improve- ments. As of late April, the majority

SOURCE: TENNESSEE DEPARTMENT OF SAFETY & HOMELAND SECURITYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

as normal services resume.” According to the department, any drivers with licenses that were set to expire between March 12 and June 29 now have until Nov. 15 to renew. The department of safety will issue letters to those aected, which drivers should hold on to as proof of the extension. New residents who moved to Tennessee any time between March 12 and May 31 now have until June 30 to obtain a Tennessee driver’s license. For residents who need to take a road skills test to obtain a license, an appointment will need to be made, according to the department.

Appointment availability at centers began June 15. Additionally, while the federal deadline for REAL ID requirements have been extended until Oct. 1, 2021, Tennessee Driver Services Centers will resume issuing REAL IDS beginning July 6. When visiting a service center, visitors are required to wear a face covering or mask and stand at least 6 feet apart from others when possible. They will also be required to have their temperature checked and answer COVID-19 screening ques- tions, according to the department.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

NEWS BRIEFS MetroNashville upgrading tornadowarning system

The Nashville area was damaged in a March 3 storm. (Alex Hosey/Community Impact Newspaper) SOUNDING ALARM Of the 93 active tornado sirens in Davidson 40 65 Although tornado season peaks during the spring, tornadoes have historically been reported in every month. SOURCE: NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATIONCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER WHENARE TORNADOESMOST COMMON INMIDDLE TENNESSEE? The region’s peak tornado season is in March, April and May, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. While Tennessee has averaged Middle Tennessee has averaged tornadoes a year since 1995. tornadoes a year since 1995. tornadoes hit the state in 2011. tornadoes in 2020. 30 17 106 18 As of May 8, the region has had

BY DYLAN SKYE AYCOCK

disregard tornado warnings under the current system. “If a tornado is sighted or warned anywhere in the county, it doesn’t matter if it’s in Belle Meade or some- where like Madison or Hermitage. All sirens go o,” Swann said. “With the new system, it will be controlled to only those warned areas.” As tornado-warned storms move through the county, new sirens will sound as additional warnings are issued, according to Swann. In late April, the Oce of Emer- gency Management began installing sirens at 20 new sites across the county. These sites will expand the system’s existing footprint into more rural areas of the county and bring the total to 113 sirens. The locations of the new sirens, which are being installed at parks, schools and public venues, will be announced later this spring.

Metro Nashville is working to complete a project to upgrade the county’s tornado warning system to set o sirens only in areas where warnings are issued. The $1.9 million project began in September and is expected to be com- pleted later this year. The new tornado siren systemwill provide polygonal alerts, which allow sirens to sound alarms only in areas covered by tor- nado warnings, according to William Swann, director chief of the Nashville Oce of Emergency Management. Swann said the current system, which was last upgraded in 2013, serves as a “blanket,” meaning that all 93 sirens sound when the National Weather Service issues a tornado warning anywhere in the county. Due to the size of Davidson County, Swann said city ocials expressed concerns that residents may

County, 17 are located in Southwest Nashville. Most sirens are installed in public parks and schools.

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Election ocials prepare for increase in absentee voting inAug. 6 election

ABSENTEE VOTING State ocials are projecting an increase in absentee ballots to prevent the risk of contracting coronavirus at a polling place. To vote via mail, voters must ll out an application before election day.

WHO CANVOTE VIA ABSENTEE BALLOT?

BY WENDY STURGES

county election administrators are being cautioned to prepare for that number to increase in August and November. “While unlikely, in order to be prepared, we suggest you plan for 100% of voters over the age of 60 voting absentee by mail,” ocials said in the contingency plan. “The Division of Elections has ordered four million each of mailing envelopes, return envelopes and ballot envelopes.” In June, an order from the Davidson County Chancery Court expanded eligibility requirements to allow any registered voter who believes it is “impossible or unreasonable” to vote in person because of ongoing coronavirus concerns to request an absentee ballot. While a statement from the Tennessee Attorney General’s oce disagreed with the order, the COVID-19 category was still listed on the state absentee ballot application as of press time. Those eligible to vote by absentee ballot must submit a written request to do so by mail, fax or email. The request must be received by July 30 in order to qualify. Voters can nd an application at www.govotetn.com.

Per a COVID-19 contingency plan released by the Tennessee Secretary of State’s Oce in late April, ocials are preparing for a possible inux of voters to cast absentee ballots to avoid going to the polls for the Aug. 6 state and county elections. In a letter to lawmakers, Secretary of State Tre Hargett said the state is preparing for an increase in absentee ballots cast, particularly by older resi- dents. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, individuals age 65 and older are at a higher risk of serious illness if they contract the coronavirus. To qualify for an absentee ballot, the registered voter must be 60 years of age or older; be hospi- talized, ill or physically disabled; be a caretaker of someone who is physically ill or disabled; be living in a care facility outside their county of residence or be a member of the military or a resident living overseas, among other reasons. Voters can also qualify if their doctor les a statement with a local county election commission stating that they are medically unable to vote in person. Election ocials estimate less than 2.5% of voters typically vote via absentee ballot; however,

Only registered voters who meet state qualications can cast an absentee ballot.

Qualications include: • Being 60 years of age or older • Being ill, hospitalized or disabled • Serving in the military or living overseas

• Caring for an

individual who is ill, hospitalized or disabled

• Being medically

unable to vote in person, per a led physician’s statement

HOWCAN I RECEIVE A BALLOT? Voters can apply at www.sos.tn.gov with the following information.

• Election in which the voter wishes to cast a ballot (and their political party, if they wish to vote in a primary) • Reason for voting absentee

• Name • Address of residence • Social Security number • Date of birth • Mailing address for ballot • Signature

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

RECENT HIGHLIGHTS

Community updates

BY DYLAN SKYE AYCOCK AND ALEX HOSEY

BLACK LIVESMATTER PROTESTS INNASHVILLE

Thousands of protesters march in downtown Nashville on June 4 to protest the killings in recent weeks of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor and many others. (Alex Hosey/ Community Impact Newspaper)

Signs with messages decrying racism and police brutality in the U.S. ood the Bicentennial Capitol Mall State Park as the protestors made their way up to the Tennessee State Capitol on June 4. (Alex Hosey/Community Impact Newspaper)

Protesters hold up signs that say “Black Lives Matter” on 7th Avenue North in downtown Nashville. (Dylan Skye Aycock/Community Impact Newspaper)

Protesters march down 7th Avenue North towards downtown Nashville on June 4. (Alex Hosey/Community Impact Newspaper)

Protesters march through downtown Nashville after departing from Bicentennial Capitol Mall State Park. (Dylan Skye Aycock/Community Impact Newspaper)

A long line of protesters holding signs and chanting works its way up the hill to the Capitol on June 4. (Alex Hosey/ Community Impact Newspaper)

The protesters met at 4 p.m. by the bells at the Bicentennial Capitol Mall State Park on June 4, 2020. (Alex Hosey/Community Impact Newspaper)

Protesters hold up signs that include messages against police brutality. (Dylan Skye Aycock/ Community Impact Newspaper)

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SOUTHWEST NASHVILLE EDITION • JUNE 2020

CITY& COUNTY

News fromMetro Nashville & Belle Meade

MetroNashville Public Schools to offer freemeals this summer

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BY DYLAN SKYE AYCOCK

METRONASHVILLE Director of Schools Adrienne Battle announced at the May 26 board meeting that the district will continue to provide free meals for children age 18 and younger throughout the summer. The district will distribute meals at 16 school locations and 40 bus stops, including Rose Park Middle School and H. G. Hill Middle School in Southwest Nashville. Meals will be available for pickup on weekdays from 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Additionally, the Metropolitan Action Commission will provide free breakfast and lunch meals for children under the age of 18 through the summer from June 1-July 31. Due to COVID-19, the agency will provide grab-and-go meals on weekdays at more than 40 locations

in Nashville. The program is being funded through the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Summer Food Service Program. “We are appreciative of the partners who were able to either adjust their summer program gathering sizes or allow their buildings to be open just to provide meals so that children will have access to nutritious meals throughout the summer,” said Marvin D. Cox, director of Metro Action Community Services, in a release. The Metropolitan Action Com- mission will utilize meal delivery in select areas of Nashville. Meals are available for pickup at three locations in Southwest Nashville, including Easley Community Center, Sevier Park Community Center and Watson Grove Baptist Church.

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SUMMERMEAL PROGRAMS INNASHVILLE Metro Action Commission distribution sites

MNPS distribution sites 4 Rose Park Middle School 5 H.G. Hill Middle School

1 Easley Center Recreation Center 2 Sevier Park Community Center 3 Watson Grove Baptist Church

BelleMeade sees 5th straight year of small population declines

census data. Since 2014, the city has seen a 1.3% decrease in the number of residents in the city. However, since 2010, the city’s population has varied slightly year by year, rising to a peak of 3,003 in 2014. Over the last 10 years, the city population has changed by a margin of fewer than 100 residents, according to historic data. In the 2010 decennial census count, the city’s population was 2,912, according to historic data. Just north of Belle Meade in Nash- ville, the city saw population growth of less than 1% from 2018-19.

BY WENDY STURGES

BELLEMEADE New 2019 popula- tion estimates from the U.S. Census Bureau released May 21 show the city of Belle Meade has had a population decrease for the fifth year in a row. The 3.1-square-mile city saw a slight population decrease of 0.7% from 2018-19 down to 2,858 residents, marking a 10-year low, according to

Metro Parks and Recreation began reopening select park facilities in late May. (Dylan Skye Aycock/Community Impact Newspaper)

Community centers, other park facilities in Nashville reopen at 50%capacity

POPULATION CHANGES The city of Belle Meade has seen slight changes to its population over the years.

BY DYLAN SKYE AYCOCK

can be maintained”—whichever is less—according to a news release. As part of the department’s reopening plan, all employees and visitors inside these facilities must wear face coverings. Water foun- tains, locker rooms and meeting rooms are closed at community centers. Additionally, playgrounds, dog parks, outdoor pools and basketball courts will remain closed until further notice.

3,500

METRONASHVILLE Metro Parks and Recreation began to reopen several park facilities at partial capacity May 26 as was announced May 21 by the department. City-owned facilities, including community centers, tennis courts, nature centers, golf clubhouses, Centennial Sportsplex and the Par- thenon, reopened at 50% capacity or “to the extent safe social distancing

-1.3%

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0

2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019

SOURCE: U.S. CENSUS BUREAU/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

Metro Nashville Council Meets July 7 and July 21 at 6:30 p.m. in the David Scobey Council Chamber at the Metro Council, 1 Public Square, Nashville. 615-862-6780. www.nashville.gov/metro-council Metro Nashville Public Schools Meets July 14 at 5 p.m. at the MNPS Administration Building, 2601 Bransford Ave., Nashville. 615-259-4636. www.mnps.org Belle Meade Board of Commissioners Meets July 15 at 4 p.m. at City Hall, 4705 Harding Road, Nashville. 615-297-6041. www.citybellemeade.org MEETINGSWE COVER CITY HIGHLIGHTS METRONASHVILLE Mayor John Cooper announced June 8 he is requesting council approval to use $24 million in CARES Act funding to purchase laptops for every student in Metro Nashville Public Schools for remote learning. METRONASHVILLE PUBLIC SCHOOLS School board Chair Anna Shepherd died in early June at age 68. Shepard had served on the board since 2010 and was in her second term as board chair.

Nashville to keep door open for future economic incentives

Nashville to begin full deployment of body cameras

BY WENDY STURGES

Member Kyonzté Toombs, who sponsored the bill. While some council members argued it would be beneficial to have more data on incentive deals to determine if a deal is worth the money, others said the city should not close the door on any deals that could bring more jobs to the area at a time when many residents are experiencing unemployment. “Our residents are going to be helped the best by getting back to work,” District 19 Council Member Freddie O’Connell said. “So if there is an opportunity that comes to bring good jobs to people in our community, I believe that’s beneficial to our neighbors. We’re looking not only at struggling to fund [Metro Nashville Public Schools]; we’re struggling to fund Opportunity Now, which brings our young people jobs.”

BY DYLAN SKYE AYCOCK

METRONASHVILLE Metro Nashville Council voted 20-14 against a resolution May 19 that would have put a one-year pause on any city economic development incentives as officials work to balance the fiscal year 2020-21 budget. Sponsors for the resolution said it was intended to prevent the city frommaking any deals that might not bring enough economic benefits to the city, especially while the city is facing a tight budget. “With the current budget constraints that the city is experi- encing, there’s a lot of conversation around incentives that the city has given out to corporations in the past [for which] we as a body have not been able to provide any clear indication of what the [benefits have] been,” said District 2 Council

METRONASHVILLE The Metro Nashville Police Department will begin deploying body-worn cam- eras among officers in July, Mayor John Cooper announced June 8. “George Floyd, Ahmaud Arbery [and] Eric Garner, we know the names of these men and other black victims of police brutality because of cell phone recordings captured by eyewitnesses or bystanders,” Cooper said. “Body- worn cameras provide accountabil- ity when it comes to public safety.” As part of the deployment process, 1,325 officers and 30 Metro Park officers will be equipped with body-worn cameras. The operating cost for the cam- eras will be $2.1 million in 2020-21, with additional payments deferred until 2023, Cooper said.

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• Preventative, restorative, orthodontic, or surgical procedures all at one place with the same doctor.

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SOUTHWEST NASHVILLE EDITION • JUNE 2020

Health Care Edition 2020

Data and information on health care trends in Metro Nashville

HEALTH CARE SNAPSHOT SOUTHWEST NASHVI LLE

COMMUNITYDATA Healthy Nashville, an initiative from the Metro Public Health Department, tracks many dierent health statistics.

Statewide rankings show Metro Nashville has high health outcomes in relation to other areas across the state; however, Davidson County received lower scores for socioeconomic and environmental factors.

COMPILED BY WENDY STURGES

HOWHEALTHY IS YOUR COUNTY?

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HEALTH CARE ACCESS

These rankings are updated annually but include data from previous years. There are other factors considered that are not listed below.

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Children insured: 93.3%

Adults insured: 83.9%

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HEALTH OUTCOMES:

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• LENGTHOFLIFE • QUALITYOFLIFE , such as the number of poor mental and physical health days reported

Davidson County

2020 STATEWIDE HEALTH CARE RANKINGS (out of 95 counties)

residents 94 PER 100,000

Primary care provider rate:

HEALTH FACTORS:

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HEALTH OUTCOMES

• HEALTHBEHAVIORS , such as smoking, obesity, physical activity, excessive drinking, alcohol-impaired driving deaths, sexually transmitted infections and teen births • CLINICAL CARE , including health insurance coverage; number of physicians, dentists and mental health providers; preventable hospital stays; and u vaccinations • SOCIOECONOMIC FACTORS , such as educational attainment levels, children in poverty, income inequality and violent crime • PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT FACTORS , such as air pollution, drinking water violations, housing problems and long commutes

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Length of life

9

EARLY CHILDHOOD HEALTH

Quality of life

19

HEALTH FACTORS

Infant mortality rate:

4

Health behaviors

Low birth weight: 9.2%

per 1,000 live births 7.5DEATHS

38 58 30

Clinical care

Socioeconomic

Physical environment

CORONAVIRUS CASE ANALYSIS

CASE BREAKDOWN IN DAVIDSON COUNTY

COUNTY CASES BY AGE

Unknown: 130

Davidson County saw case totals sharply rise and then slow over the past several weeks; however, positive case numbers began to trend upwards again in June.

KEY:

Total cases: 6,290

22.7%

Active cases

1.2%

Deaths

NEW CORONAVIRUS CASES PER WEEK IN DAVIDSON COUNTY

76.1%

Recoveries

March 10-14 March 15-21 127 March 22-28 116 April 4 498 April 5-11 370 April 12-18 420 April 19-25 605 May 2 637 May 3-9 585 13

Cases per 100,000 residents

Tests conducted per 100,000 residents

912

6,914

March 29-

STATEWIDE CASE BREAKDOWN

CASES PER COUNTY Coronavirus cases in the Greater Nashville area

KEY:

Total cases: 28,340

ROBERTSON 553

33.1%

Active cases

SUMNER 975

April 26-

1.6%

Deaths

65

65.3%

Recoveries

CHEATHAM 143 DAVIDSON 5,801

May 17-23 May 10-16

514

WILSON 475

Cases per 100,000 residents

Tests conducted per 100,000 residents

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593

407

5,963

May 24-30 May 31- June 6

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575 702

WILLIAMSON 621

RUTHERFORD 1,479

SOURCES: ROBERT WOOD JOHNSON FOUNDATION, UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN POPULATION HEALTH INSTITUTE, COUNTYHEALTHRANKINGS.ORG, TENNESSEE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, METRO PUBLIC HEALTH DEPARTMENTCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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All coronavirus data is up to date as of press time June 11. For updated coronavirus data and information, go to communityimpact.com.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

HOSPITALS

Health Care Edition 2020

Information on local hospitals in Southwest Nashville

TRAUMA LEVEL TENNESSEE

1

4

1

4

40

1

40

70

LEVEL I

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• Highest level of care • Full range of specialists, equipment in-house 24/7 • Research requirements

Ascension Saint Thomas Midtown Hospital

LEVEL I I

• Oer specialists on call 24/7 • Has transfer agreements to Level I facilities • Research component not required but desired

PHOTOS BY DYLAN SKYE AYCOCKCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

MEDICAL CENTER DR.

MEDICAL CENTER DR.

2

LEVEL I I I

440

3

440

3

• Oers resources for emergency surgery, intensive care • Has transfer agreements for transfer to Level I and II centers

5

70S

5

LEVEL IV

Ascension Saint Thomas West Hospital

70S

• Provides initial evaluation, stabilization, diagnostic capabilities • Has transfer agreements for transfer to higher level trauma centers

4

2

TENNESSEE 2

WHITE BRIDGE RD.

NICU LEVEL

WHITE BRIDGE RD.

LEVEL I

• Well nursery • Can care for mothers, infants at 35-plus weeks gestation with rou- tine perinatal problems • Anesthesiology, lab, radiology, ul- trasonography, blood bank services and pharmacist available WOODMONT BLVD.

WOODMONT BLVD.

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TriStar Centennial Medical Center

COMPILED BY WENDY STURGES

6159361000 www.childrenshospitalvanderbilt.org

1 Ascension Saint Thomas Midtown Hospital 2000 Church St., Nashville 6152845555 www.healthcare.ascension.org • Trauma level: N/A • NICU level: III • Total employees: 2,800+ • Total beds: 680+ • Notable programs and specialties: Joint Commissioner-certied primary stroke center, advanced chest pain center, Beaman Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Saint Thomas Cancer Care Center, Blue Distinction Center in bariatric care 2 Ascension Saint Thomas West Hos- pital 4220 Harding Pike, Nashville 6152222111 www.healthcare.ascension.org • Trauma level: N/A • NICU level: N/A • Total employees: 1,700+ • Total beds: 540+ • Notable programs and specialties: Heart and vascular health, brain and spine conditions, stroke care, breast health, internal medicine, palliative care 3 Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt 2200 Children’s Way, Nashville

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• Trauma level: I • NICU level: IV • Total physicians: 400+ • Total beds: 300+

LEVEL I I

• Specialty care nursery • Can care for mothers, infants at 32-plus weeks gestation with problems to be resolved rapidly • In addition to Level I requirements, dietician and physical and respiratory therapists available

• Notable programs and specialties: cancer, transplant, trauma, sickle cell disease, developmental disorders, ENT, general surgery, Pediatric Heart Institute, The Fetal Center at Vanderbilt 4 TriStar Centennial Medical Center 2300 Patterson St., Nashville 6153421000 www.tristarcentennial.com • Trauma level: N/A • NICU level: III • Total employees: 3,100+ • Total beds: 740+ • Notable programs and specialties: TriStar Centennial Heart & Vascular Center, TriStar Centennial Women’s Hospital, The Children’s Hospital at TriStar Centennial, Sarah Cannon Cancer Institute at TriStar Centennial Medical Center, TriStar Centennial Advanced Joint Replacement Institute, TriStar Centennial Parthenon Pavilion 5 Vanderbilt University Medical Center 1211 Medical Center Drive, Nashville

LEVEL I I I *

• Neonatal intensive care unit • Can care for mothers, infants of all ages with mild to critical illnesses • Can provide consultation for pediatric medical and surgical subspecialists; can perform major pediatric surgery on-site

Vanderbilt University Medical Center

• Trauma level: I • NICU level: IV • Total employees: 24,000+ • Total beds: 1,100+

• Notable programs and specialties: Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt Eye Institute, Vanderbilt Psychiatric Hospital, Vanderbilt Stallworth Rehabilitation Center, Vanderbilt Lifeight NOTE: THIS LIST IS NOT COMPREHENSIVE OF ALL PROGRAMS OFFERED IN THE SOUTHWEST NASHVILLE AREA. SOME EMPLOYEE AND BED ESTIMATES MAY HAVE CHANGED AS A RESULT OF THE ONGOING CORONAVIRUS PANDEMIC.

LEVEL IV*

• Advanced NICU • Can care for mothers, infants of all gestational ages as well as the most complex, critically ill infant cases • Comprehensive pediatric medical and surgical subspecialists on-site; can provide major surgeries, includ- ing repair of complex conditions SOURCES: TENNESSEE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, AMERICAN TRAUMA SOCIETYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER *MEET LEVEL I AND LEVEL II REQUIREMENTS AS WELL

6153225000 www.vumc.org

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SOUTHWEST NASHVILLE EDITION • JUNE 2020

DEVELOPMENT UPDATES

Health Care Edition 2020

COMPILED BY BY DYLAN SKYE AYCOCK

DYLAN SKYE AYCOCKCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

DYLAN SKYE AYCOCKCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

COURTESY MONROE CARELL JR. CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL

VANDERBILT UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER ORAL HEALTH CLINIC Vanderbilt University Medical Center plans to open an oral health clinic at the mixed-use development Belcourt Village, 2111 Belcourt Ave., Ste. 201, Nashville, according to a permit issued by Metro Nashville. Vanderbilt currently operates a dental clinic on the hospital’s main campus. An opening date has not been announced. Space: 8,329 square feet Status: in planning

ASCENSION SAINT THOMAS HOSPITAL FOR REHABILITATION Ascension Saint Thomas, in partnership with Kindred Healthcare, is constructing a freestanding rehabilitation hospital on the grounds of its Midtown hospital campus at 21st Avenue North and Patterson Street, according to a release. Upon completion, the 40-bed facility will replace the 24-bed acute rehab unit inside Ascension Saint Thomas Midtown Hospital. The hospital serves a population of 1.9 million.

MONROE CARELL JR. CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL AT VANDERBILT Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt opened a neonatal intensive care unit on the new 11th oor of the hospital in March. Big Machine Neighborhood, the 23-bed NICU, is a partnership between the hospital and Big Machine Label Group and features music-themed art. The oor also includes 15 acute care beds, increasing the total number of beds in the hospital from 305 to 343. Space: 40,000 square feet Status: complete

Space: 98,237 square feet Status: under construction

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VANDERBILT HEALTH BELLE MEADE AMBULATORY SURGICAL CENTER Vanderbilt University Medical Center has plans to renovate the former Harris Teeter at 6002 Hwy. 100, Nashville, into an ambulatory surgical center, the hospital announced in March. The facility, which is expected to open in early 2021, will oer urology, orthopedic and oncology services. The center will feature seven operating rooms and 18 exam rooms.

Space: 50,000 square feet Status: under construction

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DYLAN SKYE AYCOCKCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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Call 615-320-1720 or email amartin@portfolioIA.com PortfolioIA 3100 West End Ave. Suite 930 Nashville TN 37203

Securities and Investment Advisory Services offered through Silver Oak Securities, Inc. Member FINRA/SIPC, (A Tennessee-based broker/dealer) PortfolioIA and Silver Oak Securities, Inc. are separate entities

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

Health Care Edition 2020

HOWTOHELP Make a donation. More than 900 donations in quantities from $50-

$100 have been made to the United Way of Greater Nashville’s COVID-19 Response Fund; however, no donation is too small to help local nonprots. 1 Go to www.unitedwaynashville.org/donate. 2 Click “COVID-19 Response Fund” from among the donation options. HOWTO GET HELP While United Way does not provide funding assistance directly to individuals, the nonprot can connect residents with local resources. 3 Make a donation to help residents in Davidson, Williamson, Robertson, Cheatham and Hickman counties. 1 Call the UWGN 211 line for help accessing food, social services and other emergency assistance. 2 Visit www.nashvilleresponsefund.com/individuals for links to nd help with child care, domestic violence, rent and mortgage assistance, mental health care and more. SOURCE: UNITED WAY OF GREATER NASHVILLECOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

NONPROFIT

United Way of Greater Nashville launched its COVID19 Response Fund in March to support local nonprots. (Alex Hosey/Community Impact Newspaper)

UnitedWay of Greater Nashville Nonprot’s COVID19 fund aims to address eects of coronavirus A s many local nonprots were still dealing with the fallout from a tornado that hit the Nashville area in March, the region was BY WENDY STURGES

never had to ask for help before.” To decide how funding is distributed, the United Way uses data compiled from its 211 help line as well as from community partners to nd where dollars are needed, according to Chief Community Impact Ocer Erica Mitchell. “We’ve been looking at a lot of dierent data sources to inform the process. 211 has been a great source of data for us. We’ve had friends from [the Vanderbilt University Oce of Equity, Diversity and Inclusion] who have really helped us put together trend data using 211 so that we can see what the top needs are across the community,” Mitchell said. “We knew for a period of time that housing insecurity was one of the top needs—people needed assistance with rent and mortgage—but then, there were also conversations and signals around things like ... people being able to have personal protective equipment so that they would feel safe.” Mitchell said another trend from the past few weeks has been an increase in demand for mental health care. “We have seen lots of spikes in mental health and crisis counseling needs, so organizations that have been able to pivot to telehealth counseling have also been very high on the support list,” she said.

quickly hit with its rst cases of coronavirus. The illness soon spurred an unprecedented public health emergency, causing widespread unemployment and creating greater need for health care funding. On March 17, ocials with the United Way of Greater Nashville announced the launch of the COVID-19 Response Fund to help provide nancial support to local nonprots that are helping to provide health care as well as to address some of the unforeseen eects to the coronavirus. To date, the UWGN, which has been in Nashville for nearly a century, has received approximately $5 million in donations to its COVID-19 Response Fund and has distributed more than half of that to local nonprots, including AGAPE, Charis Health Center and Faith Family Medical Center in Metro Nashville. “The key thing has been distributing the funding as quickly as possible,” UWGN President and CEO Brian Hassett said. “Initially, the focus was on helping people pay their bills—people that had lost their jobs and, in many cases, [people who] had

UNITEDWAY OF GREATER NASHVILLE

250 Venture Circle, Nashville covid19@unitedwaygn.org www.unitedwaynashville.org

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Thanyk ou!

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SOUTHWEST NASHVILLE EDITION • JUNE 2020

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