Bellaire - Meyerland - West University Edition | April 2022

BELLAIRE MEYERLAND WEST UNIVERSITY EDITION

VOLUME 3, ISSUE 12  APRIL 130, 2022

ONLINE AT

HISD releases strategic plan

Centralization: Funding for some departments moved from campuses to central oce Houston ISD’s proposed ve-year strategic plan calls for changes to how the district operates. A NEW SCHOOL OF THOUGHT

IMPACTS

6

Compensation: $82.7 million to boost employee pay in for 2022-23 school year

TODO LIST

8

Equity: Campus budgets frozen March 3 with decit projected

LOCAL VOTER GUIDE 2022 INSIDE INFORMATION West University updates Edloe Street plans TRANSPORTATION

SOURCE: HOUSTON ISD COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Details of a proposed ve-year strategic plan were released inMarch to kick o budget talks. (Shawn Arrajj/Community Impact Newspaper)

Houston ISD Superintendent Millard House II has big ambitions for the dis- trict’s future, but getting there, he said, is going to require tough decisions. The start of that process kicked o BY SHAWN ARRAJJ & SOFIA GONZALEZ

with the February release of House’s ve-year strategic plan for the dis- trict, and a few of those decisions were made more immediate at a budget workshop in early March. With a $69milliondecit looming for

the scal year ending in June, House announced a central oce hiring freeze eective immediately, a reduc- tion in central oce budgets and a campus-based spending freeze for the

9

CONTINUED ON 16

Houston real estate prices soar to historic levels

Breaking records

The median price of homes sold in the Greater Houston area has been on the rise. $328K

14

$300K $250K $200K $150K $100K $50K $0

BY GEORGE WIEBE

Single-family home prices across the U.S. have risen faster in the last two years than at any point in time since the coun- try began tracking home prices in 1963, according to data from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. That trend can also be seen in the Greater Houston area, where the median price of single-family homes sold has risen by more than 30% since the start of the pandemic in March CONTINUED ON 18

SOURCE: HOUSTON ASSOCIATION OF REALTORSCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER '13 '14 '15 '16 '17 '18 '19 '20 '21 '22

100%TAQUITO

15

Support local journalism by donating $120 (total or in monthly installments) and receive

Scan to give today. It's that easy!

without joint pain KEEP YOU MOVING

Live life without joint pain. At Houston Methodist Orthopedics & Sports Medicine, we know that joint pain affects every part of your life. With treatment plans customized for you, our specialists offer a full range of advanced nonsurgical and surgical techniques. Our expert joint care includes: • Innovative pain control methods

Memorial City

• Physical therapy to improve mobility and range of motion • The latest technology, including minimally invasive surgical techniques that help reduce recovery time

Bellaire

Texas Medical Center

Schedule an appointment: houstonmethodist.org/jointpain 713.441.9000

2

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

C E L E B R A T E W I T H U S

PA S S I ON WE E K E X P E R I E NC E Wednesday & Thursday • April 13 & 14 • 10AM - 9PM Friday • April 15 • 2-9PM

Prepare your heart for Easter as you walk through Christ’s last days in an immersive, self-guided journey through the stations of the cross.

E A S T E R C E L E B R AT I ON S E RV I C E S GOOD FRIDAY • April 15 • 12PM EASTER SUNDAY • April 17 9:30 & 11:11AM, 5PM + 11AM en Español

FOR MORE INFORMATION, VISIT SECOND.ORG/EASTER

WOODWAY CAMPUS • DR. ED YOUNG, PASTOR 6400 WOODWAY DR AT VOSS RD

3

BELLAIRE - MEYERLAND - WEST UNIVERSITY EDITION • APRIL 2022

Get a $25 signing bonus without breaking a sweat.

Student Checking

that fits you to a

At Trustmark, you don’t have to be an athlete to get a signing bonus. In fact, we’ll give you $25 just for opening your Student Checking account. There’s no monthly maintenance fee, plus, you can access your money anytime, anywhere with mobile banking. Learn more at trustmark.com/studentchecking.

Disclosures: Minimum $50 deposit required to open. To receive the $25 credit, the Student Checking account must be opened between March 21 - June 30, 2022, remain open for 30 days and have a balance greater than $0.00 at the time of the credit. The $25 credit will be deposited into the account on the next business day after 30 days from the date of account opening. Limit of one $25 credit per account.

Don’t overpay on your property taxes. Let Ownwell protest your property taxes and save. Pay just 25% of final tax savings.

89% success rate $1,457 average customer saving

Pay nothing up-front Pay just 25% of final tax savings

5-star customer reviews Sign up in under 5 minutes

Scan before May 16 to get your free savings estimate. Get started today!

Sign up at ownwell.com/impact

Email us at hello@ownwell.com or call us at 512-886-2282

4

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

ABOUT US

Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the rst edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and Pugerville, Texas. We have expanded our operations to include hundreds of employees, our own printing operation and over 30 hyperlocal editions across three states. Our circulation is over 2 million residential mailboxes, and it grows each month with new residents and developments.

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

FROM JAY: Single-family home prices across the U.S. have risen at a record rate in the past two years, and in the Greater Houston area, we have seen a 30% jump since the beginning of the pandemic. Our front-page story this month takes a deep dive into these statistics as well as how the federal interest rate hikes expected this year will aect all aspects of the housing market and other purchasing decisions. Jay McMahon, GENERALMANAGER

Community Impact Newspaper teams include general managers, editors, reporters, graphic designers, sales account executives and sales support, all immersed and invested in the communities they serve. Our mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Our core values are Faith, Passion, Quality, Innovation and Integrity.

FROMSHAWN: Big changes are underway at Houston ISD as district ocials begin the rollout of a new ve-year strategic plan. In this issue, we present a high-level overview of what is being proposed as well as what can be expected in the coming months. Stay tuned to future coverage for the hyperlocal implications for schools in the area. Shawn Arrajj, SENIOR EDITOR

Our purpose is to be a light for our readers, customers, partners and each other.

WHATWE COVER

Sign up for our daily newsletter to receive the latest headlines direct to your inbox. communityimpact.com/ newsletter DAILY INBOX Visit our website for free access to the latest news, photos and infographics about your community and nearby cities. communityimpact.com LIVE UPDATES

MARKET TEAM GENERAL MANAGER Jay McMahon SENIOR EDITOR Shawn Arrajj REPORTER George Wiebe SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNER Anya Gallant ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Holly Nunez METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Jason Culpepper ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Kristina Shackelford MANAGING EDITOR Kelly Schaer ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Kaitlin Schmidt CORPORATE LEADERSHIP GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Warner CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES &MARKETING DIRECTOR Tess Coverman CONTACT US

BUSINESS &DINING Local business development news that aects you

TRANSPORTATION &DEVELOPMENT Regular updates on area projects to keep you in the know

SCHOOL, CITY & COUNTY We attend area meetings to keep you informed

HOWWE'RE FUNDED

Join your neighbors today by giving any amount to the CI Patron program. Funds support our PATRON PROGRAM

ADVERTISING

Our local teams customize advertising

campaigns for all business sizes and industries wanting to reach their customer base and accomplish their goals. A third-party Readex survey proved 78% of paper recipients read three of the last four editions, and from what they read, 83% "took action" of some kind. We ask our readers to thank our advertisers by shopping locally.

$20 average donation choose to give monthly 35% edition newsletter called The InCIder and occasionally reach out with other opportunities to directly engage. hyperlocal, unbiased journalism and help build informed communities. As a thank you, we'll include you in a special Saturday

245 Commerce Green Blvd., Ste. 200 Sugar Land, TX 77478 • 3463682555 PRESS RELEASES bmwnews@communityimpact.com SUBSCRIPTIONS communityimpact.com/subscriptions © 2022 Community Impact Newspaper Co. All rights reserved. No reproduction of any portion of this issue is allowed without written permission from the publisher.

communityimpact.com

facebook.com/impactnewsbmw

@impactnews_bmw

Proudly printed by

COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM ADVERTISING

COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM CIPATRON

WE’VE TEAMEDUP TOBRING YOUMORE OF THE STORIES YOU CARE ABOUT

5

BELLAIRE  MEYERLAND  WEST UNIVERSITY EDITION • APRIL 2022

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon or celebrating anniversaries

1

D

W. ALABAMA ST.

3

8

RICHMOND AVE.

69

59

288

WEST UNIVERSITY PLACE

Kids Garden

610

COURTESY KIDS GARDEN

HERMANN PARK DR.

include self-wash, full-service wash, full-service grooming and pet transpor- tation. An opening date for the business had not been announced as of press time. www.petbar.com 5 A new location of the Taiwan-based bubble chain shop Sharetea is slated to open in Rice Village at 2416 Rice Blvd., Houston. Work on the site is slated to wrap up around early June, but an opening date has not been announced. The chain operates stores in 11 countries, including a location in Bellaire at 9889 Bellaire Blvd., Ste. E213, Houston. Oerings include a variety of fruit teas and milk teas as well as fresh milk drinks and other ice blended drinks. www.1992sharetea.com 6 Bitty & Beau’s Coee could open in late summer in Rice Village at 2367 Rice Blvd., Houston. Owners Ben and Amy Wright announced the business is expanding to Houston with the couple’s ninth franchise location later this sum- mer. The coee shop operates with the mission of helping people with intellectu- al and developmental disabilities nd em- ployment and is named after the Wrights’ children—Bitty and Beau—who were born with Down syndrome. The original shop opened in 2016 in North Carolina. www.bittyandbeauscoee.com 7 Work is underway on a new Scent Hound location coming to 4850 Beech- nut St., Houston, in the Meyerland area with construction slated to wrap up in mid-May, according to information led with the Texas Department of Licens- ing and Regulation. The dog care and grooming business will oer hygiene and grooming needs, including bathing, ear cleaning, nail trimming and teeth brush- ing. Company ocials said an opening

HERMANN PARK

UNIVERSITY BLVD.

DRYDEN RD.

4

FANNIN ST.

1

288

BERTNER AVE.

BELLAIRE

BERTNER AVE. 9

90

5

PINE ST.

RICE BLVD.

7

6

2

BEECHNUT ST.

TIMES BLVD.

MEYERLAND

BRAYS BAYOU

UNIVERSITY BLVD.

610

S. POST OAK RD.

MAP NOT TO SCALE N TM; © 2022 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER CO. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

2 Dave’s Hot Chicken opened in Rice Village on Feb. 24 at 2525 Rice Blvd., Ste. B, Houston. Bringing Nashville-style hot chicken in a fast-casual restaurant, this is the fourth location of Dave’s Hot Chicken to open in the Houston area. Menu items include chicken tenders and sliders with a choice of fries, slaw, or mac and cheese as a side. 832-701-0122. www.daveshotchicken.com 3 The rst and only Texas location of the women’s clothing store Savage X Fenty opened in March in the Galleria Mall, 5085 Westheimer Road, Houston. Founded by the singer Rihanna, the brand

WILLOWBEND BLVD. NOWOPEN 1 New child care service Kids Garden hosted a grand opening and open house March 27 at 6729 Stella Link Road, West University Place. The center, which opened in February, seeks to provide a safe learn- ing environment for children with exible hours for working parents by utilizing a modern, drop-in concept. The Houston location of Kids Garden is operated by Kimi Minor. Other locations of the center can be found in North Carolina, South Carolina and Colorado. 713-485-4418. www.kidsplaygarden.com

specializes in lingerie, underwear, sleep- wear and loungewear. The new store can be found on the Galleria’s second oor near Nordstrom Rack. 346-241-3988. www.savagex.com COMING SOON 4 Work on a new PetBar is slated to end around June 30 at 5130 Bissonnet St., Bellaire, according to information led with the Texas Department of Licensing and Regulation. The chain dog grooming business has locations in eight states, including other Houston-area locations in Conroe and Katy. Services

PSYCHIATRIC EMERGENCY SERVICES April is Alcohol Awareness Month • Drug/Chemical dependency treatment

• Treatment for mental disorders • Alcohol/drug detox treatments • Alcohol addiction treatment WE HAVE YOU COVERED.

WALK IN OR REGISTER ONLINE

2280 Holcombe Blvd., Houston, TX 77030 713-357-7391 www.ascentemc.com Corner of Holcombe & Almeda

Emergency evaluations for Covid-19, RSV, and Flu available 24/7

6

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY SHAWN ARRAJJ & GEORGE WIEBE

2

9

Dave’s Hot Chicken

TMC3

The Houston Zoo is celebrating its 100-year anniversary in 2022. COURTESY VISIT HOUSTON

COURTESY DAVE’S HOT CHICKEN

GEORGE WIEBECOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

FEATURED IMPACT ANNIVERSARY The Houston Zoo is celebrating its 100-year anniversary in 2022, which kicks o with a birthday party set for April 30. Guests who attend the daylong celebration will not have to pay admission and can purchase centennial- themed items at the gift shop. Other highlights will include guest speakers and family entertainment, zookeeper chats every half hour at dierent animal habitats, zoo history trivia, an opportunity for guests to build their own birdhouses and a live ice carving. The Houston Zoo was founded in 1922 by the city of Houston, starting

IN THE NEWS 9 Ocials with the Texas Medical Cen- ter celebrated its rst major construction milestone on TMC3 , a new health care research development, on March 22. A topping-out event was hosted for the TMC3 Collaborative Building, a research center meant to facilitate cooperation between multiple Texas-based uni- versities located o Bertner Avenue in Houston. The nal beam was signed by the event’s attendees and later lifted into place. The 250,000-square-foot building is still far from complete with a scheduled opening in August 2023. Upon completion, the TMC3 campus will fea- ture four multitenant industry buildings, a hotel, a residential tower and a series of ve 55,000-square-foot gardens that will serve as public parks. www.tmc.edu

date has not yet been determined. 281-884-9191. www.scenthound.com ANNIVERSARIES 8 Ocials with Greentown Labs will celebrate the site’s one-year anniversary April 21 at 4200 San Jacinto St., Houston. The organization was founded as a com- munity for climate action and technology entrepreneurs to collaborate with the goal of creating a more sustainable world. After one year, Greentown Labs is home to more than 50 startup members and 20 partners. A celebration April 21 will include a net- working reception, a panel on the energy transition, celebratory remarks, lightning pitches from members and a startup show- case. 346-571-5627. www.greentownlabs.com

out with a single bison named Earl, according to the zoo’s website. In 2002, the zoo ocially became a nonprot. Today, the 55-acre zoo houses around 6,000 animals. As part of a centennial capital campaign, a new Galapagos Island exhibit is slated to open in early 2023. 713-533-6500. www.houstonzoo.org

288

HERMANN PARK

HERMANN PARK DR.

CAMBRIDGE ST.

MACGREGOR WAY

N

MEMBERSHIP THAT

Spend your summer at the Y!

YMCA Mission: To put Judeo-Christian principles into practice through programs that build healthy spirit, mind and body for all. Everyone is welcome. JOIN TODAY | Join us for a summer of engaging activities for youth and families, motivating fitness programs and opportunities to come together as a community. ymcahouston.org

7

BELLAIRE  MEYERLAND  WEST UNIVERSITY EDITION • APRIL 2022

TODO LIST

April events

COMPILED BY CYNTHIA ZELAYA

Houston’s Got Bollywood performs in April. (Courtesy Miller Outdoor Theatre)

FEATURED EVENT ENJOY A FREE SHOWAT MILLER OUTDOOR THEATRE Located at Hermann Park, Miller Outdoor Theatre oers a variety of free events for the public during a season that typically runs from April through November. Although performances are free, guests can secure tickets for covered seating one day prior to each performance. APRIL 01 Remember When Rock Was Young: The Elton John Tribute, 8 p.m. 02 Houston’s Got Bollywood, 8 p.m. 07 My First Orchestral Concert, 11 a.m. 08 “In The Heights” lm screening, 8 p.m. 09 Cirque Zuma Zuma, 8 p.m. 15 America, 8:15 p.m. 16 Philly Soul Sound, 8:15 p.m. 20 Rhyme & Reason, 11 a.m. 23 Kinder HSPVA’s Encore 50, 8:15 p.m. 26 The Barber of Seville in Texas, 11 a.m. 29 “Encanto” lm screening, 8:15 p.m. 30 Heart By Heart, 8:15 p.m. Miller Outdoor Theatre 6000 Hermann Park Drive, Houston 832-487-7102 www.milleroutdoortheatre.com

APRIL 0116

SEE A LOCAL THEATRICAL PRODUCTION MAIN STREET THEATER

APRIL 09

WATCHA PARADE OF CREATIVE CARS DOWNTOWN HOUSTON

Liz Duy Adams is putting on “Dog Act,” an original dark comedy, at Main Street Theater. The play follows traveling performers Zetta Stone and Dog as they venture through a postapocalyptic wasteland to get to a gig in China. 7:30 p.m. (Thu.-Sat.), 3 p.m. (Sun.). $35-$59. Main Street Theater-Rice Village, 2540 Times Blvd., Houston. 713-524-6706. www.mainstreettheater.com (Courtesy Main Street Theater)

The 35th annual Art Car Parade will be presented by Team Gillman and features over 250 cars. The main event will be surrounded by multiple smaller events on dierent days, including an award show, preparties, and children’s workshops. 2-4 p.m. Free. Downtown Houston, Bagby Street at Dallas Street. 713-926-6368. www.thehoustonartcarparade.com (Courtesy Morris Malako)

23 WALK FOR A CAUSE Prosperity Bank presents Walk With Me, a noncompetitive 5K run. Proceeds benet Easter Seals Greater Houston, serving people with disabilities by providing therapy and education. 8 a.m. $50. Houston Zoo, 6200 Hermann Park Drive, Houston. 713-838-9050. www.eastersealshouston.org 24 CELEBRATE EARTHDAY Christ the King Evangelical Lutheran Church will host a day of stewardship in honor of Earth Day. Tools will be provided on-site. 1:30-4:30 p.m. Free. Schwartz Gazebo at the Willow Waterhole Greenway, 5300 Dryad Drive, Houston. 713-523-2864. www.ctkelc.org 28 DANCEWITHOUT JUDGMENT Gallery Furniture will host an Autism Prom with Success on the Spectrum. The sensory-friendly event is open to all ages and will include behavioral therapists who will lead children in games and dances. 3-6 p.m. Free. Gallery Furniture, 6006 North Freeway, Houston. 346-217-8328. www.galleryfurniture.com

APRIL 08 ATTENDA FUNDRAISER GALA Devereux Advanced Behavioral Health will host its 10th annual Dev Gala. Funds raised go to helping people with behavioral, cognitive and emotional diculties. The gala will feature a live band, cocktails and a red carpet. 6:30- 11:30 p.m. $275-$15,000. Hotel ZaZa, Museum District, 5701 Main St., Houston. 800-373-0011. www.savorthehope.org 09 RUN FOR THE ASTRODOME The Astrodome Conservancy will host a 5K competitive run and a 1K leisure run around the Astrodome to celebrate its 57th anniversary and raise funds for its preservation and development. 7:30 a.m. $20-$35. Houston Astrodome, 3 NRG Parkway, Houston. www.astrodomeconservancy.org 09 DROP BY A LOCAL MUSIC FESTIVAL The Willow Waterhole Greenway will host MusicFest, featuring live bands playing country, jazz and classic rock music. The pet-friendly event will host

four food trucks on-site, and guests can take photos among the blooming bluebonnets. 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Free. Schwartz Gazebo, 5300 Dryad Drive, Houston. www.willowwaterhole.org/ musicfest 22 LAUGHALONG AT A COMEDY PERFORMANCE Tig Notaro will bring her standup show “Hello, Again” to Cullen Theater. The Grammy-nominated comedian is known for her appearances on “The Late Show,” “The Ellen Show,” and her podcast “Don’t Ask Tig.” 7 p.m. $45-$55. Cullen Theater, 501 Texas Ave., Houston. 713-227-4772. www.spahouston.org 22 AND 23 MARVEL AT DANCERS Choreographer Karol Armitage will present a dance routine in celebration of Skyspace’s 10th anniversary at the Moody Center of the Arts. The performance is set to take place in sync with the setting sun. 8 p.m. Free. James Turrell’s “Twilight Epiphany” Skyspace, 6100 Main St., Ste. 101, Houston. 713-348-2787. http://moody.rice.edu

Find more or submit Bellaire-Meyerland-West University events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

Get your reading today to avoid this!

Get peace of mind and upgrade your home today

Like a check engine light, but for your home foundation to avoid costly repairs.

200,000 foundation readings on any home.

FREE hourly foundation monitoring for 3 months with promo Code: CI-A3

Call us at 833-SLABSURE (833-752-2787)

SlabSure is an exclusive brand of Steadfast Foundation Technologies, LLC

8

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES West Uupdates conceptual design for Edloe Street pathway

COMPILED BY SHAWN ARRAJJ & GEORGE WIEBE

UPCOMING PROJECTS

HEMPSTEAD RD.

45

Following an evening packed with public comments, the West Univer- sity Place City Council voted Feb. 28 to approve an updated conceptual design for a jogging path along the east side of Edloe Street between Albans Road and Georgetown Street. The Edloe project has drawn atten- tion across the West University Place community, including a number of public comments at council meetings that took place Feb. 28 and Jan. 10 about the project’s cost, scope and effects on traffic. Following the Jan. 10 meeting, city officials proposed changes to the plan to include pet friendly fountains and retain trees for shade. Mayor Susan Sample joined council members Melanie Bell, Shannon Carrol and John Montgomery in voting to approve the new plans for the pathway as presented by the West University Place Parks & Recreation Department. Council Member John Barnes voted against the measure after requesting

an amendment to the plans that would have split the project into two pieces, which Barnes said would allow the city to postpone work on a northern segment—between Sunset Boulevard and Albans Road—to give residents a chance to provide more feedback. Barnes said he supports the southern portion of the project moving forward independently. While most of the meeting’s attendees were in favor of some sort of pathway being constructed, about half of the public’s comments were against building the portion between Sunset Boulevard and Albans Road. Concerns included traffic congestion, the cost, and comments that the segment between Sunset and Albans was a “road to nowhere.” Community members who came out in support of the project cited the safety improvements it would bring around street crossings as well as the potential beautification of the city. “You have a chance to pick up where we left off,” former Mayor Bob

A

A B

C

10

KATY RD.

STUDEMONT ST.

NOTTINGHAM ST.

610

ROBINHOOD ST.

MEMORIAL DR.

N

SHEPHERD DR.

ARNOLD ST.

Inner Katy bus rapid transit The Metropolitan Transit Authority of Harris County approved a preferred route for the planned Inner Katy Cor- ridor bus rapid transit line along I-10 at a March 24 board meeting. The line provides a dedicated bus lane from the Northwest Transit Center—at the I-10 West and Loop 610 intersection— to downtown Houston. Stations will be at A Memorial Park, B Shepherd Drive and C Studemont Street. Timeline: late 2023-27 Cost: $450 million Funding sources: Houston-Galveston Area Council, METRO

TANGLEY ST.

PLUMB ST.

GEORGETOWN ST.

N

Kelly said at the meeting. “This is the ideal time to make West [University] a little bit safer.” The council’s vote solidifies the plans drafted by the park’s department, creating direction for contractors with TerraLab to complete construction documents. When a design contract was initially approved in October, the project was estimated to cost $468,000. Timeline: TBD Cost: $468,000 Funding source: city of West University

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF MARCH 28. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT BMWNEWS@COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

9

BELLAIRE - MEYERLAND - WEST UNIVERSITY EDITION • APRIL 2022

DEVELOPMENT Master plan nears completion at WillowWaterholeGreenway

BY SHAWN ARRAJJ

However, events would still be able to take place even when the site takes on water following a storm event, she said. “Those things can keep going, resting assured they still have access to their portion of the site, and they won’t have a soggy site,” she said. The detention would be created in a way that serves as an amenity to visitors and supports wildlife, Leonard said. Natalye Appel—owner of Natalye Appel and Associates Architects—said she has high hopes for what the area can become. At the Feb. 21 meeting, she said no drilling was conducted at the site when Shell worked on it. Instead, Shell used the site to test ttings and other more physical items related to drilling, Appel said. “But the really interesting thing, I think … is they also tested processes for green energy and cleanup of the environment,” Appel said. “Just as we’re interested in bringing forth new ideas about clean energy and the sustainability of the site, some of these things were already going on.” Some of the testing infrastructure still on-site could be converted into a museum, Leonard said. An elevated walkway could allow people to get close to and learn about what went on at the site under Shell and the technologies they used. During the study process, Lion- heart looked at other industrial sites that were converted into mixed-use developments, including the Pearl Brewery in San Antonio, she said.

Plans are being workshopped for how to use a site formerly occupied by the petrochemical company Shell in the Willow Waterhole Greenway and could include an outdoor performance venue, sports elds and a skate park. The greenway is a 300-acre network of lakes, prairie, marsh and park amenities along Brays Bayou in southwest Houston. At a Feb. 21 meeting of the Brays Bayou Associ- ation, ocials working on the site’s master plan told attendees that a public open house is being planned for late April to present details. “We need to have people who love this site as much as the people who worked on this site loved it,” said Rebecca Leonard, CEO of Lionheart Places—the rm brought on to draft the plan—at the Feb. 21 meeting. The land was bought by the city of Houston in 2019 to be converted into a detention basin, but the city later tasked the Brays Oaks Management District with redeveloping the site into a community amenity. The man- agement district—which is a munici- pal group composed of residents and property owners—then sought out Lionheart, which is working on the master plan alongside Natalye Appel and Associates Architects. The site is proposed to house the Levitt Pavilion, an outdoor theater, and signicant portions of it will also be used for detention, holding roughly four feet of water during heavy rain events, Leonard said.

A former Shell plant at WillowWaterhole Greenway is slated to be redeveloped with community amenities. (Courtesy Brays Oaks Management District)

Guiding the greenway

Work on a master plan is ongoing, but some ideas for the site were shared at a Feb. 21 meeting.

Sports eld

Dog park

Skate park

Outdoor cafe

Playground

Outdoor market

Performance space

Rentable private event space

Outdoor classroom

Picnic area

S. WILLOW DR.

GASMER DR.

WILLOW WATERHOLE GREENWAY

90

N

N

SOURCE: LIONHEART PLACESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Planners said they are gathering more public feedback on the ideas. Other possible plans for the site include pedestrian walkways that connect into Willow Waterhole trails, an outdoor cafe, a skate park, a rentable private event space and an outdoor market space. Another proposed space at the site could include a library, oce and classroom space. The theater group Company OnStage has expressed

interest in having a long-term home on the site, Leonard said. Other remaining questions plan- ners are looking to get more public feedback on include ways to connect visitors with nature and what kinds of community events are most in-de- mand. Ocials expect to get a better sense of the cost and timeline of the project as design work continues. A capital campaign to raise funds could launch in mid-2022.

At Legacy Pediatrics, we Focus on a Child’sWhole Health Our Board-Cer�fied Pediatricians take the �me to get to know you and your child, and answer ALL your ques�ons. • Annual wellness exams • School & sports physicals • Sick child visits • In-person & video visits • 12 convenient loca�ons • Southwest Pediatric Walk-In Clinic (Open every day to all families) • Vaccina�ons & immuniza�ons (including COVID-19) • Care for newborns to young adults • TeenWell™, health program for adolescents • Pediatric dental & vision NewPatientsWelcome!AppointmentsAvailable. Visit LegacyCommunityHealth.orgorCall (832) 5485000.

Dr. Tamisha Jones Pediatrician & Sr. Medical Director, Clinical Affairs

Legacy accepts most HMO/PPOs, Medicare and the following CHIP and Medicaid plans: Amerigroup, Community Health Choice, Molina Healthcare, Superior HealthPlan, Texas Children’s Health Plan and UnitedHealthcare. Eligibility Specialists are available to discuss sliding scale fees and poten�al programs to help reduce the cost of services.

10

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY& COUNTY

News from Bellaire, Houston & Harris County

MEETING HIGHLIGHTS HARRIS COUNTY Following several issues in the March 1 primary elections, Harris County Elections Administrator Isabel Longoria announced her resignation, effective July 1. The resignation came after the county was not be able to count and report votes by the statutory deadline and about 10,000 ballots were discovered after the final count. County officials said they will engage a third-party consultant to review election operations and make recommendations. Bellaire City Council will meet at 6 p.m. April 4 at 7008 S. Rice Ave., Bellaire. Meetings are streamed at www.bellairetx.gov. West University Place City Council will meet at 6:30 p.m. April 11 at 3800 University Blvd., Houston. Meetings are available via teleconference. Find details at www.westutx.gov. Houston City Council will meet at 1:30 p.m. April 5 for public comment and 9 a.m. April 6 for regular business at 901 Bagby St., Houston. Meetings are streamed at www.houstontx.gov/htv. MEETINGSWE COVER

Council approves development permits on former Chevron campus

Houston hires lawfirm for redistrictingwork

BY SOFIA GONZALEZ

BY GEORGE WIEBE

HOUSTON During a March 2 meeting, Houston City Council approved an ordinance authorizing a legal service agreement between the city and the law firm Thompson and Horton LLP for redistricting services. Council Members Mike Knox, Michael Kubosh, Mary Nan Huffman and Amy Peck voted against the ordinance. Knox said his main issue is with Thompson and Horton’s plans to subcontract a portion of the work to West and Associates LLP, which he said could be construed as politicizing the process. Founding partner Royce West is a Democratic state senator. City Attorney Arturo Michel said there is no indicationWest would be working on the case. The council is expected to vote on multiple items in the future regarding redistricting criteria before any plan is adopted. Newmaps need to be in place in time for the city’s general election in November 2023.

BELLAIRE Plans for the North Bellaire Special Development District are in motion after Bellaire City Council at a March 22 meeting approved three special develop- ment permits. The site, located at Fournace Place and South Rice Avenue in Bellaire, is owned by SLS West Loop LP, which is planning to construct a mixed-use develop- ment. The proposed development is broken up into three sections to make oversight and potential alterations more manageable. Permits for two of the sections passed unanimously. The third permit passed with a 5-2 vote with Council Members Catherine Lewis and Jim Hotze voting against it. That section—also known as the “Rice Portion”—is the largest section at 9.6 acres, larger than the other two sections combined.

610

CHEVRON CAMPUS

N

Lewis, in explaining her oppo- sition, brought up concerns about increased traffic, light pollution, and the overall size and scale of the project. Other council members said they thought those concerns had been addressed in past meetings, when a slew of amendments were made on what would be allowed at the site. Lan- guage was amended to prohibit drive-thrus and to require opaque walls to block lighting from proposed parking garages, among other changes. “I think we’ve done a lot to address the concerns of the city,” Council Member Brian Witt said.

Easter at First Presbyterian Church 8:30 | 9:30 | 10:45 | 11:05

Join us in person or online as we celebrate our risen Savior!

5300 MAIN ST | 713.620.6500 | FPCHOUSTON.ORG/EASTER

11

BELLAIRE - MEYERLAND - WEST UNIVERSITY EDITION • APRIL 2022

Paid Advertisement

HEART DISEASE? ARM YOURSELF WITH THE LATEST KNOWLEDGE

If you or a loved one has been diagnosed with a heart or vascular problem, or if you have a family history of heart disease, you are likely concerned. Heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women in the United States, claiming about 659,000 lives each year. When it comes to your health, including your heart health, knowledge is power. By arming yourself with the latest information about how to prevent, treat andmanage heart disease, youmay increase your chances of living a longer and healthier life. Cardiothoracic surgeon Dharmraj Chauhan, MD, affiliated with theMemorial HermannHeart &Vascular Institute at Memorial Hermann Southwest Hospital, answers frequently asked questions about heart disease. What is heart disease? Heart disease describes several types of heart conditions, including coronary artery disease, which can lead to heart attack; congestive heart failure; abnormal heart rhythms (arrhythmias); congenital heart disease, a heart problem present at birth; and cardiomyopathy, the thickening or enlarging of the heart. What causes heart disease, and can it be prevented? According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about half of Americans have at least one of three key risk factors for heart disease—high blood pressure, high cholesterol and smoking. While you can’t control some risk factors, such as your family history, you can reduce your risk by quitting smoking, being physically active, managing your weight, eating a healthy diet, managing diabetes and avoiding excessive use of alcohol. What are the symptoms of heart disease? Symptoms vary by type of disease. Heart attack symptoms

may include chest pain or discomfort, upper back or neck pain, indigestion or heartburn, nausea or vomiting, extreme fatigue, dizziness or shortness of breath. Heart failure symptomsmay include shortness of breath, fatigue or swelling of the feet ankles, legs, abdomen or neck veins. And individuals with arrhythmia may feel heart palpitations, sometimes described as f luttering feelings in the chest. But it’s important to note that heart disease can be a “silent’ killer,” presenting with no symptoms at all. How is heart disease diagnosed? A patient’s diagnosis usually starts with an evaluation by a cardiologist or admission to an emergency center. Based on an initial evaluation, additional testsmay be performed, such as imaging studies (chest X-ray, CT-scan or MRI), an electrocardiogram (EKG), an echocardiogram, a coronary angiogram, cardiac catheterization or an electrophysiologic study. What treatments are available at the Institute for heart disease? The affiliated heart and vascular specialists at the Institute provide a full spectrumof heart and vascular care—from prevention to treatment, recovery and rehabilitation. Treatments include noninvasive andminimally invasive procedures, as well as open heart surgeries. Memorial Hermann Southwest is an accredited Chest Pain Center and a percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) hospital. In the hospital’s 24/7 cardiac catheterization labs, specialists are equipped to perform fast PCIs, with or without stents, for coronary blockages and heart attacks. For blockages that are not amenable for PCI or stents, surgeons at the Institute perform coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. Heart valves can become narrowed (stenotic) or leaky,

leading to hear t fai lure problems. Affiliated cardiac surgeons at the Inst itute perform both open heart surger y and minima l ly invasive heart procedures for valve problems, including m i n i m a l l y i n v a s i v e transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) for patients with severe aortic valve disease.

Dharmraj Chauhan, MD Cardiothoracic Surgeon

Some cardiovascular problems occur outside of the heart. The affiliated vascular and endovascular surgeons at the Institute performvascular and less invasive endovascular procedures to correct blood vessels outside of the heart and brain that may be narrowed, blocked or dilated. These procedures include aortic aneurysm repair, balloon angioplasty, bypass surgery, carotid endarterectomy, carotid stenting and fistula creation and repair. The affiliated electrophysiologists at the Institute treat all types of heart arrhythmias, including atrial fibrillation (AFib). Depending on the diagnosis, a patient’s treatment plan might include medication and/or cardioversion, pacemaker/ICD implantation, heart ablation or implantation of a left atrial appendage closure device. What about after surgery? TheMemorial HermannHeart &Vascular Institute offers a uniquely designed post-procedure healing program designed to reduce a patient’s risk of re-hospitalization, lessen the need for cardiac medications and encourage a return to work following a heart-related illness. The program is tailored to each patient’s specific needs and includes exercise, nutrition counseling, stressmanagement and other services.

For more information or to schedule an appointment, call 713.222.2273 or visit memorialhermann.org/heart

Advancing health. Personalizing care.

12

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

INSIDE INFORMATION

BY WESLEY GARDNER

BRINGING IN BLOOD

The Gulf Coast Regional Blood Center, an area nonprofit that provides blood to Houston and its surrounding communities, is nearing a shortage of blood supplies for the roughly 170 hospitals it serves across 26 Texas counties. Here is a look at how blood donations are used and how residents can help.

DONOR DILEMMA

BLOOD TYPE BREAKDOWN

TRACKING TRANSFUSIONS

According to the GCRBC, the percentage of Americans who will need a blood transfusion at some point in their lives greatly outweighs the percentage of Americans who donate blood.

There are four major blood groups determined by the presence or absence of two antigens, A and B, on the surface of red blood cells. Additionally, the presence or absence of a protein called the Rh factor determines whether the blood type is positive or negative.

Rh-negative blood can only be given to Rh-negative patients, while Rh-positive or Rh-negative blood types can be given to Rh-positive patients, meaning O- blood types can be given to all four blood groups, and patients with an AB- blood type can receive blood from all four groups.

1 in 20 people will donate blood at some point in their life. 1 in 7 people will need a blood transfusion at some point in their life.

BLOOD TYPES by percent of U.S. population

Donor

O

A

B

AB

37.4% 6.6%

+

O

-

44%

Recipient

O

A

B

AB

+

35.7% 6.3%

A

The GCRBC has 17 permanent donor centers across Southeast Texas in addition to mobile blood drives hosted across the area on a daily basis. Bill T. Teague Donor Center 1400 La Concha Lane, Houston 713-791-6620 WHERE TO DONATE?

Anyone who is age 17 or older may be eligible to donate blood. Individuals who are 16 years old may be eligible to donate with parental consent. WHO CAN DONATE? Donors who are age 19 and older must weigh at least 110 pounds. Whole-blood donors who are age 16 must weigh at least 120 pounds. Whole-blood and automated donors who are ages 17-18 and male must weigh at least 115 pounds; female donors must weigh at least 120 pounds. Donors must be in general good health without any cold or flu symptoms. Donors who have COVID-19 or a positive test for COVID-19 must wait 10 days and be

-

42%

8.5% 1.5%

+

B

-

Pearland Neighborhood Donor Center 9223 W. Broadway St. Ste. 119, Pearland 713-436-7722 Sugar Land Neighborhood Donor Center 4949 Sweetwater Blvd., Sugar Land 281-313-1122 Westchase Neighborhood Donor Center 10001 Westheimer Road, Ste. 2117, Houston 832-242-7600

10%

+

3.4% 0.6%

Champions Donor Center 6935 FM 1960 W., Ste. A, Houston 281-440-5900 Cy-Fair Donor Center 11811 FM 1960 W., Ste. 120, Houston 281-469-1964 For a complete list of donation sites, visit www.commitforlife.org .

AB

-

4%

RH+ 85%

RH- 15%

asymptomatic prior to donating. Donors must bring a valid photo ID.

SOURCES: AMERICAN RED CROSS, GULF COAST REGIONAL BLOOD CENTER, STANFORD MEDICINE BLOOD CENTER/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

CALL TODAY FOR YOUR CONSULTATION!

We

7515 S Main Street, Suite 780, Houston, TX 77030 832-955-1221 • dounsizlipocenter.com DOWNSIZE LIPO CENTER OF HOUSTON LIMITED TIME OFFER FREE When you present this ad during your first consultation. Receive a free compression garment

State Parks

WholeEarthProvision.com WholeEart r ision.com April is Texas State Parks Month

13

BELLAIRE - MEYERLAND - WEST UNIVERSITY EDITION • APRIL 2022

INSIDE INFORMATION

PROPERTYTAX PROPOSITIONS

P R O P O S I T I O N 1

P R O P O S I T I O N 2

S EN AT E J O I N T R E S O LU T I O N 2 Second special session of 87th Texas Legislature

S EN AT E J O I N T R E S O LU T I O N 2 Third special session of 87th Texas Legislature

House vote:

Senate vote:

Sent to secretary of state’s oce Aug. 30

House vote:

Senate vote:

Sent to secretary of state’s oce Oct. 19

1160 290

1470 310

COMPILED BY MATT STEPHENS

Texas voters will decide local elections in numerous communities across the state

B A L L O T T E X T

B A L L O T T E X T

“The constitutional amendment authorizing the Legislature to provide for the reduction of the amount of a limitation on the total amount of ad valorem taxes that may be imposed for general elementary and secondary public school purposes on the residence homestead of a person who is elderly or disabled to reect any statutory reduction from the preceding tax year in the maximum compressed rate of the maintenance and operations taxes imposed for those purposes on the homestead.” Although property taxes are already frozen for the disabled and those 65 and older, this would allow the Legislature to provide additional tax relief from school districts for even those elderly and disabled homeowners with frozen taxes. W H A T D O E S I T M E A N ?

“The constitutional amendment increasing the amount of the residence homestead exemption from ad valorem taxation for public school purposes from $25,000 to $40,000.”

May 7, but they will also vote on two propositions that will have implications on property taxes statewide. Community Impact Newspaper spoke with Joshua Blank, research director of the Texas Politics Project for The University of Texas; Dale Craymer, president of the Texas Taxpayers and Research Association; and Dick Lavine, senior scal analyst for the Every Texan, regarding what the two propositions mean for voters. Blank said both constitutional amendments received bipartisan support from legislators in 2021, and he believes they are likely to pass to provide homeowners property tax relief, but they would place more of the public education funding burden on the state. “You are shifting the burden from … the homeowner automatically handing over some of our property tax into the public education system ... to rely on the Legislature to continue to fund public education at equal or higher levels than they have in the past,” he said.

W H A T D O E S I T M E A N ?

Blank said every homeowner in Texas is already oered a $25,000 homestead exemption on property taxes from public school districts— meaning the rst $25,000 of a home’s appraised property value does not count against a homeowner’s annual property taxes. If approved, that exemption for homeowners would be raised to $40,000.

$600M Estimated annual cost to the state

Estimated cost to the state through 2026

Annual savings for the average homeowner

$744M

$167

Your son is not. Space is limited. Our Summer Camp wi ll enhance your f i tness, conf idence , self-di scipl ine , and leadership ski lls. Unplug from your electronics, strengthen your muscles, improve your stamina and bui ld your conf idence wi th more than 30 outdoor events. Be one of the few who completes summer camp, the Marine Corps way, and have an experi ence of a l i fet ime ! Apply Today! » » Summe r Camp 2022 Now Acc e p t i ng App l i cat i ons Camp S e s s i on : June 25 to Ju ly 23 Op en to boys ag e s 11- 18 MARINE MILITARY ACADEMY SOURCES: TEXAS LEGISLATURE ONLINE, TEXAS SECRETARY OF STATE’S OFFICE WEBSITE, JOSHUA BLANK, DALE CRAYMER, DICK LAVINECOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

A Co l l e g e - Pr e p Board i ng Schoo l f or Boys i n Grade s 7- 12 »» 320 Iwo J ima B lvd . Har l i ng en , TX »» R E G I ST E R NOW F OR FA L L » MMA-TX . ORG » 956 . 423 . 6006 »» ADMI S S I ONS@MMA-TX . ORG

14

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

DINING FEATURE

BY GEORGE WIEBE

Chicken autas ($4.99)

3 dishes to try

Three small fried tacos with banderitas chicken are served with sour cream or fresco cheese.

Chicharrones ($5.99)

Asada tacos ($5.99)

Three steak tacos are served on a homemade corn tortilla with onions and cilantro. (Photos by George Wiebe/Community Impact Newspaper)

Large, fried pork rinds are served with four ounces of guacamole and four ounces of salsa.

Marko Garcia founded 100% Taquito as a food truck in 1995.

2 refreshments to try

100%Taquito Eccentric Houston joint brings streets of Mexico inside S erving Mexican street food

The drink is made with a mix of mango, orange, pepino and chamoy. Spicy fruit ($3.69)

traditional sopes; tostadas; tortas; and taquitos, or “small taco” in English, the food item fromwhich the restaurant gets its name. To maintain the authentic Mexican taste, Garcia said he tries to stay away from “Tex-Mex,” which means no ground beef, no yellow cheese and little to no cumin in the seasoning. In the kitchen, corn tortillas are handmade, and fresh fruit is used in many of the drinks, both those that are alcoholic and those that are not. When it comes to dessert, the tres leches sponge cake is made with a rich cream top. Flan, a Mexican custard, rounds out the menu. However, Garcia’s enthusiasm for authenticity did not always translate to success, he said.

“Things have changed dramati- cally,” he said. “When I rst started, people walked out. ... I have Chi- huahua-style cheese, and someone asked me if it was [made with] real chihuahuas.” The public’s understanding of Mexican cuisine has come a long way since 100% Taquito rst opened, Garcia said. “Now, you have Americans asking for horchata. They knowwhat Tajin means,” he said, referring to a Mexican company known for its chili pepper blend. Garcia said he is happy to have played his part in bringing the trend of Mexican street food to Houston. “I wanted everything to remind people of Mexico City,” he said.

and drinks, the restaurant 100% Taquito is a bit of an oddity, owner Marko Garcia said. Located o the Southwest Freeway in the Upper Kirby area, the eclectic eatery opened in 1995 as a food truck that also served as a University of Houston school project, Garcia said. “We wanted to recreate the experience of eating on the streets of Mexico,” he said. The food truck evolved into a full-edged restaurant in 1998. The inside features Mexican iconography, a giant plastic skeleton, streetcar counters and a green taxi parked in the center. The setting is not the only thing authentic. The menu features

100%Taquito 3245 Southwest Freeway, Houston 713-665-2900 www.100taquito.com Hours: Sun.-Thu. 11 a.m.-9 p.m., Fri.- Sat. 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Tinja mango slush is served with a spicy mango lollipop straw. Mangonada ($4.79)

59

N

YOUR SOLUTION IS HERE. dailymarketing NEWSLETTER BANNERS

DEDICATED HEALTHCARE CHAMPIONS FOR ALL With one million of our residents uninsured, Harris Health System proudly serves as a vital public healthcare safety net, providing high-quality primary, specialty, acute and trauma care. Thank you for your support.

YOUR PUBLIC HEALTHCARE SYSTEM

*Newsletters deliver either daily or Tuesdays & Fridays depending on your area.

COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM/ADVERTISE (866) 989-6808

15

BELLAIRE  MEYERLAND  WEST UNIVERSITY EDITION • APRIL 2022

Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8 Page 9 Page 10 Page 11 Page 12 Page 13 Page 14 Page 15 Page 16 Page 17 Page 18 Page 19 Page 20 Page 21 Page 22 Page 23 Page 24

communityimpact.com

Powered by