Tomball - Magnolia | May 2020

TOMBALL MAGNOLIA EDITION

VOLUME 10, ISSUE 8  MAY 5JUNE 2, 2020

ONLINE AT

Please join your friends and neighbors in support of Community Impact Newspaper’s legacy of local, reliable reporting by making a contribution. Any amount matters. Together, we can continue to ensure our citizens stay informed and keep our local businesses thriving. Become a #CommunityPatron

SUPPORT LOCAL JOURNALISM

HWY. 249 CONNECTORS

9 TRESSIE’SSOUTHERNKITCHEN 21

COMMUNITYIMPACT.COMPATRON

High unemployment casts unclear future for businesses, local workers AWEEKOF TEXAS UNEMPLOYMENT CLAIMS BY INDUSTRY

= 1% of estimated claims by industry for the week ending April 4, 2020

Arts, entertainment and recreation Education services Mining Information Real estate rental and leasing Finance and insurance

TOTAL ESTIMATED CLAIMS MARCH 29APRIL 4 277,714 NOTE: OFFICIAL DEPARTMENT OF LABOR DATA IS EXCLUDED FROM TOTAL.

Professional, scientic and technical services Wholesale trade Transportation and warehousing

The two hardest-hit industries include 6,283 residents, or of the civilianworkforce 16.83% within Tomball ISD boundaries of the civilianworkforce 16.54% and 5,472 residents, or within Magnolia ISD boundaries. SOURCE: U.S. CENSUS BUREAU 2018 ANNUAL COMMUNITY SURVEY 5YEAR ESTIMATES COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Manufacturing Construction

Other services

Administrative, support and waste disposal services

Other

Health care and social assistance

Retail trade Accommodation and food services

INSIDE

22

Between Feb. 16-April 25, Texas Workforce Commission estimates as of press time April 28 show the most unemployment claims were led statewide during the week ending April 25. A WEEKLY BASIS

Estimated unemployment claims

2019 VS. 2020: A WEEK OF UNEMPLOYMENT CLAIMS BY COUNTY

April 4, 2019 April 4, 2020

5,929

437,300

Waller County Montgomery County 213

313,832

UNEMPLOYMENT CLAIMS * *INCLUDES OFFICIAL DEPARTMENT OF LABOR DATA AND TWC ESTIMATES

414

Harris County

52,468

158,364

14

2,582

SOURCE: TEXAS WORKFORCE COMMISSIONCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER Note: Industry- and county-specic data is shown for the week ending April 4, the week with the highest number of claims for which data by sector and county was available as of press time. Harris County had the most unemployment claims led the week of May 29-April 4 of any of the six counties that make up the Greater Houston area, according to Texas Workforce Commission estimates.

Fort Bend County

7,053

6,368

185

3,867

344

8,824

April 25

Feb. 22

March 7

March 21*

April 4*

2020 WEEK ENDING

Galveston County

SOURCE: TEXAS WORKFORCE COMMISSIONCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

CORONAVIRUS COVERAGE

All content in this print publication, both editorial and advertisements, was up to date as of press deadline. Due to the fast-changing nature of this event, editorial and advertising information may have changed. Please visit communityimpact.com and advertiser websites for more information. Thanks for your support.

E E

U N

S A DD L E u p . S E T T L E d o w n .

Welcome to Willowcreek Ranch, where expansive estate homesites, a gorgeous 50-acre recreational lake, miles of wandering trails, and an exquisite equestrian center make each day even more magnificent than the next.

Schedule a tour today and discover Life Unbridled.

Gated Luxury Estate Living | 1-7+ Acre Homesites

PREFERRED CUSTOM HOME BUI LDERS Braziel Building Group | Brickland Custom Homes | Jamestown Builders | Morning Star Builders

19744 Telge Road | Tomball, Texas 77377 | WillowcreekRanchTX.com | 281-351-1900

2

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

Lone Star College is committed to helping you achieve your goals. LSC offers Associates and Bachelor’s Degrees, 20+ fully-online degrees that allow you to graduate without setting a foot on campus, certifications for high-demand industries, and credits that enable you to transfer to universities. Visit LoneStar.edu/Start

04.16.20.03

3

TOMBALL - MAGNOLIA EDITION • MAY 2020

WE NEED TO SUPPORT THE BEST GOOD CAUSE OF ALL: EACH OTHER.

Our city is famous for its Big Houston Heart. But right now, Houston is under attack. It’s a virus.

At St. Luke’s Health, we know who’s defending us – the city’s Healthcare teams, EMS, Police, Rescue Workers, and Fire Fighters. And what supports them? It’s our collective commitment to the basics: washing hands, practicing social distancing, and staying home. Simple. But critical. Because if we don’t take care of the frontline, who’s going to take care of us?

Take care of the basics. And show what our Big Houston Heart really can do. ShowUsYourHoustonHeart.org | #ShowUsYourHoustonHeart

4

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

WHAT’S NEWAT COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER ? CUSTOMDIGITAL CAMPAIGNS FOR ADVERTISERS Our online partnership includes more value with record-breaking content and readership and exible weekly ad schedules. communityimpact.com/advertise EEDITIONS FROMCHRISSY: Over the past weeks our lives have been drastically changed in many ways due to the eects of the coronavirus—from employees nding themselves suddenly unemployed to business owners struggling to keep their doors open. The industries hit with the highest amount of unemployment claims are retail services and the accommodation and food service industry, based on April unemployment data from the state of Texas. In this issue, our front-page story covers the eects of the surge in unemployment claims and gives some helpful resources for business owners and job seekers. As the current situation continues to change, you can stay up to date with real-time local coverage by visiting communityimpact.com and liking our Facebook page, Community Impact Tomball/Magnolia. In addition, be sure to check on those who may be struggling. Remember when frustrations run high to be kind to those that are out there serving us, and remember we are all in this together. Chrissy Leggett, GENERALMANAGER

CONTACT US 8400 N. Sam Houston Parkway W., Ste.220 Houston, TX 77064 • 2814696181 communityimpact.com PRESS RELEASES tomnews@communityimpact.com SUBSCRIPTIONS communityimpact.com/subscriptions © 2020 Community Impact Newspaper Co. All Rights Reserved. No reproduction of any portion of this issue is allowed without written permission from the publisher.

PUBLISHERS AND FOUNDERS John and Jennifer Garrett PUBLISHERHOUSTONMETRO Jason Culpepper GENERAL MANAGER Chrissy Leggett, cleggett@communityimpact.com EDITORIAL EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Lanane MANAGING EDITOR Matt Stephens EDITOR Anna Lotz

REPORTER Dylan Sherman COPY CHIEF Andy Comer

Proudly printed by

COPY EDITORS Ben Dickerson, Kasey Salisbury STAFFWRITERS Andy Li, Adriana Rezal, Danica Smithwick, Ben Thompson, Eva Vigh, Emma Whalen, Hannah Zedaker ADVERTISING SALES DIRECTOR Tess Coverman ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE April Halpin DESIGN CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Aubrey Galloway GRAPHIC DESIGNER Matthew T. Mills STAFF DESIGNERS Kaitlin Schmidt, Stephanie Torres, Ronald Winters BUSINESS GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER Claire Love

communityimpact.com

facebook.com/impactnewstom

@impactnews_TOM

DAILY LOCAL NEWSLETTER Sign up to receive daily headlines directly to your inbox. communityimpact.com/ newsletter

Explore over 100 new interactive digital editions at communityimpact.com.

WE’VE TEAMEDUP TOBRING YOUMORE OF THE STORIES YOU CARE ABOUT

RENEE LESLIE-BUCKHOFF BROKER/OWNER

RE/MAX ELITE PROPERTIES 713-955-2510 (Office) | 281-639-5982 (Mobile) Renee@ReneeBuckhoff.com | www.RemaxEliteProperties.com 14257 FM 2920, #115 | Tomball, TX 77377

NEW LISTING INWILDWOOD UNDER CONTRACT IN 2 DAYS!

N O B O D Y S E L L S M O R E R E A L E S T A T E T H A N R E / M A X

Simplified TRUST SOLUTIONS Looking for responsive service? Satisfied with investment options? Establishing a new trust? Are your Trust Officers experienced and knowledgeable?

CELEBRATING 35 YEARS IN TOMBALL! SAME OWNERSHIP & SAME GREAT QUALITY & SERVICE! TOMBALL. WE CAN’TWAIT TO SEE YOU AGAIN SOON! WE

FM 2920 @ 249 Bypass (In the Academy Center) www.ClassicHair.com 281-351-2345

Our focus is on building relationships

Our thoughts and prayers

KERATIN NATURAL SMOOTHING SYSTEM $40 OFF NEW CLIENTS ONLY

FULL HIGHLIGHTS, CUT & STYLE $40 OFF NEW CLIENTS ONLY

$10 OFF CUT & STYLE

are with you all.

Michael Pinkley, AIFA®, AWMA® michael.pinkley@lpl.com

Kevin Pinkley, AIFA®, CDFA™, CIMA® kevin.pinkley@lpl.com

LPL Financial Representatives offer access to Trust Services through The Private Trust Company N.A., an affiliate of LPL Financial. Securities Offered Through LPL Financial. Member FINRA/SIPC. 832.375.0900 | www.MyWealthManagementGroup.com

NEW CLIENTS ONLY

5

TOMBALL  MAGNOLIA EDITION • MAY 2020

BUSINESS INNOVATION

Local business owners adapt to coronavirus restrictions

NEW INITIATIVES Unleashed Machines rolled out new services during the pandemic. • Customers can drop off their cars and notify the company by phone.

FREE FUN Children can pick up a free pet rock in Tomball or Pinehurst.

• Employees sanitize areas they were in contact with and call the customer to let them know their car is ready.

COURTESY RAC MATERIALS

COURTESY UNLEASHED MACHINES

Rocking the social distancing

Keeping things rolling

I n addition to offering top soil, concrete and crushed rocks, RAC Materials is providing free advertisement for local Tomball businesses by adorning the backs of the company’s dump trucks with signs to be seen by passersby and giving free pet rocks to children, owner Russell DeNina said. DeNina said it was customary for local kindergarten teachers to come to the business every spring to collect rocks to bring back to their

B ritt Barron, owner of Vickie B’s on Main, said she was forced to not only change how the boutique operated, but also which products it sold. “The challenge has been that most people need to try [clothes items] on,” she said. “We have added gifts to our inventory because we recognized that’s what was selling.” Barron said candles have been Brick and digital B ruce Jackson, owner of Unleashed Machines in Tomball, said he wanted to give back to first responders and medical professionals by offering complementary oil changes and discounts for first responders. “We want them to have reliable vehicles to get back and forth and support our community at this time,” Jackson said. Unleashed Machines also added no-contact drop-off and pickup for

vehicles as well as free pickup and delivery within a 10-mile radius. Jackson said he wants to continue these initiatives after restrictions are lifted to continue providing conve- nience to customers. “[We are] trying to find ways to support the community in the best way needed right now,” he said.

students, so with schools closed, he said he wanted to provide rocks for children and their families to decorate for free. “There’s been a lot of people coming to get free rocks,” DeNina said. “People love stuff for free, and now they can come get a free rock.”

27100 Hwy. 249, Tomball 31350 Hwy. 249, Pinehurst 281-255-8500 www.racmaterials.com

10041 FM 2920, Tomball 281-351-4333 www.unleashedmachines.com

MOVING ONLINE Items for sale include:

213 W. Main St., Tomball 832-559-3620 www.facebook.com/vickiebsonmain B’s was open with limited hours. “[A website] was needed from a business perspective because that is where our growth is going to be,” Barron said. a big seller with people at home. The closure also led Vickie B’s to launch an online store. As of press time, Vickie

• Jewelry • Women’s clothing • Accessories • Candles

DYLAN SHERMAN/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

SELLING PROPERTIES IN YOUR AREA!

TOMBALL OFFICE 281.310.5888

Located in Tomball Town Center across from Kroger

INDIGO LAKE ESTATES 28211 INDIGO LAKE CT. NOREEN ARLETH | 832.435.9903 | $539,900

THREE LAKES EAST 19418 CAVERN SPRINGS ISABEL NORDIN | 210.415.6736 | $163,000

CALL US TODAY TO SELL YOURS!

©2019 Better Homes and Gardens Real Estate LLC. Better Homes and Gardens® is a registered trademark of Meredith Corporation licensed to Better Homes and Gardens Real Estate LLC. Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Each Franchise is Independently Owned and Operated. If your property is currently listed with a real estate broker, please disregard. It is not our intention to solicit the offerings of other real estate brokers.

6

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

This content temporarily replaces our Impacts section due to the ever-changing coronavirus pandemic.

COMPILED BY ADRIANA REZAL AND DYLAN SHERMAN

ONE-ON-ONE LEARNING Arbor Music offers real-time music lessons through Zoom, FaceTime and Skype to its students for:

HOWTOORDER Craving Kernels has rolled out new ways to order. • Phone • Curbside • On the web • Craving Kernels Rewards app

• Guitar • Piano • Violin • Cello

DYLAN SHERMAN/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

COURTESY ARBOR MUSIC

Socially distanced sweets

Finding a new rhythm

A fter having to temporarily close to the public, Craving Kernels Gourmet Popcorn and Treats added curbside delivery for customers as well as mobile ordering through its new app called Craving Kernels Rewards. Orders can be placed over the phone, online, through the app, on Facebook or even curbside, as a buzzer has been placed outside the Tomball storefront, owner Tracey Harmon said.

W ith stay-home orders in place through late April, some residents have been dusting off unused instruments and trying to learn something new. The majority of Arbor Music’s students had switched to online lessons, store manager Casey Brown said. Online lessons may continue as business restrictions are lifted, Brown said, as it could be a way to O ffering take-home art kits with paint and canvases is one way Paint & Bubbles Studio in Magnolia has adapted to temporarily closing its studio to the public, owner Rachel Alarid said. “That has been a pretty good hit for us,” she said. “We have great customers, and they have been supporting us.” Alarid said the studio will

continue to teach students if they are sick or cannot make it to the store. Lessons can be taught virtually for guitar, piano, violin and cello. In addition to virtual learning, the Magnolia-based music store continues to offer its retail products via online sales and curbside service as of press time, Brown said.

“We are trying to keep the theme going by having some music playing outside while customers wait for orders,” she said. In addition, Harmon said Craving Kernels offers free delivery within a 10-mile radius, as long as the order is at least $25. Shipping is also available with prices varying.

312 Market St., Tomball 281-377-3282 www.cravingkernels.com

33311 Bear Branch Lane, Magnolia 281-259-5585 www.arbormusic.com

Stay-at-home Picasso

AT-HOME ART Delivered to customers’ porches, Paint & Bubbles Studio art kits include: • A bubble wand • A canvas • 6-8 paint colors

31311 FM 2978, Ste. 107, Magnolia 346-703-2141 www.paintandbubbles.com the studio was planning to roll out online art classes following its online class rollout for some Magnolia ISD students. continue to put out new designs for customers to work on at home for as long as is needed. Additionally, Alarid said in late April

COURTESY RACHEL ALARID

As pediatric dentists, we focus on preventative care to help each child grow a healthy smile that will last a lifetime.

Call and make your appointment today! 281-516-2700 I 455 School St. Suite 42 I Tomball, TX 77375 teethforkidz.com

Georganne McCandless Board Certified

7

TOMBALL - MAGNOLIA EDITION • MAY 2020

CARING TAKES TRUE COURAGE. THANK YOU FOR YOUR SACRIFICE.

THANK YOU TO EVERY PHYSICIAN, NURSE, FIRST RESPONDER AND HEALTHCARE WORKER IN THE GREATER HOUSTON AREA. Thanks to those being called away from their own families to be of service to yours. And we thank the people of the Greater Houston area for taking every step possible to safeguard your own health. Thank you for the sacrifices you’re making. And for the impact you’re having on all our lives.

ThankYouHouston.org

Advancing health. Personalizing care.

8

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES

COMPILED BY ANNA LOTZ & HANNAH ZEDAKER

HOW ITWORKS

RECENT PROJECTS

Tree clearing and site work began in March for the Harris County Toll Road Authority project to build four direct connectors providing a direct route between the Grand Parkway and the tolled Hwy. 249 lanes in Tomball, according to Matt Kainer, HCTRA assistant director of mainte- nance and construction engineering. Williams Brothers Construction was awarded the approximately $90 million, 27-month contract and given notice to proceed with construction March 17, Kainer said. The drilling crew began working on the rst shafts along the Grand Parkway as of mid-April. The project includes connectors in four directions: heading north on the Tomball Tollway to eastbound or westbound on the Grand Parkway and going eastbound or westbound on the Grand Parkway to southbound on the Tomball Tollway, Community Impact Newspaper previously reported. Direct connector construction begins

How has the coronavirus aected Texas driver’s license expiration dates and other deadlines? Eective March 18, Gov. Greg Abbott announced the temporary waiver of expiration dates for driver’s licenses, commercial driver’s licenses, election identication cards and identication cards. This means if a license or card expired on or after March 13, 2020, it falls under the period that encompass- es the state of disaster declaration re- lated to COVID-19 and will remain valid for 60 days after the Department of Public Safety issues public notice that the extension period for this disaster declaration has been lifted. Additionally, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security announced March 26 that the Real ID enforcement deadline had been extended by one year until Oct. 1, 2021. The original enforcement deadline was set for Oct. 1, 2020. Eective March 16, Abbott issued a statement granting a temporary extension to obtain initial registration, renewal of registration, vehicle titling and renewal of a permanent disabled parking placard. The temporary waiver is in eect until 60 days after the Texas Department of Motor Vehicles noties the public that normal services have resumed. As vehicle inspections must be obtained prior to renewing vehicle registration, those, too, can be delayed.

Construction began in mid-March. (Dylan Sherman/Community Impact Newspaper)

Timeline: March 17, 2020-June 2022 Cost: $90 million Funding source: HCTRA

Hwy. 249 lanes open Previously slated to open in Feb- ruary, the rst Montgomery County lanes of the tolled extension of Hwy. 249 opened March 26, accord- ing to information from the oce of Montgomery County Precinct 2 Commissioner Charlie Riley. The Montgomery County Toll Road Authority segment stretches from Spring Creek to just south of Woodtrace Boulevard and features two main lanes in each direction with a toll gantry and tolled entries and exits. Although connecting two toll roads, the project itself will include no new tolling points. Kainer said Tomball-area residents can expect to see some lane closures on the frontage roads, but there will be no reduction in lanes on the Grand Parkway or Hwy. 249 main lanes. The project is anticipated to provide trac relief near Boudreaux Road, as drivers will no longer have to use Boudreaux and the frontage roads to travel between the toll roads, Kainer said.

OLD BOUDREAUX RD.

249 TOLL

99 TOLL

N

This segment spans 3.6 miles and is part of a larger, multi-agency project. The Harris County Toll Road Authority, the MCTRA and the Texas Department of Transportation have been working since 2017 to extend the tolled portion of Hwy. 249 from Tomball through Magnolia with a nontolled segment stretching to Navasota, Community Impact Newspaper previously reported. Timeline: early 2018-March 2020 Cost: $63 million Funding source: MCTRA

WOODTRACE BLVD.

249

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF APRIL 20. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT TOMNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

DECKER PRAIRIE RD.

N

Get excellent care from the comfort of your own home, office or wherever with Next Level Virtual Visits. Fill out a Virtual Visit request form at nextlevelurgentcare.com and you will be notified within 30 minutes to schedule your virtual appointment. Best of all, Virtual Visits can be billed to insurance or paid for directly.

Actual care. Virtually anywhere.

Available 9-9, 7 days a week nextlevelurgentcare.com | 832.779.8597

9

TOMBALL  MAGNOLIA EDITION • MAY 2020

STRUGGLING TO SERVE TOMAGWA HealthCare Ministries has seen a decrease in revenue as resources are diverted elsewhere amid the pandemic.

HEALTH CARE TOMAGWAfaces fewer funds, supplies

$425,000 in lost revenue expected March-May

3,200 patients served annually

BY ANNA LOTZ

interactions, Simmons said. As such, pharmacy services were also moved curbside, labs were limited, and the clinic operated temporarily at the Lone Star College-Tomball Health Sci- ences Building to see critical patients. “Not being a major hospital system, we have not had the same access to supplies, PPE, and sanitation as those entities would,” Simmons said. “So we had to shift to telehealth much quicker so that those resources—right- fully so—can be reserved for the direct COVID-19 care.” However, TOMAGWA has seen nancial contributions slow signi- cantly, making it dicult to continue caring for the uninsured, she said. “The entire community is struggling with this, and we are not a govern- ment-funded entity. We do not accept health insurance, so a typical doctor’s oce right now even if they’re seeing patients via telemedicine they can still bill an insurance company,” Simmons said. “We are not collecting anything for patient visits.”

TOMAGWA HealthCare Ministries sta have had little interaction with patients testing positive for the coro- navirus, yet the outbreak has drained the nonprot’s resources and put a strain on its ability to continue serving uninsured, chronically ill patients. “We were already overwhelmed with caring for just the regular popula- tion of illnesses, and now you layer on all the eorts being diverted to COVID-19,” CEO Timika Simmons said. “It’s a wonder how we’re here today.” TOMAGWA provides health care to the uninsured population in Tomball, Magnolia and Waller. Two-thirds of its 3,200 patients have chronic illnesses, such as diabetes or severe heart con- ditions, making them “high risk” for severe illness or death from COVID-19, Simmons said. TOMAGWA switched to providing telehealth services March 16 with home visits in special circumstances to conserve personal protective equipment by limiting sta-patient

$150,000 Monthly expenses total at least SOURCE: TOMAGWA HEALTHCARE MINISTRIES COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Patients are screened before labs are drawn at the Tomball facility. TOMAGWA moved to telehealth March 16 for most services. (Courtesy TOMAGWA HealthCare Ministries)

DONATIONS NEEDED Community members can help TOMAGWA with donations. • Financial support • Personal protective equipment • Sanitizer • Disinfectant wipes Visit www.tomagwa.org/give/supplies for a full list. we cannot gure out a way to continue to provide care, you have 3,200 people who just lost their source of medica- tion, their lab, their doctor, and two- thirds of them have serious medical issues. And what will the community do then?”

Simmons said TOMAGWA was already overwhelmed with patients prior to COVID-19, as it is the only clinic providing care to the uninsured within 600 square miles, and is likely to see an inux of patients over the next fewmonths should unemploy- ment rates continue to be high. At the same time, Simmons said she projects losing more than $425,000 in revenue in March, April and May as foundations have less to give, patient contributions are null and fundraisers are canceled. “Every source of revenue that’s usually available to us is impacted,” she said. “You talk about a surge—if

Driving accident-free pays

Allstate gives you money back every 6 months you’re accident-free. Yep, and no other company does that. Sign up for Safe Driving Bonus® today. Call me to learn more. th . Sign up for Saf Driving Bonus® oday. Call me to learn more. accident-free. Yep, and no other company does

Driving accident-free pays Chris Draper 218-477-8805 i raper 81 -8805

Chris Draper 218-477-8805 11623 Spring Cypress Rd., Ste. #A Tomball, TX 77377 11623 Spring Cypress Rd., Ste. #A Tomball, TX 77377 pring Cy res Rd., Ste. #A l, X 7 37

Have any other coverage needs? Call any time.

NOT AVAILABLE IN EVERY STATE. Feature optional. Subject to terms & conditions. Allstate Fire and Casualty Insurance Co. © 2018 Allstate Insurance Co.

Have any other coverage needs? Call any time.

NOT AVAILABLE IN EVERY STATE. Feature optional. Subject to terms & conditions. Allstate Fire and Casualty Insurance Co. © 2018 Allstate Insurance Co.

10

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

PANDEMIC EFFECTS Stephen Head, the chancellor of the Lone Star College System, said the college system has moved classes online, adjusted dates and canceled graduations as a result of the coronavirus outbreak.

HIGHER EDUCATION

Lone Star College to up online presence following pandemic

in summer enrollment with most classes held online. LSCS anticipates about aa 30% DROP The drop date—the day for students to drop out of classes with a refund if they have been aected by the coronavirus—was moved to MAY 1 $1 MILLION in stimulus funding budgeted for refunds. with around

LSCS facilities are closed from mid-March toa

have been moved online, up from 1,624 classes. Since mid-March 6,825 CLASSES in relief funding as part of the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act, with $14 million designated for student nancial aid. LSCS received nearly $28 MILLION

because of the outbreak. JUNE 1

BY ANNA LOTZ

enrollment, with classes beginning June 1 and most classes online. LSCS facilities were closed from mid-March to June 1 as of press time. Despite closed facilities, Head said he believes LSCS is positioned well nancially to weather the pandemic. He said the college system antici- pates losing at most $20 million. In comparison, after Hurricane Harvey in 2017, LSCS saw a loss of about $52 million, he said. LSCS was named to receive more than $28 million in relief funding as part of the federal Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act, according to an April 14 release from the oce of U.S. Sen. John Cornyn. According to the release, at least half of the funding has to go toward providing nancial aid to students. This fall, Head said LSCS could see an uptick in enrollment. “Back in 2008, we had double-digit

Lone Star College System increased its online classes from 1,624 classes to 6,825 classes since mid-March as facilities closed during the coronavi- rus pandemic, according to an April 27 news release. LSCS Chancellor Stephen Head said in early April he foresees LSCS continuing to enhance its online options even after stay-at- home orders are lifted. “What happens when you have a situation like this, it exacerbates your weaknesses,” Head said. “We have the largest online enrollment in the country for community colleges. ... You’ll be seeing us really focused on online going forward. ... The other thing is we’re really going to be focused on these workforce programs where we know that there’s a need, like health care for example.” Head said in April he anticipates about a 30% drop in summer

The end of the spring semester was pushed

because of the outbreak. from May 8 toa MAY 22

May graduation ceremonies were CANCELED.

SOURCE: LONE STAR COLLEGE SYSTEMCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

increases after that [recession],” he said. “What happens when the economy is good—and it’s been really good—people were not coming to school. ... As soon as you have a prob- lem, if you don’t have a combination of education and experience, then you could get laid o.”

Although the fall semester is slated to resume with on-site courses, Head said LSCS hopes to expand its online oerings long term. “We already had plans to expand. ... We actually have people from all over the country taking classes, and we wanted to expand on that,” Head said.

BEFORE

AFTER

LIFE @ HOME We Are Open

LIFE @ HOME

PREPLESS VENEERS Before & After Actual Patients

SHOP ONLINE - BY PHONE - BY APPOINTMENT

With the stay at home order lifted inMontgomery County, we are resuming our normal operating hours: Monday – Friday 9 AM – 5 PM, Saturday 10 AM – 4 PM

BEFORE

AFTER

Prepless Veneers $6,295 FOR A SET OF 8

FREE

EXAM & X-RAYS

FREE 2ND OPINION Includes consultation, exam and necessary X-Rays. A savings of $199. New patients only. Good for 30 days. Some conditions apply. Good for 30 days.

Cash or check payment required. Available to the first 7 patients who contact us from this ad. Prepless Veneers for qualifying patients only. Good for 30 days.

SET UP A STUDY OR WORK SPACE Read tips on how to transform your living space to a new office or study environment.

COZY OUTDOOR LIVING SPACE With warmer weather arriving, now is a great time to move outside.

CREATE A BATHROOM OASIS

TOMBALL 616 West Main Street 281-290-8000

SPRING 1100 Rayford Rd.. Suite 100 281-602-8843

Now more than ever, we all need an escape.

Josh W Gosnell, DDS ∙ Robert M.Turner, DDS Diego Flores, DDS

Magnolia • 32411 FM 2978, Suite A 281-298-5200 AnthologyLighting.com • Follow Us

Serving the Area Since 1999!

AmericasFamilyDental.com

11

TOMBALL  MAGNOLIA EDITION • MAY 2020

12

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

PUBLIC SAFETY Domestic violence calls climb amid coronavirus pandemic

Advocates against domestic violence in Harris and Montgomery counties said domestic crisis calls have increased since social distancing measures were implemented in mid-March. SOURCES: HARRIS COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE, MONTGOMERY COUNTY DISTRICT ATTORNEY’S OFFICECOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER CALLS FOR HELP

HARRIS COUNTY

increase in the number of domestic violence cases reported by county district attorney’s oce from March 2019 to March 2020 35% MONTGOMERY COUNTY

Since social distancing orders due to the coronavirus took eect in mid-March, ocials in Harris and Montgomery counties said the combination of encouraged isolation, coronavirus-related nancial stress- ors and limited shelter space as a result of social distancing has created an ideal environment for escalated domestic violence. “All of those things create a petri dish for domestic violence,” said Mai- sha Colter, the CEO of Aid to Victims of Domestic Abuse, a Houston-based organization that provides free legal representation and counseling for survivors of domestic abuse. “We’ve actually seen an uptick in calls for service related to victim programs ... specically around the time when the stay-at-home orders started to come down.” The Montgomery County District Attorney’s Oce reported a 35% increase in domestic violence cases in March compared to March 2019, according to a news release from the DA’s oce. Meanwhile, the Montgomery County Women’s Center saw a 34% increase in the number of hotline calls in that same time: 4,009 in March 2019 compared to about 5,388 in March 2020. “Stay-at-home measures may help prevent the spread of COVID-19, but home may not be the safest place,” said Chau Nguyen, Houston Area Women’s Center chief public strat- egies ocer. “Calls to the hotlines have spiked up to 40% on some days, BY EVA VIGH AND HANNAH ZEDAKER

JANUARY 2020 1,449 Number of calls related to domestic violence

averaging about 60-80 domestic violence-related calls a day.” According to the Harris County Sheri’s Oce, while calls related to domestic violence saw an overall 10.28% decrease between the months of January and February, that number shot back up in March, growing 19.84% from February with 1,558 domestic violence-related calls. “Our call volume has seen a grad- ual increase since the end of February in all categories of family violence,” HCSO Director of Public Aairs Jason Spencer said. “People are conned from their homes, [and] many people are not working or working from home. Those that are not working have no income so their stress is up, which can cause them to lash out much more quickly. For the batterer, they are home more, which gives themmore access to the victim.” ‘The perfect storm’ With social distancing measures, victims now have limited resources and safe places to turn to, which makes leaving an abuser even more risky, said Sarah Raleigh, CEO and president of the Montgomery County Women’s Center. Debi Edge, the chief program ocer for the Montgomery County Women’s Center, described it as “the perfect storm” for domestic violence. “Any time you nd additional stress in the home, typically domes- tic violence escalates, and this is certainly a stressful time,” Raleigh said.

1,300

FEBRUARY 2020 MARCH 2020

1,558

Help is available for abuse victims. RESOURCES FORVICTIMS

800-799-7233 www.thehotline.org National Domestic Violence Hotline 866-331-9474 National Dating Violence Hotline Northwest AssistanceMinistries 24-hour hotline

Montgomery CountyWomen’s Center 24-hour hotline www.tcfv.org/survivor-resources Texas Council on Family Violence

936-441-7273 www.mcwctx.org

Houston AreaWomen’s Center 24-hour hotline

281-885-4673

713-528-2121

She said the last time she recalls seeing such a noticeable uptick in calls was during the economic down- turn of 2007 and 2008. In that time, the shelter’s call volume rose from 1,500 per month to 3,000 per month. Ocials added they suspect actual incidences of domestic violence are much higher as more cases are going unreported as connections to the outside world are more limited. “A lot of times in a domestic vio- lence situation it is actually a friend, coworker or teacher who is actually reporting the violence,” said Echo Hutson, the domestic violence chief for the Montgomery County DA’s oce. “Right now, when you have that isolated situation, we don’t know how many are [in danger].”

The same can be said for inci- dences of child abuse, said Sarah Hernandez, the communications and outreach coordinator for The Chil- dren’s Assessment Center—a Harris County-based organization—as many children are now separated from adults they trust such as teachers. Sheryl Johnson, the director of Northwest Assistance Ministries’ Family Violence Center, said she anticipates domestic violence calls will continue to climb even after the stay-at-home orders are lifted. “Quite frankly, the longer we’re in this scenario and the longer [the vic- tim] is isolated, the more entrenched some of those behaviors are going to become once we go back to ‘normal life,’” she said.

13

TOMBALL  MAGNOLIA EDITION • MAY 2020

“Breast cancer, I beat you onmy terms” Rashe Bowie | Cancer Survivor When Rashe was diagnosed with breast cancer, she chose the nation’s leader in cancer care first. At MD Anderson Cancer Center, her subspecialized team of experts created a comprehensive treatment plan and gave her the support she needed to beat cancer on her own terms. Choose MD Anderson first. Call 1-844-870-9032 or visit MDAndersonBreastCare.com.

Ranked number one in the nation for cancer care by U.S. News &World Report.

LEAGUE CITY | SUGAR LAND | TEXAS MEDICAL CENTER | THE WOODLANDS | WEST HOUSTON

14

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CORONAVIRUS INMONTGOMERY COUNTY As of April 28, Montgomery County had not set up free testing sites because repeated county requests for COVID-19 tests were not fullled. Numbers are as of press time.

The county has more than 530 CONFIRMED CASES out of 607,391 residents. The closest free testing facility for the region was set up at

Magnolia ZIP codes include at least 38 CONFIRMED CASES out of 64,753 residents. As of April 16, Montgomery County had 25 privately operated testing sites.

AMERICA'S ER TESTING SITE

STONEBRIDGE CHURCH DR.

N

BUTLER STADIUM in Houston.

CORONAVIRUS

America’s ER opened a drive-thru testing site April 4 in The Woodlands with tests costing $150 if not covered by insurance. It was the rst drive- thru site to open in Montgomery County as the county has seen a lack of free publicly funded sites. (Andy Li/Community Impact Newspaper)

Montgomery County sees few test kits, lack of free COVID19 testing Due to limited resources, Montgom- ery County has been unable to secure enough testing kits to launch a free BY ANDY LI AND EVA VIGH in areas outside Houston, she said. The Southeast Texas Regional

MCPHD knew of 25 privately operated sites in the county. However, ocials with privately run sites said they did not have the funds to adequately serve the uninsured population. Testingkit backlog During the week of March 8 and prior to the opening of Butler Stadium as a testing site, the MCPHD entered a request to order emergency supplies from the state, including 1,000 COVID- 19 test kits, and received six, according to an April 14 MCPHD news release. The Montgomery County Oce of Homeland Security and Emergency Management also requested COVID-19 test kits and was told the state would consider sending kits in August, according to the release. Several major hospital systems then attempted to pool resources and set up free testing sites in Houston and sur- rounding counties, Willingham said. But these entities also never received enough resources to provide test sites

County Judge Mark Keough said he had been in talks with Conroe ISD to set up testing at Woodforest Stadium but had to scrap plans due to a lack of resources. However, several private entities have opened testing sites in the county with residents paying or billing insurance. America’s ER opened the county’s rst drive-thru site at Stone- bridge Church in The Woodlands on April 4. Lone Star Clinic Family Clinic opened its drive-up testing clinic April 13, testing about 500 individuals per week, CEO Karen Harwell said. America’s ER—which was testing between 130-140 people per day in mid-April—receives no federal, state or local nancial support. “Somebody has to pay the check. And right now, we’re the one’s hold- ing the bill,” said Dr. Mark Feanny, the president, CEO and owner of America’s ER. BEN THOMPSON CONTRIBUTED TO THIS REPORT.

Advisory Council did receive some test kit resources from the state and, along with Houston-area hospital systems, set up the free testing site at Butler Stadium, Willingham said. Chris Van Deusen, director of media relations for the Texas Department of State Health Services, said one chal- lenge for the state has been obtaining testing swabs. “We had some on hand in our labs, so we were able to share those out, but it was a limited supply,” he said. “We tried to share those out as fairly as possible, but nobody in that situation is going to get as much as they asked for.” Van Deusen said April 20 that the DSHS received 10,000 nasopharyngeal swabs the week prior to distribute. In the meantime, the county has had its hands tied on opening sites without a guarantee of supplies and manpower. At the April 2 The Woodlands Township board meeting,

coronavirus testing site as of press time April 28. However, the Mont- gomery County Hospital District and Montgomery County Public Health District met after press time April 28 to consider approving a voucher system providing more than 12,000 tests for free testing countywide, according to MCPHD Public Information Ocer Misti Willingham. “We wouldn’t want to implement mass-scale testing until we are sure we have the supply to meet the demand,” Willingham said in mid-April. Ideally, there should be a free testing center in every quadrant of Montgomery County, Willingham said. But as of press time, the closest free site for residents was Butler Stadium in southwest Houston. Additional sites were set up throughout Harris County. As of April 16, Willingham said the

Adult & Youth Leagues | Earn Scholarships Bowling Pool League on Tuesday Nights | Corporate Events/Fundraisers Pool Tables – Arcades Pro Shop – Great Food & Drinks Tomball bowl

SOCIAL DISTANCING. I T ’ S B E EN A ROUND A L ONG T I ME !

CALL NOW FOR TRASH SERVICE

BIG UPDATES COMING! CAN’T WAIT TO SHOW YOU WHAT WE’VE BEEN WORKING ON! BOWLING WILL BE BACK!

346-248-5222 www.rrrtx.net

14435 FM 2920, Tomball, TX 77377 281-351-1831 www.tomballbowl.com

2920

249

15

TOMBALL  MAGNOLIA EDITION • MAY 2020

THE BEST OF BOTH WORLDS Southern Charm Meets Urban Excitement

NEW SECTION NOW OPEN, PRICED FROM THE MID 200’S

W.G. Jones State Forest

1488

Stillwater, a master-planned community within The Woodlands area, is located within minutes of I-45 and bordered by WG Jones State Forest. Enjoy the best of all worlds– a retreat into nature featuring a Lowcountry-inspired architectural approach and lifestyle along with easy access to all The Woodlands has to offer.

45

242

NEW MODELS NOW OPEN

Zoned to CISD The Woodlands High School

Call Johnny Cochran or Kimbra Gaby to make your appointment today at 281-681-0400

The Hill 2224 Pintail Lane & 2228 Pintail Lane

New Chapel East 2394 Hagerman Road Conroe, Texas 77384

P R O S P E R f r o m t h e $ 1 M M ’ s C U S T O M H O M E S I N S T I L L W A T E R

Contact Kecia Haseman 713 -515-4948 and Arlene English 713-367-7333 with Compass Realty

2111 COACH ST. TD Cox Custom Homebuilder

2119 COACH ST. Tommy Bailey Custom Homes

2123 COACH ST. Tommy Bailey Custom Homes

2115 COACH ST. Partners In Building

Karen Gaines Office: 713-452-1366 Cell: 702-338-7171 Email: Karen.Gaines@PartnersInBuilding.com

WELCOME NEW PROSPER BUILDER PARTNERS IN BUILDING

S t i l l w a t e r T X . c o m

16

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

NEWS BRIEFS

Wildcat Cables shifts tomakingPPE Wildcat PPE was created after the Magnolia-based business, Wildcat Cables, pivoted frommanufactur- BY DYLAN SHERMAN

TEXAS TEXA

1.3 MILLION units of PPE since early April Orders made for more than

ENGINEERED ROOFING I ROOFING

ing cables to personal protective equipment in early April, founding member Jason Arcemont said. “[Our] core business was in oil and gas, and with that meltdown we were looking to pivot,” he said. As local hospitals and clinics needed PPE, Arcemont said with the company’s background in stream- lined manufacturing, they decided they could enter the market and do a quality job. Orders for 1.3 million units had been received as of late April, and Arcemont said the company is look- ing to expand into Tomball within 30-60 days. “The biggest issue we have is manpower,” he said. “We need about 150 people [for the new complex], and that will grow to about 800 at the end of the year.” Wildcat PPE has been making gowns from local materials and manufacturers but plans to expand

AND GENERAL CONTRACTING AND GENERAL CONTRACTING

Wildcat began making PPE in April.

into other PPE products. “Hospitals and clinics are looking for long-term, U.S.-made solutions,” Arcemont said. With the growth into Tomball, Wildcat PPE anticipates having as many as 1,500 employees in the future, Arcemont said. A job fair was held April 24. “Tomball will be a major PPE manufacturer,” he said. “We have to get Tomball back to work, and we are going to do that as safely as we can.”

We A re I n T he Neighborhood - Licensed Roofing Contractor: Residential & Commercial - GreaterMagnolia&Tomball Chamber of CommerceMembe r - Fully Insured for Peace of Mind - Types of Roofs: Composite Shingle, Flat, Metal & Tile - Only Hand Nail all Composite Shingle Roofs - A+ BBB Rating & 5 Stars on Yelp - Angie’s List Super Service Award: 20 17-20 1 9 - Woodlands Online Best Of: Best Roofer 201 7 -20 20 We A re I n T he Neighborhood - Licensed Roofing Contractor: Residential & Commercial - GreaterMagnolia&Tomball Chamber of CommerceMembe r - Fully Insured for Peace of Mind - Types of Roofs: Composite Shingle, Flat, Metal & Tile - Only Hand Nail all Composite Shingle Roofs - A+ BBB Rating & 5 Stars on Yelp - Angie’s List Super Service Award: 20 17-20 1 9 - Woodlands Online Best Of: Best Roofer 201 7 -20 20 WE ARE IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD - Licensed Roofing ntractor: Residential & Commercial - Greater Magnolia & Tomball Chamber of Commerce Member - Fully Insured for Peace of Mind - Types of Roofs: Composite Shingle, Flat, Metal & Tile - Only Hand Nail all Composite Shingle Roofs - A+ BBB Rati g & 5 Stars on Yelp - Angie’s List Super Service Award: 2017-2019 - Woodlands Online Best Of: Best Roofer 2017-2020 CALL FOR A FREE INSPECTION DUE TO THE RECENT HAIL &WIND STORM 281-259-3300 www.TxEngineeredRoofing.com

TISDapproves SMARTTagsystem

BY ANNA LOTZ

bus stop, we are going to transport them to a school if they’re a school- age student, so that poses a variety of safety issues,” Chief Operating Ocer Steven Gutierrez said April 13. Parents will also be able to track where their students are on the bus route, Gutierrez said, which could prove to be particularly advantageous should there be a bus accident. “[Our current] process is so cumbersome that by the time parents get notication from the district notifying them that their student was involved in an accident ... they would have possibly known about it for hours from their students,” he said. He said students’ contact infor- mation would be connected to their SMART Tag for only the district to access. As board members raised con- cerns about how secure student data would be, trustees approved rolling out the system with the condition that approval is “subject to review of the data security set of questions that were asked by board members.”

The Tomball ISD board of trustees approved a $342,318 contract April 13 for a SMART Tag system, slated to enhance the safety and security of students who use the district’s bus service. The district plans to implement the system in August to track which students get on and o buses and where, TISD ocials said. Once implemented, each student will have a card with his or her photo on it that will use RFID tech- nology to communicate with the scanner on the bus, district ocials said. Students will scan their cards when entering and exiting the bus. Each bus driver will have a tablet alerting them of how many students are on the bus and whether the student boarding the bus is actually supposed to be on the bus. “Right now there is not a mecha- nism where a bus driver will know who the student is that’s boarding their bus. If they are a student at a

17

TOMBALL  MAGNOLIA EDITION • MAY 2020

INSIDE INFORMATION

Learn how to make a mask from household items

COMPILED BY DANICA SMITHWICK

In late April, Harris County Judge Lina Hidalgo ordered all residents over age 10 to wear face coverings while in public from April 27-May 26. Earlier in April, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended individuals wear cloth face coverings when in public even when they are not exhibiting symptoms of the coronavirus. Facing the facts

DO

DON'T

WHY SHOULD I WEAR A MASK? Many coronavirus cases lack symptoms or develop symptoms later on in the diagnosis, so individuals might not know they have or are transmitting the disease. The virus can spread during interactions such as speaking, coughing or sneezing.

• Cover your mouth and nose in public even if you are not experiencing symptoms of COVID-19 or interacting with someone who is experiencing symptoms. • Wash masks in hot water before the rst use and between uses. • Wear a mask when in public places such as grocery stores, at medical appointments and accessing other essential services. • Replace masks when they get damp.

• Use surgical masks or N-95 respirators, as these critical supplies should be reserved for health care professionals. • Ignore calls for social distancing of 6 feet between persons. • Forget to wash hands frequently as well as before putting on a mask. • Reuse single-use masks.

HOW TO MAKE A MASK AT HOME Cloth face coverings can be crafted from household items such as fabric, scarves, bandanas, hand towels, T-shirts and rubber bands or hair ties.

STEP 4: Fold fabric to the middle from both sides and tuck the sides in.

STEP 5: Attach each rubber band to either ear, ensuring the mouth and nose are completely covered.

STEP 3: Place a rubber band on each side of the fabric.

STEP 2: Fold fabric to the middle from the top and bottom.

STEP 1: Fold fabric to the middle from the bottom.

CORRECT

6 inches apart

NOT CORRECT

SOURCES: CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION, HARRIS COUNTY PUBLIC HEALTHCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Residential & Commercial A/C Repair, Maintenance & Replacement We’re Not Comfortable Until You Are.

MAY SPECIAL $895

MAY SPECIAL $ 1,000 OFF with complete A/C

REME HALO® Whole Home In-Duct Air Purifier 15 IN STOCK, INCLUDES A SURGE PROTECTOR The REME HALO® whole home in-duct air purifier is the next generation of indoor air quality technology and capable of purifying every cubic inch of air that your central air conditioning system reaches, bringing relief to those who suffer from allergies and other respiratory issues.

and HEATING SYSTEM Must present coupon. Exp 6/15/20. Cannot be combined with other offers.

Must present coupon. Exp 6/15/20. Cannot be combined with other offers.

CROSSWAYMECHANICAL.COM • 832-250-6191

18

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8 Page 9 Page 10 Page 11 Page 12 Page 13 Page 14 Page 15 Page 16 Page 17 Page 18 Page 19 Page 20 Page 21 Page 22 Page 23 Page 24 Page 25 Page 26 Page 27 Page 28 Page 29 Page 30 Page 31 Page 32 Page 33 Page 34 Page 35 Page 36

communityimpact.com

Powered by