Keller - Roanoke - Northeast Fort Worth - July 2022

2022 KELLER ROANOKE NORTHEAST FORT WORTH EDITION

ONLINE AT

REAL ESTATE EDITION

VOLUME 4, ISSUE 3  JULY 21AUG. 24, 2022

Northwest ISD at a glance 7,342

27,612 Student population in 2021-22

2,700 Multifamily units under construction

80.49% Projected growth in student population from 2021-22 to 2031-32

Number of residential lots where groundwork is underway

IMPACTS

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TODO LIST

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A 396-home build-to-rent development called Litsey Creek Cottages is under construction south of Litsey Road in Northeast Fort Worth.

REAL ESTATE EDITION 2022

VALERIE WIGGLESWORTHCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Residential construction booming in Northwest ISD

BY VALERIE WIGGLESWORTH

construction—4,579. The inventory of homes—meaning those still under con- struction or not yet sold by the end of the rst quarter of this year—totaled 2,467, according to the report delivered to school trustees in May by Zonda Education. Another 2,982 vacant residential lots within the district are primed for construction crews, the report stated. As for the future, the report shows at least 38,594 sin- gle-family lots on the books to be built in the coming years in NISD.

When it comes to residential real estate in Northwest ISD, the numbers speak for themselves. Northwest ISD nished at the top of a recent demographic report by Zonda Education ranking 20 North Texas school districts by the annual number of homes sold or newly occu- pied within its boundaries. Between April 2021 and March 2022, the district saw 3,579 new home closings. NISD also ranked rst during that period among those dis- tricts based on the number of homes that year that started

SNAPSHOT DATA

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WINE:30 ON OAK STREET

Deloitte plans $100M campus expansion

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OTTINGER RD.

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BY VALERIE WIGGLESWORTH

consulting and nancial advisory services and employs more than 350,000 people worldwide. Its West- lake campus, known as Deloitte University: The Leadership Center, launched in 2011. It is located south

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Ocials with a leadership training center that has a global reach are pro- posing a $100 million expansion that will benet not only the town of West- lake but also Tarrant County. Deloitte LLP provides audit, tax

Deloitte University is in Westlake.

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DAN’S BAGELS

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COURTESY DELOITTE UNIVERSITY

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KELLER - ROANOKE - NORTHEAST FORT WORTH EDITION • JULY 2022

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THIS ISSUE

ABOUT US

Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the rst edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and Pugerville, Texas. Now in 2022, CI is still locally owned. We have expanded to include hundreds of employees, our own software platform and printing facility, and over 30 hyperlocal editions across the state with circulation to more than 2.4 million residential mailboxes.

HIGHLIGHTS FROM THIS MONTH

FROM ANA: It’s safe to say this has been one hot year for real estate! Learn more about the 52% of Tarrant County homes sold last year that went to investors (Page 15) and how the growth of Northwest ISD is fueling real estate development in the region (Pages 18-19). Our real estate coverage starts on Page 14. Ana Erwin, GENERAL MANAGER

Community Impact Newspaper teams include general managers, editors, reporters, graphic designers, sales account executives and sales support, all immersed and invested in the communities they serve. Our mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Our core values are Faith, Passion, Quality, Innovation and Integrity.

FROM VALERIE: I love learning about the stories of the owners behind the businesses in our communities. This edition features Wine:30 on Oak Street in Roanoke (Page 25) and Dan’s Bagels in Trophy Club (Page 26). Be sure to check them out. If you have suggestions for future features, send them to krnnews@communityimpact.com. Valerie Wigglesworth, SENIOR EDITOR

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CORRECTION: Volume 4, Issue 2 In the roundup of July 4 events in the To-do List, the listing for the All American Fireworks & Festival in Roanoke contained several errors. This year's bands were Texas High Road and The After Party. The reworks show was set to start at about 9:25 p.m.

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KELLER  ROANOKE  NORTHEAST FORT WORTH EDITION • JULY 2022

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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TROPHY CLUB DR.

Poki Bowl

Hyatt Place

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COURTESY POKI BOWL

COURTESY HYATT PLACE FORT WORTHALLIANCE TOWN CENTER

CANNON PKWY.

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Wae House

Outpost 36 Texas Barbeque

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COURTESY WAFFLE HOUSE

COURTESY OUTPOST 36 TEXAS BARBEQUE

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Alliance Town Center, Fort Worth. The 130-room hotel includes a restaurant, a tness center, an outdoor pool, a business center and meeting facilities, according to its website. 682-285-1234. https://bit.ly/3y6wjUc 5 Texas Orthopedic Specialists opened a new Alliance location June 20 at 3301 Golden Triangle Blvd., Fort Worth. The team oers hip, knee, shoulder, hand, upper extremity, foot and ankle services. In addition, it oers joint replacement and sports medicine services. 817-540-4477. www.txortho.net 6 Alpha & Omega Chiropractic opened June 13 at 252 S. Elm St. in Keller, accord- ing to a Facebook post. The new chiro- practic practice is run by Texas natives Hannah Traweek and Morgan Himango, and oers prenatal, pediatric and family wellness services. 817-562-4325. www.alphaandomegachiro.com 7 Revival Fitness , also called RevFit, opened June 20 in the Alliance area at 9763 North Freeway in Fort Worth. The

workout studio has another location at 3322 Hulen St. in Fort Worth. RevFit oers a “science-based group tness program” that includes cardio, athlete, strength, abs and power training, accord- ing to its website. www.revttexas.com COMING SOON 8 A new Wae House is being con- structed at 4600 Golden Triangle Blvd. in Fort Worth. The restaurant is projected to open in October. Wae House oers breakfast, lunch and dinner options, in- cluding a variety of waes, omelets and steaks. www.waehouse.com 9 Outpost 36 Texas Barbeque will open sometime in August or September at 1801 S. Main St. in Keller, according to Je Lowery, Horizon 76 American Grill House and Outpost 36 Texas Barbeque operating partner. Billed as an “authentic Texas barbecue” joint, the restaurant will be located next to Horizon 76 American Grill House. The owners of Horizon 76

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N. RIVERSIDE DR.

NOW OPEN 1 Poki Bowl opened its Trophy Club Town Center location at 2220 Hwy. 114, Ste. 430, on June 11, according to the restaurant’s Facebook page. Poki Bowl sells customizable rice and salad bowls with seafood, special sauces and toppings. 682-888-4132. www.pokibowl.com 2 Shri Foods opened July 1 at 11477 Woodland Springs Drive, Ste. 100, in Fort

Worth. The Indian restaurant serves a variety of vegetarian entrees as well as biryani, fried rice, crepes and more, ac- cording to its website. 682-593-0140 or 817-793-7084. https://shrifoods4u.com 3 Ice cream shop Cold Wave Creations opened July 1 at 242 Rufe Snow Drive, Ste. 150, Keller. It oers homemade ice cream and Italian ice. 817-662-7707. www.coldwavecreations.com 4 Hyatt Place Fort Worth/Alliance Town Center opened June 9 at 3201

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American Grill House—Lowery, Dwight Dowell and Chris Polk—bought the neigh- boring building to open the barbecue restaurant. 817-898-3636 (phone num- ber will be activated closer to opening). www.outpost36.com 10 Life Time , an athletic country club with more than 150 locations across the country, is set to be built at 2902 Sam School Road, Westlake, according to a ling with the Texas Department of Li- censing and Regulation. This new project is set to begin construction in January and cost an estimated $47 million, according to the ling. The projected completion date is mid- 2024, according to the company. Life Time locations oer more than 100 group tness classes a week and feature a restaurant, a salon and a spa. The Westlake location will also have indoor and outdoor pools; regula- tion-size basketball courts; a large tness oor; small group training; and four outdoor pickleball courts, according to Natalie Bushaw, vice president for public relations and corporate communications for Life Time. www.lifetime.life 11 Wild Oak Studio is planning to open in July at 400 S. Oak St., Ste. 160, Roanoke. Wild Oak Studio oers rentable spaces for events and photo shoots. Rentals are by appointment only, accord- ing to the studio’s website. www.babiesandbrands.co/WildOakStudio FEATURED IMPACT COMING SOON A Carvana Customer Care Center is under construction at 8741 North Freeway in Fort Worth. The $5.5 million project includes a new oce building, customer vehicle delivery bays and an automated vehicle display-delivery tower, according to a ling with the Texas Department of Licensing and Regulation. Carvana is an online automobile retailer that allows customers to pick up their vehicle at a Car Vending Machine. This location will be the sixth Carvana Car Vending Machine in Texas and the rst one in Fort Worth, according to a

company representative. The state-of-the-art steel and glass structure will be 12 stories tall and have the ability to store up to 43 vehicles, the representative stated in an email. An opening date has not yet been set. www.carvana.com

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12 On-Site PC Services will open in a one-story building being constructed at 800 Cannon Parkway in Roanoke, accord- ing to a ling with the Texas Department of Licensing and Regulation. The com- pany oers commercial and residential computer support and services. Work in Roanoke is set to be completed by Jan. 1, 2023. 817-306-6106 (Southlake). http://ospcservices.com 13 Parkway CJ’s Salon and Suites is coming to 2122 Rufe Snow Drive, Ste. 114- 120, Keller. Keller City Council voted July 5 to allow the suites in the Keller Commons Addition to be combined into one large salon. Council also approved a specic-use permit for the business. CJ’s Salon and Suites will oer esthetician services, styl- ists, chiropractic services, massages and more, owner Fredrecio Washington said. An opening date, phone number and web- site were not available as of press time. NEW OWNERSHIP 14 Aloha Nails and Spa is the new name for a nail salon in Keller that was permitted in June after changing ownership. Aloha Nails and Spa, which was previously named D&T Nails Spa, is located at 8825 Davis Blvd., Ste 125, Keller. The shop oers var- ious treatments, including manicures, nail repair, polish changes, waxing, facials and eyelash extensions. 682-593-7171.

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KELLER  ROANOKE  NORTHEAST FORT WORTH EDITION • JULY 2022

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TODO LIST

July & August events

COMPILED BY BETH MARSHALL

JULY 23 30, & AUG. 6, 13, 20 CHECK OUT A MARKET The Tanger Outlets Farmers Market, sponsored by Texas Health Harris Methodist Hospital Alliance, takes place every Saturday behind Olive Garden near Buc-ee’s. The European-style market features an assortment of fruits, vegetables, sweets, savory treats, jewelry, home decor and more. 9 a.m.-noon. Free (admission). 15853 N. Freeway, Fort Worth. 817-464-5400. www.tangeroutlet.com/ fortworth/events/july 30 ENJOY A MOVIE AT THE OUTLET MALL Tanger Outlets hosts its Summer Movie Saturdays series with a screening of “Monsters, Inc.” The event has moved indoors to the TangerClub Lounge. Sponsored by Duy Dental Ranch, the event includes games and free popcorn while supplies last. Snacks will be available for purchase. The movie begins at 7 p.m. Free (admission). Tanger Outlets, 15853 N. Freeway, Fort Worth (near Tommy Hilger). 817-464-5400. www.tangeroutlet.com/fortworth/ events/july AUGUST 01 THROUGH 5 CHECK OUT TROPHY CLUB’S SUMMER ADVENTURE CAMP As part of the town of Trophy Club’s Summer Adventure Camp series, campers ages 5-12 can enjoy weekly sessions during the day. Two eld trips per week are included on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Week 9’s lineup includes a trip to the Dallas Aquarium and The Battleeld Nerf Wars. 7 a.m.-6 p.m. (each weekday). $175 (Trophy Club residents for the week), $200 (nonresidents for the week). Fee includes eld trip admissions and a camp T-shirt. 601 Parkview Drive, Trophy Club.

JULY 2631

‘MEAN GIRLS’ MUSICAL BASS PERFORMANCE HALL

COURTESY JENNY ANDERSON

Workshop for children entering grades 3-7 will be hosted by Time to Shine Performing Arts in Keller. The workshop will prepare students to sing, act and dance condently for auditions by going through the audition process daily. Attendees will also develop audition skills in all genres and styles of musicals. 9 a.m.-noon daily. $175 (includes a daily snack and a T-shirt). 5751 Kroger Drive, Ste. 195, Keller. 817-659-8757. https://time2shinearts.com/summer- camps/2/ 09 NETWORK WITH BUSINESS PROFESSIONALS Keller Green Horns is a monthly event hosted by the Keller Chamber of Commerce that aims to connect WORTH THE TRIP Catch a performance of “Mean Girls” at Bass Performance Hall in Fort Worth. Based o the 2004 movie of the same title, this musical follows Cady Heron as she adjusts to life in public school in suburban Illinois after being homeschooled on an African savanna. Along her journey to take down Regina George, the school’s most popular student, Cady learns, “you can’t cross a Queen Bee without getting stung,” the show’s website overview states. 7:30 p.m. (July 26-30), 1:30 p.m. (July 30-31), 6:30 p.m. (July 31). Tickets start at $44-$61 depending on the date. 525 Commerce St., Fort Worth. 817-212-4300. www.basshall.com/meangirls

JULY 25

Hawaiian Falls water park in Roanoke will host a Champion's Day for families and individuals with special needs.

COURTESY HAWAIIAN FALLS

FEATURED EVENT Attend Champion’s Day at Hawaiian Falls In partnership with the Special Olympics, Hawaiian Falls will host a morning exclusively for families and individuals with special needs. Hawaiian Falls water park is open daily through Aug. 16. The Roanoke location’s attractions include Coconut Cove, an activity pool with shaded lounge space and cabanas; Beach Blasters, a multitube racer; and Breaker Bay, a wave pool. 9-10 a.m. (Champion’s Day), 10:30 a.m.-6 p.m. (regular hours). Free (for visitors with the business community through nonintimidating networking. Drink tickets are provided for the rst drink at Two Brothers Winery. Attendees should bring a door prize. 4:30-6 p.m. Free (admission). 110 Lamar St., Keller. https://bit.ly/kellergreenhorns 17 ATTEND A WINE GLASS PAINTING CLASS Wine:30 on Oak Street hosts a class where participants can paint a design on a set of two wine glasses. This session’s theme is “Cutie Pie Cacti” and will be led by an instructor from Le Painted Grape. No

special needs), $10 (family companion tickets; limit four) 290 Byron Nelson Blvd., Roanoke 817-853-0099 https://hfalls.com/specials-events.php

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experience is necessary, and wine and food will be available for purchase during the event. 6:30 p.m. $25. 400 S. Oak St., Ste. 150, Roanoke. 682-502-4111. https://bit.ly/wineglasspainting 17 GET BACK TO SCHOOL The 2022-23 school year for Keller and Northwest ISDs begins on Wednesday, Aug. 17. The rst break of the school year for both districts will be Labor Day weekend, Sept. 3-5. See websites for school times and locations. https://bit.ly/KellerISDbacktoschool. https://bit.ly/NorthwestISDbacktoschool

https://bit.ly/3HIxpKb 08 THROUGH 11

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Find more or submit Keller, Roanoke, Northeast Fort Worth, Trophy Club and Westlake events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

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KELLER  ROANOKE  NORTHEAST FORT WORTH EDITION • JULY 2022

TRANSPORTATION UPDATES Trinity Metro’s new Alliance route to Fort Worth gets 8 electric buses

SOURCE: TRINITY METRO/ COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER and the Alliance area. A Dunkins Transfer Center, 4104 E. Lancaster Ave., Fort Worth B North Park-n-Ride lot in the Alliance area NEW ROUTE Trinity Metro will create a new route once the electric buses arrive to connect east Fort Worth

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to more than 550 companies and generated more than 63,000 jobs as of the end of 2021, according to figures from the development. Tito Rodriguez, vice chair of the Trinity Metro board of directors, said the service would connect people to employers such as FedEx, UPS, Amazon and several warehouses. “It gives those individuals an opportunity for new employment opportunities and education,” Rodri- guez said in a news release. Edwards said that because the new route will use the I-35W man- aged lanes, Trinity Metro will offer passengers a guaranteed arrival time with the posted bus schedule. “Should the bus not arrive on time at the destination, the fare for that trip will be refunded, more than likely with a credit,” Edwards said. The new route would run from the Dunkins Transfer Center in east Fort

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Trinity Metro is buying eight electric buses to support a new route between east Fort Worth and the Alli- ance area to help connect employees with jobs. The new bus route would replace the existing 63X, or North Park-n- Ride Xpress route, currently offered, according to Chad Edwards, vice president of planning and develop- ment for Trinity Metro. “The key difference with the new route is that it would originate in east Fort Worth with a stop in downtown,” Edwards said in an email. “When the new route is in operation, it will replace Route 63X. Ridership is steady, but the growth potential is high with the planned route.” The AllianceTexas development that spans northern Tarrant County and southern Denton County is home

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Worth to the North Park-n-Ride lot in the Alliance area with a stop at Cen- tral Station in downtown, according to a news release. The new service will be offered seven days a week compared with the five-day service offered with the 63X route. The North Central Texas Council of Governments will provide about $16 million in federal funds for the service. About $14 million will be used to purchase the buses with the remainder expected to be used on operating expenses, including the refund program, Edwards said.

He estimated that it could take as long as 24 months before the new buses are available to use. A news release from the city of Fort Worth calls the effort “an innovative service that will increase the reliabil- ity of transit.” “It’s a really cool approach to perhaps equalizing the playing field for people who use transit and people who drive their cars. ... I think it’s gonna be very successful,” said Paul Ballard, who was interim president and CEO of Trinity Metro at the time of the news release.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

ONGOING PROJECTS

TxDOT proposes improvements to US 81/US 287 in Tarrant County

170

BY SARA RODIA

of one northbound exit ramp to North Tarrant Parkway and two southbound ramps to and from North Tarrant Parkway/Harmon Road. Bridges and intersection signals will also be constructed at Harmon Road and North Tarrant Parkway. More details about the project are available at https://bit.ly/3HEmLEc.

ultimate or nal phase of construc- tion will occur as funding becomes available, so there is no timetable, TxDOT ocials said. This phase is expected to cost $227 million. Phase 1 of the project includes construction of frontage roads from north of Harmon Road to west of I-35W. Also included is construction

The Texas Department of Trans- portation is proposing improvements to US 81/US 287 from south of Avondale-Haslet Road to I-35W in Tarrant County. The project’s goal is to improve capacity and access as well as address safety issues, according to TxDOT ocials. The safety issue is that “adjacent property owners have direct driveway access to the main lanes,” according to a presentation from a June 2 public hearing. TxDOT ocials stated the project would reconstruct the main lanes and construct new continuous one-way frontage roads. Construction will specically aect Willow Springs Road, Heritage Trace Parkway, Wag- ley Robertson Road, Tarrant Parkway and Harmon Road. This construction is proposed in two phases. Phase 1, which is about 1.3 miles, is estimated to begin in 2024 and last about three years. It is projected to cost $35 million. The

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Independence Parkway closure A section of Independence Parkway between the SH 170 frontage roads in Fort Worth will be closed until this fall for construction work. The closure, which began in late May, is part of a larger project to build the future SH 170 lanes and the Independence Park- way bridge. Trac will be detoured to the nearest intersections. The closure is part of a nearly 6-mile expansion of SH 170 from I-35W to Hwy. 114 that will add two main lanes in each direc- tion along with new ramps and bridg- es, according to the Texas Department of Transportation. Cost: nearly $100 million Timeline: October 2020-June 2023 Funding source: TxDOT

PROPOSED CHANGES

SOURCE: TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Existing

Proposed

81

81

Existing US 81/US 287: • Two 12-foot-wide main lanes in each direction with 6-foot-wide inside shoulders and 10-foot-wide outside shoulders • Median • Varied one-way and two-way frontage roads that are not continuous

Proposed US 81/US 287 improvements: • Reconstruct main lanes and add one inside main lane in each direction • Build new continuous one-way frontage roads • Adjust entrance and exit ramp locations to improve eciency

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF JULY 6. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT KRNNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

ROANOKE CITY HALL PLAZA

8 AM to NOON

EXCITING EVENTS EVERY SATURDAY April 23 ...National Picnic Day April 30 ...National Garden Month May 7...... Roanoke Roundup ~ Farmers Market Starts @ Noon May 14 .... National Stamp Out Hunger Food Drive Day May 21 .... National Armed Forces Day ~ Breakfast for Service Members May 28.... National Brisket Month Cooking Demonstration with Antlershed BBQ June 1 ..... National Jerky Day June 4 ....National Candy Month June 18 ... Blackland Prairie Raptor Center June 25 ......National Soul Food Month ~ Cooking Demonstration with Yeschf July 2.........Independence Day Weekend Fun July 9.........National Kitten Day, National Pina Colada Day July 16 .......National Ice Cream Day July 23 .......National Parents Day July 30 .......Culinary Arts Month ~ Cooking Demonstration with Professional Chef August 6 .....National Farmer’s Market Week August 13....Fun In The Sun August 20 ...World Honey Bee Day August 27.. National Sandwich Month ~ Cooking Demonstration with Heimbakers Sept. 3 ..... National Spice Blend Day Sept. 10.... National Hug Your Hound Day, National Day of Service and Remembrance Sept. 17 .... National Dance Day Sept. 24.... Hispanic Heritage Month ~ Cooking Demonstration With Maria Del Mar Owner, Sage Sakiri @CityofRoanokeTX

The Unique Dining Capital of Texas ROANOKETEXAS.COM/FARMERSMARKET

11

KELLER  ROANOKE  NORTHEAST FORT WORTH EDITION • JULY 2022

CITY & COUNTY

News from Keller, Roanoke, Northeast Fort Worth & Tarrant County

Applications being accepted for grants to help businesses

City restrooms to offer free menstrual products

said in the release. “These funds will help more local businesses stay open, keep their employees, grow their success and continue to be a strong force in our county.” The grant application process opened at noon July 11. As of 8 a.m. July 12, the county had received 313 applications. Of those applications, 231 were from businesses with 10 or fewer employees, according to Maegan South, the county’s economic development manager. Grants of up to $27,500 will be awarded to busi- nesses and nonprofits based on eligibility and the number of employees. Businesses may have no more than 50 employ- ees as of the first quarter of 2020, according to program requirements. They must also be located in Tarrant County. The grant program will run until Aug. 31 or until funds are depleted. Applications will be processed in the order they are received. Visit www.tarrantcounty.com/recovery to submit an application.

BY VALERIE WIGGLESWORTH

FORT WORTH The city of Fort Worth will start offering free menstrual products in restrooms at its community centers, libraries, City Hall and munic- ipal court. City Council voted unanimously June 14 on the plan, which was inspired by two Paschal High School students who successfully advocated for sanitary napkins and tampons to be provided for free in Fort Worth ISD schools. District 9 Council Member Elizabeth Beck said she learned about the teens’ effort through the media and wanted the city to do its part. “Tonight’s council proposal is about equity,” Beck said. “It’s about dignity, and it’s about basic human hygiene.” The memo stated that a similar initiative in 2019 in other Texas cities cost about $33,000 a year. City staff plan to get an estimate on costs for Fort Worth facilities and begin implementation. “We don’t ask residents to source their own toilet paper or their own soap, and feminine products are the same basic hygiene necessities, which is why it makes sense that they would be provided in city facilities,” Beck said.

BY VALERIE WIGGLESWORTH

TARRANT COUNTY The county will be using $25 million in federal funds to help small busi- nesses adversely affected by the pandemic. The Commissioners Court voted unanimously at its June 14 meeting to approve the Small Busi- ness Workforce Recovery Grant Program. Funds will help businesses with workforce recovery, retention, recruitment, training and develop- ment, according to a county news release. “We know that small businesses continue to bear the brunt of the economic impacts of the pandemic,” Tarrant County Judge Glen Whitley

GRANT DETAILS Tarrant County is offering grants to eligible small businesses.

Businesses may be eligible to receive up to $27,500 each.

Applications close Aug. 31 .

• Businesses may have no more than 50 employees as of Q1 in 2020. • Businesses must be in Tarrant County.

SOURCE: TARRANT COUNTY/ COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Texas Oncology–Keller Has Moved to a New Location

To better serve our patients, Texas Oncology–Keller has moved to a new location to provide enhanced, convenient access to cancer care with the same team of trusted physicians who have always served the community. We provide comprehensive services including medical oncology, hematology, breast surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, clinical trials, and genetic risk evaluation. With Texas Oncology, you don’t have to choose between expert cancer care and staying close to friends and family. To schedule an appointment, visit TexasOncology.com.

TEXAS ONCOLOGY–KELLER 9750 Hillwood Parkway Fort Worth, TX 76177 • 817-697-5620

12

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

Fort Worth City Council Meets at 6 p.m. Aug. 2, 9, 16 and at 10 a.m. Aug. 23 | 200 Texas St., Fort Worth | www.fortworthtexas.gov Keller City Council Meets at 5 p.m. Aug. 2, 16 1100 Bear Creek Parkway, Keller Meets at 7 p.m. Aug. 9, 23 500 S. Oak St., Roanoke www.roanoketexas.com Trophy Club Town Council Meets at 7 p.m. July 26 and Aug. 9, 23 1 Trophy Wood Drive, Trophy Club www.trophyclub.org Westlake Town Council Meets at 10 a.m. Aug. 8 and 5 p.m. Aug. 29 | 1500 Solana Blvd., Bldg. 7, www.cityoeller.com Roanoke City Council Ste. 7200, Westlake www.westlake-tx.org Denton County Commissioners Court Meets at 9 a.m. Aug. 2, 9, 16 231 Courthouse Drive, Denton www.dentoncounty.gov Tarrant County Commissioners Court Meets at 10 a.m. Aug. 2, 9, 16 23100 E. Weatherford St., Fort Worth www.tarrantcounty.com Keller ISD Meets at 6 p.m. July 25 and Aug. 8, 22 350 Keller Parkway, Keller www.kellerisd.net Northwest ISD Meets at 6:30 p.m. Aug. 8, 22 2001 Texan Drive, Fort Worth www.nisdtx.org MEETINGS WE COVER HIGHLIGHTS TARRANT COUNTY The county and city of Fort Worth are partnering with Visit Fort Worth to help with costs to keep the Professional Bull Riders World Finals local. PBR ocials announced last year the World Finals would move to Dickies Arena for 2022, 2023 and 2024. County commissioners voted July 12 to give $1.5 million to help cover costs. The city of Fort Worth is matching that amount.

Architect chosen for new police and courts facility

BY SARA RODIA

months ago, according to Campbell. “The destination is a centrally located piece of property that we felt was ideal,” Campbell said. Funding will come from a half cent sales tax dedicated to the city’s new crime control and prevention district. The district was established after voter approval in May. The estimated cost from the city’s feasibility study was about $38 million, Campbell said. “We estimate based on the $38

million building that the annual debt service for that cost will be roughly $2.5 million,” Campbell said. The timing for this project is about three years—one year for the design and two years for construction, according to Campbell.

ROANOKE City Council voted to approve FGM Architects to design the city’s new police and courts facility at its June 28 meeting. The facility is being updated because the current location, at 609 Dallas Drive, is too small, and the police force has outgrown it, accord- ing to City Manager Scott Campbell. The council acquired property for the new facility across from the fire station off of Fairway Drive about three

F A I

377

N

Council considering changes to allow outdoor entertainment

BY SARA RODIA

amending the unified development code to allow outdoor entertainment and amending the noise ordinance to restrict hours for outdoor music and live bands, according to a June 16 newsletter from the city. City Council is expected to con- sider the proposed changes at its Aug. 2 meeting.

377

JOHNSO N

KELLER City Council is considering changes that would allow outdoor entertainment within the Old Town Keller zoning district and ensure noise does not bother nearby resi- dents late at night. Two staff recommendations from a June 7 meeting are being examined:

K E L L E R P K W Y .

RUFE SNOW DR.

B E A R C R E E K P K

.

N

City focuses on short-term rentals

UPCOMING MEETINGS

BY VALERIE WIGGLESWORTH

July 26, 6 p.m. City staff will give a

July 28, 6 p.m. This online event will include a panel discussion. People are invited to submit questions before or during the event.

FORT WORTH The city has created a webpage and will hold two public meetings to help gather information about short-term rentals as officials decide whether to do more to regulate them. Short-term rentals are typically found online through sites such as Airbnb and Vrbo. Fort Worth prohibits short-term rentals in residential districts but acknowledges that some are operating with- out permission. The city is also considering a registration process to collect hotel occupancy taxes.

presentation and collect public comment at City Hall council chambers, 200 Texas St., Fort Worth.

Visit https://bit.ly/3aJC1Ui for more information, including links to watch meetings live online or later in recordings.

SOURCE: CITY OF FORT WORTH/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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13

KELLER - ROANOKE - NORTHEAST FORT WORTH EDITION • JULY 2022

2022

REAL ESTATE EDITION

REAL ESTATE DATA

Data on the real estate market

ROANOKE

NORTHEAST FORT WORTH

2021-22 Keller, Roanoke, Northeast Fort Worth, Trophy Club and Westlake real estate market at a glance Home prices went up across all four ZIP codes in this area this past year while the number of homes sold went down, mostly due to the limited inventory. Homes that did sell also spent fewer days on the market compared with the previous year.

76177

114

76262 76244 76248

170

377

35W

COMPILED BY VALERIE WIGGLESWORTH

KELLER

SOURCES: GREATER FORT WORTH ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS COURTESY NORTH TEXAS REAL ESTATE INFORMATION SYSTEMS, FREDDIE MACCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

N

Average days on market

Number of homes sold

June 2020-May 2021

June 2021-May 2022

June 2020-May 2021

June 2021-May 2022

1,474

46

1,284

1,004

32

31

29

799

783

676

23

488

16

414

13

12

-15.16%

-12.89%

76248 -13.67%

-20.42%

76177

76244

76262

76177 -62.5%

76244 -43.48%

76248 -48.39%

-36.96%

76262

National mortgage rate data Mortgage rates steadily declined early in the pandemic with the 30-year xed-rate mortgage dropping to as low as 2.65% in January 2021. Rates have since increased, spiking to their highest point since 2009 as of late June. 30-year xed-rate mortgage 15-year xed-rate mortgage

Average home sales price

June 2020-May 2021

June 2021-May 2022

$299,900

76177

+28.38%

6%

$385,000

4.52% 5.27%

5%

$296,950

4.51%

76244

+26.28%

3.72%

$375,000

4%

2.65% 3.22%

$475,000

76248

+22.11%

3%

$580,000

3.99%

3.16%

2% 0 January 2019

2.16% 2.43%

$458,200

76262

+24.48%

$570,350

January 2020

January 2021

January 2022

14

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

BUYING TREND Growing number of DFW homes sold in 2021 went to institutions

2022 REAL ESTATE EDITION

INCREASE IN INSTITUTIONAL BUYERS

The percentage of homes bought by institutions in 2021 was higher in North Texas counties compared with the state and national gures. Institutions are dened as companies, corporations or limited liability companies.

39% 34% Collin County Denton County

BY SARA RODIA

because they oered cash, purchased the property ‘as is,’ or oered a guaranteed purchase,” according to the report. More institutional buyers may also change a community. “If the investor makes high-quality repairs and updates to the properties, then it could be an improvement to a neighborhood,” said Taylor Walcik, president of the MetroTex Associa- tion of Realtors based in Grapevine. “If the investor makes lower-quality modications to a property, it could denitely go the other way and make the neighborhood not as appealing as it should be.” Umit Gurun, who holds the posi- tion as the Ashbel Smith professor of accounting at The University of Texas at Dallas, researched the trend of institutional homebuyers in DFW. He said there were two main shifts in the marketplace with these institutional investors. “One of them is that they become a big landlord,” Gurun said. “So they become the biggest landlord in the area, which gives them pricing power, which means they can increase the rent at higher levels, so that is kind of a monopoly on pricing.” The other shift he observed is institutional owners’ ability to repair houses at cheaper prices. “If you go to an area where a majority of the houses are owned by a landlord, you end up paying higher prices, but at the same time these institutional investors help the neigh- borhood through some amenities,”

U.S. 13.2% Texas 28%

Tarrant County

Dallas County

A growing number of homes in North Texas are being purchased by institutions rather than individuals. A report released in May by the National Association of Realtors shows Collin, Dallas, Denton and Tar- rant counties had among the highest percentage of institutional buyers of anywhere in the nation when it came to residential home sales last year. The association dened institu- tional buyers as companies, corpora- tions or limited liability companies. Tarrant County was the third highest in the nation with 52% of all home sales last year going to compa- nies, according to the report. Dallas County came in seventh with 43%, Denton County was 11th with 39%, and Collin County tied for 20th place with 34%, the report showed. Nationwide, institutional buyers made up 13% of the residential sales market in 2021, the report stated. Among states, Texas had the high- est percentage of institutional buyers with 28%, the report stated. That is a 4.6% increase from the institutional buyer share in 2020, according to the report. The association’s report found the increase in institutional buyers reduced available housing stock, creating a more competitive real estate market for individual buyers and increasing the number of rentals. That, in turn, led to a higher turnover rate, according to the report. “The major reason homeowners sold to institutional buyers was

52% 43%

SOURCE: NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

TYPES OF INSTITUTIONAL BUYERS The National Association of Realtors surveyed real estate agents in residential and commercial transactions about how single-family properties purchased by institutional buyers are returned to the market. Results are based on 3,644 responses from across the country.

45%

They resell or ip.

42%

They list as a rental. They have shared ownership/ shared equity. They rent to own. Properties are owned by a bank or short-sale buyers. Other

3%

6%

NUMBERS DO NOT ADD UP TO 100% DUE TO ROUNDING.

4%

SOURCE: NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

1%

Gurun said. With institutional buyers, home prices are likely to increase, said Marissa Benat, president of the Collin County Association of Realtors. “Where buyers will win is that overpriced homes are going to stand out much more if a home doesn’t sell due to price or condition,” Benat said. “Price can overcome a lot of conditions, but consumers should question why a particular home has longer days on market than compara- ble sales.” Institutional buyers have also been

changing the way they approach purchases. Shelby Kimball, manager at Kimball Real Estate in Fort Worth, said he is seeing institutional buyers in Tarrant County take dierent approaches compared to previous years. “We used to see more institutional buyers come in with lower oers, but now, to me what’s really changed is that the oers from institutional buyers are [at] asking price or above and all in cash still. …,” Kimball said. “It’s hard for other individual buyers to compete with that.”

15

KELLER  ROANOKE  NORTHEAST FORT WORTH EDITION • JULY 2022

GUIDE

Local businesses oer home improvement tips

HOME IMPROVEMENT AND MAINTENANCE

ASK A REAL ESTATE AGENT

With all the changes in the market in recent months, real estate agent Jessica De La Cruz shares advice on how to secure a home.

COMPILED BY HANNAH JOHNSON & SARA RODIA

prices are going to also shift, meaning that they’re going to go down to being normal and not overpriced. WHERE DO YOU SEE THE MARKET GOING THESE NEXT FEW MONTHS? I think [the market] is going to normalize itself. WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE ON ENTERING THE MARKET NOW? I would denitely advise to have a good agent that is going to take the time to do the comparables [and] to really look at the market trend to really scope out the area so they are not overpaying or getting into a situation where they are going to overpay for the property in the long run. Educating the buyer is very, very important and key for myself in making sure that they’re still getting the best deal possible.

WHAT’S THE NO. 1 THING PEOPLE NEED TO KNOW BEFORE PUTTING THEIR HOUSE UP FOR SALE? The market has shifted in the last month or so. At this point, it’s no longer the same expectation [that] you put your house on the market, and it’s going to sell within a day or two, and there’s going to be a crazy bidding war. Of course it depends on the area, [but] I would [tell] a seller to keep in mind that the home may be back in the traditional market, meaning it’s going to sit on the market for 10 to 30 days. WHAT TRENDS IN REAL ESTATE MIGHT SURPRISE PEOPLE? It will surprise them [that] the home is sitting longer, but that has nothing to do with them or the home. It just has to do with current trends right now. ... List

TIPS FROM AN INTERIOR DESIGNER

April Littmann, the founder and principal interior designer of Neighbor Interiors in Southlake, oers some ideas about design.

and then take into consideration how much natural light your oce receives throughout the day. Light plays such an essential part to good design and increases productivity. WHAT ARE SOME DESIGN CHANGES YOU HAVE SEEN THIS YEAR? We’ve seen a shift toward mixing nishes, materials and furniture that aren’t all a perfect match. We’ve seen this a lot on exterior home selections. This approach to design creates interest and layers, which we love.

WHAT ARE SOME OF THE RECENT TRENDS IN INTERIOR DESIGN? We are seeing a resurgence of saturated colors, which has been a refreshing change from the recent trend of neutral interiors. Also, a lot of organic, owing shapes, such as curved furniture, circular- shaped pieces and unique forms are becoming popular. WHAT IS YOUR TOP TIP FOR SOMEONE LOOKING TO CREATE OR REDESIGN THEIR HOME OFFICE? Focus on your functionality needs rst,

Jessica De La Cruz Agent Lily Moore Realty 1301 Solana Blvd., Bldg. 1, Ste. 1505, Westlake 817-701-5414 www.lilymoorerealty.com

April Littmann Founder and interior designer Neighbor Interiors 325 Miron Drive, Ste. 110, Southlake 832-743-5696 www.neighborinteriors.com

E. SOUTHLAKE BLVD.

114

N

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MAINTAINING YOUR HOME The National Association of Home Builders oers routine home maintenance tips for homeowners looking to maintain their homes’ value and ensure their

EXTERIOR

INTERIOR

1 Roofs should be inspected by a qualied roofer every three years, and skylights should be inspected so leaks do not develop. 2 Ensure downspouts and gutters do not get clogged with leaves and other debris. 3 Inspect siding each year to see if it needs repainting, and trim shrubs away so they do not touch the siding. 4 Check for split or cracked caulking on windows and doors annually, and replace the caulk as necessary. 5 Moving parts of garage doors need to be oiled once every three months.

6 Air lters require regular replacement, generally once every three months. 7 Regularly check security alarms and circuit breakers . Check batteries in smoke and carbon monoxide detectors. 8 Clean each faucet’s aerator every three to four months. Maintain garbage disposals by running cold water through them. 9 Masonry walls can develop a white powder that can be scrubbed o with water and a sti brush. 10 Hardwood oors without polyurethane need to be waxed with a liquid or paste “spirit” wax. Use emulsion wax on vinyl.

1

safety. Find other useful homeownership tips at www.nahb.org.

2

6

9

7

4

8

10

5

3

SOURCE: NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF HOME BUILDERSCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

16

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