Lewisville - Flower Mound - Highland Village | Sept. 2022

LEWISVILLE FLOWER MOUND HIGHLAND VILLAGE EDITION

VOLUME 5, ISSUE 11  SEPT. 14OCT. 11, 2022

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Flower Mound parks projects move forward

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IMPACTS

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BY SAMANTHA DOUTY

Rheudasil Park reopened with the snip of a large pair of scissors and fan- fare from nearly 200 people during its Aug. 27 ribbon-cutting ceremony in Flower Mound. “This incredible new space is the result of many years of planning and foresight from our Town Council and board members,” Mayor Derek France said. “We knew this park could oer so much more to our residents.” The park underwent $2.9 million in renovations over the course of eight years, and it leads the way for several more parks projects that are slated to open or start construction later this year. In addition to Rheudasil Park, the Flower Mound Parks and Recreation Department plans to open Canyon Falls Park and start construction on Peters Colony Memorial Park. Canyon Falls Park is being built as the western portion of Flower Mound continues to develop and to meet the

TODO LIST

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HIGHER EDUCATION FOCUS 2022 LOCAL INSTITUTIONS

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Rheudasil Park is named for the town’s rst mayor Bob Rheudasil. SAMANTHA DOUTYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

CONTINUED ON 12

Serve Lewisville brings local nonprots under one roof

LEWISVILLE NONPROFITS Serve Lewisville is set to help a number of people after ocials saw a need in the community. $2.8M nonprots and organizations are located in Lewisville. of the Lewisville population is in need. is needed for Serve Lewisville. 23 About 10  SOURCES: CITY OF LEWISVILLE, LEWISVILLE AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, 2020 U.S. CENSUS DATACOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

BUSINESS FEATURE

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BY DESTINE GIBSON

Lewisville ocials are working on creating the city’s rst one-stop building for nonprot services after nearly ve years of planning. Serve Lewisville will be the city’s new nonprot organi- zation and facility. It is expected to open in spring 2023. Its

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DINING FEATURE

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

ABOUT US

Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the rst edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and Pugerville, Texas. Now in 2022, CI is still locally owned. We have expanded to include hundreds of employees, our own software platform and printing facility, and over 30 hyperlocal editions across the state with a circulation to more than 2.4 million residential mailboxes.

HIGHLIGHTS FROM THIS MONTH

FROM CATHY: We are fortunate to have a number of higher education institutions with campuses located right here in Denton County. This month we’re taking a look at enrollment and demographics in our Campus Closeup (see Page 9) along with highlights of campus happenings. Cathy Williams, GENERAL MANAGER

Community Impact Newspaper teams include general managers, editors, reporters, graphic designers, sales account executives and sales support, all immersed and invested in the communities they serve. Our mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Our core values are Faith, Passion, Quality, Innovation and Integrity.

FROM SAMANTHA: In this edition, you will read about Lewisville’s new Serve Lewisville organization that hopes to bring area nonprots together under one roof (see Page 14). You will also see a story on Flower Mound’s Parks and Recreation Department as they invest in local park updates (see Page 12). Samantha Douty, EDITOR

Our purpose is to be a light for our readers, customers, partners and each other.

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BUSINESS & DINING Local business development news that aects you

TRANSPORTATION & DEVELOPMENT Regular updates on area projects to keep you in the know

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LEWISVILLE  FLOWER MOUND  HIGHLAND VILLAGE EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2022

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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Scooter’s Coffee

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GRAPEVINE LAKE

Dirty Cajun Seafood Kitchen

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COURTESY DIRTY CAJUN SEAFOOD KITCHEN

NOW OPEN 1 Texas Star Cafe opened in July in Flower Mound, according to a town news release. The restaurant is located at 1901 Long Prairie Road, Ste. 180. The cafe offers breakfast and lunch food with a mix of sweet and savory options. Its offerings include French toast, omelets and Tex-Mex dishes. 214-513-9959. www.txstarcafe.com 2 Scooter’s Coffee opened in Lewisville on Aug. 8. The drive-thru coffeehouse is located at 1225 S. SH 121. Scooter’s Coffee opened its first location in Ne- braska in 1998 and offers hot, iced and blended drinks. Its signature drink is the Caramelicious, an espresso drink with caramel sauce, milk and whipped cream. 214-222-1266. www.scooterscoffee.com

3 Morningstar Storage opened in Lewisville on July 28. The storage space at 1850 McGee Lane was previously occupied by McGee Lane Self Storage. The facility offers 24/7 access to indoor, climate-controlled storage units as well as drive-to-your-door storage units. Morningstar Storage also has a facili- ty in Flower Mound. 972-848-8890. www.morningstarstorage.com 4 Amore’s Italian Restaurant officially opened Aug. 6, according to a spokesper- son for the restaurant. The family-owned restaurant is located at 297 W. Round Grove Road, Ste. 160, Lewisville. Amore’s Italian Restaurant serves pizza, homemade pasta, seafood, chicken and more. 469-702-2010. www.clover.com/online-ordering/ amores-italian-restaurant-inc-lewisville

5 Sisters Fashion and More held its grand opening at Music City Mall at 2401 S. Stemmons Fwy. in Lewisville on July 30. The clothing store is located on the upper level in Suite 2074. Sisters Fashion sells clothes tailored to women. 469-293-8787. www.mcmlewisville.com 6 Old Hag’s Pizza and Pasta held a soft opening for its Lewisville location Aug. 8. The restaurant is located at 359 Lake Park Road, Ste. 132. The restau- rant’s menu includes more than two dozen specialty pizzas, pasta dishes, salads, cheesecake and appetizers. Old Hag’s Pizza and Pasta is open 24/7 and anticipates offering dine-in services soon, according to a spokesperson for the restaurant. 972-999-6899. www.oldhagspizza.com

7 Sparrow on Main held a ribbon-cut- ting ceremony in Old Town Lewisville on Aug. 4. The event venue is located at 105 E. Main St. The venue caters events, such as weddings, receptions, retire- ment parties, business events and family reunions. When booking with Sparrow on Main, 100% of the net proceeds are donated to Sparrow Collective, a non- profit organization that meets the needs of at-risk women and their families. 214-918-9156. www.sparrowonmain.com 8 Chick-fil-A officially opened a new Lewisville location Aug. 4. A ribbon-cut- ting ceremony was held Aug. 3. The new restaurant has drive-thru service and is located at 1201 W. Main St. Chick-fil-A is known for its chicken sandwiches and waffle fries as well as chicken strips,

     

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY SAMANTHA DOUTY & DESTINE GIBSON

Rumble Boxing officially opened its Flower Mound location July 25. COURTESY RUMBLE BOXING

FEATURED IMPACT NOW OPEN Rumble Boxing ocially opened its Flower Mound location July 25. The boxing-inspired tness boutique combines boxing with strength training. Each class is a 45-minute, 10-round session and beginner-friendly. Rumble Boxing is located at 4351 Cross Timbers Road, Ste. 500. 469-240-1862. www.rumbleboxinggym.com chicken nuggets, salads and milkshakes. 972-353-3000. www.chick-fil-a.com/ locations/tx/main-street 9 Dirty Cajun Seafood Kitchen opened with a soft opening Aug. 5 in Flower Mound. It is located at 1913 Justin Road, Ste. 101. The restaurant features New Orleans-inspired dishes with seafood, including fried alligator. The menu includes spicy jambalaya, crawfish corn- bread, crab legs, beignets, deep-fried brownies and pecan pie. 214-513-9474. www.dirtycajun.com COMING SOON 10 Brident Dental & Orthodontics is expected to open a new location in Lew- isville. The office will be located at 551 E. Round Grove Road and is expected to open before the end of the year, accord- ing to a spokesperson for the project. Brident Dental & Orthodontics provides a full range of dental services for all ages and offers evening and weekend appointments. www.brident.com/en-us 11 Zoom Room Dog Training is expect- ed to open in Highland Village, according to its website. The indoor facility will pro- vide dog training classes in small groups or private sessions. Trainers will teach obedience and enrichment workshops. Zoom Room will be located at 1842 Justin Road, Highland Village. An opening date is unknown, but the Texas Department of Licensing and Regulation lists the estimated completion date for construc- tion of the facility as April 30, 2023. 972-638-7402. www.zoomroom.com

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OFFICIAL SMOOTHIE DALLAS COWBOYS OF THE

Motor City Pizza

Cowboys Smoothie NEW

COURTESY MOTOR CITY PIZZA

RENOVATIONS 12 Motor City Pizza owners recently completed renovations of its Lewisville location on Aug. 10. The restaurant, located at 1425 FM 407, Ste. 600, now offers full dine-in service and a bar. Motor City Pizza offers authentic Detroit-style pizza and has expanded its menu to include pasta, sandwiches, soup and additional salads. Motor City Pizza’s expanded hours now include lunch ser- vice Wednesday-Sunday. 972-654-6276. www.motorcitypizzatx.com

AVAILABLE AT DFW AND SAN ANTONIO AREA SMOOTHIE KING STORES FOR LIMITED TIME ONLY

FLOWER MOUND,TX 75028 (214) 513–9491 801 International Pkwy., Suite 500 Flower Mound, TX 75028 214-504-1680 Suite 110 3701 Justin Rd. 3701 Justin Rd., Suite 100 Flower Mound, TX 75028 214-513-9491 © 2021 Smoothie King Franchises, Inc.

Buy 1 Smoothie, Get 1 Free (2 nd smoothie must be of equal or lesser value)

FREE EXTRA OR ENHANCER (with purchase of a smoothie)

Some restrictions may apply. Valid only at particpating locations. Excludes Extras and Enhancers. Not valid with any other offer. Not valid on 32oz smoothies on Fridays. Must surrender original coupon to receive offer. Photocopied or altered coupons will not be honored. limit one per person. No cash value. Sales tax extra. ©2020 Smoothie King Franchisees, Inc. FLOWER MOUND 3701 Justin Rd. Ste 110

Some restrictions may apply. Valid only at particpating locations. Excludes Extras and Enhancers. Not valid with any other offer. Not valid on 32oz smoothies on Fridays. Must surrender original coupon to receive offer. Photocopied or altered coupons will not be honored. limit one per person. No cash value. Sales tax extra. ©2020 Smoothie King Franchisees, Inc. FLOWER MOUND 3701 Justin Rd. Ste 110

EXPIRES: 10/31/22

EXPIRES: 10/31/22

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LEWISVILLE - FLOWER MOUND - HIGHLAND VILLAGE EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2022

TODO LIST

September & October events

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(469) 962-2060 3964 TX -121, SUITE #100 LEWISVILLE, TX, 75056 castlehillsvet.com

Lewisville Western Days returns to Old Town Lewisville. The two-day festival will include family-friendly music, food and activities. The event will feature entertainment and more. The 2022 headliners will be Randy Rogers Band and Gary Allan. Free (before 7 p.m.), $15 for 13 years and older. Old Town Lewisville, 2 W. Main St., Lewisville. 972-219-3401. www.tinyurl.com/5n8rkpvu

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to recycle paper, electronics, clothing, writing materials, plastic bags and wraps, and wire hangers. Drop-o for medication and eye glasses will also be available. Lunch will be provided. Groups and individuals can register for trash pickup on the organization’s website. 8:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. Flower Mound High School, 3411 Peters Colony Road, Flower Mound. 469-828-9074. www.tinyurl.com/3zkcd92z LISTEN TO MUSIC OUTDOORS The city of Highland Village begins its 2022 Concerts in the Park series Oct. 1. The free, family-friendly event will take place during the rst three Saturdays of the month. The series will feature performances by local bands and food from food truck vendors at Doubletree Ranch Park. Live 80 will perform on Oct. 1, followed by Jukebox Heroes on Oct. 8 and Texas Flood on Oct. 15. Overow parking will be available at Copperas Branch Park, and a shuttle service will begin running at 6:30 p.m. Event starts at 7 p.m. Free (admission). Doubletree Ranch Park, 310 Highland Village Road, Highland Village. 972-317-7430. www.tinyurl.com/2pw97cxe 15 PLAY BALL Fire and police teams from OCTOBER 01 08 & 15 across North Texas will come together for the annual Battle of the Badges softball tournament hosted by The Lewisville Citizen Police Academy Alumni Association. Opening ceremonies will begin at 11:30 a.m., and the rst pitch will be at 8 a.m. The charity event benets the LCPAAA. The event will also feature bounce houses, a craft fair and a rae. 8 a.m. Free. Lewisville Railroad Park, 1301 S. Railroad St., Lewisville. www.tinyurl.com/ 5n7bwyc2

COMPILED BY DESTINE GIBSON

121 TOLL Entrance on Windhaven Pkwy.

SEPTEMBER 19 ATTEND AN OPEN HOUSE Lewisville Public Library is hosting a homeschool open house for families with children and teens. Families with children who are homeschooled can learn about resources and opportunities available to students and parents during a presentation followed by tours of the library. Registration is not required. 2-3 p.m. Free. Lewisville Public Library, 1197 W. Main St., Lewisville. 972-219-3570. www.tinyurl.com/ yc2szcuk 24 LEARN FLYFISHING The Lewisville Lake Environmental Learning Area is hosting a y-shing clinic. The Dallas Fly Fishers will teach participants the basics of y-shing, including how to cast, tying basic y-shing knots, discussing various types of ies, learning about aquatic ecosystem health and more. Participants will need warm clothing, eye protection, a hat, sun protection and drinking water. All y-shing equipment will be provided. The class is open to those age 12 and up. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Free (with paid entry to LLELA), $5 (per vehicle paid by card only at gatehouse). 201 E. Jones St., Lewisville. 469-877-0695. www.tinyurl.com/26nzju5e 24 CLEAN UP AND RECYCLE Keep Flower Mound Beautiful is hosting its semiannual fall cleanup. The event will begin with a trash-o from 8:30-11 a.m., followed by the environmental fair from 10 a.m.-noon and a recycle drop-o from 10 a.m.-1 p.m. The fall cleanup will be held at Flower Mound High School’s parking lot at the corner of Sagebrush Drive and Old Settlers Road. Participants are invited

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Find more or submit Lewisville, Flower Mound and Highland Village events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

Flower Mound Rd.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATION UPDATES

COMPILED BY SAMANTHA DOUTY & DESTINE GIBSON

UPCOMING PROJECT

UPCOMING PROJECT

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Flower Mound renewed its contract with Span Inc.

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Span contract renewal Flower Mound Town Council voted Aug. 22 to renew the town’s contract with Span Inc., a demand- response transit service. The new contract will decrease passenger fares from $5 to $3 for a one-way trip. The new fare is in line with what Span charges seniors and special needs riders in nearby areas. Grant funds will provide additional funding over the scal year, which will allow Span to provide an additional 100 one-way rides per month. Grant funds will be used rst to pay for the one-way rides until exhausted. Timeline: 2022-23 scal year Cost: $53,611.20 Funding sources: Town of Flower Mound, grant funding

Rippy Road improvements The project in Flower Mound begins at the intersection with Pecan Meadows Drive and extends south and east to approximately 300 feet west of FM 2499. This project consists of improvements to approximately 2,500 linear feet of existing two-lane open section as- phalt roadway to a two-lane concrete urban collector. A construction award was approved by Town Council on Aug. 8. A work start date has not been determined because of material delays. A neighborhood meeting will be held in mid-September. Timeline: TBD Cost: $9.25 million Funding sources: Tax Increment Reinvestment Zones, water impact fees

I-35E northbound ramp construction The Texas Department of Transportation is set to begin construction of the Highland Village Road northbound ramp onto I-35E. The ocial start date is Sept. 14, and the contract calls for a 71-day construction timeframe, with crews working Monday-Friday. Interruption to trac should be minimal during con- struction. City ocials will provide updates as needed. Timeline: late December Cost: $2.78 million Funding source: North Central Texas Council of Govern- ments

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF AUG. 31. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT LFHNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

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LEWISVILLE  FLOWER MOUND  HIGHLAND VILLAGE EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2022

CITY & COUNTY

News from Denton County, Lewisville ISD, Lewisville & Flower Mound

Lewisville ISD board of trustees meets at 6 p.m. Oct. 3 and 17 at 1565 W. Main St. www.lisd.net Lewisville City Council meets at 7 p.m. Sept. 19 and Oct. 3 at 151 W. Church St. www.cityoewisville.com Flower Mound Town Council meets at 6 p.m. Sept. 19 and Oct. 3 at 2121 Cross Timbers Road. www.ower-mound.com Highland Village City Council meets at 6 p.m. Sept. 27 and Oct. 11 at 1000 Highland Village Road. www.highlandvillage.org MEETINGS WE COVER historical society nonprot that is already working to preserve Flower Mound’s history. Based on research on other town’s historical commissions, supporting a historical nonprot seemed to be the most successful, according to Town Secretary Theresa Scott. The task force will initially research how it could be of service to the town as it relates to historical preservation, including dening its goals and objectives. Council Member Ann Martin suggested establishing this temporary commission for two years. CITY HIGHLIGHTS FLOWER MOUND The Town Council discussed establishing a historical commission at its Aug. 8 meeting. It later approved a historical commission task force during its Aug. 22 meeting. It is being considered to ensure the town preserves its history and historical sites, according to a meeting document. The idea was initially mentioned at a June 16 Town Council Strategic Planning Session. The council discussed two dierent routes to create a historical commission. One was to appoint a board to lead the commission. The other was to support a

Lewisville discusses senior living housing

Denton County calls $650M bond

BY SAMANTHA DOUTY

Among proposed projects are Loop 288 West and Loop 288 East frontage roads, FM 1171 West, I-35W frontage roads, US 377 North and more. “We wanted to focus this bond election on our roads and bridges, and that’s exactly what we did,” County Judge Andy Eads said. Denton County will use funds from the bond to begin engineer- ing, right-of-way acquisitions, util- ity relocations and other startup costs to ensure state and federal highway projects are potentially given higher priority. “Great roads invite great eco- nomic companies to come to the county of Denton to provide more tax dollars so we can do greater things,” Commissioner Bobbie Mitchell said. RATE DECREASE The scal year 2022-23 tax rate decreased by 5.49% percent from the FY 2021-22 rate. FY 2022-23 tax rate: $1.2368 per $100 valuation FY 2021-22 tax rate: $1.3087 per $100 valuation

BY DESTINE GIBSON

DENTON COUNTY Commis- sioners unanimously voted during their Aug. 16 meeting to call a $650 million bond election for the Nov. 8 ballot. County commissioners have not called for a road improvement bond since 2008. That bond included county road and building projects, including the Lewisville Government Center. The Nov. 8 ballot items focus on transportation projects. The projects are slated to provide congestion relief and safety improvements, according to the county. More than 110 projects have been identied to date in all four precincts of Denton County. A list of proposed projects is avail- able at www.dentoncounty.gov.

LEWISVILLE City Council held a public hearing for consideration of a new senior living community during its Aug. 15 meeting. The subject property, located at 1727 S. Edmonds Lane, is owned by Bethel Baptist Church of Texas. The church is relocating, and the owners are selling the property, providing an opportunity for senior housing to replace the church by a developer, according to the agenda item. A zone change from a single-family residential district to a medical district will allow the site to be redeveloped into a community for people age 55 and above. The proposed development would oer one- and two-bedroom units. Community amenities designed spe- cically to appeal to seniors would be included, such as a community garden, a tness center, a business center, a community room and porte-cochere. Free services, such as health and wellness classes as well as community group outings would also be included in the proposed development. The proposed development aligns with the Lewisville 2025 Vision Plan, which intends to address the need for aordable and senior housing.

LISD board approves FY 202223 tax rate

BY DESTINE GIBSON

LEWISVILLE ISD The school board unanimously approved a lower tax rate on Aug. 29. Board members voted on the district tax rate during a special meeting. The tax rate is $1.2368 per $100 valuation, according to the district. The approved mainte- nance and operations tax rate will account for $0.8559, and the inter- est and sinking, or debt service, rate will account for $0.3809. The new maintenance and oper- ations rate is a decrease from last

SOURCE: LEWISVILLE ISD COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

scal year’s $0.9278 rate, while the interest and sinking rate remains the same. The board also approved the district’s scal year 2022-23 budget. The district looks at a projected $578.89 million budget and includes a $15 million shortfall.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY SAMANTHA DOUTY 2022 HIGHER EDUCATION FOCUS GUIDE Denton County area colleges

Denton County 1 Midwestern State University 1 1

3 University of North Texas 1 1

These higher education institutions have campuses in Denton County. They oer an array of degrees and certicates.

The University of North Texas is located in Denton and oers 113 bachelor’s, 94 master’s and 37 Ph.D. programs. Enrollment: 40,653 Opened: 1890 Average annual tuition: $11,994 Levels of degrees oered: bachelor’s, master’s, Ph.D. 1155 Union Circle, Denton 9405652000 www.unt.edu 4 Texas Woman’s University 1 1 Texas Woman’s University oers degree programs in liberal arts and sciences; nursing; health sciences; business; and education. It has campuses in Denton, Dallas and Houston. Enrollment: 16,032 Opened: 1901 Average annual tuition: $9,630 Levels of degrees oered: bachelor’s, master’s, Ph.D. 304 Administration Drive, Denton

KEY

Public school

Two-year degree

Four-year degree

Midwestern State University’s home campus is located in Wichita Falls, but it has a learning center in Flower Mound. Enrollment: 5,387 Opened: 1922 Average annual tuition: $9,796 Levels of degrees oered: bachelor’s, master’s 100 Parker Square Road, Flower Mound 9724100125 North Central Texas College is located in Gainesville but has a campus in Flower Mound. It oers a variety of dierent associate degrees and certicates. Enrollment: 8,191 Opened: 1924 Average annual tuition: $3,000 Levels of degrees oered: associate degrees and certicates 1200 Parker Square Road, Flower Mound 9728998400 | www.nctc.edu www.msutexas.edu/owermound 2 North Central Texas College 1 1

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LEWISVILLE  FLOWER MOUND  HIGHLAND VILLAGE EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2022

HIGHER EDUCATION MSU oers discounted rates for Medical City Lewisville sta

COMPLETING A BACHELOR’S DEGREE The respiratory program from an associate degree to a bachelor’s degree can be done in as few as two years that can be taken anytime during the summer, fall and spring semesters.

Year 1 Possible class schedule

Year 2

BY SAMANTHA DOUTY

The respiratory therapist program, which is a public degree program, is not the rst partnership for the two organizations. It also allows radiol- ogists to get their bachelor’s degree, Canivel said. “We did this with Medical City just to help get their current sta to complete that bachelor’s so they have increased knowledge, skills and abilities at the bedside and taking care of patients. But [we] also just [want] to show our commitment locally,” he said. MSU Texas is one of the few uni- versities in the country that oers completion of the program online, he said. “We wanted to bolster those programs, not just for Midwestern but also for the workforce here in the area,” Canivel said. The program is oered at a discounted rate, but Medical City

Midwestern State University Texas at Flower Mound partnered with Medical City Lewisville this summer to oer respiratory therapists a tuition discount to get their bachelor’s degree in the eld. “Let’s say you’re a respiratory ther- apist or a radiographer, and you need to complete your bachelor’s, you can do that if you’re employed at Medical City [Lewisville] for a discount; it’s approximately 20%,” said Randy Canivel, MSU Texas-Flower Mound Student Learning Center director. The partnership, which was nalized in July, allows Medical City Lewisville employees to go back to school and get their bachelor’s degree while still work- ing. The focus is on those employees who have an associate degree and have been practicing and want to continue that education to a bachelor’s degree, he said.

Year 1

Year 2

3 Courses (9 credit hours) 1 Course (3 credit hours) 1 Course (3 credit hours)

1 Course (3 credit hours) 1 Course (3 credit hours) 3 Courses (9 credit hours)

SOURCE: MIDWESTERN STATE UNIVERSITY TEXASCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Lewisville will also reimburse more than $5,000 to the employees who take advantage of the program, Chief Operating Ocer Allen Marsh said. “When MSU approached us with this, this is a fantastic way to help our respiratory therapy colleagues con- tinue to further their education, and we take investing in our people here in Medical City very seriously, investing in their education and furthering them in their career,” Marsh said. The program benets both

employees and the hospital, he said. Those who go through the program enhance their critical thinking skills and are more educated in their eld, Marsh said. Having that more educated employee base only raises the bar of care for patients as well. “It really comes back down to patient care at the bedside,” he said. “We want to be the choice for health care excellence, and we believe we are. We believe in furthering the education of our employee base.”

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

PEOPLE

BY HANNAH JOHNSON

Harrison Keller Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board commissioner

Community Impact Newspaper recently interviewed Commissioner of Higher Education Harrison Keller, who has served as the chief executive ocer for the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board since October 2019. Before he was com- missioner, Keller was a faculty member and administrator of The University of Texas. Keller shared the board’s initiatives for helping students attend college, challenges within higher education and his vision for adapting to a changing work- force. Answers have been edited for length and clarity.

WHAT DOES THE TEXAS HIGHER EDUCATION

aid, nancial aid policy [and] nancial aid programs. [The] second thing is college and career advice. We are charged by the Legislature to support college and career advising from secondary schools through our higher education institutions. The most important thing we can do to make college more aordable is to make sure that folks can complete their high-quality credentials in a timely manner. ... If we can get folks through to earn high-quality credentials and enter the workforce more eciently, then that reduces those total costs of higher education for students and their families, and helps set them on a better path to career opportunities. We are at the front edge of historic transformation in higher education. We’ll look back on this time the [same] way we look back on changes that happened after the Civil War or after World War II. I think higher education is much more receptive to innovation and change than we’ve seen in many, many years. All of those combined with these changing workforce needs set the stage for exciting transformations in higher education. WHAT DO YOU SEE FOR THE FUTURE OF HIGHER EDUCATION?

dollars. We were able to provide some targeted funding to keep tens of thousands of students enrolled and on track. Within a few days of receiving funds, we were able to work with institutions and get those funds allocated and out the door. Ulti- mately, those served about 60,000 students that fall of 2020. WHAT ARE SOME OF THE MAIN CHALLENGES THESE DAYS IN HIGHER EDUCATION? The pace of change in the econ- omy has accelerated faster than anyone anticipated. There were changes already underway in the economy before the pandemic, but the pandemic accelerated those changes in how we use technology and the ways that we communicate. Our workforce needs of higher skills and more credentials [moved] faster than anyone expected. Our greatest challenge is how we will educate more Texans to higher standards than we’ve ever achieved before, so we can meet our current and emerging workforce needs and be competitive in the future. HOW IS THE BOARD MAKING COLLEGE MORE AFFORDABLE? One of the things we do for aord- ability is focused around nancial

COORDINATING BOARD DO? There’s three major roles. First, we’re the state authorizing agency. When institutions want to offer new degree programs or set up a new college or school, they need to get approval through the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board. The second role is the various functions that we administer for the state. We run the state’s student loan programs [and] other inancial aid programs. We have a support center where we work with institu- tions [for] student access initiatives around digital learning, and college and career advising. We’re also charged to be the hub of the state’s combined education and workforce data infrastructure. ... The third big function is our policy role. ... One of our most important policy roles is specifying and advancing the state’s Strategic Plan for Higher Education. WHAT ACCOMPLISHMENT WOULD YOU HIGHLIGHT SINCE YOU STARTED? [After the pandemic] Texas was one of only a few states that prior- itized higher education for more exible, more discretionary stimulus

Harrison Keller

RESOURCES The Texas Higher Education

Coordinating Board oers resources for students needing nancial help.

College Access Loan

This program provides low-interest education loans to Texas residents unable to meet the costs to attend a higher education institution.

For more information, visit bit.ly/3pQYLFJ .

Texas Armed Services Scholarship Program

This program encourages students to complete a bachelor’s degree and join the Texas Army National Guard, Texas State Guard or U.S. Coast Guard or a branch of the U.S. military.

For more information, visit bit.ly/3Kss7Uv .

For other general resources, visit

bit.ly/3CJD6XF .

SOURCE: TEXAS HIGHER EDUCATION COORDINATING BOARD COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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twu.edu

11

LEWISVILLE  FLOWER MOUND  HIGHLAND VILLAGE EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2022

Park timeline

Park locations

1 RHEUDASIL PARK

CANYON FALLS PARK

PETERS COLONY MEMORIAL PARK

2

3

“I doubt he thought he’d be the rst mayor or [ that he’d] have a park named after him,” she said about her father. Additional projects In addition to Rheudasil Park, the parks depart- ment continues work on two other projects. Construction work on Canyon Falls Park will reach completion this fall, Jennings said. The $3.1 million park is new, and it is being built in the western por- tion of town. The Canyon Falls development deeded the 10.8 acres of land to the town for the park. It will include a playground, a basketball court and a splash pad. The department is also working on a specialty park—Peters Colony Memorial Park—adjacent to the Flower Mound Public Library, Jennings said. The park is in the nal review stages and is expected to have a nal approval of funds by Septem- ber, according to town ocials. The park will include a legacy monument com- memorating local heroes and veterans. “The trails and the parks are huge [for people look- ing to move to Flower Mound]. People are going to want to make sure they’re close to their homes, that they can hopefully walk to that park,” Jennings said. “It just adds beauty, and it gives family activities, things for folks to do. Not only that, but we try to make sure these parks look great.”

Rheudasil Park renovations are eight years in the making. Dec. 1, 2014 Site Specic Conceptual Master Plan approved by Town Council January 2018 Pond dredging and bank stabilization project completed Oct. 1, 2018 Agreement with Studio Outside approved by Town Council May 2, 2019 Studio Outside presents a 70% design review during parks board meeting Nov. 8, 2020 Bid opens for construction March 1, 2021 Construction contract awarded during Town Council meeting Aug. 27, 2022 park completion

Canyon Falls Park is being built to account for the growth happening in the western part of town.

Areas within a 10-minute walk to parks

Existing park

Some park need

Greatest park need

Greater park need

2

Status: completed

Status: under construction

Status: planning stages

377

Rheudasil Park is located at 2401 Lake Forest Blvd. The 10.02-acre community park was deeded to the town in 1987. Amenities: lighted boardwalk, playground area, basketball court, pavilion and restroom structure, enhanced landscaping, trail, small shing pier Completion: Aug. 27 | Cost: $2.9 million

Canyon Falls Park is a new park being built in the western portion of town for area residents. It is located on 10.8 acres of land deeded to the town by the Canyon Falls development. Amenities: playground, pavilion, restrooms, basketball court, splash pad, trails, tness equipment, parking Completion: fall 2022 | Cost: $3.1 million budget

This park will be adjacent to the Flower Mound Public Library and will include a legacy monument commemorating local heroes and veterans. Details on construction have yet to be determined. Amenities: children’s play area, pavilion, public art, water feature, nature trails and pathways Completion: TBD | Cost: TBD to visit the park every Tuesday. To honor her father, she worked with the town to dedicate a park bench to him. Miller, who now lives in Arlington, said she is excited to see the park get a needed upgrade where she can continue to feed the ducks for years to come. Miller’s father is not the only one remembered at the park. Penny Glover sees her father, Bob Rheudasil, who served as mayor from 1961-68, remembered at the park with a plaque and bronze statue at the park entrance.

3

N

CROSS TIMBERS RD.

1

FLOWER MOUND RD.

SOURCES: THE TRUST FOR PUBLIC LAND, TOWN OF FLOWER MOUND COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

LONG PRAIRIE RD.

Rheudasil Park renovations Rheudasil Park, named for the town’s rst Mayor Bob Rheudasil, sits on 10.02 acres of land that was deeded to the town in 1987. “It’s one of our older parks, and it hadn’t had very many upgrades over the years. A lot of stu had reached its lifecycle,” Jennings said. Before the renovations, which were funded through a portion of the town’s sales tax revenue, the park included a playground, a pavilion, a bas- ketball pad and the pond.

park for another 40 years.” Community reactions

Pond dredging started in January 2018 and n- ished later that year. The town awarded the con- struction bid to North Rock Construction LLC in March 2021. Teresa Thomason, the Flower Mound Parks Board chair, said the park will be a place for family gatherings. “The design team and general contractor cre- ated a space we can all be proud of. The beautiful park truly has something for everyone,” she said. “I know our residents will appreciate and enjoy the

CONTINUED FROM 1

growing needs of the community. The Rheudasil Park renovation comes from the 2014 master plan, Parks and Recreation Director Chuck Jennings said. “It was totally worth it. This space, this 10.02 acres, is special,” France said. “It really is a place that was created by the community for the community.”

Well before the park got its facelift, former Flower Mound resident Jamie Miller visited the park every Tuesday with her father. She grew up in town, and the two would have their “dad-daughter” days at the park to feed the ducks, she said. The tradition continued into adulthood, and Miller moved out of Flower Mound, she said. Miller said her father died in 2018, but she continues

For more information, visit communityimpact.com.

THE COLONY 4901 Hwy 121 214-469-2113 LEWISVILLE 2416 S Stemmons Fwy 214-488-0888 HEBRON

2401 Parker Rd 972-395-2522

PROPOSED PARTNERSHIPS

Serve Lewisville’s goal is to bring multiple nonprots under one roof. Six nonprots have expressed interest in partnering with Serve Lewisville as of Aug. 29.

SERVE LEWISVILLE

MARKET ST. RUSSELL NEWMAN BLVD. DENTON

Serve Lewisville will partner with organizations to address five needs: adult health care; mental health; rental and utility assistance; affordable child care; and food assistance.

1

288

L

6

FLOWER MOUND

4

ERSRD.

35E

LEWISVILLE

3

5

A

635

FOXAVE.

FORESTLN.

PARKER SQUARE RD.

JOSEY LN. DALLAS

MAP NOT TO SCALE N

1001 S. Edmonds Lane, Lewisville

2

A

Serve Lewisville will be in a 23,983-square-foot facility.

1

2

3

4

5

6

GIVING GRACE

CATHOLIC CHARITIES

DENTON COUNTY MHMR

CITY OF LEWISVILLE’S CO-CARE TEAM

NORTH CENTRAL TEXAS COLLEGE

WOMEN, INFANTS AND CHILDREN (WIC) Women and Infant Children (WIC) will partner to provide food.

Giving Grace will partner

Catholic Charities will partner to provide rental

Denton County Mental Health and Mental

The Co-Care team will partner to provide

North Central Texas College will partner to

to provide rental and utility assistance; case management; and wraparound services. 306 N. Loop 288, Ste. 112, Denton

and utility assistance; case management; and wraparound services.

Retardation will provide mental health services.

mental health and law enforcement services.

provide adult education and workforce training.

2920 Forest Lane, Dallas

1001 Cross Timbers Road, Ste. 1250, Flower Mound

1187 W. Main St., Lewisville

1200 Parker Square Road, Flower Mound

190 N. Valley Parkway, Lewisville

SOURCE: SERVE LEWISVILLE FEASIBILITY STUDY/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

in Denton that serve Lewisville resi- dents,” Feryan said. “So having a space here to provide services directly here in Lewisville kept coming up.” The organization aims to attract nonprofits, churches and civic organi- zations to a proposed 23,983-square- foot facility on Edmonds Lane. With multiple organizations being in close proximity at the center, nonprofits can work together and easily refer clients to other agencies, Feryan said. The need for a facility was deter- mined by a feasibility study, which was conducted last year. The study identified five of Lewisville residents’

top needs: adult health care; mental health care; rent and utility assistance; affordable child care; and food assis- tance. The median household income in Lewisville is $67,026, and 10% of residents live in poverty, according to 2020 U.S. Census data. “The pandemic may be slow- ing down, but now we’ve got infla- tion. Rental rates are skyrocketing,” Feryan said. The new nonprofit’s board will consist of five members: Feryan, Lewisville Council Member William Meridith, Serve Denton CEO Pat Smith and two community members, who

have yet to be named. “I grew up in a household with a family of six,” Meridith said. “There probably were times that we probably could have used these services that probably didn’t exist back when I was a kid, so it’s just a way for me to kind of bring this full circle and give back.” Seeing a need Social services are spread across town, making it difficult for those in need who may not have adequate transportation to access the resources they need, Feryan said. Serve Lewisville’s creation is coming

CONTINUED FROM 1

mission will be to bring multiple non- profit organizations together under one roof, making it easier for the com- munity to access social services. Lewisville’s Neighborhood Services Coordinator Ashleigh Feryan will be one of Serve Lewisville’s inaugural board members. In her first role with the city as a grants specialist, she said local nonprofits repeatedly expressed a desire for a building in Lewisville that could house multiple organizations. “Not a lot of nonprofits actually are housed here in Lewisville; a lot are

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

Nonprofit benefits Giving Grace CEO Leighanne Chris- ton said the nonprofit’s interest in potentially partnering with Serve Lewisville was heavily influenced by its successful partnership with Serve Denton. “All the shared services that we receive for free really impacts our bottom line and allows us to help more people,” she said. “It is such a benefit to small to mid-sized non- profits—wanting to give us that finan- cial break in partnership around that but then to have it and get such high- end quality care as a tenant, as a part- ner is very impressive. We’re really grateful for that.” Giving Grace’s mission is to help individuals and families with chil- dren in Denton County who are homeless or are at risk of becoming homeless. “Our intention and desire is to have significant sustainable change for not just the mom or the individ- ual, but for generational changes,” Christon said. Giving Grace has one office in Den- ton. Christon said if Giving Grace partners with Serve Lewisville, its street outreach team will be able to reach more people. Feryan said Serve Lewisville will build a better sense of community within the city, and its success will provide opportunities for the organi- zation to expand services. “My hope and dream for this is to really bring our community together, not only our residents that live here, but our partners and our busi- nesses—knowing a place like this is here to support our community,” she said. “It’s really going to build and enhance our community.”

TENTATIVE TIMELINE Serve Lewisville officials anticipate a grand opening in spring 2023. Oct. | Officials began conducting feasibility study July | Serve Lewisville approved by Lewisville City Council Aug. | Council appoints Ashleigh Feryan, William Meridith to Serve Lewisville board Aug.-Nov. | Design/permitting Nov. | Demolition Nov.-Feb. 2023 | Renovations March | Move in April | Grand opening SOURCE: SERVE LEWISVILLE/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

The city will provide a $2.5 million forgivable loan that will cover the purchase of the building and renova- tions, Smith said. Serve Lewisville will raise the remaining $300,000 needed to buy, renovate and cover first-year operating costs. Smith said remaining costs will be funded through rent from nonprofits and fundraising events. The proposed location was selected because of its ease of access and proximity to neighborhoods, churches and schools. AGENCIES THAT WHEN PEOPLE COME IN, THEY FEEL LIKE THEY’RE TREATED WITH DIGNITY AND RESPECT, WE ALWAYS WANT SERVE DENTON, AND NOW Serve Lewisville will be rolled out in two phases. Mental health, food, and rental and utilities agencies will move into the facility during the first phase, Feryan said. Child care and health care services will be targeted next once Serve Lewisville acquires more space. Smith said nonprofits that plan to have offices at the Serve Lewisville facility will also remain in their existing offices and buildings. Plans for food assistance include pantries and a community garden, which would help support access to fresh produce. Serve Lewisville will start with 7,983 square feet for Phase 1. Smith said Serve Lewisville plans to add 16,000 square feet for the second phase, which will occur about three years later. “IT’S VERY IMPORTANT TO ME AND TO THE SERVE LEWISVILLE, TO BE A PLACE OF HOPE.” PAT SMITH, SERVE DENTON CEO

Serve Lewisville will be modeled after nearby Serve Denton, according to the feasibility study. Established in 2012, Serve Denton also has a one-stop shop model. Serve Denton is partnered with nearly two dozen organizations across several social services, includ- ing food; housing and rental assistance; health care; women and children’s needs; and mental health. Smith, one of the organization’s founders, said Serve Lewisville will be different in terms of branding and addressing the unique needs of resi- dents. Serve Denton’s success, how- ever, will provide a blueprint. “It’s very important to me and to the agencies that when people come in, they feel like they’re treated with dignity and respect,” Smith said. “We always want Serve Denton, and now Serve Lewisville, to be a place of hope.” Smith knows the challenges of launching a nonprofit better than any- one. He said building trust with the community potentially will be Serve Lewisville’s biggest challenge, but the organization is already better posi- tioned for success than Serve Denton was in its infant stages. “I’m so impressed with the leader- ship. When city leaders are aligned on things like this, that makes everything run smoother,” he said. “I love Denton. That’s where I grew up, but I didn’t have the support of [the] City Council that I had in Denton that I’ve had in Lewisville. To me that’s huge.” Smith said Serve Denton plans to remain involved and in close partner- ship long after its Lewisville counter- The projected site for Serve Lewis- ville will be at 1001 S. Edmonds Lane, an old Denton Area Teachers Credit Union building in need of renovations. Officials look to renovate the space through a number of funding revenues. part gets off the ground. Serving the community

HOW TO HELP

Serve Lewisville anticipates volunteer opportunities beginning in early 2023.

The website is set to launch by November. Donation options are set to debut by late September.

SOURCES: PAT SMITH, SERVE DENTON CEO/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

at a time when those working in or alongside nonprofits say they are see- ing an increased need in social services. There are about two dozen nonprofits located in Lewisville city limits. There are four nonprofit centers in the Dallas-Fort Worth area, according to The Nonprofit Centers Network. The closest center for Lewisville residents is the Serve Denton facility, located roughly 30 minutes away. By having multiple nonprofits under one roof, individuals and families will not have to travel long distances or take time off from work to get the assistance they need, Meridith said.

For more information, visit communityimpact.com .

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