Grapevine - Colleyville - Southlake Edition - May 2020

GRAPEVINE COLLEYVILLE SOUTHLAKE EDITION

VOLUME 10, ISSUE 3  MAY 14JUNE 10, 2020

ONLINE AT

March 25-April 25

The city of Grapevine saw the highest number of unemployment claims between March and April during stay-at-home orders due to the coronavirus pandemic as compared with Colleyville and Southlake.

Eligible claims made Not eligible claims made

Hotels & motels: 25,340

Full-service restaurants: 84,093

Department stores: 25,709

Temp. help services: 25,921

Dentist oces: 29,863

Great Wolf Lodge, located at 100 Great Wolf Drive, Grapevine, remains closed amid the COVID-19 pandemic. (Gavin Pugh/Community Impact Newspaper)

INSIDE Businesses mixed about reopening with lifting of restrictions. See Page 18.

Grapevine hotels see furloughs as citywide unemployment claims spike

Bureau. April data was not available by this paper’s press deadline, but rev- enue was expected to remain down through April, as most businesses remained closed. The issue is compounding, indus- try experts said: As most restaurants, businesses and attractions were shut- tered through April, there were few travelers to occupy hotel rooms. CVB Executive Director Paul W. McCallum said the immediate toll of the COVID-19 pandemic on hotels has

been universal.

“There was just

contraction across the board,” McCallum said, adding that when airlines limit ights and businesses are shut down, “the basic tourismmodel just ceases to exist.” McCallum painted a portrait of how the rippling eects of industry clo- sures have forced many hoteliers to furlough employees. “None of the meeting spaces are

BY GAVIN PUGH

as many Grapevine residents led for unemployment compared with neigh- boring Southlake and Colleyville. Grapevine hotels’ revenue declined by more than 60% at the close of March, according to data provided by the Grapevine Convention and Visitor

The numbers tell the story: Grape- vine hotels saw their nances take a nosedive in March as tourism and travel industries ground to a halt. Subsequent job loss data reported by the state shows that roughly four times

CONTINUED ON 16

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All material presented herein is intended for informational purposes only. Information is compiled from sources deemed reliable but is subject to errors, omissions, changes in price, condition, sale, or withdrawal without notice. All measurements and square footages are approximate, but not guaranteed and should be independently verified. This is not intended to solicit property already listed. Nothing herein shall be construed as legal, accounting or other professional advice outside the realm of real estate brokerage. Compass is a licensed real estate broker. Equal Housing Opportunity.

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GRAPEVINE - COLLEYVILLE - SOUTHLAKE EDITION • MAY 2020

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THIS ISSUE

CONTENTS

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

GROCERY GUIDE When and where to shop

6

PUBLISHERS AND FOUNDERS John and Jennifer Garrett PUBLISHERDFWMETRO Christal Howard GENERAL MANAGER Ana Erwin, aerwin@communityimpact.com EDITORIAL EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Lanane MANAGING EDITOR Valerie Wigglesworth EDITOR Gavin Pugh COPY CHIEF Andy Comer COPY EDITORS Ben Dickerson, Kasey Salisbury STAFFWRITERS Anna Herod, Miranda Jaimes, Jamie Kietzke, Ian Pribanic, Elizabeth Uclés CONTRIBUTINGWRITER Rachel Dew ADVERTISING SALES DIRECTOR Tess Coverman ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Lexi Canivel DESIGN CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Aubrey Galloway ASSOCIATE ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Breanna Flores GRAPHIC DESIGNER Ellen Jackson STAFF DESIGNERS Chase Autin, Katherine Borey, Caitlin Whittington BUSINESS GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER Claire Love ABOUT US John and Jennifer Garrett began Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 in Pugerville, Texas. The company’s mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. CONTACT US

FROMANA: You have asked us for more news, and we listened. You can now subscribe to our free daily email newsletter with the latest stories about our community along with some useful regional content. I welcome you to sign up at communityimpact.com/newsletter and to continue to follow the facts about what is going on in your own backyard. Have more suggestions? You know where to nd me! Ana Erwin, GENERALMANAGER

FROMGAVIN: The past three years I’ve spent reporting for Community Impact Newspaper have shown me how our mission of building communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses is made manifest: We keep our readers up to speed on news in their backyard. I’m excited to continue this work as the new editor for the Grapevine, Colleyville and Southlake edition. Gavin Pugh, EDITOR

FEATURED LISTING

7

British Emporium TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES 8

Upcoming projects HEALTH CARE

10

Virtual COVID19 screening CITY& COUNTY Latest local news BUSINESS FEATURE Twisted Clay Studio DINING FEATURE Mango’s Breakfast and Brunch

THIS ISSUE BY THE NUMBERS

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Local sources 24

Grocery listings 19

U.S. Navy jets 6

Transportation projects 4

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GRAPEVINE  COLLEYVILLE  SOUTHLAKE EDITION • MAY 2020

GUIDE

Know when to shop for groceries in Grapevine, Colleyville and Southlake

Area grocery stores are nding ways to oer food to everyone while also attempting to slow the spread of the virus. Innovations include online ordering, curbside pickup, direct delivery and senior hours. GROCERY GUIDE

DOVE RD.

114

GRAPEVINE

17

18

15

SOUTHLAKE BLVD.

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5

14

2

13

SOUTHLAKE

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7

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KEY:

Online ordering

Curbside pickup Direct delivery Third-party delivery

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GLADE RD.

GRAPEVINE 1 Eatzi’s Market & Bakery 1200 W. State Highway 114, Grapevine 817-527-4007

817-481-5669 www.tomthumb.com Hours: 6 a.m.-11 p.m. Senior hours: 6-9 a.m. Tue., Thu. 6 Tom Thumb 4000 William D. Tate Ave., Grapevine 817-785-1004 www.tomthumb.com/ Hours: 6 a.m.-11 p.m. Senior hours: 6-9 a.m. Tue., Thu. 7 Walmart Supercenter 1601 W. Hwy. 114, Grapevine 817-421-4770 www.walmart.com Hours: 7 a.m.-8:30 p.m. Senior hours: 6-7 a.m. Tue. Pharmacy & Vision Center open for senior hour COLLEYVILLE 8 Albertsons 4000 Glade Road, Colleyville 817-354-0505 www.albertsons.com Hours: 6 a.m.-11 p.m. Senior hours: 6-9 a.m. Tue., Thu. 9 Market Street 5605 Colleyville Blvd., Colleyville 817-577-5020

HALLJOHNSON RD.

6

9

360

https://eatzis.com/ Hours: 9 a.m.-9 p.m. Senior hours: None

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GLADE RD.

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COLLEYVILLE

2 Farmers Market of Grapevine 520 S. Main St., Ste. 203, Grapevine 817-527-7446 www.farmersmarketofgrapevine.com Hours: Mon.-Sat. 8 a.m.-8 p.m.,

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MAP NOT TO SCALE N

Sun. 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Senior hours: None

Hours: 7 a.m.-8:30 p.m. Senior hours: 6-7 a.m. Tue.

www.marketstreetunited.com Hours: 6 a.m.-10 p.m. Senior hours: 6-9 a.m. Mon., Thu. 10 Sunower Shoppe 5100 Hwy. 121, Colleyville 817-399-9100 https://sunowershoppe.com/ Hours: Mon.-Sat. 9 a.m.-9 p.m., closed Sun. Senior hours: 9-10 a.m. Mon., Wed., Fri. 11 Walmart Neighborhood Market 4904 Colleyville Blvd., Colleyville 817-770-8334 www.walmart.com

3 Sam’s Club 1701 W. Hwy. 114, Grapevine 817-416-5434 www.samsclub.com Hours: Mon.-Sat. 9 a.m.-8 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Senior hours: 7-9 a.m. Tue., Thu. 4 Target 1101 Ira E. Woods Ave., Grapevine 817-488-1800 www.target.com Hours: 8 a.m.-9 p.m. Senior hours: 8-9 a.m. Tue., Wed.

12 Whole Foods Market 4801 Colleyville Blvd., Colleyville 817-918-3821 www.wholefoodsmarket.com

Hours: 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Senior hours: 7-8 a.m.

SOUTHLAKE 13 Central Market 1425 E. Southlake Blvd., Southlake 817-310-5600 https://centralmarket.com/ Hours: 8 a.m.-10 p.m.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY RACHEL DEW, JAMIE KIETZKE & GAVIN PUGH

British Emporium has operated in Grapevine for 28 years. (Courtesy British Emporium)

FEATURED LISTING BRITISH EMPORIUM As day-to-day life has changed during the COVID-19 pandemic, British Emporium owner Sheela Bailey said more people have found her grocery store on Grapevine’s Main Street. Those serendipitous encounters revealed to Bailey that housebound shoppers are now more keen to cook, she said. “They are so happy to be able to provide a British accent with their meals,” Bailey said. “Our ingredients can make for very rich, full and avorful family suppers and lockdown lunches.” As a 28-year veteran of the Grapevine business community, Bailey said she has personally seen generations grow up. “Now, those children are bringing their own kids in for a taste of home,” she said. The grocery store was deemed an essential business in early statewide COVID-19-related executive orders. But despite being able to remain open, Bailey said she has recently seen

the eects of the pandemic in her suppliers. “We are unique in that our supply chain stretches all the way across the Atlantic,” she said. “We have found that some of our lines are getting harder to source than others.” Grocery items include canned goods and items for common British dishes. “What we’re providing is a cross-section of everything that an expat would miss,” she said. British Emporium 140 N. Main St., Grapevine 817-421-2311 www.british-emporium.com

DISASTER? ARE YOU ONE STORM AWAY FROM

NORTHWEST HWY.

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Senior hours: none CVS pharmacy open during special hours

www.sprouts.com Hours: 7 a.m.-10 p.m. Senior hours: none

14 Costco 2601 E. Hwy. 114, Southlake 817-749-2800 www.costco.com Hours: Mon.-Fri. 10 a.m.-8:30 p.m., Sat. 9:30 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Senior hours: 9-10 a.m. Mon.-Fri. Pharmacy & Vision Center open for Senior hour 15 Kroger 2110 E. Southlake Blvd., Southlake 817-421-8105 www.kroger.com Hours: 6 a.m.-1 a.m. Senior hours: 6-7:30 a.m. Tue., Thu., Sat.

17 Tom Thumb 100 W. Southlake Blvd., Southlake 817-416-5464 www.tomthumb.com Hours: 6 a.m.-11 p.m. Senior hours: 6-9 a.m. Tue., Thu. 18 Trader Joe’s 1492 E. Southlake Blvd., Southlake 817-251-0360

www.traderjoes.com Hours: 9 a.m.-8 p.m. Senior hours: 8-9 a.m.

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16 Sprouts Farmers Market 220 Randol Mill Ave., Southlake 682-223-5805

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GRAPEVINE  COLLEYVILLE  SOUTHLAKE EDITION • MAY 2020

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES

COMPILED BY GAVIN PUGH

ONGOING PROJECTS

RECENT PROJECTS

POST OAK TRL.

HALL-JOHNSON RD.

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HALL-JOHNSON RD.

GLADE RD.

GLADE RD.

CYPRESS CREEK COURT

BROWN TRL.

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Post Oak Trail construction Asphalt repairs on Post Oak Trail in Southlake will result in traffic being limit- ed to one lane from May 13-21, according to the city. Drivers should expect delays as crews conduct their work from Cypress Creek Court to the end of pavement. The work will take place from 8 a.m.-5 p.m., according to the city. Reynolds Asphalt is the contractor behind the project. Timeline: May 13-21 Cost: $50,000 Funding source: city of Southlake

SH 26 widening work Construction planned for the week of May 3 along SH 26 resulted in the installation of irrigation sleeves and permanent foun- dations from John McCain Road to Brown Trail, according to the city. Work will also include the installation of poles and arms for traffic signals throughout the project’s scope. Some lane closures will continue to take place during the construction project. Timeline: November 2016-spring 2020 Cost: $38.2 million Funding source: Texas Department of Transportation

Main Street improvements to pedestrian signals

Glade Road work relocates utility poles The city of Colleyville has announced the temporary relocation of utility poles, which resulted in obstruction on some sidewalks along Glade Road. This work is to allow room for construction of new roundabouts to continue. Colleyville City Council agreed April 7 to pay Ed Bell Con- struction Company $14.2 million for work on Glade Road. The city will upgrade the condition of 1.5 miles of the road from SH 26 to Pool Road. Timeline: 24-30 months from start of construction in July Cost: $14.2 million Funding source: city of Colleyville

The scope of work on Main Street in Grapevine has expanded to include improvements on pedestrian signals, a city spokesperson said. The construction is expected to be completed by May 15. Grapevine staff said the intersection of Main Street and Dallas Road down- town was closed starting March 24 to allow crews to make pedestrian-friendly changes to the intersection more quickly, according to a news release. Timeline: March 24-May 15 Cost: $8.4 million Funding source: city of Grapevine

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UP TO DATE AS OF MAY 5. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT GCSNEWS@COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

BUSINESS

Chambers facing nancial challenges in pandemic At their core, area chambers of commerce serve to represent the needs and interests of local business owners, Grapevine Chamber of who joined together to ... market themselves and the community to be successful.” When Congress passed the CARES Act in March, it excluded 501(c)(6) organizations, such as chambers of BY GAVIN PUGH

TO LEARNMORE Each chamber of commerce oers more resources online for businesses dealing with the eects from COVID-19. To learn more, contact your city’s chamber. • Grapevine Chamber of Commerce www.grapevinechamber.org

education institutions and other local stakeholders. He said he is calling on North Texas’ congressional represen- tatives to include associations. Because chambers of commerce operate as businesses, each with their own sta, Chelsea Rose, Colleyville Chamber of Commerce president and CEO, said she hopes to see 501(c)(6) organizations included in future aid. “We are thrilled our businesses were granted access to funds so direly needed,” Rose said in a statement. “[But] chambers are also businesses providing ongoing services, informa- tion, and promotion of our members, who are open for business.” Hessel said a slimmed-down cham- ber sta would mean fewer resources for local business owners. “We are a corporation, and every- thing we’ve done ... has been based on what our businesses tell us they want us to do,” Hessel said. Hessel said she expects the greatest source of nancial hard- ship to come from cancellations of

Commerce CEO RaDonna Hessel said. But when faced with unprecedented stress on local economies, North Texas chamber and association leaders have said they are in straits just as dire as those of their business constituents. “Most people think that chambers of commerce are a part of govern- ment, and they are not,” Hessel said. “We’re an organization of businesses

commerce, from accessing loans and grants made available to most other small businesses, according to the American Society of Association Executives. Subsequent allocations so far have also excluded chambers. Chris Wallace is the president and CEO of the North Texas Commission, the regional public-private part- nership between businesses, cities,

• Colleyville Chamber of Commerce www.colleyvillechamber.org

• Southlake Chamber of Commerce www.southlakechamber.com

revenue-generating events as well as from some chamber members being unable to pay their dues in the future. “Chambers are facing a challeng- ing situation,” said Mark Guilbert, president and CEO of the Southlake Chamber of Commerce. “We are all determined to assist the business community at the highest possible level and have expanded our ser- vices, all while facing the reality of near zero revenues. Chambers are playing a vital role in the business recovery process.”

“WE ARE THRILLED OUR BUSINESSES WERE GRANTED ACCESS TO FUNDS SO DIRELY NEEDED...” CHELSEA ROSE, COLLEYVILLE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE PRESIDENT AND CEO

682-477-2078 2350 HALL JOHNSON RD GRAPEVINE, TX 76051

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To provide emergency support to our community in response to COVID-19, please consider the following: • Online contributions at www.gracegrapevine.org for COVID 19 emergency response fund • Donate items for Emergency Food Boxes Visit the website for a list of items • Pray for our neighbors, country, and the world Our Community Needs Your Help!

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GRAPEVINE  COLLEYVILLE  SOUTHLAKE EDITION • MAY 2020

HEALTH CARE

Tarrant County launches virtual screening for COVID19 testing

Tarrant County Online

Screening COVID19

BY GAVIN PUGH

medical and travel history, whether they are in the health care industry and their contact information. The in-person tests for qualifying respon- dents will be via drive-thru. The test includes a deep nose swab for 20 seconds, which the county warned is uncomfortable. Test results should be available in between four and ve days, according to the county. This service is provided in coor- dination with Tarrant County, Health Science Center at Fort Worth, the city of Fort Worth and the UT Southwestern Medical Center. “We are very pleased to have this resource,” county Director of Public Health Vinny Taneja said in the news release. “The platform will not only University of North Texas help our testing facilities operate more eectively, it will also arm us with valuable information to keep our communities safe.” The virtual screening is oered in both Spanish and English, and those who need assistance with other languages can call 817-248-6299. For those seeking testing else- where, both the city of Arlington and the Walgreens at 8600 Camp Bowie W. Blvd., Fort Worth, are oering free COVID-19 testing.

Tarrant County residents now have access to virtual COVID-19 screening and free testing. The Tarrant County Public Health Department announced that as of April 26, residents can navigate to covidtesting.tarrantcounty.com for virtual COVID-19 screening. The rst tests began April 27. Those who meet certain

Tarrant County launched a new screening website April 26 with the goal of making COVID-19 testing more available to residents age 18 and older. See the step-by- step guide to the process below. For questions call the hotline at 817-248-6299

“THE PLATFORMWILL NOT ONLYHELPOUR TESTING FACILITIES OPERATEMORE EFFECTIVELY; ITWILL ALSO ARMUSWITHVALUABLE INFORMATION TOKEEP OUR COMMUNITIES SAFE.” VINNY TANEJA, TARRANT COUNTY DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC HEALTH

Go to https://covidtesting.tarrantcounty.com

criteria will be automatically scheduled for an appointment at a Fort Worth-based testing site. “As we begin planning for reopening, it is vitally important

Enter your ZIP code, and then, answer a ve-step questionnaire about

your medical history COVID-19 exposure other details

If you meet the criteria:

The site will schedule a testing time.

that we have more testing,” Tarrant County Judge Glen Whitley said in a news release. “These testing sites are going to be critical in helping us open up the county.” The county health department plans to gradually ramp up testing capacity over the next few weeks, spokesperson Richard Hill said. The county’s testing site will be able to eld about 30-40 tests per day at the start, he said. “We have not been able to get that many testing sites in Tarrant County, so the fact that we’re now nally getting them is a good thing because people want more tests,” he said. Tarrant County’s virtual screening prompts respondents to provide their

Go to a Fort Worth-based site to receive your drive-thru test.

If you don’t meet the criteria

Both the city of Arlington and the Walgreens at 8600 Camp Bowie W. Blvd., Fort Worth , oers free COVID-19 testing.

Receive results 45 days later.

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CAMP BOWIE W. BLVD.

SOURCE: TARRANT COUNTY, CITY OF FORT WORTHCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

EDUCATION BRIEFS

News from Carroll and Grapevine-Colleyville ISDs

COMPILED BY GAVIN PUGH

AID for colleges & universities

Texas institutions received a total of $1 billion in aid related to COVID-19. Area schools receiving grants include:

CISDworking on graduation plan

$30M $25M $20M $15M $10M $5M $0

CARROLL ISD According to the district, graduation plans depend on the results of the state reopening plan and whether restrictions for social distancing remain in place. Plan A would have the class of 2020 graduate May 29 at Dragon Stadium if social distancing requirements are lifted, according to the district. The event may include spaced seating, sanitizing stations and face mask requirements. If Plan A is canceled, Plan B would move the graduation date to July 31. It would still be held at Dragon Stadium after sunset. Similar

requirements to those of Plan A might be asked of attendees. The third and final plan, Plan C, would be a ceremony without a physical audience, according to the district. Final details about how the modified ceremony would take place are still being discussed, but a district news release said that the lack of a physical audience does not neces- sarily mean Plan C would be a virtual ceremony. The latest information can be found on the district’s FAQ page at www.southlakecarroll.edu/ page/3206.

$21,984,486

SOURCE: U.S. SEN. JOHN CORNYN/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Federal grants benefit higher education

REGION North Texas colleges and universities will receive $154 million in grant money amid the fallout of the coronavirus pandemic. At least 50% of those funds will be provided to students in the form of emergency financial aid grants to cover expenses related to campus disruptions, according to a

release from Sen. John Cornyn. This aid, which includes a total of $22 million for Tarrant County College, comes as part of the CARES Act passed by Congress in March. “No Texan should have to give up their education because of the economic effects of the coronavi- rus,” Cornyn said in a release.

Principal to head district leadership efforts

GRAPEVINE-COLLEYVILLE ISD Lance Groppel, Colleyville Heritage High School principal, has been named executive director of instruc- tional leadership for secondary campuses. The board approved his

appointment April 27. “Dr. Groppel will have the oppor- tunity to grow and develop campus leaders across our secondary cam- puses,” GCISD Superintendent Robin Ryan said in a news release.

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GRAPEVINE - COLLEYVILLE - SOUTHLAKE EDITION • MAY 2020

distance

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As a community we're all in this together. Please consider supporting your local restaurants and CI advertisers that are adapting offerings and delivery methods to weather these unprecedented times.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY& COUNTY

News from Grapevine, Colleyville & Southlake

CITY HIGHLIGHTS COLLEYVILLE City Council heard site plan updates from the developer of a Methodist Retirement Community at a May 5 work session but will not make a decision on the plans until its May 19 meeting. The bulk of the site is located at 913 Cheek-Sparger Road, and the project would include 220 units. GRAPEVINE Citing a 22-year Grapevine, City Council designated Grapevine a Bee City USA aliate May 5. The designation recognizes the city’s partnership with the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, which has included management of more than history of championing the importance of pollinators in 1,000 acres of environmentally sensitive green space for native wildlife, according to the city. SOUTHLAKE City Council approved a special-use permit May 5 for a new Dogtopia facility that would be located at 2225 W. Southlake Blvd., Southlake. The dog boarding and day care chain with spa services has locations throughout North Texas. www.dogtopia.com Colleyville City Council Meets at 7:30 p.m. the rst and third Tuesday of each month www.colleyville.com Grapevine City Council Meets at 7:30 p.m. the rst and third Tuesday of each month www.grapevinetexas.gov Southlake City Council Meets at 7 p.m. the rst and third Tuesday of each month www.cityofsouthlake.com Grapevine-Colleyville ISD board Meets at 7 p.m. the fourth Monday of each month www.gcisd.net Carroll ISD board Meets at 5:30 p.m. the rst and third Monday of each month www.southlakecarroll.edu MEETINGSWE COVER

City Council approves construction contract for $4.8Mclubhouse

LONG PRAIRIE RD.

SILVERON BLVD.

BY GAVIN PUGH

GRAPEVINE The Grapevine Golf Course clubhouse will be receiving upgrades in the form of new locker rooms, a pro shop and a restaurant. The $4.8 million project received voter approval in the city’s 2017 bond program. The club house will be situated in Grapevine’s 27-hole course. Grapevine City Council approved a $3.9 million build contract with Steele & Freeman at an April 21 meeting. The city intends for the clubhouse to serve as a multipurpose facility, including oering event space for banquets, corporate events and more. The golf course had closed for

GRAPEVINE LAKE

The Grapevine Golf Course clubhouse will host meetings and events. (Rendering courtesy city of Grapevine)

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course reopening still requires every- one’s respect of this virus,” Grapevine Golf Course Director Russell Pulley said in a news release. The golf course’s shop, Mulligans Grill restaurant, practice facilities and clubhouse restrooms will remain closed. Additionally, golf carts will be limited to one person and will be sanitized by sta after each use, according to the city.

several weeks amid the COVID-19 pandemic but has since partially reopened. The city said social distancing is still required, face masks are recommended, and all Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines for individuals must be followed. “It is important that everyone understands that the COVID-19 virus is still highly contagious, and the golf

Main Street Fest gets rescheduled for June

Response rates vary on census

CENSUS RESPONSE RATES AS OFMAY 3

BY MIRANDA JAIMES

BY ANNA HEROD

GRAPEVINE The 36th annual Main Street Fest has been rescheduled from May 15-17 to June 26-28, organizers announced April 9. “This year’s feel-good theme, ‘Wel- come to the Flavorhood,’ will shine a spotlight not only on the myriad of avors associated with craft brews but also on Grapevine’s foodie commu- nity,” Main Street Fest Co-Chair Stacy Holt said in a statement. The event features samples from the new Harvest Hall, tasting rooms, food vendors, live entertainment, a carnival, art shows and exhibits.

TARRANT COUNTY More than 6 million Texas households had responded to the 2020 U.S. census as of May 3, according to data from the U.S. Census Bureau. Texas came in at No. 39 among states for the number of responses so far, with a 51.2% rate of house- hold participation statewide. Tarrant County is ranked No. 12 among 254 Texas counties with a 58.6% response rate. Responses to the census will help determine where more than $675 billion of federal funds will

SOURCE: U.S. CENSUS BUREAUCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

be allocated toward various elds, including infrastructure and public education. The census can be completed online, by phone or by mail by Oct. 31. The survey is online at https://my2020census.gov.

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GRAPEVINE  COLLEYVILLE  SOUTHLAKE EDITION • MAY 2020

BUSINESS FEATURE

BY GAVIN PUGH

Ruthie Schulz’s Twisted Clay Studio has hundreds of pounds of clay and amassive electric kiln for the Shelter in Clay program.

Ruthie Schulz’s studio includes space for students to learn how to throw clay on the potter’s wheel.

SHELTER IN CLAY Twisted Clay Studio’s ‘Shelter in Clay’ program oers students the chance to learn various building techniques.

Twisted Clay Studio Grapevine business promotes play with take-home craft kits A s the owner of a recently opened ceramic studio, Ruthie Schulz decided she really interesting pots [that way], and it’s great for kids.” The at-home program provides students a block of clay and

SLAB BUILDING

I was just closed and not teaching, and it made me feel a little bit lost because I didn’t feel like I was engaging in ... [teaching] pottery to people. I get a lot out of that.” Under normal operating condi- tions, Twisted Clay Studio oers equipment and instructional space for hand-thrown ceramics and slab building. Schulz said she will reopen her studio on May 18 with some changes. The classroom space is rearranged for social distancing. Everyone will have to wear a mask, and the studio will be cleaned between every class. “I think we can still have a lot of fun with these precautions in place,” she said in an email.

PINCH POTS

would not wait out the shelter-in- place orders to continue teaching. Schulz’s Twisted Clay Studio has hundreds of pounds of clay stock- piled and a massive electric kiln, to boot. So rather than let her studio sit unused, Schulz kicked o her Shelter in Clay program. “It’s real, meaningful projects that we’re making, and [we’re] learning how to just use the older methods of working in clay,” she said. “That includes ... pinching and coiling. And a lot of times, we think of pinching and coiling as things that we do when we’re kids. But the truth is that you can make some

COIL POTS

instructions on various clay build- ing techniques, such as slab and pinch-and-coil. Schulz also guides participants through the various techniques via prerecorded videos. Each package oers at least 10 pounds of clay, building instruc- tions, a glazing sheet, slab tem- plates and instructions to return the work for ring and glazing. Schulz said the new take-home service helps. “It’s also been great for me because I love to teach, and it makes me feel like I’m in my element,” she said. “There was ... one week where

AND MORE

Twisted Clay Studio 441 E. Northwest Hwy., Grapevine 817-527-6019 www.twistedclay.co

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E. NORTHWEST HWY.

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14

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

DINING FEATURE Mango’s Breakfast and Brunch Southlake eatery leaning on community support, menu variety during coronavirus pandemic W hen he made the move from Illinois to Texas, Nick Mustafa said Southlake’s survive, generating enough money and keeping everybody employed to [bringing in] 2% of sales.” BY ELIZABETH UCLÉS

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“undeniably good” community pushed him to open Mango’s Break- fast and Brunch. The family-owned restaurant has been serving its varied menu on Southlake Boulevard since December 2017, the Mango’s owner said. After years of breakfast, lunch and dinner restaurant experience in Illinois, Mustafa said he wanted Mango’s to take its own path. “We directed our attention [to] creating a menu that you really can’t nd anywhere else,” he said. With more than 120 items, Mango’s has an option for everyone, no matter the craving, Mustafa said. For those looking for something on the healthier side, he said, the breakfast stued avocado is a popular option among guests. The restaurant is also known for its French rolled omelet, he said. The 2.5-year-old eatery has faced a “massive decrease” in business since the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic, Mustafa said, and has been adapting its services to survive. “It’s been a really rough ride,” he said. “We went from being able to

Mango’s has been oering curbside carryout, and it reopened its dining room at 25% occupancy in early May as part of the governor’s rst phase for reopening Texas, Mustafa said. “No business can denitely survive on 25%,” he said. “It’s impossible, especially with the cost of operating.” Through a time of uncertainty, Mustafa said the Southlake com- munity has shown support to the restaurant. “That’s one of the biggest reasons why we even started in Southlake,” he said. “They’ve sup- ported us from the start, and we can’t thank them enough for that.” Mustafa said Man- go’s is taking extra precautions to make guests feel safe should they decide to dine in or to order to go. In the dining room, there are sanitizing stations for customer and employee use, and all sta members are regularly changing out their masks and gloves, he said. “We just want the continuous support that we’ve received, and we really hope that we can continue serving all the community,” Mustafa said.

DISHES TO TRY

1 Lemon berry French toast ($13): Lemon poppy seed bread dipped in house batter, berry compote, maple syrup 2 Breakfast stued avocado ($15): Avocado, scrambled egg whites, turkey sausage, cheddar cheese, side of fruit

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"SOUTHLAKE HAS SUPPORTEDUS FROM THE START, ANDWE CAN’T THANK THEM ENOUGH FOR THAT." NICK MUSTAFA, OWNER

The breakfast and brunch eatery opened on Southlake Boulevard in 2017. (Photos courtesy Mango’s Breakfast and Brunch)

Mango’s Breakfast andBrunch 2750 E. Southlake Blvd., Ste. 140, Southlake 817-329-0123 www.brunchatmangos.com

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That time you caught more with your leftover hotdog than the most expensive bait on the market.

Don’t let him forget that Day.

AL 307432 MC 104660

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GRAPEVINE  COLLEYVILLE  SOUTHLAKE EDITION • MAY 2020

CONTINUED FROM 1

COMPILED BY GAVIN PUGH DESIGNED BY ELLEN JACKSON

able to be open, so that takes you out of that business right away,” he said. “When [groups are] not there to sup- port all the other businesses around, ... ultimately, it moves to furloughs and layos and such—a great impact on our workforce—and so it’s pretty devastating.” But with the phased reopening of Texas’ economy in the coming weeks, McCallum said those furloughed employees should remain in close contact with their employers. “Our hotels have issued furloughs, which means that they’re essentially one phone call away from putting the sta back in place, even though they’ll be running ... in a little more limited capacity,” he said. Mark Woolverton is the chief devel- opment ocer at GRACE Grapevine, a nonprot that provides a host of services for local families, including emergency assistance, a community clinic, food pantry, housing and other various programs. He said GRACE has seen a spike in requests for aid since the start of the pandemic. Due to Grapevine’s large hotel and tourism industry, a large number of the new clients are coming

SOURCES: GRAPEVINE CVB, STR COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Hotels across Grapevine saw a 60% month-over-month decline in revenue at the close of March, according to data provided by Grapevine’s Conventions and Visitors Bureau. The fallout of the COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in furloughs for workers across the city, CVB Executive Director Paul W. McCallum said.

REVENUE FOR ALL GRAPEVINE HOTELS

2019

2020

10% 20%

-70% -60% -50% -40% -30% -20% -10% 0%

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

from the hospitality sector, Woolver- ton said. “We’re looking at about ... two-and- a-half times the [normal] number of clients coming in for emergency assis- tance,” Woolverton said. Statewide data showed hotel and motel workers were the fth highest category of unemployment claims. From March 25-April 25, the Texas Workforce Commission elded 25,340 unemployment claims from workers in this eld. The industry with the highest unemployment claims was full-service restaurants. That cate- gory saw 84,093 claims during that same period, data showed. Despite seeing massive declines in revenue, McCallum said he is hopeful for a rebound as area residents search for ways to vacation locally. Occupancy rates down McCallumsaid at aMay 5 City Coun- cil meeting that roomoccupancy rates across Grapevine remain in the single digits. Those numbers factor in hotels that are closed, he said. Steve Haley, general manager of Hilton DFW Lakes, said the lack of travelers has been a major source of nancial woe. “It’s no secret that ... our industry

has been devastated by [the pan- demic] due to the immediate and ... total cease of travel,” Haley said. Being a Grapevine-based hotel, Hil- ton DFWLakes is located near the Dal- las Fort Worth International Airport. Haley said revenue losses are coming not only from unoccupied rooms, but also from the lack of gatherings from corporate travelers. “The dierences in what we’re doing now versus … the normal in this time of year is … overwhelming,” he said. “There is no group business to speak of at the moment until further safety measures by the governor are given.” Recouping some of those losses would look like the rescheduling of canceled events, he said. “We’re not taking groups of very signicant size,” Haley said. “We’re spending our time … rebooking and [putting] folks into later parts of the year, when they hope that they’ll be able to be traveling in larger groups.” Other big players include the Gay- lord Texan Resort & Convention Cen- ter and the Great Wolf Lodge. Both of those resorts remain closed as of press time May 7. Great Wolf Resorts CEO Mur- ray Hennessy said in a release he is

looking at a mid- June reopening. “We are actively supporting gov- ernment- i ssued community safety measures and doing everything possible to help slow the spread so we may return to some level of nor- malcy,” Hennessy said. “For us, that has included the closing all of our

PAUL W. MCCALLUM, GRAPEVINE CVB EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

willing to do it. It’ll be a gradual—it won’t be ... all at once.” While booking corporate gatherings may be further down the pathway for local hoteliers, McCallum said he is hopeful leisure travelers will ll the gaps in the meantime. “After 9/11 there was this sense of staying close,” he said. “Grapevine has ... very much provided this sort of family entertainment. ... This is where people come to kind of feel the ‘hometown America’ experience.”

resorts through June 15. This unprece- dented health crisis has caused many hardships and challenges.” McCallum said it simply does not make much nancial sense for some larger hotels and resorts to stay open. “[With] the amount of stang it takes to [stay open], and for a 6%-8% occupancy—it just doesn’t work,” he said. As travel and business restrictions are eased, Haley said he expects the trickle of local vacationers to be slow. “We use the term ‘staycation.’ ... I think you’ll see some of that … once folks are allowed to get back out,” Haley said. “I think people will be

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GRAPEVINE  COLLEYVILLE  SOUTHLAKE EDITION • MAY 2020

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