Lewisville - Flower Mound - Highland Village Edition - May …

LEWISVILLE FLOWERMOUND HIGHLAND VILLAGE EDITION

VOLUME 3, ISSUE 7  MAY 6JUNE 2, 2020

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Ocials brace formillions in revenue loss As coronavirus continues to send shockwaves through local economies, ocials in Lewisville, Flower Mound and Highland Village are preparing for budget cuts and millions of dollars of projected revenue loss. BY ANNA HEROD budget IMPACTS

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Based on early estimates, Lewisville is expected to lose upward of $7 mil- lion during scal year 2019-20. Flower Mound stands to lose an estimated $2.8 million in revenue, and Highland Vil- lage ocials are expecting to lose about $500,000. Ocials with all three cities said they expect to have rmer estimates of where the budgets stand in May, when the state will inform them how much sales tax has been collected since the pandemic emerged locally. However, since it is unclear how long the eco- nomic eects related to the coronavi- rus might last, the future remains uid. “It’s hard to know the full impact,” Highland Village Assistant City Man- ager Ken Heerman said. “We certainly have some early projections, but at this point, they’re just educated guesses. There’s just so many unknowns.” Debra Wallace, the town of Flower Mound’s chief nancial ocer and assistant manager, said she looked at national retail sales data to help inform projections of how much the town could lose in sales tax revenue in the coming months. CONTINUED ON 14

As the eects of coronavirus continue to take a toll on local economies, area cities are preparing for substantial revenue loss.

Highland Village -$500K

COMMUNITYIMPACT.COMPATRON

SOURCES: CITY OF LEWISVILLE,

Flower Mound -$2.8M

CORONAVIRUS COVERAGE

CITY OF HIGHLAND VILLAGE, TOWN OF FLOWER MOUND COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

All content in this print publication, both editorial and advertisements, was up to date as of press deadline. Due to the fast-changing nature of this event, editorial and advertising information may have changed. Please visit communityimpact.com and advertiser websites for more information. Thanks for your support.

Lewisville -$7M

GROCERY GUIDE

Options for shoppers in Lewisville, Flower Mound and Highland Village

Projected revenue loss for the current scal year

Child advocatesworry abusemay go unnoticed, unreportedwith schools out

LOCAL LISTINGS

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as stress increases in families grap- pling with health concerns and nan- cial hardships, local child advocates fear that abuse may go unnoticed and unreported. “We are very nervous for our kids CONTINUED ON 16

BY ANNA HEROD

Under Texas law, every adult is mandated to immediately le a report if they have knowledge of suspected child abuse or neglect. The law applies even to individuals with privileged communications, including attorneys, health care professionals and clergy members.

Teachers are trained to recognize and report any signs of abuse, often acting as the rst line of defense for vulnerable children. But as schools remain closed in the wake of the COVID-19 outbreak and

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Message from the MAYOR This has been a difcult time for all of us, and it’s not over yet. When we nally do get past the COVID-19 public health emergency, some things will have changed forever. Two things that I am certain will not change are Lewisville’s steady pursuit of a bright future, and the can-do spirit of her people that makes the pursuit possible.

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LEWISVILLE - FLOWER MOUND - HIGHLAND VILLAGE EDITION • MAY 2020

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THIS ISSUE

CONTENTS GROCERY GUIDE

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

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Now Open, Coming Soon &more TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES 8 Lewisville Mail and Mill corridor project CITY& COUNTY 9 Latest local news INSIDE INFORMATION 11 Learn how to make a face mask

PUBLISHERS AND FOUNDERS John and Jennifer Garrett PUBLISHERDFWMETRO Christal Howard GENERAL MANAGER Brian Pardue, bpardue@communityimpact.com EDITORIAL EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Lanane MANAGING EDITOR Valerie Wigglesworth EDITOR Anna Herod COPY CHIEF Andy Comer COPY EDITORS Ben Dickerson, Kasey Salisbury STAFFWRITERS Gavin Pugh, Danica Smithwick CONTRIBUTINGWRITER Rachel Dew ADVERTISING SALES DIRECTOR Tess Coverman ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Jason Lindsay DESIGN CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Aubrey Galloway ASSOCIATE ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Breanna Flores GRAPHIC DESIGNER Tobi Carter STAFF DESIGNERS Ellen Jackson, Stephanie Torres BUSINESS GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER Claire Love ABOUT US John and Jennifer Garrett began Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 in Pugerville, Texas. The company’s mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. CONTACT US

FROMBRIAN: While we may have started to lose track of what day it is or how long we’ve been working out of our homes, our teams haven’t lost sight of our mission to inform citizens as news surrounding the coronavirus continues to develop. In our front-page story this month, we look at the impact coronavirus is having on Lewisville, Flower Mound, and Highland Village as sales tax revenue goes down. We also explore an increase in child abuse cases in Denton County as stress levels are high. In addition, we put together a Grocery Guide (see Page 6) to show the dierent services and hours that many stores have adopted. We’re all in this together, and while we can’t shake hands right now, we’re glad to be able to provide something useful you can hold in yours. As our state and county continue to open up, we’ll continue to keep you updated at communityimpact.com and through our daily newsletter. Brian Pardue, GENERALMANAGER

BUSINESS FEATURE 12 Guidepost Montessori at Flower Mound

THIS ISSUE BY THE NUMBERS

Grocery stores 30

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Transportation updates 2

Caterpillar 1

Budgets

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© 2020 Community Impact Newspaper Co. All Rights Reserved. No reproduction of any portion of this issue is allowed without written permission from the publisher.

CORRECTION: Volume 3, Issue 6 The article on the cover titled “Adapting to Change” should have said that Marta Gomez Frey is the director of the Collin Small Business Development Center.

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LEWISVILLE  FLOWER MOUND  HIGHLAND VILLAGE EDITION • MAY 2020

GUIDE

Where to shop in Lewisville, Flower Mound and Highland Village

Lewisville, Flower Mound and Highland Village grocery stores are nding ways to oer food to everyone while also attempting to slow the spread of the coronavirus. Innovations include online ordering, curbside pickup, direct delivery and senior hours. Here is a noncomprehensive list of services. To alert our news sta about potential updates, email lnews@communityimpact.com. GROCERY GUIDE

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Curbside pickup Direct delivery Third-party delivery

LOCALLY OWNED 1 El Rancho Supermercado 701 S. Stemmons Freeway, Ste. 150, Lewisville 972-221-9206 Hours: 8 a.m.-10 p.m. Senior hours: None 2 India Bazaar 2151 S. Edmonds Lane, Lewisville 972-312-0114 COVID-19 special hours: 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Senior hours: 11 a.m.-noon Mon., Tue. 3 Indopak Supermarket 297 W. Round Grove Road, Lewisville 972-906-2980 COVID-19 special hours: 10 a.m.-10 p.m. Senior hours: None 4 Kabayan Filipino Store and Cafe 2305 S. Hwy. 121, Ste. 165, Lewisville • 972-798-3030 COVID-19 special hours: 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Senior hours: None 5 Terry’s Supermarket 1019 Fox Ave., Lewisville 972-888-8888 COVID-19 special hours: 7 a.m.-11 p.m. Senior hours: None 6 Tharkari Indian Grocery 3317 Long Prairie Road, Flower Mound 972-355-2611

COVID-19 special hours: 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Senior hours: None 7 Zion Market 2405 S. Stemmons Freeway, Lewisville 469-637-0070 COVID-19 special hours: 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Senior hours: None REGIONALNATIONAL WHOLESALE 8 ALDI 1585 W. Main St., Lewisville 855-955-2534 COVID-19 special hours: 9 a.m.-7 p.m. Senior hours: 8:30-9:30 a.m. Tue., Thu. 9 Kroger 1101 Flower Mound Road, Flower Mound 469-671-5770 COVID-19 special hours: 7 a.m.-11 p.m. Senior hours: 6-7:30 a.m. Tue., Thu., Sat. 10 Kroger 2709 Cross Timbers Road, Flower Mound 972-355-0997 COVID-19 special hours: 7 a.m.-11 p.m. Senior hours: 6-7:30 a.m. Tue., Thu., Sat.

Seven Dallas-Fort Worth Medical City Healthcare hospitals have opened miniature grocery stores to help hospital sta during the outbreak. (Courtesy Medical City Healthcare)

FEATURED IMPACT NOWOPEN Seven Dallas-Fort Worth Medical City Healthcare hospitals have opened miniature grocery stores to help hospital sta in the midst of the coronavirus outbreak. The on-site grocery stores have been set up inside Medical City Dallas, Medical City Denton, Medical City Frisco, Medical City Lewisville, Medical City McKinney, Medical City North Hills and Medical City Plano. “We recognize the many challenges that our hardworking health care colleagues are facing right now. By oering essential groceries, we are able to provide a convenient, safe option for our teams to secure food necessities with ease, allowing them to spend more time with their families,” said Jenifer Tertel, Medical City Healthcare regional vice president of human resources. “Caring for and protecting our caregivers is an essential part of our emergency response in any situation, and I’m proud of our

resourceful team for nding innovative ways to support each other.” The grocery stores oer basic items, such as produce, bread, meat and dairy products, according to Medical City Healthcare ocials. Hospital employees can purchase the groceries at cost or by using payroll deductions. Anya Sears, laboratory services manager at Medical City Lewisville, said being able to get her grocery shopping done before she leaves work has helped her through a stressful time. “It’s been great to be able to get fresh vegetables at work because a lot of times, when we get o work and go to the store, produce is limited,” Sears said. “It helps to keep employees safe, too, because a lot of times, the grocery stores are a madhouse, and at times, you see people who aren’t social distancing. So for us, it’s another way of our facility caring [for us] like family ... as well as keeping us safe so we can keep taking care of patients.”

11 Kroger Marketplace 4620 Hwy. 121, Lewisville

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY ANNA HEROD AND RACHEL DEW

WE’RE OPEN! CURBSIDE PICK-UP, DELIVERY & CARRY-OUT ARE AVAILABLE

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GET IT AND GO — ORDER ONLINE ™

FLOWER MOUND

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FREE EXTRA OR ENHANCER (with the purchase of a smoothie)

Some restrictions may apply. Valid only at particpating locations. Excludes Extras and Enhancers. Not valid with any other offer. Not valid on 32oz smoothies on Fridays. Must surrender original coupon to receive offer. Photocopied or altered coupons will not be honored. limit one per person. No cash value. Sales tax extra. ©2020 Smoothie King Franchisees, Inc. 00 any 32 oz. OR larger smoothie

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FLOWER MOUND,TX 75028 3701 Justin Rd Suite 110 (214) 513–9491

Senior hours: 7-9 a.m. Tue., Thu.

469-535-2479 COVID-19 special hours: 7 a.m.-11 p.m. Senior hours: 6-7:30 a.m. Tue., Thu., Sat. 12 Market Street 3800 Long Prairie Road, Flower Mound 972-355-4007 Hours: 6 a.m.-10 p.m. Senior hours: 7-9 a.m. Mon., Thu. 13 Sprouts Farmers Market 2301 Cross Timbers Road, Ste. 200, Flower Mound 972-874-7380 COVID-19 special hours: 7 a.m.-8 p.m. Senior hours: None 14 Tom Thumb 1075 W. FM 3040, Lewisville 214-488-3060 COVID-19 special hours: 6 a.m.-11 p.m. Senior hours: 7-9 a.m. Tue., Thu. 15 Tom Thumb 4301 Cross Timbers Road, Flower Mound 972-691-2084 COVID-19 special hours: 6 a.m.-11 p.m. Senior hours: 7-9 a.m. Tue., Thu. 16 Tom Thumb 2301 Justin Road, Flower Mound 972-539-2366 COVID-19 special hours: 7 a.m.-10 p.m. Senior hours: 7-9 a.m. Tue., Thu. 17 Tom Thumb 745 Cross Timbers Road, Flower Mound 972-539-6828 COVID-19 special hours: 7 a.m.-10 p.m.

Some restrictions may apply. Valid only at particpating locations. Excludes Extras and Enhancers. Not valid with any other offer. Not valid on 32oz smoothies on Fridays. Must surrender original coupon to receive offer. Photocopied or altered coupons will not be honored. limit one per person. No cash value. Sales tax extra. ©2020 Smoothie King Franchisees, Inc.

18 Walmart Grocery Pickup 801 W. Main St., Lewisville 972-439-7040 COVID-19 special hours: 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Senior hours: 6-7 a.m. Tue. Pharmacy & Vision Center open for senior hour 19 Walmart Neighborhood Market 1515 Justin Road, Lewisville 972-966-6215 COVID-19 special hours: 7 a.m.-8:30 p.m. Senior hours: 6-7 a.m. Tue. Pharmacy & Vision Center open for senior hour 20 Walmart Neighborhood Market 2800 Flower Mound Road, Flower Mound 972-538-0355 COVID-19 special hours: 7 a.m.-8:30 p.m. Senior hours: 6-7 a.m. Tue. Pharmacy & Vision Center open for senior hour 21 Walmart Supercenter 3060 Justin Road, Highland Village 972-317-4951 COVID-19 special hours: 7 a.m.-8:30 p.m. Senior hours: 6-7 a.m. Tue. Pharmacy & Vision Center open for senior hour 22 Whole Foods Market 4041 Waller Creek, Highland Village 972-538-9710 COVID-19 special hours: 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Senior hours: 7-8 a.m.

FLOWER MOUND,TX 3701 Justin Rd, Suite 110

FLOWER MOUND,TX 3701 Justin Rd, Suite 110

EXPIRES: 5/31/2020

EXPIRES: 5/31/2020

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23 WinCo Foods 1288 W. Main St., Lewisville 469-645-1669

COVID-19 special hours: 7 a.m.-10 p.m. Senior hours: 6-7:30 a.m. Tue., Thu.

For the most up-to-date listing of grocery options, visit communityimpact.com .

Shoppers line up outside Costco during senior hours. (Courtesy Hulmin Sun)

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LEWISVILLE  FLOWER MOUND  HIGHLAND VILLAGE EDITION • MAY 2020

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES LewisvilleMain andMill Corridor Project cost goes up

UPCOMING PROJECT

CHANCELLOR DR.

BY ANNA HEROD

according to Salmon’s memo, was to en- sure that it could provide public utilities, including water, sanitary sewer and storm sewer, to the southeast corner of Main and Mill streets, the future site of Main & Mill, a planned $35 million, six-story, mixed-use development in Old Town. City Council approved an economic de- velopment agreement with Main & Mill’s developer, AMAC Holdings, in November. Part of the agreement stated that the city would provide all public utilities to the property, which could not be done with- out rerouting the existing sanitary sewer mainline, according to the memo. Main & Mill will feature 201 luxury-style residential units and 6,500 square feet of retail and restaurant space as well as structured parking, according to the economic development agreement. James Kunke, Lewisville’s community relations and tourism director, said all of the street, parking and sidewalk work for the Main and Mill corridor project is expected to nish on schedule by Sep- tember. However, due to the additional work approved in the change order, some landscaping and pedestrian features may not be completed until November.

According to a memo by City Engineer David Salmon, the change order was nec- essary because a sanitary sewer mainline at the site of a former Sonic Drive-in on the east side of Mill Street and south of Main Street needed to be abandoned. The change order is set to cover the additional costs associated with rerout- ing the sewer line along Mill Street from Elm Street to Main Street and along Main from Mill to Kealy Avenue. The reason the city needed to abandon the existing sanitary sewer mainline,

Ocials have said Lewisville’s Main and Mill Corridor Project is still on track to be substantially completed by September, but its cost has gone up by $394,324 fol- lowing Lewisville City Council’s approval of a change order at an April 6 meeting. City Council awarded an $8.5 million contract to HQS Construction in fall 2018 to complete paving, drainage, landscape and trac signal improvements to the corridor, which comprises Main, Mill and Charles streets in Old Town.

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Forest Vista Drive reconstruction The second phase of the reconstruc- tion of Forest Vista Drive from Morriss Road to Chancellor Drive in Flower Mound is set to start in June. Flower Mound Town Council voted unanimously to award $62,378 to ECS Southwest to provide construction ma- terials, engineering and testing for the project as well as to reconstruct the Forest Vista water line, which has had ongoing maintenance issues, according to ocials. Informational door hangers will be distributed in nearby neighbor- hoods before construction begins. Timeline: June 2020-April 2021 Total cost: $2.7 million Funding source: town of Flower Mound

Existing sewer line Rerouted sewer line

Sewer line to be abandoned

ANEW SEWER LINE The cost of the Main and Mill corridor project increased by $394,324 as ocials begin to reroute a sewer line.

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ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UP TO DATE AS OF APRIL 22. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT LFHNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY& COUNTY

News from Lewisville, Flower Mound and Highland Village

COMPILED BY ANNA HEROD

HIGHLIGHTS LEWISVILLE Starting May 4, residents will no longer be allowed to smoke tobacco or vape in city parks. “Ensuring park users have a smoke-free park system is an incredible accomplishment for Lewisville,” said Stacie Anaya, director of Lewisville Parks and Recreation. “Prohibiting the use of tobacco and electronic nicotine devices in our parks system will enhance visitors’ experience as well as help us protect the environment.” LEWISVILLE ISD The district announced April 13 that Jerey Kajs has been named the new chief executive director of student support services. Kajs, who is currently the principal of Lewisville High School, will start his new position in the upcoming school year. “I have been blessed to have worked in LISD for 25 years,” Kajs said. “I believe in what this district has accomplished, and I fully believe in the direction it is going. ... I am excited to continue to serve the students, sta and communities of LISD.” HIGHLAND VILLAGE City Council set the schedule for its upcoming budget cycle at an April 28 meeting. The budget process for scal year 2020-21 will begin at the May 8 meeting. A nal reading and vote on the budget will be held Sept. 22. MEETINGSWE COVER Lewisville City Council Meets at 7 p.m. the rst and third Monday of each month. www.cityoewisville.com Lewisville ISD board of trustees Meets at 7 p.m. the second Monday of each month. www.lisd.net Flower Mound Town Council Meets at 6 p.m. the rst and third Monday of each month. www.ower-mound.com Highland Village City Council Meets at 7:30 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesday of each month. www.highlandvillage.org

Lewisville grants incentives to Ericsson for 5G factory, new jobs

LEWISVILLE Lewisville City Council unanimously voted April 20 to approve the nal plat for Dental Depot, which is set to open an 11,300-square-foot oce at Duncan Lane and West Round Grove Road. Dental Depot, which has four other Dallas-Fort Worth loca- tions, will build the new oce on 1.57 acres of land. The business will oer full dental services and will be staed by doctors and dental specialists. An opening date for the new oce has not yet been announced. City Council OKs nal plat for new Dental Depot

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LEWISVILLE City Council unan- imously approved an economic development agreement April 6 with Ericsson, which has chosen the city for its rst fully automated 5G factory in the country. Last fall, Ericsson announced it would transform an existing 300,000-square-foot facility at 2601 S. Valley Parkway into a state-of- the-art factory that will produce advanced antenna system radios, which will enable 5G deployment and increase network capacity and coverage across the nation. Jason Moore, Lewisville’s director of economic development, stated in a city memo that Ericsson will invest an estimated $64 million into renovations for the factory; upgrades to building utilities and infrastruc- ture; construction of oce space and employee amenities; and invest- ments in innovative technologies to make the facility energy ecient. Moore also stated that Ericsson is

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set to employ 400 full-time employ- ees at the factory over a four-year period, with an annual total payroll of $28 million. In exchange for Ericsson’s invest- ments, City Council voted April 6 to give the company three economic incentives, including an annual grant based on 75% of the business’s personal property taxes paid to the city for 10 years. Those taxes are estimated to total between $200,000 and $300,000 each year. In addition, City Council agreed to give Ericsson a one-time grant equal to 75% of all building permit fees paid, which is estimated at $225,000, and a one-time sales tax construc- tion grant for an estimated $200,000.

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County gives $735,000 toUnitedWay COVID19Relief Fund

DENTON COUNTY Commission- ers Court voted April 28 to allocate $675,000 to UnitedWay of Denton County’s COVID-19 Relief Fund. The donation follows the court’s vote earlier in the month to contrib- ute $60,000 to the fund, bringing the county’s total donation to $735,000. The fund was established to help provide nancial assistance to

individuals and families negatively aected by the COVID-19 outbreak, said Courtney Cross, director of mental health and housing initiatives for United Way of Denton County. “We know that when any kind of disaster or crisis hits, it unfortunately tends to impact those most vulner- able rst, and sometimes, in the largest ways,” Cross said.

Through the fund, people who have experienced income or job loss can get nancial help for rent, mortgage and utility expenses. Residents can nd out more about eligibility rules and the documenta- tion required to receive assistance at www.unitedwaydenton.org. The site also lists other resources available to those in need.

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LEWISVILLE  FLOWER MOUND  HIGHLAND VILLAGE EDITION • MAY 2020

BUSINESS Lewisville, FlowerMound chambers of commerce feel strain as local businesses struggle

BY GAVIN PUGH AND ANNA HEROD

the American Society of Association Executives. A second round of funding approved April 24 is also not available to chambers. Chris Wallace is the president and CEO of the North Texas Commission, the regional public-private part- nership among businesses, cities, education institutions and other

statewide efforts to advocate for relief for chambers. Lori Walker, the CEO of the Flower Mound Chamber of Commerce, said she has been on multiple calls with state lawmakers. “We want to make sure they hear our voice and know that it’s really important for our chambers to have

member—more than 700 people,” Walker said. “We had a lot of very depressing and sad calls. ... So the emotional side of this is hard, and we want to help them through it.” Fickling said she has had similar conversations with Lewisville busi- ness owners. “We are just feverishly trying to figure out things we can do to help our businesses because so many of them are just in a terrible situation,” Fickling said. Despite the challenges, Fickling said she is optimistic about the future. “I feel like when we get the go-ahead to fully open back up and get back to our lives—that we’re going to see an explosion of business,” Fickling said. “It may be slower than I had hoped. But if people can hang on, and just get through it—and I know that every week we extend this, it becomes more and more difficult—but if a business can hang on, I really feel like they will be back bigger, stronger and better than ever.”

At their core, area chambers of com- merce serve to represent the needs and interests of local business owners, said Lori Fickling, CEO of the Lewis- ville Area Chamber of Commerce. But when faced with unprece- dented stress on local economies, North Texas chamber and association leaders said they are in straits just as dire as those of businesses. “We’re here to help local businesses grow,” Fickling said. “So whether it’s a small business of one or two or five or 10 people or a major corporation, we’re the connector to the commu- nity. I think the chamber is a neces- sary component to any successful and thriving business community. That’s what our priority is, but we’re hurting right now, too.” When Congress passed the CARES Act in March, it excluded 501(c)(6) organizations, such as chambers of commerce, from accessing loans and grants made available to most other small businesses, according to

some type of relief for the sake of our local economic development and our local business community,” Walker said. Chambers of commerce connect owners with the rest of the community and with resources

"IF ABUSINESS CAN HANGON, I REALLY FEEL LIKE THEYWILL BEBACK BIGGER, STRONGERAND BETTER THAN EVER." LORI FICKLING, LEWISVILLE AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

local stake- holders. He said he is calling on North Texas’ congressional

represen- tatives to include associations in the next stimulus bill. Because chambers of commerce operate as businesses, each with their own staff, the Lewisville and Flower Mound chambers of commerce have been involved in local, regional and

that can help them succeed, Walker said. And even as the chamber feels the financial strain caused by the coronavirus, Walker said she remains focused on helping members. “We called every single

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INSIDE INFORMATION Ocials with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are encouraging residents to wear cloth face coverings or medical-grade masks over the nose and mouth when performing most activities outside of the home. If you have not been able to buy masks, here is a guide to make your own cloth masks at home. Please refer to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.cdc.gov for more guidelines. Facing the facts

Learn how to make a mask from household items

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DO

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WHY SHOULD I WEAR A MASK? Many people with the coronavirus lack symptoms or develop symptoms later on in the diagnosis, so they might not know they are transmitting the disease. The virus is believed to be spread among people in close contact with one another. The virus can spread during interactions such as speaking, coughing or sneezing. Some people who are not showing symptoms could still be infected and spread the virus.

• Cover your mouth and nose in public even if you are not experiencing symptoms of COVID-19 or interacting with someone who is experiencing symptoms. • Wash masks in hot water before the rst use and between uses. • Wear a mask when at grocery stores, medical appointments or other public places. • Replace masks when they get damp.

• Use surgical masks or N-95 respirators, as these critical supplies should be reserved for health care professionals. • Ignore calls for social distancing of at least 6 feet between people. • Forget to wash hands frequently as well as before putting on a mask. • Reuse single-use masks.

HOW TO MAKE A MASK AT HOME Cloth face coverings can be crafted from household items, such as fabric, scarves, bandanas, hand towels, T-shirts and rubber bands or hair ties.

STEP 4: Fold fabric to the middle from both sides and tuck the sides in.

STEP 5: Attach each rubber band to either ear and ensure the mouth and nose are completely covered.

STEP 3: Place a rubber band on each side of the fabric.

STEP 2: Fold fabric to the middle from the top and bottom.

STEP 1: Fold fabric to the middle from the bottom.

CORRECT

6 inches apart

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LEWISVILLE  FLOWER MOUND  HIGHLAND VILLAGE EDITION • MAY 2020

GuidepostMontessori at FlowerMound 2501 Simmons Road, Flower Mound 972-874-7000 www.guidepostmontessori.com/ ower-mound

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GuidepostMontessori at FlowerMound School adds health, safety measures to care for children of essential workers BUSINESS FEATURE G uidepost Montessori at Flower Mound has reopened to provide emergency care coming into the building with any COVID-19-like symptoms.” For students who are able to learn at home, the school is also oering virtual learning, she said. “We are still taking a new students BY ANNA HEROD

Guidepost Montessori at Flower Mound has reopened to provide emergency care for children of essential workers who still have to go to work amid the COVID19 outbreak. (Courtesy Guidepost Montessori at Flower Mound)

Williams said. “So us being able to open for essential workers really allows parents to have that same comfort so they can be focused on their work and the eorts that they are contributing to be able to help end this pandemic.” Every learning environment at Guidepost Montessori will have no more than 10 people at a time in order to comply with social dis- tancing guidelines, Williams said. Classrooms have also been set up to keep students distanced from each other, she said. “There’s constant hand-washing and constant sanitizing of anything that a child could potentially touch,” she said. “Before entering the school, all children are required to have their temperature taken in order for us to make sure that no child or parent is

process for the children to return to see some of their beloved guides, and I think that that has helped tremen- dously with them not feeling any of that anxiety of being lost in wondering what’s happening with their parents in the midst of the coronavirus.” Because things are rapidly chang- ing due to COVID-19, the school also has begun oering discounted, week- to-week tuition, Williams said. “This allows them the exibility if something ends up happening. ... Let’s say a parent is put on furlough, and they’re no longer able to aord the services. They just need to be able to provide us a one-week notice, and then, they would be able to drop out of the program at that time,” she said. “We want to do what we can to provide the support our community needs right now.”

for the children of essential workers who still have to go to work amid the COVID-19 outbreak. The school initially closed March 18 but reopened March 31 to take children of essential workers. Head of School Channler Williams said the school has adopted additional health and safety measures to help protect students, sta and teachers from COVID-19. “We really wanted to be able to be a guidepost, if you will, in terms of us helping essential workers to be able to be dedicated back to their work without the distraction of managing the educational environments of their children in the home setting,”

in addition to serving the current families that we had prior to the COVID-19 outbreak,” Williams said. “We want to be here for any outside families who may be struggling to nd quality care for their child during this time.” In the face of the uncertainty that has come along with the pandemic, Williams said, it is useful to give children a sense of stability in their education. “The guides who’ve come back to our school to serve during this time are the faces the children are familiar with,” she said. “So it’s been a natural

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

DINING FEATURE

Bistecca—an ItalianSteakhouse Restaurant donates 365 hot meals to Medical City Lewisville W ith the help of donations from loyal cus- tomers, Bistecca—an Italian Steakhouse served 365 hot meals to healthcare professionals at Medical City Lewisville over Easter weekend. Stacey Miller, the restaurant’s general manager, said she recently found out that the hospital cafe- teria has temporarily closed, leaving only a grab- and-go sack lunch option for healthcare workers amid the coronavirus outbreak. On the weekends, hospital workers have only what they bring from home or what is in the vending machines, she said. “That really just hurt our hearts because we’re all about feeding people and trying to help take care of the community,” Miller said. “So I sent out an email to some of our customers to let them know that for every meal somebody donated for a local healthcare worker, we would match it. Pretty soon, my phone and email were just blowing up with people wanting to make donations.” The restaurant then cooked up hot, three-course meals for the Medical City sta. Miller said Bis- tecca partnered with the Lewisville Noon Rotary Club to help pack and deliver the food. “When we pulled up to the hospital at the loading dock, they had the supervisors from each depart- ment come down and grab however many bags they needed to take care of their sta,” Miller said. Miller said the community has been extremely responsive and eager to help Bistecca continue donating meals. “Not only do we have people, like, calling and saying, ‘I want to donate ve meals; I want to donate 10 meals; I want to donate 20 meals.’ ... When people called, some said, ‘I want to give you $1,000 to go towards this.’” BY ANNA HEROD

Bistecca—an Italian Steakhouse served 365 hot meals to health care professionals at Medical City Lewisville over Easter weekend. (Photos courtesy Medical City Lewisville)

Bistecca—an Italian Steakhouse 2300 Highland Village Road, Highland Village 972-318-0515 www.bisteccasteakhouse.com

HIGHLAND VILLAGE RD.

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HOWTOHELP: To donate to the meal donation program, email General Manager Stacey Miller at stacey@bisteccasteakhouse.com.

Bistecca—an Italian Steakhouse matched every meal donation sponsored by customers.

Because of the rst weekend’s success, Miller said Bistecca is hoping to continue and expand the dona- tions. The restaurant is hoping to create a weekly rotation so that it can also donate meals to Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital of Flower Mound, Medical City Denton and local rst responders. “When we heard about the hours that the healthcare workers were working and the fact

that they didn’t have a cafeteria and couldn’t always have a hot meal, it was a no-brainer that we needed to do something,” Miller said. “Every- body’s stuck at home right now and feeling like they have no control of any part of their lives. It’s made people feel good to be able to feel like they’re contributing and helping somebody that’s out there taking care of all of us.”

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LEWISVILLE  FLOWER MOUND  HIGHLAND VILLAGE EDITION • MAY 2020

Lewisville braces for dip Lewisville Mayor Rudy Durham told residents in an April 21 coronavi- rus update that the city is expecting an estimated $7 million loss in reve- nue. The most severe losses will likely come from dips in hotel occupancy tax and in sales tax, he said. “The next 12-18 months will see a very lean budget for the city,” Durham said. “Some projects will be put on hold, and some programs will be sus- pended or eliminated.” As ocials determine what budget cuts need to be made, Durham said, they will try to make them as “pain- less as possible” for residents. “You can be assured that all essen- tial services will continue,” he said. “Some of the cuts might include your favorite program or event, and I wish that could be avoided. But the core public safety and infrastructure needs of the city have to be met.” Lewisville Director of Strategic Ser- vices Gina Thompson said city sta is still trying to determine the eects on the budget. Lewisville CityCouncil will receive an update at its May meeting. “I would say $7 million is a con- servative number,” Thompson said. “The city will likely lose much more than that. But we are still trying to

full-time employees in parks and recreation and 10 part-time and nine full-time library services employees. There were also three temporary employees furloughed in commu- nications, engineering services and environmental services. Wallace said the town could also save money by canceling non-re- quired travel or training for employ- ees, canceling events, postponing a scheduled employee survey and potentially defer one-time purchases and facility projects. More details will be available at Flower Mound Town Council’s May meeting. The town announced April 20 it is canceling the annual Indepen- dence Fest, which will save about $220,000. “We’re disappointed we will not be able to host Independence Fest this year,” Town Manager Jimmy Statha- tos said in a statement. “Every year, I look forward to seeing the commu- nity come together to celebrate July Fourth. However, due to the uncer- tainty of the COVID-19 situation in Texas at the moment and how long it will aect large events, we need to make the call now in order to recu- perate as much of our costs associ- ated with hosting it as possible.”

GRANDOPENINGOF THRIVE POSTPONED Originally scheduled to open in May, Lewisville’s new multigenerational

CONTINUED FROM 1

She rst looked at the town’s top revenue-generating industries: retail trade and accommodation, food services, information and whole- sale trade. Early projections show that the sales tax generated across those industries will be down 7% in March, 17% in April, 15% in May and 7% in June. Wallace said the closure of the Community Activity Center will be another signicant source of reve- nue loss. If the center, which rst closed in March, remains shuttered through June, the town could lose $570,000 that would have been collected through classes, spring break and summer camps and other programs. Though ocials are still examin- ing potential budget cuts, Wallace said city sta has already identied $2 million of budget expenditures that could be deferred or canceled. She said some of the savings are a result of the town’s decision to furlough 148 employees. Fifty-six were school crossing guards, and 15 were seasonal parks and recre- ation employees. The town also furloughed 49 part-time and six

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determine exactly how much.” Thompson said the city will explore every option before considering any type of furloughs or layos. The city has implemented a hiring freeze for most vacant positions and has delayed the grand opening of Thrive, its new, 87-000-square-foot multigenerational recreation center. The facility will feature a natato- rium, gymnasiums, an indoor walk- ing track, a tness area, community rooms, an indoor playground and more than 14,000 square feet of space for senior activities. Lewisville city ocials said con- struction on Thrive is largely on schedule, but there have been minor delays due to the COVID-19 outbreak. Construction is expected to be com- pleted in May. While the construction of Thrive is funded by a 2015 voter-approved bond, the center’s operations are to

be funded by a combination of user fees and tax revenue. As part of the budget analysis, city sta will try to determine what challenges that might create for the center going forward. “We know there is tremendous excitement in the community about Thrive, and we want to open as soon as we can,” Durham said in a state- ment. “Our top priority has to be the safety andwell-being of our residents, visitors, and sta during this unprec- edented time. That, combined with serious nancial challenges that still are not fully known, will delay us but won’t stop us from giving residents the multigenerational recreation cen- ter that they want and deserve.” Durham said he believes the COVID-19 outbreak will likely change some aspects of daily life forever. “Two things that I am certain will not change are Lewisville’s steady pursuit of a bright future and the can-do spirit of her people, [which] makes the pursuit possible,” Durham said. ‘Good news, bad news’ Heerman said Highland Village is not as reliant as some other munic- ipalities are on sales tax, but it will still experience some strain due to the coronavirus. About 13% of the city’s revenue comes from sales tax revenue. “It’s a ‘good news, bad news’ type of situation,” he said. “We don’t have as much reliance on sales tax. That’s the good news. But it’s also the bad news because it means we don’t have as much revenue to work with from that.” Like Lewisville and Flower Mound, Highland Village is canceling all non-required training and travel for employees, he said. The city can tap into its reserves and does not intend to lay o or fur- lough any employees.

“Laying o employees would be more toward our last resort,” Heerman said. “We want to

“TWO THINGS THAT I AMCERTAINWILL NOT CHANGE ARE

keep all of our people. We need them, we have high service expectations, and anytime you lay o peo- ple, that’s going to be challenged.” The city will rst consider postponing preventative infra- structure maintenance on various street proj- ects, he said. “Certainly, some cuts, but we are still looking at what those will be,” Heer- man said. “Before this happened, we were we will have to make

LEWISVILLE’S STEADY PURSUIT OF ABRIGHT FUTURE AND THE CANDO SPIRIT OF HER PEOPLE, WHICH MAKES THE PURSUIT POSSIBLE.” LEWISVILLE MAYOR RUDY DURHAM

Before stay-at-home orders were put into place in March, the city was moving full steam ahead to have the new Kids Kastle completed this spring, Lozano said. “We have all been thrown a major, major curveball here,” Highland Vil- lage City Manager Michael Leavitt said. “There are still so many vari- ables out there, even with what we’re proposing moving forward here tonight. It’s doable, but it’s going to take a lot of luck.” The city will need about 2,330 vol- unteers to help with the community build when it happens in the fall. “I reallybelieve that people are going to want to get out and help now even more than before,” Highland Village Mayor Charlotte Wilcox said about the new timeline. “I’ll even grab a hammer and go out just to get out of the house and do something dierent.”

in a very solid nancial position, so we’re very fortunate in that respect. We don’t have any immediate need for panic or worry about anything. We’re just going to be prudent and make sure we take the necessary steps to keep us in good standing and to be well positioned going forward.” Also aected is the highly antici- pated community-build of Kids Kas- tle playground in Unity Park. That has been rescheduled to sometime in the fall. “The challenges with this—well, when will it be safe to proceed?” Phil Lozano, the director of the Highland Village Parks and Recreation Depart- ment, said at an April 14 City Coun- cil meeting. “I can tell you that even if we were able to build it today, the community would not be able to use it because of the [disaster] declara- tion and the fact that we have closed down all of our playgrounds.”

KIDS KASTLE CONSTRUCTION DELAYED

The community build of Kids Kastle in Highland Village was rescheduled from March and April to sometime in the fall.

The city needs 2,330 volunteers to help build the new playground.

953 residents signed up before the coronavirus outbreak.

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