Plano North - August 2020

PLANONORTH EDITION

VOLUME 6, ISSUE 11  AUG. 21SEPT. 16, 2020

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2020 Guide ducation HIGHER

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Construction on the Sam Rayburn Tollway and its intersections has ramped up in recent months as part of a $200 million expansion. The North Texas Tollway Authority’s Sam Rayburn Tollway widening project began in January 2019 and will add a fourth lane in both directions from Den- ton Tap Road in Coppell to US 75 in McKinney. The project also calls for ramp improvements in Plano between the Dallas North Tollway and Preston Road. The Sam Rayburn Tollway widening project aims to improve regional mobility, as the population of North Texas is projected to exceed 11 million in the CONTINUED ON 20 BY MIRANDA JAIMES, ELIZABETH UCLÉS & DANIEL HOUSTON Crewsmake progress on $200Mtollwaywidening

Higher Education Guide 2020

UNDIMINISHED DEMAND Despite primarily oering online classes, Collin College saw higher enrollment this summer than in previous summers. Ocials said they expect fall enrollment to be similar to that of past years. Enrollment numbers Summer 2016 14,027 Summer 2017 14,372 Summer 2018 14,677

*SUMMER 2020 NUMBERS ARE BASED ON JULY ESTIMATES AND HAVE NOT BEEN FINALIZED.

15.9% INCREASE

14,701

Summer 2019 Summer 2020*

16,263*

Classes will resume Aug. 24 throughout the Collin College system, including at the Spring Creek campus in Plano. (Courtesy Collin College)

TOLLWAY UPGRADES

SOURCE: COLLIN COLLEGECOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

The Sam Rayburn Tollway expansion will add a fourth lane in both directions throughout the SRT corridor. Much of this work will take place in the center median.

Collin College prepares to restart fall classes CollinCollegewill have several learning options— and a mask-wearing requirement—for students and sta returning this fall. when classes start for the fall semester. “Safety and exibility are the key considerations for fall,” said Toni Jenkins, senior vice president of campus operations for Collin College. BY MIRANDA JAIMES

SOUTHBOUND CUSTER RD.

When the coronavirus pandemic made its way into North Texas in March, all classes at Collin Col- lege abruptly transitioned to an online format. The college moved about 33,000 students in 4,000 dif- ferent courses online in less than a week, ocials said. Now, the college is looking ahead to Aug. 24,

This fall, the community college will oer on-site and remote learning options as well as combina- tions of the two. Students will be able to choose from various options at the time of registration, which opened July 24 for the fall, according to CONTINUED ON 13

NORTHBOUND CUSTER RD.

SOURCE: NORTH TEXAS TOLLWAY AUTHORITY COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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THIS ISSUE

CONTENTS

FROMTHE EDITOR

IMPACTS

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Now Open, Coming Soon &more TODO LIST

MARKET TEAM GENERAL MANAGER Leanne Libby, llibby@communityimpact.com EDITOR Daniel Houston REPORTER Liesbeth Powers GRAPHIC DESIGNER Chase Autin ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Rebecca Anderson, Stephanie Burnett MANAGING EDITOR Valerie Wigglesworth ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Breanna Flores CORPORATE LEADERSHIP PUBLISHERS AND FOUNDERS John and Jennifer Garrett GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Warner METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Christal Howard John and Jennifer Garrett began Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 in Pugerville, Texas. The company’s mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Today, we operate across ve metropolitan areas, providing hyperlocal, nonpartisan news produced by our full-time journalists in each community we serve. BECOMEA#COMMUNITYPATRON Please join your friends and neighbors in CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES DIRECTOR Tess Coverman WHOWE ARE support of Community Impact Newspaper ’s legacy of local, reliable reporting by making a contribution. Together, we can continue to ensure citizens stay informed and keep businesses thriving. COMMUNITYIMPACT.COMCIPATRON CONTACT US 7460 Warren Pkwy. Ste. 160 Frisco, TX 75034 • 2146189001 PRESS RELEASES plnnews@communityimpact.com SUBSCRIPTIONS communityimpact.com/subscriptions © 2020 Community Impact Newspaper Co. All Rights Reserved. No reproduction of any portion of this issue is allowed without written permission from the publisher. SUPPORT LOCAL JOURNALISM

FROMDANIEL: For the last three years, I have been lucky to be welcomed into your homes each month as the editor of this newspaper. Plano has been good to me. When I joined the team in January 2017, Legacy West was a skeleton of mostly empty oce campuses and infrastructure, soon to be lled with bustling business activity. Collin Creek Mall was dying, with no concrete plan in place for revitalizing it. The city was still months away from a round of municipal elections that would reshape

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Local events and things to do TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES 7 Projects from across Plano CITY& COUNTY 9 Latest local news

HigherEducationGuide2020

policy on residential development for years to come. I’ve been fortunate to have the opportunity to dive into these stories and many others in this vibrant community. I am grateful to all of you for the trust you placed in me over the years to share your stories. That’s why it is somewhat dicult for me to announce this will be my last edition with our Plano team. Don’t worry, I’m not going far. From this point on, I’ll be the editor for our paper covering Lewisville, Flower Mound and Highland Village. And while this moment is bittersweet for me, I’m looking forward to the new challenge. I also couldn’t be more excited to share with you the news sta who will be covering Plano going forward. You’ll recognize the name of Reporter Liesbeth Powers, who has covered some of the biggest stories in Plano ISD and throughout the city over the last year. She’ll be rejoining our Plano team, alongside fellow Reporter Makenzie Plusnick. Guiding coverage will be our new editor, Olivia Lueckemeyer, and our managing editor, Valerie Wigglesworth. Leanne Libby, our longtime general manager, will continue holding it all together. The paper is in great hands. It’s been a privilege to tell some of your stories, Plano. I look forward to seeing what’s in store for you. DANIEL HOUSTON, EDITOR

LOCAL EDUCATION

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Higher education stats and news BUSINESS FEATURE

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McSweeney Martial Arts DINING FEATURE

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PLANO NORTH EDITION • AUGUST 2020

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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7301 Lone Star Drive, Plano. The comedy club will feature a dine-in experience with drinks and stand-up comedy. Tickets for upcoming shows are listed on the company website. 780-483-5999. https://tx.houseofcomedy.net REOPENING 10 Holy Grail Pub reopened July 22 with a plan to center more of its business around its food for the time being. The pub, located at 8240 Preston Road, Ste. 150, Plano, had fallen under a business category that required it to close under the governor’s order shuttering bars across the state. In a statement, Holy Grail said it would have to shelve some of its premium alcohol products to maintain the required food-to-alcohol sales ratio under Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission guidelines. 972-377-6633. www.holygrailpub.com RELOCATIONS 11 Mia Fiori moved Aug. 1 to a new location at 1900 Preston Road, Ste. 131, Plano. The boutique store specializes in custom oral arrangements, gifts, art and home decor. It was formerly located

NOWOPEN 1 Urban Nutrition Lounge held its soft opening in July at 1145 14th St., Ste. 2117, Plano. The drink bar oers a series of shakes and energy teas for breakfast or lunch. The shakes include a variety of toppings, from cheesecake to pecans, Oreos or other combinations. www.facebook.com/ urbannutritionlounge 2 Mallow Box opened its second location Aug. 10 in Plano’s Legacy Hall at 7800 Windrose Ave., Plano. The gourmet marshmallow dessert stall will oer s’mores, skewers, toasts, bowls and specialty shakes. The marshmallows are available in a variety of avors. The con- cept’s other spot is located at The Shops at Willow Bend. www.mallowbox.com COMING SOON 3 Bar-Ranch Steak Company plans to open in late September or early Octo- ber in downtown Plano at 1016 E. 15th St., Plano. The butcher shop will oer a variety of aged steaks as well as beer

and wine pairings. Steak oerings will include prime-plus and Wagyu beef. 469-294-4074. www.facebook.com/ barsteakco 4 Velvet Taco plans to open a new location in the fall at 5013 W. Park Blvd., Plano. The restaurant chain serves more than 20 varieties of tacos with a number of inuences. The chain has a number of locations across the country, including seven others in the Dallas-Fort Worth area. www.velvettaco.com 5 Park Wine & Spirits is expected to open in late September or early October at 4101 E. Park Blvd., Ste. 160, Plano. The family-owned liquor store will oer a va- riety of products for alcoholic beverages. The store hopes to pair competitive pric- es with “a more personal shopping expe- rience,” according to its Facebook page. www.facebook.com/parkwinespirits 6 Chipotle Mexican Grill plans to open a new Plano location in early 2021 at 6917 Independence Parkway, Plano. A company spokesperson conrmed the general timeline and said no additional information is available at this time. The fast-casual restaurant oers a variety of

burritos, tacos, bowls and salads. The new location will operate from the build- ing formerly occupied by Boston Market. www.chipotle.com 7 Hardcore Fitness Boot Camp , a gym for all types of tness levels, will open Sept. 5 at 3115 W. Parker Road, Ste. 335, Plano. Among the services the business will oer are weights and personal training with an emphasis on boxing and cardio workouts. The Plano location will be Hardcore Fitness’ rst in Texas. It has other gyms spread across California; Las Vegas, Nevada; and Orlando, Florida. 214-394-1418. https://hardcoretnessbootcamp.com/ 8 Rise Nation , plans to open a new tness center in the near future at The Shops at Legacy, 7300 Lone Star Drive, Ste. C103, Plano. The business specializes in 30-minute, high-intensity climbing workouts. Although no specic opening date had been set as of this paper’s print deadline, a Shops at Legacy spokesperson said the opening would happen “soon.” www.rise-nation.com 9 Plano House of Comedy was preparing to open at The Shops at Legacy,

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A portion of Nueces Drive will be removed to make way for a greenbelt between the Promontory on Preston development’s proposed apartment buildings, left, and the existing neighborhoods to the south. (Rendering courtesy city of Plano) FEATURED IMPACT IN THE NEWS The city of Plano approved plans

Developers told council members they hope to retain the Kohl’s elsewhere on the property. Plans for other retail stores have been reduced “consistent with market trends,” developers said in a presentation to council members. Instead, developers said they are seeking a “small-box grocery store” for the nonresidential sections of the development as well as other food and beverage uses.

July 27 for the Promontory on Preston development that place a limit of 264 apartment units on the project and require two-story apartment buildings be set back at least 75 feet from the homes to the south. The apartments would be set o from nearby neighborhoods by a wide stretch of green space with walking paths. The green space would serve as a buer between the proposed apartments and existing houses, replacing a stretch of Nueces Drive that runs north of the neighborhood. The residential portion of the development would replace the existing Kohl’s building, the only developed structure on the property. at The Shops at Legacy. 972-599-9697. www.mia-ori.com 12 The Consignerie has moved once again to a new location at 1900 Preston Road, Ste. 229, Plano. The store spe- cializes in resale of top-end furniture, home decor and accessories. The store had previously moved from its original location to the former site of Horchow Finale before moving again to the Preston Road location. 469-543-2818. www.theconsignerie.com 13 An Armed Forces Recruitment Center is relocating near Sprouts at the end of September at 4100 Legacy Drive, Ste. 403, Plano. The oce will hold re- cruiting personnel for the various armed services. The station is relocating from its former location at 301 W. Parker Road, Ste. 215, Plano. IN THE NEWS 14 Stein Mart Inc. announced Aug. 12 that it had voluntarily led for bankruptcy, as it does not have “sucient liquidity” to continue operations. A press release from the company said it expects to close “a signicant portion, if not all” of its stores. Stein Mart’s Plano store at 1701 Preston Road was expected to close as part of the bankruptcy, according to signage on the front of the building. www.steinmart.com

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PLANO NORTH EDITION • AUGUST 2020

TODO LIST

August & September events

AUG 2429

CLEAR THE SHELTERS PLANO ANIMAL SHELTER

Adoption fees will be waived from Aug. 24-29 at the Plano Animal Shelter as part of the city’s annual Clear the Shelters event. Organizers are following new protocols this year to minimize risk during the pandemic. Those interested in adopting a pet can view the animals in advance at http://share.plano.gov/adoptablepets. Shelter sta will be available by phone to answer questions at 972-769-4360. Masks are required when visiting the shelter, which is located at 4028 W. Plano Parkway. No adoption fee. 9 a.m.-6 p.m. (Mon.-Fri.), 10 a.m.-4 p.m. (Sat.). www.plano.gov (Courtesy Plano Animal Shelter)

of Henry Ford and Thomas Edison’s Ten-Year Road Trip.” Author Je Guinn details the friendship between the automobile manufacturer and the inventor as they embarked on a series of high-prole road trips. Advance registration is required and can be accessed at https://bit.ly/3hX197J. Free. 7:15-8:30p.m.www.plano.gov/203/library 12 THROUGHOCT. 4 REGISTER FOR FALL RECREATION CLASSESWITH THE CITY Plano residents can register for fall recreation classes beginning 8 a.m. Sept. 12. Activities oered include dancing, swimming, hiking, yoga, computer skills, and arts and crafts, among others. A full list of classes is available in the Fall 2020 Recreation Catalog on the city of Plano’s website. Nonresidents may register starting Sept. 14, and classes will begin the week of Oct. 5. www.plano.gov 19 LEARN ABOUT THE HOMEBUYING PROCESS The city of Plano hosts a monthly educational session for prospective homebuyers. The class, which is held using Zoom video conference software, details what homebuyers need to know about building credit, home inspections, insurance, mortgages and other relevant topics. The registration deadline for the Zoom event is 5 p.m. Aug. 18. Registration is available at www.plano. gov/650/rst-time-homebuyers- program. This month, the class itself will be held Aug. 19. Free. 8:30 a.m.-noon. www.plano.gov

COMPILED BY DANIEL HOUSTON AUGUST 28 LISTEN TO A FREE INDIE ROCK CONCERT ONLINE The city will hold a virtual concert July 31 in a series that had originally been planned for McCall Plaza in downtown Plano. As a precaution during the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, the concert series has been moved to a stream on the Plano Arts & Events Facebook page. The Aug. 28 performer will be Plano indie pop-rock duo Vanilla & Pepper. Free. Noon-1 p.m. www.facebook.com/planoarts 31 PAINT A DRAGONFLY IN AN ONLINE CLASS Residents of all ages can learn to paint or draw a dragony as part of a free, live art class aimed at people of varying ages and skill levels. The class uses watercolor paints and can be modied for colored pencils, markers or crayons. The classes are streamed live on Mondays on the Plano Arts & Events Facebook page. Previous classes are available on demand at the Facebook page. Free. Noon-12:45 p.m. www.facebook.com/planoarts SEPTEMBER 08 BOOK CLUB EXAMINES FRIENDSHIP BETWEEN FORD, EDISON The Plano Public Library system will hold a book club meeting on Zoom to discuss, “The Vagabonds: The Story

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Find more or submit events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES

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4 Parker Road project A section of Parker Road is being affected by a new six-month construction project that will ultimately stretch from Indepen- dence Parkway to Preston Road. Con- struction will affect the roadway in both directions over the next month, primarily from Preston Meadow Drive to Preston Road. One lane will be closed at all times, with an additional lane shut down during the day on weekdays and some Saturdays. Timeline: May-November Cost: $1.5 million Funding source: city of Plano 5 Plano Parkway project Work continues on a long-term road repair project that began in June on Plano Parkway. The full project will extend from Preston Road to the Dallas North Tollway. Crews are expected to focus on the por- tion of road between Ventura Drive and the bridge west of Shepton High School. One lane will be closed at all times, with an additional lane closed during the day

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ONGOING PROJECTS 1 Spring Creek Parkway project

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A new pavement repair project began in July on Spring Creek Parkway. Crews are expected to work on the Spring Creek lanes that stretch between US 75 and Alma Drive. The project is expected to last roughly through the end of October. One lane will be closed throughout the project, with an additional lane closed on weekdays. Timeline: July-October Cost: $800,000 Funding source: city of Plano 2 Coit Road project Crews are making pavement and sidewalk repairs on two stretches of sidewalk on Coit Road. One portion of the project is expected to be active between A Wyeth Drive and Denham Way, and another is be- tween B McDermott Road and Hedgcoxe Road. Northbound and southbound lanes will be affected on both stretches of road. One lane will remain closed at all times, with an additional lane closed during the day on weekdays. Timeline: January 2020-late 2021 Cost: $6.4 million Funding source: city of Plano 3 Preston Road Intersection project A project to expand the bridge where Preston Road meets President George Bush Turnpike began in March with the installation of traffic control devices along outside southbound lanes. Crews began demolition on outside lanes in March. Timeline: March 2020-February 2021 Funding sources: Texas Department of Transportation, city of Plano

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on weekdays and some Saturdays. Timeline: June 2020-June 2021 Cost: $3.5 million Funding source: city of Plano 6 Jupiter Road project

An extensive project to repair pavement and sidewalk on Jupiter Road began in early January. The project, which will eventually stretch from 14th Street to the northern city limits, will affect north- bound and southbound lanes this month between Park Boulevard and Parker Road. One lane will remain closed at all times, with an additional lane closed during most daytime hours on weekdays. Timeline: January 2020-summer 2021 Cost: $500,000 Funding source: city of Plano

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ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF JULY 31. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT PLNNEWS@COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

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PLANO NORTH EDITION • AUGUST 2020

DEVELOPMENT

City repeals Plano Tomorrowplan after years of contentious debate

BY DANIEL HOUSTON

apartment developments, Mayor Harry LaRosiliere said. “We have a committee that’s obviously working really hard to nd some common ground [so we can] put this all behind us,” said LaRosiliere, who has been one of the plan’s most vocal supporters over the years. “I’m actually very encouraged and optimis- tic that this is a good path for us.” That committee’s work is expected to conclude later this year, city spokesperson Todd Rice said in a news release. The road to this point was tor- tuous; it involved an anti-Plano Tomorrow petition, a lawsuit and a series of heated local elections that often centered on the topic of apartment density. But in the end, council was unanimous in its decision to repeal. Council members and zoning commissioners—even those who had previously opposed repeal eorts— expressed a desire for the city to move forward.

The city of Plano has repealed the Plano Tomorrow comprehensive development plan as the result of nearly a half decade of political and legal conict over the document’s pro- visions on development and density. Plano City Council voted Aug. 5 to repeal the plan and replace it with the prior comprehensive development guidelines, which were in place from 1986 until 2015, when Plano Tomor- row was adopted. “We’re pleased that the city came around to listening to the will of an awful lot of people,” said Allan Samara, a Plano Planning & Zoning Commission member and a spokes- person for the Plano Citizens’ Coa- lition. “We recognize it’s a divisive issue, and we want to cooperate to make the city a better place. We really mean that.” Moving forward, the city’s com- prehensive plan review committee will work to arrive at a compromise on how the next plan will treat future

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PLAN FOR THE FUTURE: AWINDING PATH

The road to the city’s decision on the Plano Tomorrow plan was inuenced by a petition and a lawsuit that played out in recent years. Here are some key dates.

October 2015 : The city approves the Plano Tomorrow plan, a guide for city zoning decisions.

November 2015 : A group gathers more than 4,000 signatures to repeal the plan or force a public vote on its future.

February 2016 : The group sues the city after city sta declines to present the petition to Plano City Council.

Texas Health is right there with you. Whatever comes.

February 2017 : In a setback for the city, an appeals court rules that a trial court has jurisdiction to decide whether the city has to present the petition to council. September 2019 : A district court rules in favor of the city, oering clarity in the eyes of City Manager Mark Israelson and disappointing the attorney on the opposite side.

July 2019 : The city oers to repeal the plan and replace it with an amended version that would be stripped of some of its more controversial provisions on density. The deal falls through after the group declines to drop the lawsuit.

Take the Texas Health Joint Assessment. YourJointHealth.com

July 2020 : An appeals court rules against the city of Plano and orders the city secretary to present the petition to Plano City Council.

August 2020 : The city repeals the Plano Tomorrow plan, and a comprehensive plan review committee continues to work on its eventual replacement.

Doctors on the medical staffs practice independently and are not employees or agents of Texas Health hospitals or Texas Health Resources. © 2020

SOURCE: CITY OF PLANOCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY& COUNTY

News from Plano

NUMBER TOKNOW

Plan to cut retail at Beacon Square rejected

$0.4482

The city of Plano has

Plano City Council Meets at 7 p.m. on the second and fourth Mondays of the month. Meetings are held at 1520 K Ave., Plano, and can be streamed at www.plano.gov/210/plano-tv. Agendas are available at the city website. www.plano.gov Plano ISD board of trustees Expected to meet Sept. 1 and to hold a work session Sept. 15. In recent months, the board has been holding meetings via video conference, which can be streamed at www.pisd.edu/pisdlive. Agendas are available at the district website. www.pisd.edu MEETINGSWE COVER committed not to raise its property tax rate as it deals with declining revenues and an uncertain nancial future. Plano City Council directed the city sta Aug. 10 to move forward with a scal year 2020-21 tax rate no higher than $0.4482 per $100 of assessed value, unchanged from the previous year. The city is planning for roughly $605 million in expenditures next year. The council is expected to vote on the nal version of the budget Sept. 14. CITY HIGHLIGHTS PLANO On Aug. 10, council members delayed a decision to rezone the area around the Plano Event Center, citing the ongoing work being conducted by the city’s comprehensive plan review committee. Council Member Kayci Prince said she wanted to give the committee more time to lay out its priorities on development and density before the city made a decision aecting the Oak Point area. The proposal involved creating a new zoning category intended to help implement the city’s Envision Oak Point plan for the area. Council is set to consider the zoning changes again at a meeting Jan. 25, 2021.

BY DANIEL HOUSTON

Billingsley has yet to build on the property, located near Coit Road and President George Bush Turnpike, but the developer has recently indicated interest in moving forward with early phases of construction. The attempt to move away from retail was partly a response to the industry’s struggles during the coro- navirus pandemic and beyond, the developer told the Plano Planning & Zoning Commission in July. In place of some of these retail con- cepts, the developer proposed nine more live-work units, which provide space for small businesses to operate near multifamily housing units at the Beacon Square development. each day, not just one—as well as their ability to safely enforce social distancing guidelines, Assistant Superintendent for Academic Services Katrina Hasley said. “It’s a health concern,” Hasley told trustees, adding that under a hybrid model, there would be fewer people on campus at a time. Students who opted for a fully remote learning environment this year—nearly half of the district’s enrollment—would not be aected by the change unless they later opted to return to an in-person approach. The district is pursuing a slightly dierent path for middle schoolers. While face-to-face learners would not be subject to a hybrid model, the district plans to pair middle school remote learners with face-to-face learners in the same class under the same teacher.

PLANO Billingsley, the developer behind a long-planned Plano mixed- use project, suered a setback after Plano City Council voted Aug. 10 to reject the company’s request to reduce the amount of retail space in the plan. City Council voted down the developer’s requested changes for the Beacon Square property by a 4-4 vote. The rejected changes included additional live-work units in place of some of the retail stores that had been featured in the original plans. Billingsley has had approval to build out the property since the current zoning was approved in 2014.

Billingsley was seeking a zoning change. (Screenshot via city of Plano)

W. 15TH ST.

W. PLANO PKWY.

PGBT TOLL

N

Hybrid learningmakes return at high schools

ANEWMODEL FOR LEARNING

Plano ISD will have dierent learning approaches at each level in order to accommodate scheduling and make the most of teaching resources. High schools and senior high schools HYBRID LEARNING • In-person students spend some days in classroom, some days remote • Some students spend all days in remote learning Middle schools COSEATINGMODEL • Classes include some in-person, some remote learners under same teacher Elementary schools FULLY INPERSONOR FULLY REMOTE • In-person students spend all days on campus • Some students spend all days in remote learning SOURCE: PLANO ISDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

BY DANIEL HOUSTON

PLANO ISD District ocials said they believe a hybrid approach is needed for the high school and senior high school students who have opted to return to classrooms later in the year. Plano ISD administrators unveiled these details Aug. 4 in a meeting of the board of trustees. Under the latest outline, high school and senior high school students who opted for face-to-face instruction this year would still have multiple days of remote schooling each week. The new plans were driven by these schools’ complex scheduling considerations—where each student works with a number of teachers

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

Higher Education Guide 2020

COMPILED BY MIRANDA JAIMES

A look at

Here is a look at the demographics for student enrollment at and degrees/certicates awarded by some area public higher education institutions. White African American Hispanic Asian Other International CAMPUS CLOSEUP

LOCAL EDUCATION

Here is data on educational attainment among area residents age 25 and older. EDUCATEDPOPULATIONS

COLLIN COUNTY COMMUNITYCOLLEGE

Degrees/certicates FISCAL YEAR 201819

FALL 2019

PLANO

Student enrollment

17.8% 6.3% 35.0% 21.7% 12.6%

34,328 Total enrolled in fall 2019 4,088 Degrees/certicates issued scal year 2018-19

9.47% 4.38% 17.66% 50.73% 11.47% 6.29%

11.11% 1.76% 4.88% 21.77% 47.65% 12.83%

Less than ninth grade Ninth-12th grade, no diploma High school graduate (includes equivalency) Some college, no degree Associate degree Bachelor’s degree Graduate or professional degree

3.7% 2.9%

MCKINNEY

FRISCO

THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT DALLAS 7,908 Degrees/certicates issued scal year 2018-19 29,543 Total enrolled in fall 2019

Degrees/certicates FISCAL YEAR 201819

FALL 2019

Student enrollment

17.3% 6.7% 38.7% 24.7%

21.7% 9.4% 31.0% 14.8% 15.2% 4.7% 3.2%

20.46% 4.46% 11.53% 28.84% 4.87% 29.84%

27.87% 18.69% 5.36% 14.38% 28.15% 5.55%

9.2% 1.7% 1.7%

COLLIN COUNTY

TEXAS

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH TEXAS 9,457 Degrees/certicates issued scal year 2018-19 39,192 Total enrolled in fall 2019

Degrees/certicates FISCAL YEAR 201819

43.65% 14.62% Student enrollment FALL 2019

19.7% 7.5% 33.0% 18.7% 14.8% 3.4% 3.0%

21.8% 7.1% 19.1% 10.2% 25.0%

4.97% 3.29% 22.30% 50.89% 12.20%

6.76% 6.81% 3.25% 24.91%

8.5% 8.3%

6.35%

*SOME PERCENTAGES MAY NOT EQUAL 100% DUE TO ROUNDING. SOURCE: 2018 AMERICAN COMMUNITY SURVEY 5YEAR ESTIMATESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

SOURCE: TEXAS HIGHER EDUCATION COORDINATING BOARDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

11

PLANO NORTH EDITION • AUGUST 2020

Data from Collin College Data from Collin College INSIDE INFORMATION

COLLIN COUNTY COMMUNI TY COLLEGE

Collin College, the only public community college in Collin County, provides services to students in Collin and Rockwall counties. It marked its 35th anniversary in July.

DUAL CRED I T PARTNERSHI PS

The following chart shows the number of dual credit students who were enrolled at Collin College in the fall of 2019.

826

Allen ISD Frisco ISD McKinney ISD

1,437

STUDENT ENROLLMENT

35 +1,080%

YEARS ENROLLMENT

781

5,000

1985

1,183

Plano ISD Wylie ISD

ABOUT 59,000

583

Fiscal year 2018-19

• The University of Texas at Dallas • University of North Texas • Texas A&M University- College Station • Texas Woman’s University • Texas A&M University- Commerce TOP UNI VERS I T I ES COLL IN COLLEGE STUDENTS TRANSFER TO 15

STAY ING ON TRACK

• The University of Texas at Austin • The University of Texas at Arlington • University of Arkansas- Fayetteville • University of Oklahoma • Texas State University • Texas Tech University • Oklahoma State University • Baylor University • Stephen F. Austin State University • Southern Methodist University

Over the years, enrollment at Collin College has kept pace with the population of Collin County, but the college’s tax rate has continued to decrease.

60K ENROLLMENT

1.2M POPULAT ION

0.10 PROPERTY TAX RATE*

40K

800K

0.09

20K

400K

0.08

0 2000

0 2000

0 2000

2019

2019

2019

Year

Year

Year

SOURCE: COLLIN COLLEGE/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

*RATE PER $100 VALUATION

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

Higher Education Guide 2020

CONTINUED FROM 1

FACE COVERING GUIDELINES Students, faculty and sta are required to wear their own face coverings in the following areas.

COLLIN COLLEGE AND THE CORONAVIRUS Collin College created a set of guidelines as classes restart this fall.

70%-75% will be oered in a hybrid/blended format 25%-30% of fall classes will be fully online. $5.31 million of that given to 6,685 students whose educations were aected by COVID-19.

12-page document detailing requirements and guidelines $3 million in air cleaning technologies to be installed at all 10 college facilities to eliminate airborne contaminants Majority of classes to be oered in a blended or hybrid format this fall

Classrooms and labs

Hallways, elevators, stairwells and other places where physical distancing is not feasible

Mohammed U. Ibrahim, M.D.

Other areas where the requirement is visibly posted

Ready to Care for Your Family

ENFORCEMENT

PROCEDURES

$5.34 million received in CARES Act funding

Students will be issued a warning by Collin College Police Department ocers if they refuse to wear a mask. A second warning or citation will result in a report to the dean of students’ oce, and students may be subject to discipline.

An employee may also be issued a citation by Collin College Police Department

SOURCE: COLLIN COLLEGE COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

ocers for refusal to wear a face covering. Continued refusal will be reported to the appropriate supervisor, and the employee will be subject to discipline.

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college spokespeople. Students who need to complete coursework or labs have continued to attend classes at the college despite the rising number of COVID-19 cases in recent weeks in Collin County, o- cials said. In recent weeks, the college expe- rienced more than an 11% increase in summer class enrollment as compared to the same period of time in 2019, or a 15.9% increase over the last ve years. While student enrollment has been increasing each year at Collin College for several years, ocials said they are not yet sure how the pandemic will aect enrollment numbers for the fall semester. Challenges toaddress As the college looked at bringing students back, Jenkins said there were several challenges to consider. For instance, Collin College has established partnerships for dual- credit classes with multiple school districts in the surrounding area, including Plano ISD. Most school districts are still tai- loring their plans for the upcoming school year due to the COVID-19 pan- demic, which has made coordinating with these districts more dicult, Jenkins said. In addition, the college is opening new facilities. Its new $177 million Col- lin College Technical Campus in Allen, which opens this fall, will oer Plano ISD students the opportunity to earn certications and a year of credit in one of 10 technical career areas by the time they graduate high school with dual credit classes. The surrounding communi- ties are looking forward to these

SOURCE: COLLIN COLLEGE COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

2800 E. Spring Creek Pkwy. COLLIN COLLEGE SPRING CREEK CAMPUS DANIEL HOUSTON COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

75

N

MAP NOT TO SCALE

format again, ocials said. This could be needed for students who could be asymptomatic and need to iso- late or self-quarantine, per college documents. According to the reopening plan, students and employees will be expected to self-screen before arriv- ing on campus. They should be able to certify that they are not actively infected with the virus; do not have a fever, cough, or other symptoms of COVID-19; and have not been in close contact with anyone known or suspected to have tested positive for COVID-19 in the previous 14 days. If a student or employee is exposed to COVID-19 while on campus, the college will notify all aected indi- viduals and may take additional action, including a short-term clo- sure of the aected campus.

developments, so it is important that these projects stay on track for the upcoming year, Jenkins said. The most important thing to ensure in this upcoming semester is that stu- dents have choices to the fullest extent possible, she said. “We’re very committed to reopening this fall but doing so in the safest pos- sible way,” Jenkins said. Plan for fall semester Masks will be required in all public areas of the college as well as in spaces where physical distancing is not pos- sible, according to the college’s fall restart plan. While the school will have a limited number of masks available, students, faculty and sta will be expected to bring their own masks to college, per the plan. According to the district’s fall restart plan, the blended classes will provide for the exibility needed for classes to move into an online-only

Texas Health Family Care is a Texas Health Physicians Group practice. Providers employed by Texas Health Physicians Group are not employees or agents of Texas Health Resources hospitals. © 2020

For more information, visit communityimpact.com .

13

PLANO NORTH EDITION • AUGUST 2020

2

Community Impact Newspaper communityimpact.com

F I S C A L Y E A R ( F Y ) 2 0 2 0 - 2 0 2 1 R E C O MM E N D E D B U D G E T

F I N A N C I A L P O L I C I E S The City will continue its commitment to sound financial policies. The sales tax policy which uses a 3-year average has been critically important during this current financial crisis. The City will continue operating under the Budget Contingency Plan throughout FY 2020-21. P E R S O N N E L Our staff are the City’s greatest asset and we continue to attract and retain high performing professionals to provide programs and services to the Plano community. Civil service positions will progress in steps and a small structural adjustment to keep the plan within market, but no across the board increases are included in the FY 2020-2021 operating budget. P R O P E R T Y TA X For FY 2020-2021, the City Manager recommends the same tax rate as last year, 44.82 cents. The value of the average house in Plano is marginally down from the previous year, which results in the average Plano household having a $16 reduction in their City property tax bill. For additional information regarding the FY 2020-2021 recommended budget and community investment program, visit plano.gov/recommendedbudget. If you have questions or comments, email us at askplano@plano.gov

The FY 2020-2021 recommended budget reflects the reality of an uncertain future. The annual budget defines the priorities for our community and balances the needs of the community with available resources provided by that same community. The combined budget for FY 2020-21 totals $604.7 million dollars. The recommended budget positions the City to meet citizen and business needs, while understanding the City must retain some adaptability in our programs and services to respond to unforeseen changes in a timely manner.

F I NANC I AL PO L I C I E S

Q U A L I T Y I N F R A S T R U C T U R E The City will maintain City assets and be proactive in providing needed repairs. No additional funding or personnel are programmed in the operating budget.

PERSONNE L

QUAL I TY INFRASTRUCTURE

S E R V I C E D E M A N D S The City will continue to provide all programs and services for our citizens and businesses and will modify program/- service delivery as needed to minimize disruptions. Two small additions are programmed for 2020-21 to address the growing homeless population in Plano and environmental waste cart servicing. No other additions are programmed in the operating budget.

PROPERTY TAX

S ERV I C E DEMANDS

Listen to the City’s monthly podcast at insideplano.com Sign up for weekly news updates from the City of Plano at plano.gov/news

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