Southwest Nashville Edition | July 2020

SOUTHWEST NASHVILLE EDITION

REAL ESTATE

VOLUME XX, ISSUE XX  XXXXXXXXXX, 2020

ONLINE AT

2020EDITION

VOLUME 2, ISSUE 3  JULY 25AUG. 21, 2020

IN REDLINING NASHVILLE

According to an independent analysis, the Metro Nashville Police Department had four of the policies in 8 Can’t Wait before June 11. The Community Oversight Board recommends further policies. 8 CAN'T WAIT

DEEPROOTEDRESULTS Eects from redlining can still be seen today by comparing the percentage of white and Black homeownership in these areas.

2017 homeownership rates

Best

These areas were typically white neighborhoods and would be deemed safest for investors to take on mortgage loans.

75.8%

White

34.4%

Aligned with 8 Can’t Wait before June 11

Aligned with 8 Can’t Wait as of June 11

Policy recommendations from the COB

Black

Still desirable

1 Ban chokeholds and strangleholds 2 Require de-escalation 3 Require warning before shooting 4 Exhaust all alternatives before shooting 5 Duty to intervene 6 Ban shooting at moving vehicles 7 Establish use of force continuum 8 Require all force be reported

These areas were seen as still a conservative investment for home loans.

57.4%

65

White

52.7%

Black

Denitely declining

This category refers to areas that were once "desirable" but may have seen an inltration of people of color.

65

55.1%

White

40

40

41.7%

Black

40

Hazardous

440

65

These areas were occupied by mainly Black residents and deemed risky. Lenders would often refuse to make home loans there.

45.6%

White

24

28.3%

Black

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PHOTO BY ALEX HOSEYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

SOURCES: CAMPAIGN ZERO, METRO NASHVILLE COMMUNITY OVERSIGHT BOARDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

SOURCES: REDFIN, 20132017 5YEAR AMERICAN COMMUNITY SURVEYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

SOURCE: UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND “MAPPING INEQUALITY” COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

MetroNashville PD policies under review

How real estate redlining shapedNashville

50 years after Fair Housing Act, housing equity gaps persist

weeks—has put the spotlight on police brutality and systemic racism in the U.S. However, amid nationwide protests and calls to remove Confederate statues, there is also a renewed push to understand how decades of sys- temic racism have aected various areas of society, one facet of which is housing and wealth. Accord- ing to fair housing experts, such practices have

BY DYLAN SKYE AYCOCK

Amid local and national calls for the review of police use-of-force policies, Mayor John Cooper announced June 15 a new committee tasked with reviewing community experiences with the Metro Nashville Police Department’s use-of-force practices CONTINUED ON 20

BY DYLAN SKYE AYCOCK

The killing of George Floyd, who died in police custody in Minneapolis on May 25—as well as those of many more Black Americans in recent

CONTINUED ON 16

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REAL ESTATE

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IMPACTS

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COMMUNITYIMPACT.COMCIPATRON

PA I D A DV E R T I S E M E N T

ERs remain open to care for everyone, with strong safety precautions

Heightened precautions for patient and caregiver safety Balancing care with caution, Ascension Saint Thomas emergency rooms have adapted to this evolving situation to provide the right care as safely as possible. So, strict safety precautions have been put in place to help protect both patients and caregivers.

Medical emergencies happen every day — even now. For people experiencing symptoms of a heart attack, stroke, mental health crisis, or other acute illness or injury, a hospital emergency room is still the safest, most appropriate place to get care. Delaying critical care canmake conditions worse or recoverymore difficult. Unfortunately, slowing the spread of COVID-19 has also delayed some people from seeking the emergency care they need for themselves or for a loved one. Some may be unsure whether the time is right to go to an ER or concerned about safety for themselves and for their caregivers. “We know people have put their lives on hold to slow the spread of COVID-19,” said Allison Bollinger, MD, FAAEM, Vice President of Emergency Services, Ascension. “Unfortunately, that has led to unintended consequences. Many patients have delayed or avoided emergencymedical care who were experiencing life-threatening conditions — this can be deadly. We want our patients to know they are safe getting care at Ascension Saint Thomas hospitals.”

to care for its communities. “We’ve been here throughout this crisis. Our emergency rooms remain open and we’re here for you when you need us,” said Dr. Bollinger. And as we all embrace a newway of living, Ascension Saint Thomas care teams are fully prepared, providing compassionate care in a newway for every patient we serve. Ascension Saint Thomas ERs are open 24/7. The importance of immediate emergency care Getting immediate care for a serious condition like a heart attack, stroke, severemental health condition or difficulty breathing is important for a person’s long-termhealth and is often lifesaving. For example, delaying care for a stroke, even by a fewminutes, can be the difference between recovery and permanent disability.

Precautions include:

• Screening doctors, nurses and care teams before they enter a facility. • Cleaning and sanitizing all areas extensively and more often • Designating separate emergency triage and care areas for patients with symptoms of COVID-19. • Maintaining proper social distancing in waiting rooms. • Continuing to wear appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE).

Committed to meeting care challenges with open doors

Find the nearest Ascension Saint Thomas ER at GetSTHealthcare.com If you are experiencing a life-threatening emergency, go directly to the ER or dial 911.

This pandemic may be unprecedented, but Ascension Saint Thomas has beenmeeting challenges for more than 100 years

© Ascension 2020. All rights reserved.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

CONTENTS

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

IMPACTS

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Now Open, Coming Soon &more

MARKET TEAM GENERAL MANAGER Mary Ella Hazelwood, mhazelwood@communityimpact.com EDITOR Wendy Sturges REPORTER Dylan Skye Aycock GRAPHIC DESIGNER Chelsea King METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Lacy Klasel MANAGING EDITOR Krista Wadsworth ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Aubrey Galloway CORPORATE LEADERSHIP PUBLISHERS AND FOUNDERS John and Jennifer Garrett GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Warner CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES DIRECTOR Tess Coverman WHOWE ARE John and Jennifer Garrett began Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 in Pugerville, TX. The company’s mission is to build informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Today, we operate across six metropolitan areas, providing hyperlocal, nonpartisan news produced by our full-time journalists in each community we serve. BECOMEA#COMMUNITYPATRON

FROMMARY ELLA: Our Real Estate Edition is lled with news and data about the real estate market in Southwest Nashville, including notes on new residential buildings, market statistics for local ZIP codes and information from housing experts. Mary Ella Hazelwood, GENERALMANAGER

FROMWENDY: In the wake of protests related to the deaths of many Black Americans, people are taking the opportunity to educate themselves about systemic racism. Our cover story takes a deeper look at how Nashville’s past history of redlining still has lingering eects. Wendy Sturges, EDITOR

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES 6 News, data on local road projects EDUCATION 7 Metro Nashville Public Schools approves

return-to-school plan CITY& COUNTY

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THIS ISSUE BY THE NUMBERS

Latest local news

Local sources 25

New businesses 8

New developments 5

New mask mandate 1

2020LocalVoterGuide

GUIDE

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Sample ballot & where to vote

Real EstateEdition

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SOUTHWEST NASHVILLE EDITION • JULY 2020

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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Ascend Federal Credit Union

DEMONBREUN ST.

COURTESY ASCEND FEDERAL CREDIT UNION

ing to a news release. The new facility, which has been in the works for nearly a decade, also hosts the 12th Avenue Thrift Shop, which hires and trains veterans for the workforce; CreatiVets, a nonprofit arts organization; and Curb Victory Hall, which offers permanent housing. 615-248-1981. www.osdtn.org 5 Dallas-based retailer Half Price Books opened July 13 near Belle Meade at 21 White Bridge Road, Nashville, according to the company’s website. The store offers new and used books, comics, DVDs, records, magazines and other items. Half Price Books now has more than 120 stores in the U.S. www.hpb.com 6 Virgin Hotels Nashville opened to guests July 1 in Music Row at 1 Music Square W., Nashville, according to the hotel company’s website. The 14-story hotel features 262 rooms, dining options and a rooftop lounge with a pool. 615-667-8000 www.virginhotels.com/nashville 7 Dunkin’ opened July 15 in the Belle Meade area at 5101 Harding Pike, Nashville. The location features the company’s “next generation” concept, which includes a new tap system for cold beverages, such as cold brew coffee, iced teas and more. www.dunkindonuts.com 8 E+Rose Wellness Cafe , a local chain with plant-based foods and wellness items, opened June 9 at 1201 Demonbre- un St., Ste. 110, Nashville. The cafe offers juices and smoothies as well as meal options. 615-200-7684. www.eandrose.com

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HILLWOOD BLVD.

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NOWOPEN 1 Brunch restaurant Ruby Sunshine opened June 18 in Hillsboro Village at 1800 21st Ave. S., Nashville. The eatery serves New Orleans-inspired takes on dishes, such as eggs Benedict, pancakes and French toast, as well as coffee, cock- tails and other beverages. 629-216-1576. www.rubysunshine.com

2 Evereve , a women’s clothing retailer, opened June 17 inside The Mall at Green Hills, 2126 Abbott Martin Road, Nashville, according to the company’s website. The shop sells tops, jeans, pants, dresses, shoes and accessories. 615-802-3444. www.evereve.com 3 Ascend Federal Credit Union opened June 22 at 1915 Glen Echo Road, Nash- ville. The credit union offers checking,

savings, investment and youth accounts as well as other financial services. Ascend Federal Credit Union serves more than 200,000 customers in 21 counties across the state, according to its website. 800-342-3086. www.ascend.org 4 Operation Stand Down Tennessee , a nonprofit serving Tennessee veterans, opened a new service center June 12 at 1125 12th Ave. S., Nashville, accord-

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COMPILED BY DYLAN SKYE AYCOCK

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Dunkin'

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COURTESY DUNKIN'

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COMING SOON 9 Home furnishings chain Arhaus will open July 31 inside The Mall at Green Hills, 2126 Abbott Martin Road, Nashville, according to a news release. The location will sell indoor and outdoor furniture as well as home decor items such as rugs, bedding and lighting.

11 All Seasons Gardening and Brewing Supply Co. announced via social me- dia June 3 it will close after 22 years in business at 924 8th Ave. S., Nashville. Ac- cording to the post, the building has been sold, and the owners have decided not to relocate the business. 615-214-5465. www.allseasonsnashville.com 12 After more than four years in busi- ness, Black Dog Book Co. closed June 20 in Green Hills at 4006 Granny White Pike, Nashville, according to a social media post from the owner. www.facebook.com/blackdogbookco 13 Microsoft Corp. announced June 26 the closure of all of its physical Microsoft Store locations as part of a “strategic change” in its retail operations. The loca- tion inside The Mall at Green Hills, 2126 Abbott Martin Road, Nashville, is included in the closures. www.microsoft.com

Ladybird Taco opened in early June. (Dylan Skye Aycock/Community Impact Newspaper)

FEATURED IMPACT Ladybird Taco , a restaurant specializing in breakfast and lunch tacos, opened June 3 in the 12 South area at 2229 10th Ave. S., Nashville. In an earlier press release, owners Andrew Wiseheart, Ben Edgerton and Gabe Scott said the restaurant is modeled after and inspired by Austin’s taco scene. In addition to tacos and coee, Ladybird Taco serves queso, salsa and guacamole. As of June 17, the restaurant is open for takeout orders only, according to its website. 615-678-8049. www.ladybirdtaco.com

www.arhaus.com CLOSINGS

10 Cakepop Heaven closed in late May at 4401 Harding Pike, Nashville, accord- ing to a social media announcement from owner Robin Tickle Stromatt. According to the post, customers can now place orders for delivery or pickup at Alley Pub. 615-394-2196. www.cakepopheaventn.com

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SOUTHWEST NASHVILLE EDITION • JULY 2020

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES I440workwraps up onemonth ahead of scheduled completion The Tennessee Department of Trans- portation announced in early July that work on the reconstruction of I-440 has been completed a month ahead of its estimated completion date. BEFORE

COMPILED BY WENDY STURGES

REGIONAL PROJECT

HARPETH RIVER

MACK C. HATCHER PKWY.

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ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UP TO DATE AS OF JULY 1. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT SWNNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM. Franklin to Hwy. 96 West near the Westhaven development is on track to be completed in fall 2021, accord- ing to a recent update from TDOT. In April, crews completed portions of the bridge deck and are now working to place beams for the bridge over the Harpeth River. The project is split into two phases, the rst of which will create a two-lane road. Timeline: 2019-2021 (Phase 1) Cost: $45.1 million Funding sources: TDOT, city of Franklin Mack C. Hatcher Parkway extension Phase 1 of a Tennessee Department of Transportation project to extend the Mack C. Hatcher Parkway from Hillsboro Road just outside downtown

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AFTER

RECONSTRUCTION WRAP UP The Tennessee Department of Transportation announced in early July that the newly reconstructed portion of I-440 from I-40 to I-24 has fully opened one month ahead of schedule, following several months of construction and lane closures.

The newly constructed roadway fully opened July 2 after more than a year and a half of construction, according to TDOT. The original completion date for the roadway was late July to early August. On June 25, the department said that reduced trac on roadways in recent weeks has allowed crews to “make solid progress” on ongoing road projects. The $154.8 million project is the largest in TDOT history, according to the announcement. The project replaced deteriorated concrete with asphalt on a 7-mile stretch of I-440 from I-40 to I-24 in Davidson County, creating three lanes in each direction and adding auxiliary lanes, lighting, landscaping and ramp

PHOTOS BY DYLAN SKYE AYCOCKCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

improvements. Noise walls in the area also under- went repairs, and a concrete barrier has been installed. The project also widened the I-440 bridge over I-65, a major intersection in the area.

The road was funded with revenue from the 2017 IMPROVE Act, which increased fees on vehicle registration and incrementally raised the state’s gas tax rates to help pay for nearly 1,000 needed road projects across the state.

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EDUCATION MetroNashville Public Schools to start school year remotelyAug. 4

to supply all students with laptops by the time remote learning begins next month. In the coming weeks, the district will contact all families to assess students’ needs to ensure all families have access to devices by Aug. 4, Battle said. The school district’s new plan fol- lows Cooper’s July 2 announcement that the city would revert from Phase 3 of its economic reopening back to Phase 2 “for the next several weeks” and that bars and entertainment venues would have to close. Under MNPS’ back-to-school plan, Battle said school facilities will not reopen for face-to-face instruction under Phase 2. A return to Phase 3 had not been announced as of press time. “Our nation has not prioritized the steps to reduce the spread of COVID- 19. ... We had every reason to believe we were on track to be in Phase 4 [of the city’s reopening plan] by the time schools are scheduled to open on Aug. 4, or at least at the end of Phase 3,” Battle said. “In the last few weeks, the numbers have caused many of us to rethink our optimism.”

WHAT TO EXPECT As district officials and teachers prepare for the first day of school, Aug. 4, here are a few new measures families can expect as students begin instruction in a virtual environment.

BY DYLAN SKYE AYCOCK

weekend, Battle said. When schools resume in-person instruction, families will have the option to keep their children at home and continue remote learning. Students who attend zoned, magnet or other optional schools will remain enrolled at their respec- tive schools in the remote setting, according to the district. Teachers will be assigned by school principals to conduct online classes. Nashville Mayor John Cooper announced June 8 that the city is working with MNPS to provide laptops and internet hot spots to thousands of students who do not have access to Wi-Fi in order to help them be able to complete remote learning assignments. Battle said the district will not have access to all 90,000 laptops by the beginning of August but that MNPS has access to enough devices from previous years

All Metro Nashville Public Schools students will begin the 2020-21 school year remotely, Director of Schools Adrienne Battle announced at a July 9 press conference. District officials previously said MNPS would offer in-person and virtual learning options when classes begin Aug. 4. However, Battle said it is now necessary to begin the school year in a remote environment due to rising COVID-19 cases in the Nashville area. As of mid-July, the city had more than 5,000 active coronavirus cases. “I’m not a public health expert, but I’ve grown increasingly uncomfort- able with the data and information in front of us and the implications for the safety and well-being of our students and staff,” Battle said during the press conference. Remote learning is expected to last through at least Labor Day

Assignments will be graded, and tests will be given.

Attendance will be required and tracked.

MNPS will use Schoology to provide access to homework and tests. Teachers will dedicate set hours each week to live classroom instruction, office hours and learning support for students.

SOURCE: METRO NASHVILLE PUBLIC SCHOOLS/ COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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SOUTHWEST NASHVILLE EDITION • JULY 2020

CITY& COUNTY

News fromMetro Nashville & Metro Nashville Public Schools

MetroNashville Council approves FY 2020-21 budget, including 34%property tax rate increase

MNPS adopts 2020-21 budget

BY DYLAN SKYE AYCOCK

BY DYLAN SKYE AYCOCK

for Metro Arts Commission $3.5M $230K $450K to hire two diversity positions to open community centers on Saturday mornings

1% cost-of-living adjustment for city employees $3.4M rainy day fund $2.1M for body-worn cameras

BUDGET SNAPSHOT

METRONASHVILLE Following an hourslong debate at the June 16 meeting, Metro Nashville Council members approved the city’s fiscal year 2020-21 operating budget that will raise property taxes for the first time since 2012. Metro Council voted 32-8 to approve a budget sponsored by At-Large Council Member Bob Mendes, the budget and finance chair. The budget, which went into effect July 1, includes a property tax rate increase of $1.066 per $100 of assessed value, or about 34%. Overall, the $1.066 rate increase will bring the total property tax rate from $3.155 to $4.221 per $100 of assessed value in the Urban Services District, according to the budget. For a home appraised at $219,900—the median home value for Davidson County, according to the U.S. Census Bureau—a home- owner will see a tax bill increase of about $586 per year under the new rate. Mayor John Cooper’s proposed budget would have increased the property tax rate by about 32%, or $1 per $100 of assessed value. “This budget season was unlike any other in Metro history,” Cooper said in a statement. “The council weighed four different budget pro- posals, each of which called for a significant tax increase. Ultimately, the council passed a crisis budget that stabilizes Metro’s finances and maintains essential city services.”

METRONASHVILLE PUBLIC SCHOOLS All MNPS employees will nowmake at least $15 per hour fol- lowing the adoption of the fiscal year 2020-21 school budget at a specially called board meeting June 30. The board adopted the budget two weeks after Metro Nashville Council approved the city’s FY 2020-21 budget, which allotted $4.9 million for the $15-per-hour minimum wage increase. The city budget also provides step increases for some staff, to be paid out of the district’s $8.2 million contingency fund. “I want to honor the fact that we can uphold the commitment of a $15-per-hour minimum, showing respect for those who do the every- day work that directly serves our students,” District 7 Board Member Freda Player-Peters said. “I hope this will lessen financial burdens for these employees and let them continue their calling to support these stu- dents. It is a great moment for MNPS.” The final budget includes $15 million in cuts and savings—which partially comes from consolidating schools—and as a result, individual school budgets will not face cuts this fiscal year, Director of Schools Adrienne Battle said. “This isn’t exactly the budget I wanted to present to you, but I’m pleased and relieved that we were able to avoid even larger cuts and that we were even able to invest in our people, which was our top priority all along,” Battle said.

The approved substitute budget sponsored by At- Large Council Member Bob Mendes has less than a 1% difference from Cooper’s budget in how funds are appropriated, according to budget documents. A few differences found in Mendes’ budget include the following.

SOURCE: METRO NASHVILLE/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Budget highlights In addition to raising property taxes, the budget includes $2.1 million for full deployment of body-worn cameras among Metro Nashville Police Department offi- cers; $450,000 to open community centers on Saturday mornings; $3.5 million for the Metro Arts Com- mission; and funding for a chief diversity officer and a workforce diversity manager. Additionally, an amendment sponsored by At-Large Council Member Zulfat Suara will redirect $8.2 million fromMetro Nashville Public Schools’ undesignated fund balance to fund step pay increases for school employees. Increased police funding A budget amendment sponsored by District 25 Council Member Russ Pulley included in the final spending plan increased funding for the MNPD by $2.6 million. Officials said the MNPD needs the additional

funding to hire 48 recruit positions. Earlier in the meeting, some council members proposed amend- ments that would have cut funding for the police department, including District 16 Council Member Ginny Welsch’s proposal to reduce MNPD funding by $108 million and Davidson County Sheriff’s Office funding by $3.5 million. Welsch’s amendment did not receive council approval. However, Pulley’s amendment also eliminated step increases for Metro employees, according to officials. City employees will still receive a 1% cost-of-living raise. “The reason I do support this amendment, even though it does reduce step raises, is that the administration has done a very good job of doing what they can to keep Metro employees paid. ... The fact that we can keep our employ- ees employed and not laid off or furloughed is a pretty big deal,” Pulley said.

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QUOTEOFNOTE “NASHVILLE FACES ANOTHER CHALLENGE INA SEASONOF CHALLENGES. WE ARE GOING TOGO BACK TOWHATWE KNOW IS EFFECTIVE IN SLOWING THE SPREAD OF THE DISEASE.” MAYOR JOHN COOPER ON THE DECISION TO REVERT NASHVILLE TO PHASE 2 OF REOPENING CITY HIGHLIGHTS METRONASHVILLE Metro Parks & Recreation reopened dog parks, playgrounds and other outdoor facilities June 22 in compliance with the city’s third phase of reopening. Outdoor basketball courts and sports fields also reopened to the public. CITY OF BELLEMEADE The Belle Meade Board of Commissioners approved at the June 17 meeting nine members to serve on the city’s Master Plan Steering Committee, which consists of residents, staff members and city commissioners. Metro Nashville Council Meets Aug. 4 and 18 at 6:30 p.m. in the David Scobey Council Chamber at Metro Council, 1 Public Square, Nashville. 615-862-6780. www.nashville.gov/metro-council Metro Nashville Public Schools Meets Aug. 11 and 25 at 5 p.m. at the MNPS Administration Building, 2601 Bransford Ave., Nashville. 615-259-4636. www.mnps.org Belle Meade Board of Commissioners Meets Aug. 19 at 4 p.m. at City Hall, 4705 Harding Road, Nashville. 615-297-6041. www.citybellemeade.org MEETINGSWE COVER

Health officials issue public health order requiring facemasks in Nashville

MASK EXEMPTIONS Individuals will not be required to wear a mask if one of the following conditions applies. • If age 12 or younger • If in outdoor spaces while at least 6 feet away from others • If outdoors while engaging in recreation or work • If unable to medically tolerate wearing a mask or face covering • If within your motor vehicle • If working alone in an office space separate from others • If in a place or situation where wearing a mask poses a safety or security risk • While eating or drinking • While in a place of worship • While in a state or federal building that operates under its own guidelines SOURCE: METRO NASHVILLE/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER visit homes from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday-Saturday, with a maximum of six visits per day. However, council members who opposed the ordinance said they believed the new law could nega- tively impact neighborhoods. Council Members Tom Cash, Thom Druffel, Angie Henderson, Kathleen Murphy and Russ Pulley, who represent areas in Southwest Nashville, voted against the bill. District 17 Council Member Colby Sledge, who represents Berry Hill and Edgehill areas, voted in support of the ordinance.

BY ALEX HOSEY

during a special session June 26 to approve a mandate that requires citizens in Nashville to wear masks in public. The board expressed support for the mask mandate as an alternative to returning to previous phases of Nashville’s Roadmap to Reopening, which allowed many businesses to reopen in recent weeks. Metro Nashville Police Department officers began enforcement of the mandate July 15, according to the city, with dedicated teams on Broadway and in the downtown area, where there are a high number of cases. Those who violate the mandate are subject to a civil citation and a $50 fine or a misdemeanor for those who refuse the citation. An expiration date for the mask mandate has not been announced by Metro officials as of press time.

METRONASHVILLE Residents are now required to wear masks or facial coverings in public, according to Public Health Order 8 issued June 28 by Metro Public Health Director Dr. Michael Caldwell. “Face coverings help slow the spread of COVID-19 and save lives,” Nashville Mayor John Cooper said in a release. “The health of our community requires every Nashvillian to do their part. While our testing capacity contin- ues to grow, the coronavirus remains a largely invisible threat. So, it’s vital that all who live and work in Davidson County maintain healthy habits.” According to the health order, masks or face coverings must be worn in indoor and outdoor public spaces. The order comes after the Metro Nashville Board of Health voted

Council expands home business rules METRO COUNCIL Metro Council approved an ordinance 25-14, with one abstention, to allow some types of home-based businesses to legally serve clients in Davidson County. BY DYLAN SKYE AYCOCK Dave Rosenberg. The new ordinance, which Rosen- berg said he first introduced nine months ago, offers protections related

to commercial deliveries, noise, signage and residential character. He said the new ordinance will also increase enforceability “by narrowing the focus” of the city’s property inspectors. Under the ordinance, only one non-resident employee is permitted to work in the home. Customers can

Businesses that offer tutoring, music lessons and other services as well as recording studios and beauticians can now apply for a per- mit to have clients visit their home businesses, according to ordinance sponsor District 35 Council Member

INVEST IN YOUR FUTURE The Heritage at Brentwood, Williamson County's only LifeCare® community, exemplifies the very best in senior living Celebrate and enjoy life in a maintenance-free home situated on a beautiful, 48-acre campus. NOW AVAILABLE! Villas • Garden Villas • Spacious, New Apartment Homes

900 Heritage Way, Brentwood, TN 37027 615-507-2686 • www.TheHeritageLCS.com CALL TODAY to set up a virtual tour or an in-person, mask-to-mask visit in our WINFIELD CENTER, located just outside The Heritage’s gatehouse!

92

SOUTHWEST NASHVILLE EDITION • JULY 2020

COME & VISIT FRANCE !

Pâtisserie Française i i i 717 Craighead, Melrose i , l

French Market & Café 2209 Bandywood, Green Hills

Large selection of French desserts, full range of croissants and pastries full coffee menu i , of crois nts nd p stries,

Large selection of French pantry items, freshly baked croissants, seating area

Both locations offer Baguette sandwiches, salads, savory croissants and quiches (*) (*) Limited quantities available in Green Hills (*) Limited quantities available in Green Hills

Discover support and peace of mind at Harmony.

THANK YOU to our residents, families and associates for your patience, support and loyalty, especially in recent months. Your support has allowed us to do what we do best—provide a safe, supportive and inviting environment for residents.

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10

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

GUIDE

2020 Local Voter Guide

Candidates and information for local May elections upcoming lo al elections

V O T E R Guide Local 2020 COMPILED BY WENDY STURGES DESIGNED BY ANYA GALLANT Registered voters in Davidson County will cast ballots Aug. 6 for the state and federal primaries and the county general election.

DATES TOKNOW

ABSENTEE BALLOTS Following an order from the Davidson County Chancery Court on June 4, registered voters in Tennessee are eligible to request an absentee ballot to vote by mail if they do not wish to vote in person due to the risk of the coronavirus, according to the Tennessee Secretary of State’s Oce. Voters can nd the application for an absentee ballot at www.sos.tn.gov and send it to the county election commission. Trustee D: Erica Gilmore Metro Nashville Public Schools board of education, District 1 Barry Barlow Sharon Gentry* Robert Taylor Metro Nashville Public Schools board of education, District 3 Brian Hubert Emily Masters Metro Nashville Public Schools board of education, District 5 Christiane Buggs* Metro Nashville Public Schools board of education, District 7 Freda Player-Peters* Metro Nashville Public Schools board of education, District 9 Russelle Ann Bradbury Abigail Tylor Oak Hill city commissioner (Voters may select three candidates) Zach Baldwin Elizabeth “Liz” Beavers John DeLuca David P. Demarco Winston Evans Stacy Widelitz* SOURCES: DAVIDSON COUNTY ELECTION COMMISSION, TENNESSEE SECRETARY OF STATE’S OFFICE COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

JULY 17 AUG. 1

Early voting

JULY 30

Last day to request an absentee ballot Election day

AUG. 6

NOV. 3

State and Federal Election Day

Follow election night coverage at communityimpact.com.

SAMPLE BALLOT

11 Nashville Fire Dept. Station No. 17 3911 West End Ave., Nashville 12 West End Middle School 3529 West End Ave., Nashville 13 Jet Potter Scout Service Center 3414 Hillsboro Pike, Nashville 14 Church of the Redeemer 920 Caldwell Lane, Nashville 15 YWCA Nashville and Middle Tennessee 1608 Woodmont Blvd., Nashville D: Grant Thomas Medeiros DAVIDSON COUNTY GENERAL ELECTION Chancellor, Chancery Court Part I, District 20 D: Patricia Head Moskal Judge, Criminal Court Division 4, District 20 D: Jennifer Smith Assessor of property D: Vivian Wilhoite* State representative, District 53 D: Jason L. Powell* State representative, District 54 D: Terry Clayton D: Vincent Dixie* State representative, District 55 D: John Ray Clemmons* State representative, District 56 R: Diane Michel Canada D: Bob Freeman* State representative, District 58 D: Harold M. Love* State representative, District 59 D: Jason Potts* State representative, District 60 D: Darren Jernigan*

*DENOTES INCUMBENT NOTE: METRO NASHVILLE PUBLIC SCHOOLS BOARD OF EDUCATION POSITIONS ARE NONPARTISAN, AND VOTERS MAY CHOOSE ONE CANDIDATE PER THEIR DESIGNATED DISTRICT. Special Referendum Residents of Oak Hill have a referendum on the Aug. 3 ballot on whether to increase the number of city commissioners from three to ve. KEY R: Republican D: Democrat I: Independent

I: Tom Kovach I: Elizabeth Mcleod I: Kacey Morgan I: Eric William Stansberry U.S representative, District 5 D: Jim Cooper* D: Keeda J. Haynes D: Joshua Rawlins State senator, District 18

FEDERAL AND STATE PRIMARY U.S. senator

R: Cliord Adkins R: Natisha Brooks R: Tom Emerson Jr. R: George S. Flinn Jr. R: Bill Hagerty R: Jon Henry

R: Ferrell Haile* I: John A. Gentry

R: Kent A. Morrell R: Glen L. Neal Jr. R: John E. Osborne R: Aaron L. Pettigrew R: David Schuster R: Manny Sethi D: Marquita Bradshaw D: Gary G Davis D: Robin Kimbrough D: James Mackler D: Mark Pickrell I: Yomi “Fapas” Faparusi Sr. I: Jerey Alan Grunau I: Ronnie Henley I: G. Dean Hill I: Steven J. Hooper I: Aaron James

State senator, District 20 R: Steven Reid Dickerson* D: Kimi Abernathy D: Heidi Campbell State representative, District 50 D: Bo Mitchell* State representative, District 51 D: Bill Beck* State representative, District 52 R: Donna Tees D: Mike Stewart* D: James C. Turner II

POLLINGLOCATIONS

5 Centennial Park Art Center 301 25th Ave. N., Nashville 6 Westmeade Elementary School 6641 Clearbrook Drive, Nashville 7 Belle Meade City Hall 4705 Harding Pike, Nashville 8 Brook Hollow Baptist Church 678 Brook Hollow Road, Nashville 10 Tennessee Technology Center 100 White Bridge Pike, Nashville

16 Church of Christ 3805 Granny White Pike, Nashville 17 Calvary United Methodist Church 3701 Hillsboro Pike, Nashville 18 Gordon Jewish Community Center 801 Percy Warner Blvd., Nashville 19 Hillsboro Presbyterian Church 5820 Hillsboro Pike, Nashville 20 Brentwood Hills Church of Christ 5120 Franklin Pike, Nashville

ELECTION DAY Voters at Davidson County can vote from 7 a.m.-7 p.m. 1 Nashville Public Library Edgehill Branch 1409 12th Ave. S., Nashville 2 Berry Hill City Hall 698 Thompson Lane, Nashville 3 Watkins Park Community Center 616 17th Ave. N., Nashville

11

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

AREA HOMES AVAILABLE FOR SALE

The Market is Moving!

318 11th Avenue North Downtown Franklin

101 Alpine Court - Franklin Sleek & Open with all the Bells & Whistles. Minutes to Downtown Franklin & Cool Springs. Backyard Oasis with Pool & Pergola. 4 BR | 3.5 BA | 4340 SF | $1,199,000

Modern Farmhouse walkable to Downtown Franklin Three-Year Old Home with Details to Impress! Standout White Kitchen, Main Floor Master, Courtyard with Fireplace. 4 BR | 3.5 BA | 2808 SF | $925,000

907 Tower Place - Oak Hill Almost New CustomContemporary is Perfection! 1st floor Master Suite + Guest Suite Light-filled Floor Plan with Amazing Finishes 6 BR | 4.5 BA | 4918 SF | $2,100,000

2320 Lewisburg Pike - Franklin 1900 Farmhouse with Charm & Character 5 Acres in Williamson County 3 BR | 2 BA | 2479 SF | $555,000

426 Prestwick Court Bowling/West End Beautiful & Welcoming Home nestled in Small & Private Gated Community U-Shaped Floorplan with Kitchen, Living Room & Master Suite opening to Charming Courtyard with Koi Pond. 3 BR | 2.5 BA | 3278 SF | $828,000

C ONFIDENCE COMES FROM T RUST Courtney

Jenrath 615-278-6210 ccjenrath@gmail.com

615-327-4800

RECENT SOLDS

It's not just about buying and selling, it's a relationship. Intown estate with expansive view and room to roam! Four bedroom home has multiple living areas and terraces. 7685 SF HOME | 2160 SF GUEST QUARTERS 14.68 ACRES 6440 Edinburgh Drive - Devonshire

Jennifer Stadler jenniferstadlerhomes@gmail.com • 615-973-3969 615-327-4800 Custom built home with attention to detail and a floorplan for today’s lifestyle. 5 BR | 5 FULL BA & 2 HALF BATHS | 5727 SF REPRESENTED BUYER 4500 Alcott Drive - Forest Hills

12

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

SEPTEMBER: PUBLIC EDUCATION FOCUS Contact us today for future sponsorship opportunities! Want to stand out as a supporter of your community?

2020 EDI T ION REAL ESTATE

COMMUNITYIMPACT.COMADVERTISE 8669896808

2020 REAL ESTATE EDITION

COMPILED BY WENDY STURGES

201920 SOUTHWEST NASHVILLE REAL ESTATE MARKET AT A GLANCE

DAYS ON THEMARKET AVERAGE June 2018-May 2019

June 2019-May 2020

37203

37203 -44%

37212

37204

40

50

28

31

26 -16.13% 37205 32 -13.51%

29

27 -6.89%

Most ZIP codes in Southwest Nashville have seen homes sell faster than in 2018-19—and for higher sales prices, on average, according to data from June 2018-May 2019 and June 2019-May 2020. However, the total number of homes sold took a slight dip in many ZIP codes over the past year.

37212

37204

37215

37220 3.7%

37205

70S

440

42

39

37

27

28

-7.14%

37215

Davidson County

Studying the stats 32

65

431

37220

average days on the market in Tennessee

26

24 -7.69%

N

HOMES SOLD NUMBER OF

June 2018-May 2019

June 2019-May 2020

HOME SALES PRICE AVERAGE

64

136

June 2018-May 2019

June 2019-May 2020

+7.81%

+10.29%

69

150

$519,521 $543,118 +4.54% $743,713 $757,721 +1.88% $960,861 $985,783 +2.59%

$794,417 $855,586 +7.69%

178

337

-11.79%

-5%

157

320

$1,022,166 $1,099,904 +7.6%

400

119

-4.5%

-5.04%

382

113

$825,655

9,323

$817,907 -0.93%

9,323 0.00%

Davidson County

Davidson County

Williamson County

TOTAL HOMES SOLD IN SOUTHWEST NASHVILLE

$385,455 $407,005 +5.59%

$579,221

$602,989 +4.1%

June 2018-May 2019

June 2019-May 2020

5.2%

5.7%

32.4%

32.1%

12.6% 9.4%

nnessee

Studying the stats

11% 9.6%

Texas

24 average days on the

$318,371 $336,959 +5.83%

1,234 homes sold

1,191 homes sold

market in Davidson County

33 average days on the market in Williamson County

13.1%

14.4%

26.8%

27.3%

SOURCE: FRIDRICH & CLARK REALTYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

13

SOUTHWEST NASHVILLE EDITION • JULY 2020

REAL ESTATE 2020EDITION

INSIDE INFORMATION

COMPILED BY ANNA LOTZ

When interest rates are low, homeowners may look to save money by renancing, which means getting a new mortgage with a better term or interest rate to lower payments. Mortgage rates have steadily declined since November 2018, according to weekly data from Freddie Mac, also known as the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. Matt Frankel, a certied nancial planner and mortgage analyst at The Ascent by Motley Fool—a general personal nance advice resource—shared advantages and disadvantages of the renancing process. REFINANCING U N D E R S T A N D I N G WHAT TOCONSIDER 1. 2. Is the current market rate at least 1% lower than your existing mortgage rate? Are you planning to stay in the same home for at least ve more years ?

HOWTO START

• Always consult multiple lenders to nd the best mortgage rate. Start with your current lender. • Multiple inquiries from mortgage lenders aect an individual’s credit score no more than a single inquiry does , Frankel said.

Renancing isn’t free. … It becomes amath problemof whether the savings you’re going to get fromyourmortgage payment are going to bemore than you’re paying.

MATT FRANKEL, MORTGAGE ANALYST AT THE ASCENT

TRACKINGMORTGAGE RATES

Pros • Can lower monthly mortgage payments • May eliminate private mortgage insurance Cons • Can be costly, as homeowners must pay lender and closing fees again • Paperwork THE INS ANDOUTS OF REFINANCING

Although the U.S. weekly average rate for a 30-year mortgage is trending downward, mortgage rates vary by credit score, Frankel said.

0 3.1% 3.2% 3.3% 3.4% 3.5% 3.6% 3.7% 3.8% 3.9% 4.0%

3.82%

3.73%

3.56%

3.13%

ANOTHER OPTION

3.36%

A homeowner can also choose cash-out renancing, in which an existing mortgage is replaced with a new home loan totaling more than the remaining debt. The dierence is paid in cash and can be helpful in paying other debts, as a mortgage is often the lowest-interest loan available, Frankel said.

March 12, 2020 Dec. 12, 2019

June 25, 2020

June 13, 2019 Sept. 12, 2019

SOURCE: FREDDIE MACCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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In Transaction Volume Amongst Medium Teams in TN 2020, REAL Trends “America’s Best” #3

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14

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

REAL ESTATE 2020EDITION

NEWCOMMUNITIES

COMPILED BY WENDY STURGES

1

40

65

1

OLYMPIC ST.

31

440

4

2

3

155

431

VAUGHNS GAP RD.

100

5

WESTSIDE CIR.

PHOTOS BY WENDY STURGESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

MAP NOT TO SCALE N

2

3

Several new housing communities, including single- and multifamily homes, are under construction in the southwest Nashville area. 1 Alina , a 50-unit residence building is nearing com- pletion near the Edgehill and Gulch neighborhoods. Each oor plan features one bedroom and one bathroom rang- ing in interior size from 734-962 square feet. Construc- tion is expected to be complete later this year. 2 Condominium complex The Manning is under con- struction near Belle Meade along Woodmont Boulevard. The homes, which will sell with prices starting at $1.8 mil- lion, will feature oor plans ranging from 2,500-6,000 square feet with two-, three- and four-bedroom options. 3 Modern on Woodmont is a six-home project under construction from Tarkington & Harwell Realtors and Richland Building Partners near Green Hills. The sin- gle-family homes start at $1.1 million, and each features four bedrooms and 3.5 bathrooms. 4 Linden Row , located in the Belmont-Hillsboro neighborhood, features 38 single-family homes near 21st Avenue South. The oor plans feature three-story town- homes with three-bedroom options ranging from 2,550- 3,100 square feet in size. Home prices start at $1 million. 5 Located near Hwy. 100 and Vaughn’s Gap, Westside Circle is a townhome community located in Belle Meade Highlands. The 54-home development features two-, three- and four-bedroom options ranging from 1,737-2,376 square feet. Home prices start in the mid-$300,000s.

4

5

HARGROVE DESIGN STUDIO 615 . 893 . 1808 hargrovedesignstudio.com NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE

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SOUTHWEST NASHVILLE EDITION • JULY 2020

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