Franklin - Brentwood Edition - July 2020

FRANKLIN BRENTWOOD EDITION

REAL ESTATE

VOLUME XX, ISSUE XX  XXXXXXXXXX, 2020

ONLINE AT

2020EDITION

VOLUME 2, ISSUE 5  JULY 27AUG. 23, 2020

Prospective buyers scramble for housing Williamson County sees low home inventory

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Homes on market 1,198

COMPOUNDING COMPETITION While the coronavirus has caused some aspects of the real estate market to slow, recent data from June shows homes are selling faster and at higher prices than they did last year, even with fewer options on the market.

Days on market

Down 22% from 2019

Average sales price $648,849

SOURCE: WILLIAMSON COUNTY ASSOCIATION OF REALTORSCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

IMPACTS

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VOTER Guide Local 2020

BY WENDY STURGES

The eects of the ongoing corona- virus pandemic can be seen in nearly every aspect of Williamson County’s economy, and the real estate industry is no dierent. However, asmany small businesses deal with tough losses due to closures, local Realtors are seeing some unexpected consequences of the virus—namely, more buyers looking to spend more on housing. In the months since the rst case of coronavirus was conrmed inWilliam- son County in earlyMarch, the number of active home listings in ZIP codes for Franklin and Brentwood has dropped by as much as 48% as compared to this time in 2019, according to data pro- vided by Parks Real Estate. “I think even before COVID[-19] hap- pened and the pandemic happened, we were starting to have an inventory issue,” said Jordan Vaughn, broker for RE/MAX and 2020 board president for CONTINUED ON 14

VOTER GUIDE

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2020 EDI T ION REAL ESTATE

MARKET AT A GLANCE

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Low inventory in Williamson County is creating a competitive housing market in which homes sell quickly. (Wendy Sturges/Community Impact Newspaper)

INSIDE

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Many residents protested in June near a Confederate statue in downtown Franklin following the nationwide response to the recent deaths of Black Americans, sparking new conversations about Confederate symbols in Williamson County. (Alex Hosey/Community Impact Newspaper)

Revisiting the past

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

CONTENTS

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

IMPACTS

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Now Open, Coming Soon &more TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES 6 Local road projects EDUCATION 7 Williamson County Schools approve

MARKET TEAM EDITOR Wendy Sturges REPORTER Alex Hosey

FROMLACY: Our special Real Estate Edition this month takes a deep-dive look at the real estate market in Williamson County, including data, information on new neighborhoods and a cover story about how the coronavirus pandemic has aected the local market in some unexpected ways. Lacy Klasel, PUBLISHER

SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNER Lindsay Scott ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Maureen Sipperley METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Lacy Klasel, lklasel@communityimpact.com MANAGING EDITOR Krista Wadsworth ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Aubrey Galloway CORPORATE LEADERSHIP PUBLISHERS AND FOUNDERS John and Jennifer Garrett GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Warner CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES DIRECTOR Tess Coverman WHOWE ARE John and Jennifer Garrett began Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 in Pugerville, TX. The company’s mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Today, we operate across six metropolitan areas, providing hyperlocal, nonpartisan news produced by our full-time journalists in each community we serve. BECOMEA#COMMUNITYPATRON

return-to-school plan CITY& COUNTY Latest local news

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2020LocalVoterGuide

FROMWENDY: Residents in Williamson County and Greater Nashville have likely heard a lot of discussion in recent weeks about the removal of Confederate-era monuments from city and county property. One of our cover stories this month takes a look at renewed eorts to add more historical context to the area and why some residents feel it is time to update decades- old names and symbols. Wendy Sturges, EDITOR

GUIDE

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Sample ballot, where to vote

Real EstateEdition

NEWCOMMUNITIES

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Neighborhoods under construction INSIDE INFORMATION

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Home renancing

THIS ISSUE BY THE NUMBERS

BUSINESS FEATURE

16

Local sources 23

New businesses 9

New neighborhoods 5

New mask mandate 1

The Pampered Pooch Resort and Spa

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HERD? Have You

Fair Fun! VIRTUAL 9 Days OF

August 7-15

Plus a look back at exciting performances from past Fairs!

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FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • JULY 2020

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

NOWOPEN 1 Just Love Coffee Cafe opened July 13 at 4031 Aspen Grove Drive, Ste. 138, Franklin, in the McEwen Northside development. The coffee shop offers a selection of specialty coffee drinks made using freshly roasted coffee beans as well as a breakfast, lunch and dinner menu. www.justlovecoffeecafe.com/mcewen 2 Vui’s Kitchen opened a fourth location July 1 at 1201 Liberty Pike, Franklin. The eatery, which also operates three loca- tions in the Nashville area, offers fresh Vietnamese options, including pork belly bao buns, banh mi sandwiches and rice and noodle bowls. 615-567-5962. www.vuiskitchen.com 3 Peace, Love and Little Donuts opened in early June at 213 Franklin Road, Ste. 120, Brentwood. The eatery offers a wide selection of specialty doughnuts in a variety of flavors, such as apple pie, cherry cheesecake, Oreo, maple bacon and lemon blueberry. The shop also offers fresh-brewed coffee from Frothy Monkey. 615-964-7995. www.peaceloveandlittledonuts.com 4 Bless Your Glam Boutique opened in early July inside the Painted Tree Mar- ketplace at 1113 Murfreesboro Road, Ste. 254, Franklin. The shop offers a selection of women’s clothing and accessories. www.blessyourglamboutique.com 5 Sweethaven hosted a grand opening celebration July 3 at 1015 Westhaven Blvd., Ste. 130, Franklin. The sweet shop offers frozen yogurt and hand-dipped ice cream in a variety of flavors as well as treats from local Nashville-based busi- nesses, including King of Pops, tiny little donuts, SugarDrop and TennesSweet. 615-398-8743. www.sweethaventn.com 6 WesVet Animal Hospital opened a location June 26 at 5511 Edmondson Pike, Ste. 205, Brentwood. “We’re so excited to start building rela- tionships with pets and their families here in the Brentwood community,” Dr. Wes Schoonover said in a press release. “With state-of-the-art equipment and a pas- sionate staff already in place, we’re proud to be able to offer such high quality vet care in the community for years to come.”

The animal hospital specializes in preven- tative medicine, vaccinations, early detec- tion of illness, surgery and dental care, with same-day appointments for pets of all ages. 615-739-5824. www.wesvet.com 7 A new location of McDonald’s opened in late June in the Berry Farms area at 1003 Village Plains Blvd., Franklin. The fast-food eatery offers burgers, fries and chicken as well as coffee drinks and breakfast options. www.mcdonalds.com 8 Cheaters Too opened June 18 inside the CoolSprings Galleria at 1800 Galleria Blvd., Ste. 1290, Franklin, on Level I near the Apple Store. The shop offers reading glasses, computer glasses and sunglass- es. 415-252-8262. https://eyebly.com COMING SOON 9 The NOWMassage Franklin is slated to open downtown at The Harpeth at 125 First Ave. N., Franklin. The spa offers Swedish massages as well as a range of treatments, including scalp renewal, Gua- Sha facials and herbal heat therapy, in an environment of natural materials. Mem- berships will be available at a monthly rate, according to the company’s website. An exact opening date has not yet been announced. www.thenowmassage.com 10 Kate & Lulu’s Kitchen will open in the Westhaven community at 158 Front St., Ste. 110, Franklin. The bakery and restaurant will offer spins on classic Texas breakfast foods and baked goods, such as kolaches and cinnamon rolls. The owners are planning to open the store in August. 713-647-1077. www.kateandluluskitchen.com RELOCATIONS 11 Pilates Franklin will relocate in August from 504 Autumn Springs Court, Ste. A1, Franklin, to 206A Cool Springs Blvd., Ste. 106, Franklin. The fitness studio offers virtual and private Pilates classes as well as limited group sessions. 615-656-8932. www.pilatesfranklin.com EXPANSIONS 12 The Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development and Gov. Bill Lee announced June 22 that

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY WENDY STURGES

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Vui’s Kitchen

WesVet Animal Hospital

DYLAN SKYE AYCOCK/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

COURTESY WESVET ANIMAL HOSPITAL

CLOSINGS 13 After five years in Brentwood, wom- en’s boutique Copper Penny will close its location at 7030 Executive Center Drive, Ste. 102, Brentwood, according to a social media announcement from the owners. The boutique, located in the City Park Shopping Plaza, is expected to close by July 31. 615-678-6909. www.facebook.com/ copperpennybrentwood 14 Brentwood Interiors , located at 144 Wilson Pike Circle, Brentwood, is slated to close later this year after more than 30 years of business. The company offers furniture, light and home decor. An exact closing date has not been announced. 615-376-6361. www.brentwood-interiors.com

Ramsey Solutions plans to invest $52 million in expanding its headquarters in Franklin, located at 1011 Reams Fleming Blvd., Franklin. The new office building, the company’s second in Williamson County, will be 192,000 square feet and is being built on 47 acres of land in Berry Farms. Construction of the building is slated to be complete in May 2021. TDECD Commissioner Bob Rolfe said the new office building will create 600 new jobs for the Middle Tennessee area. 615-371-8881. www.daveramsey.com IN THE NEWS Studio Tenn’s board of directors voted to postpone the theater’s 2020-21 season un- til February of next year and will furlough the majority of its staff as a result of coro- navirus concerns. www.studiotenn.com

The Main Street Festival and other events have been canceled.

COURTESY VISIT FRANKLIN

FEATURED IMPACT IN THE NEWS The Heritage Foundation of Williamson County announced June 17 that all programming and events for the remainder of 2020 will be canceled. This includes the Main Street Festival, which had been rescheduled for July 18-19; the annual Pumpkinfest, scheduled for Oct. 24; and the annual Dickens of a Christmas events, scheduled for Dec. 12-13. “I know this announcement is terribly disappointing to our community, vendors, local businesses and all of our

supporters, but [we] rmly believe this is the best decision to ensure that the Heritage Foundation can continue to serve our community for generations to come,” HFWC CEO Bari Beasley said in an announcement. Additionally, the foundation’s Heritage Ball, which was to be held Oct. 3, will also be canceled. Events at The Franklin Theatre have also been canceled. Organizers are working to reschedule

events for the 2021-22 season. www.williamsonheritage.org

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FRANKLIN - BRENTWOOD EDITION • JULY 2020

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES

COMPILED BY WENDY STURGES

REGIONAL PROJECT

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WENDY STURGES/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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2 Sunset Road widening Construction is ongoing to widen Sunset Road in Brentwood from two to three lanes from Owl Creek to Concord Road. The project will also create a 10-foot- wide multiuse trail on the west side of the road that will connect to an existing trail on Concord. Timeline: 2019-summer 2020 Cost: $8.9 million Funding source: city of Brentwood 3 Westhaven Boulevard traffic signal Work to add a traffic signal to the inter- section of Westhaven Boulevard, Old Charlotte Pike and New Hwy. 96 began in late June, according to the city of Frank- lin. The project is slated to be complete in late 2020. Timeline: June 2020-late 2020 Cost: $640,000 Funding source: city of Franklin

I-440 reconstruction Work on the reconstruction of I-440 wrapped one month ahead of schedule and opened to drivers in early July, according to the Tennessee Depart- ment of Transportation. The project replaced deteriorated concrete with asphalt on a 7-mile stretch from I-40 to I-24, creating three lanes in each direction and adding roadway im- provements. The project was funded through the 2017 IMPROVE Act and is the largest in TDOT history. Timeline: late 2018-July 2020 Cost: $154.8 million Funding source: TDOT

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ONGOING PROJECTS 1 Franklin Road improvements

new sidewalks on both sides of the road, outside travel lanes for bicycles, traffic signal updates at Old Liberty Pike and Liberty Pike and new street lighting. Timeline: summer 2020-December 2021 Cost: $18.1 million Funding source: city of Franklin

The city of Franklin has begun construc- tion work to widen Franklin Road from two to three lanes from the Harpeth River bridge to Harpeth Industrial Court. Other planned improvements include

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF JULY 7. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT FRBNEWS@COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

EDUCATION Williamson County Schools approves plan for 202021 school year

BACK TO SCHOOL

Amid the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, parents have the option to enroll their child in a virtual learning program or to send them for on-campus instruction.

SCENARIO 1

SCENARIO 2

BY ALEX HOSEY

while trying to combat the continu- ing spread, as the state requires the district to provide full school days to students. The plan also includes metrics that will aect protocol and operations of schools based on the number of active COVID-19 cases in the county, with dierent plans for low, medium and high levels of spread. There will be a possibility, assum- ing active coronavirus cases in areas of the county increase, that certain schools could switch back from on-campus instruction to remote instruction while not necessarily changing plans for, or closing, the entire school district, according to the framework. Golden said WCS will still be imple- menting safety measures to guard against the spread of the coronavirus even though students will be able to return to school campuses in the fall. Golden said students, sta and

The Williamson County board of education voted 11-1 at its July 13 meeting to endorse the framework plan for the 2020-21 Williamson County School year. The framework plan gives students and parents the option to receive on-campus or online learning, with a minimum commitment of one semester to whichever they choose. Franklin Special School District is also expected to provide an option for remote or in-person learning. “We know that parents are the ultimate decision-makers for their child, and we want to respect that,” Superintendent Jason Golden said. “At the same time … it’s important to us that we set up an environment and do the best we can to educate them as best as we can.” Golden said the purpose of the plan was to try to provide the most daily instruction from teachers to students

VIRTUAL LEARNING • All classes oered will be online. • Each student will have a Chromebook. • Teachers will have daily interaction with students should all students return to remote learning. • School start and end times will remain the same. • Class sizes will be similar to in-person instruction.

ONCAMPUS LEARNING • Students will return to campus with a number of safety measures in place. • Students, sta and visitors will be required to wear face masks. • Students and sta will be screened and asked to remain home if they are sick. • Handwashing and sanitation will be emphasized. • Individual school closures could be implemented if cases are reported.

SOURCE: WILLIAMSON COUNTY SCHOOLSCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

visitors must wear masks while on campus as a part of the new plan approved by the board due to the recommendation from the county health department. “I’ve made it clear to our sta that all those notices that went out

these last few years about chronic absenteeism—we’re not doing those this year. We know this is an unusual time, and we’re going to be very respectful of families who have to be quarantined and can’t come [to school],” Golden said.

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FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • JULY 2020

CITY& COUNTY

News fromWilliamson County, Franklin & Brentwood

City of Brentwood beginswork on GrannyWhite Pike

WilliamsonCountymandatesmasks

BY WENDY STURGES

In the announcement, ocials said the mandate is key to ensuring that businesses can remain open and that schools can reopen in the fall. The order came just days after Gov. Bill Lee signed Executive Order No. 54 on July 3, which enables counties to issue such mandates. City mayors joined Anderson’s call, citing recent increases. The order will last until at least Aug. 3. Violations are a Class A misde- meanor, according to the order.

WILLIAMSON COUNTY Residents in Williamson County are required to wear a face covering when out in public, according to a countywide order issued by Mayor Rogers Anderson and other city mayors July 6. The order, which went into eect at 11:59 p.m. July 7, requires residents to wear a face covering when inside public places and when outside and social distancing is not possible.

Williamson County Fair to host virtual competitions The Williamson County Fair will host nine days of virtual activities. (Courtesy Williamson County Fair)

BY ALEX HOSEY

BRENTWOOD The city of Brent- wood has begun work repaving a section of Granny White Pike, according to a June 11 release from the city. Improvements to Granny White Pike will include the addition of bike lanes as well as Americans with Disabilities Act-compliant sidewalks. The work along Granny White Pike is expected to be complete over the next two months, accord- ing to the release from the city. The roadway will remain open.

BY WENDY STURGES

WILLIAMSON COUNTY Follow- ing the cancellation of in-person events for the Williamson County Fair, the fair board announced June 29 that competitions for youth divisions will still be held this year through online applications only. Unlike in past years, competitions will only be held for certain categories, including arts, crafts, photography, Lego builds, baked goods and horticulture, according to the announcement. Online entries can be submitted from July 1-30 at www.williamson countyfair.org.

DO I HAVE TOWEAR AMASK?

YES • If you are in a commercial business establishment, such as a retail store, grocery store, bank, salon, pharmacy or restaurant • If you are in a crowded outdoor space, such as a city street or event • If you are in a government building that requires a face mask

NO • If you have a medical condition that would make breathing dicult • If you are eating or drinking • If you are outside and able to be at least 6 feet away from others • If you are 12 years old or younger • If you are in your own car • If you cannot remove your own mask without assistance • If you are in a private residence • If you are in a house of worship, though a mask is recommended

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SOURCE: WILLIAMSON COUNTYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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Hundreds turn out for candlelight vigil for fallenOcer Legieza BRENTWOOD Hundreds of residents came out June 19 to honor the memory of Ocer Destin Legieza, who was killed in a trac accident on Franklin Road on June 18. Those interested in donating to Legieza’s memorial fund can do so at any First Horizon Bank location. BY WENDY STURGES

Hundreds turned out to honor Ocer Destin Legieza, who was killed in a trac accident. (Wendy Sturges/ Community Impact Newspaper)

Residents raise their candles to honor the memory of Legieza. (Wendy Sturges/Community Impact Newspaper)

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COUNTY HIGHLIGHT WILLIAMSONCOUNTY On June 29, Gov. Bill Lee extended state of emergency orders until at least Aug. 29, thus extending gathering limitations and allowing counties and cities to continue alcohol to-go sales. As allowed through an executive order from Gov. Bill Lee, municipal meetings may be held virtually until at least Aug. 29. Franklin Board of Mayor and Aldermen Meets Aug. 11 and 27 at 7 p.m. Workshop meetings are always held two hours prior. 615-791-3217. www.franklintn.gov Brentwood City Commission Meets July 27 and Aug. 10 at 7 p.m. 615-371-0060. www.brentwoodtn.gov Williamson County Schools board of education Meets Aug. 17 at 6:30 p.m. 615-472-4000. www.wcs.edu Franklin Special School District board of education Meets Aug. 10 at 6:30 p.m. at Freedom Middle School at 750 New Hwy. 96 W., Franklin. 615-794-6624. www.fssd.org MEETINGSWE COVER

Franklin resumes BlueBin recycling

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BY WENDY STURGES

FRANKLIN The city of Franklin has resumed its Blue Bin recycling service as of July 13, according to a city announcement. The service, which was paused in March due to the coronavirus, oers single-stream recycling, which is processed by Marshall County. The city agreed to a six-month contract with the county, which will cost an additional $50,000 past the original agreement and which also includes a $25 per ton fee. The cost increase is not expected to be passed onto residents at this time, according to the city. “We thank the residents of Franklin for their patience during the pandemic when we could not collect recyclables,” City Admin- istrator Eric Stuckey said in a statement. “We are looking forward to restarting this new, important program for our community.”

New amenities are being added to the Williamson County Indoor Sports Complex. (Courtesy Williamson County Parks and Recreation Department)

Williamson County to add newamenities to Indoor Sports Complex inBrentwood

BY WENDY STURGES

new outdoor pickleball courts at the facility, doubling its current number. The new courts are slated to be available beginning in mid-July. WCPR also announced more features will be added to the facility, including a splash pad—built in partnership with the city of Brent- wood—and a full gymnasium. The splash pad was ocially opened to the public July 17, and the gymna- sium is slated for the fall, according to WCPR.

BRENTWOOD The Williamson County Parks & Recreation Depart- ment announced June 24 it will add new amenities to the county’s Indoor Sports Complex, located at 920 Heritage Way, Brentwood. The expansion includes adding a 2,200-square-foot group tness stu- dio, which will features equipment and oer a number of tness classes, such as dance and cardio. The department will also add four

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FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • JULY 2020

GUIDE

2020 Local Voter Guide

Candidates and information for local May elections upcoming lo al elections

V O T E R Guide Local 2020 COMPILED BY WENDY STURGES DESIGNED BY ANYA GALLANT Williamson County voters will cast their ballots Aug. 6 in the state and federal primary elections and in the county general election.

DATES TOKNOW

ABSENTEE BALLOTS Following an order from the Davidson County Chancery Court on June 4, registered voters in Tennessee are eligible to request an absentee ballot to vote by mail if they do not wish to vote in person due to the risk of the coronavirus, according to the Tennessee Secretary of State’s Oce.

JULY 17 AUG. 1

Early voting

JULY 30

Last day to request an absentee ballot Election day

AUG. 6

NOV. 3

State and federal Election Day

Voters can nd the application for an absentee ballot at www.sos.tn.gov.

Follow election night coverage at communityimpact.com.

SAMPLE BALLOT

POLLINGLOCATIONS

8 Edmonson Elementary School 851 Edmonson Pike, Brentwood 9 First Presbyterian Church 101 Legends Club Lane, Franklin 10 Franklin Christian Church 4040 Murfreesboro Road, Franklin 11 Grassland Elementary School 2390 Hillsboro Road, Franklin 12 Hillsboro Middle School 5412 Pinewood Road, Franklin 13 Hunters Bend Elementary School 2121 Fieldstone Parkway, Franklin 14 John P. Holt Brentwood Library 8109 Concord Road, Brentwood 15 Oakview Elementary 2390 Henpeck Lane, Franklin 16 Page High School 6281 Arno Road 17 Pearre Creek Elementary School 1811 Townsend Boulevard, Franklin 18 Sunset Elementary School 100 Sunset Trail, Brentwood 19 Trinity Elementary School 4410 Murfreesboro Road, Franklin 20 Williamson County Enrichment Center 110 Everbright Ave., Franklin

EARLY VOTING Registered voters can vote at any early voting location from July 17-Aug. 1 from 8 a.m.-6 p.m. on weekdays and 8 a.m.-noon on Saturdays. 1 Franklin Recreation Complex 1120 Hillsboro Road, Franklin 2 John P. Holt Brentwood Library 8109 Concord Road, Brentwood 3 Williamson County Voters in Williamson County can vote at any voting center in the county on election day from 7 a.m.-7 p.m. 4 Brenthaven Church 516 Franklin Road, Brentwood 5 Church of the City 828 Murfreesboro Road, Franklin 6 Clovercroft Elementary School 9336 Clovercroft Road, Franklin 7 Cool Springs Conference Center (Marriott Hotel lobby) 700 Cool Springs Blvd., Franklin Administrative Complex 1320 W. Main St., Franklin ELECTION DAY

KEY

R: Republican

D: Democrat

I: Independent

*DENOTES INCUMBENT **WILLIAMSON COUNTY BOARD OF EDUCATION POSITIONS ARE NONPARTISAN, AND VOTERS MAY CHOOSE ONE CANDIDATE PER DISTRICT.

FEDERAL AND STATE PRIMARY U.S. senator

WILLIAMSON COUNTY GENERAL ELECTION Circuit court judge R: Mike Spitzer* Assessor of property R: Brad Coleman* Sheri R: Dusty Rhoades* Williamson County board of education, District 1** Angela Durham* Williamson County board of education, District 3** Eliot Mitchell* Jennifer L. Moss Williamson County board of education, District 5**

R: Cliord Adkins R: Natisha Brooks R: Tom Emerson Jr. R: George S. Flinn Jr. R: Bill Hagerty R: Jon Henry

R: Kent A. Morrell R: Glen L. Neal Jr. R: John E. Osborne R: Aaron L. Pettigrew R: David Schuster R: Manny Sethi D: Marquita Bradshaw D: Gary G. Davis D: Robin Kimbrough D: James Mackler D: Mark Pickrell I: Yomi “Fapas” Faparusi Sr. I: Jerey Alan Grunau I: Ronnie Henley I: G. Dean Hill I: Steven J. Hooper I: Aaron James I: Tom Kovach I: Elizabeth McLeod I: Kacey Morgan I: Eric William Stansberry U.S. representative, District 7 R: Mark E. Green* D: Kiran Sreepada I: Ronald Brown I: Scott Anthony Vieira Jr. State representative, District 61 R: Brandon Ogles* D: Sam Bledsoe State representative, District 63 R: Glen Casada* D: Elizabeth Madeira I: Bradley Fiscus State representative, District 65

Jennifer Aprea Margie Johnson Brian Snyder Williamson County board of education, District 7** Shelia Cleveland* Williamson County board of education, District 9** Rick Wimberly* Williamson County board of education, District 11** K.C. Haugh* Franklin Special School District board of education (voters may choose three nonpartisan candidates) Alicia Barker* Robert W. Blair* Kevin G. Townsel* SOURCES: WILLIAMSON COUNTY ELECTION COMMISSION, TENNESSEE SECRETARY OF STATE’S OFFICECOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

LOCATIONSMAPPED

B L

41A

4

11

8

D

MACK C. HATCHER PKWY.

2 14

431

18

46

13

COOL SPRINGS BLVD.

7

1

SUNSET RD.

9

6

96

31

65

3

10

17

CLOVERCROFT RD.

20 5

19

12

15

R: Sam Whitson* D: Jennifer Foley

R

246

16

MAP NOT TO SCALE N

10

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

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2020 EDI T ION REAL ESTATE

COMMUNITYIMPACT.COMADVERTISE 8669896808

2020 REAL ESTATE EDITION

COMPILED BY WENDY STURGES

201920 FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD REAL ESTATE MARKET AT A GLANCE

DAYS ON THEMARKET AVERAGE June 2018-May 2019

June 2019-May 2020

37027

37064

30

29

34

38

-3.3%

+14.7%

Homes in most ZIP codes in Franklin and Brentwood spent less time on the market and sold for a higher price on average in June 2019-May 20 as compared to June 2018-May 19. However, fewer homes were sold overall in 2019-20 than in 2018-19.

37069

37027

431

37067 -12%

37069

65

25

22

35

31

-11.4%

37064

37067

31

840

N

HOME SALES PRICE AVERAGE

June 2018-May 2019

June 2019-May 2020

HOMES SOLD NUMBER OF

June 2018-May 2019

June 2019-May 2020

$702,260 $758,207 +7.96%

$562,633 +6.29% $598,056

1,298

1,646

-12.71%

+2.43%

$562,300

$764,433

1,133

1,686

+1.89%

-3.4%

507

354

$572,947

$738,390

-5.72%

+8.47%

Williamson County

Tennessee

478

384

$579,221

$318,371 $336,959 +5.83%

5,730

$602,989 +4.1%

Williamson County

+4.1%

5,970

TOTAL HOMES SOLD IN FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD June 2018-May 2019

COMPARISON COUNTY

June 2019-May 2020

Williamson County

Davidson County

June 2019-May 2020

37064 43.25%

37064 45.8%

37027 34.11%

37027 30.77%

5,970

9,323

Number of homes sold

3,805 homes sold

3,805 homes sold 681

33

24

Average number of days on market

37067 13.32%

37067 12.98%

37069 9.3%

37069 10.43%

$602,989

$407,005

Average home sales price

SOURCE: PARKS REALTYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

11

FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • JULY 2020

REAL ESTATE 2020EDITION

NEWCOMMUNITIES

COMPILED BY WENDY STURGES

1

BRENTWOOD

1

E

MACK C. HATCHER PKWY.

431

COOL SPRINGS BLVD.

FRANKLIN

M C E W

96

CLOVERCROFT RD.

4

31

2

CAROTHERS RD.

GOOSE CREEK BYPASS

3

5

PHOTOS BY WENDY STURGESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

MAP NOT TO SCALE N

2

3

Several new housing communities, including single- and multifamily homes, are under construction in Franklin and Brentwood. 1 Construction on homes at Oman , a 21-lot neighbor- hood is nearing completion. The gated community in Brentwood is being built by Grove Park Construction and will feature 21 one-acre lots and a community mailbox. 2 The neighborhoods of Lockwood Glen and Echelon at Lockwood Glen are located o Carothers Boulevard in south Franklin and feature townhomes and single-fam- ily homes ranging from $300,000-$700,000. Builders include Ford Classic Homes, Mallard Homes and Insignia Homes. The community includes a two-acre park, sports facilities, re pits and grills. 3 Homes at Foxglove Farm at Ladd Park are under con- struction o of Long Lane in south Franklin. Home prices start in the $630,000s. 4 New townhome options are under construction at Westhaven near the town center. The community, devel- oped by Southern Land Company, features single-family homes, townhomes and condominiums. Future amenities for the community include a new pool house and a land- scaped park. 5 Homes in The Crest at Ladd Park , a new neighbor- hood under construction near Long Lane, start from the $619,000s. The community features pools, walking trails and community open space.

4

5

Chandler Downey (615) 752-0823

Alexa Akbari (615) 480-3560

Sandra Garretson (615) 627-6026

Heidi Monti (941) 705-0706

Your luxury home specialist in Williamson County 5085 Donovan Street, Franklin, TN 37064 www.williamsoncorealestate.com/contact-us/

12

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

REAL ESTATE 2020EDITION

INSIDE INFORMATION

COMPILED BY ANNA LOTZ  DESIGNED BY MATT MILLS

When interest rates are low, homeowners may look to save money by renancing, which means getting a new mortgage with a better term or interest rate to lower payments. Mortgage rates have steadily declined since November 2018, according to weekly data from Freddie Mac, also known as the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. Matt Frankel, a certied nancial planner and mortgage analyst at The Ascent by Motley Fool—a general personal nance advice resource—shared advantages and disadvantages of the renancing process. REFINANCING U N D E R S T A N D I N G WHAT TOCONSIDER 1. 2. Is the current market rate at least 1% lower than your existing mortgage rate? Are you planning to stay in the same home for at least ve more years ?

• Always consult multiple lenders to nd the best mortgage rate. Start with your current lender. • Multiple inquiries from mortgage lenders aect an individual’s credit score no more than a single inquiry does. HOWTO START

Renancing isn’t free. … It becomes amath problemof whether the savings you’re going to get fromyourmortgage payment are going to bemore than you’re paying.

MATT FRANKEL, MORTGAGE ANALYST AT THE ASCENT

THE INS ANDOUTS OF REFINANCING

TRACKINGMORTGAGE RATES

Although the U.S. weekly average rate for a 30-year mortgage is trending downward, mortgage rates vary by credit score, Frankel said.

Pros • Can lower monthly mortgage payments • May eliminate private mortgage insurance Cons • Can be costly, as homeowners must pay lender and closing fees again • Paperwork

0 3.1% 3.2% 3.3% 3.4% 3.5% 3.6% 3.7% 3.8% 3.9% 4.0%

3.82%

3.73%

3.56%

3.13%

ANOTHER OPTION

3.36%

A homeowner can also choose cash-out renancing, in which an existing mortgage is replaced with a new home loan totaling more than the remaining debt. The dierence is paid in cash and can be helpful in paying other debts, as a mortgage is often the lowest-interest loan available, Frankel said.

March 12, 2020 Dec. 12, 2019

June 25, 2020

June 13, 2019 Sept. 12, 2019

SOURCE: FREDDIE MACCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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13

FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • JULY 2020

CONTINUED FROM 1

37027

37064

LOWHOME

0 200 300 400 500 0 100 200 300 400

0 400 500 600 700 0 100 200 300 400

INVENTORY

Active home listings in four ZIP codes in the Franklin and Brentwood areas saw significant decreases as compared to numbers seen in 2019. HOMES ON MARKET % Percent change from 2019-20 2020 2019

January February March

April

May

January February March

April

May

+1.65% -31.9%

-32.1%

-26.2%

-17.5%

+30.6% -22.2%

-27.6%

-27.9%

-24.7%

SOURCE: PARKS REAL ESTATE/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

37067

37069

37069

37027

431

65

37064

37067

31

January February March

April

May

January February March

April

May

840

+8.1% -11.2%

-38.5%

-32.9%

-23.4%

+4.7% -36.7%

-38%

-48.6%

-36.3%

N

Supply and demand Local realtors agree the reaction from buyers in the weeks after the pandemic began has been surprising, as most predicted a downturn fol- lowing sudden shutdowns across the Middle Tennessee region. However, even in the midst of eco- nomic uncertainty, the area remains attractive to prospective buyers. “I think the virus has affected everything—as far as sales, we’re doing really, really well,” said Danny Anderson, a managing broker with Parks Real Estate in Franklin. “Like everyone else, I think we expected it to be this big drop, and it hasn’t.” Anderson said the area’s low inven- tory has created demand for housing, even in higher price ranges, which was not always the case. “We are in a little bubble in this area, and we’re not hit like some areas are, but we’re still impacted by it greatly,” he said. “We have a lot of multiple offers because … it’s

the Williamson County Association of Realtors. “Our data shows that, and our National Association of Realtors economist has been talking about that for quite some time. I think the pan- demic has increased that.” While on their own, these dips in inventory may signal a signifi- cant slowdown in the market, recent data shows that while the number of homes sold in recent months has slowed, it has not done so at quite the same rate. In fact, ZIP codes in Frank- lin and Brentwood saw small gains in the numbers of homes sold as com- pared to 2019. “I’ve been in business almost 20 years, and this has been my best year ever, and I almost feel evil that it’s in the midst of this global meltdown,” said Gabrielle Hanson, principal bro- ker for Williamson Real Estate. “It just doesn’t seem like it’s right, but it’s the truth. We have so many people moving from other places. It’s been a strangely amazing year.”

supply and demand, and the demand is greater than the supply. And a lot of that’s [always] in a certain price range, but now, it’s even in a broader price range.” One demographic that has not slowed down is buyers from out of state. Hanson said prospective buyers from states such as Washington and California are showing a lot of interest in the area, with some even willing to buy homes sight unseen. “I’ve sold $2,000,000-plus homes that people never even stepped foot in. It’s all fromvirtual tours,” Hanson said. “People are so desperate to get out of where they are that anything is better than where they’re coming from.” Even locally, Williamson County’s tax rate of $2.22 per $100 assessed home value—compared to Davidson County’s recently raised rate of $4.22— attracts buyers looking to make moves in the Greater Nashville region. “With Davidson [County]’s taxes going up 32%, that’s only going to

drive more buyers into Williamson County because our schools were bet- ter anyway,” Hanson said. “So it gives them one less reason to be in David- son County.” Creating competition Homes in Williamson County are also selling faster now than in the past, according to recent data. Accord- ing to statistics released from WCAR for the month of June, the average number of days on the market for a home in Williamson County was just 26, down from an average of 32 days in June 2019. “There was a small, little slowdown [in home sales] as we were enter- ing into April, but we’re seeing that pick back up, for sure,” Vaughn said. “We’re seeing multiple-offer situa- tions on homes that are just on the market for a few days before they’re getting purchased.” With increased competition and less inventory to work with, real

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

REAL ESTATE 2020EDITION

BUYING

HOMES SOLD

While the number of homes on the market has decreased, data shows homes are still selling, and recent months have showed small gains on some areas.

SHIFTING PRIORITIES

2019

2020

POWER

% Percent change from 2019-20

Local realtors said while Williamson County is still a desirable area for buyers, items on their wish lists have been aected by the coronavirus, and priorities for what they want in a home have changed.

80 120 160 200 0

120 160

37027

37064

0 40 80

MORE PRIVACY

While open oor plans have long been a popular choice, Realtors said many homebuyers are looking for options that allow for more privacy, a possible side eect of residents being home for longer stretches of time.

January February March

April

May

January February March

April

May

-52.5%

-2%

-10%

-26.6

+138%

+15.2%

-0.9%

-7.6%

-29.1%

-26.1%

0 40 80 120

0 40 80 120

37067

37069

OFFICE OPTIONS

With many residents continuing to work remotely, homes that include an oce or a study are sought-after by many buyers.

January February March

April

May

January February March

April

May

-12.9%

+16.6%

+9%

-35.7%

-57.6%

+16.6%

-10%

-13.7%

-24.2%

-34.2%

INTERNET INFRASTRUCTURE

As employees plan to work from home in the near term, reliable internet access is a must-have for many clients.

Figuring out financing While many factors indicate sellers have had the upper hand during much of 2020, Hanson said residents look- ing to sell should be wary of setting their prices too high, as changes to lending prices and employment have caused hurdles for buyers. Hanson said prices in Williamson County and particularly in Franklin can often venture into jumbo loan territory, which includes homes that would require a loan of more than $510,000 for purchase and are not secured by government sponsored lenders. In the recent economic cli- mate, she said, lenders are wary of taking on such a large amount. “The mortgage market has changed dramatically, so that has affected some things. I’ve had to dig deep into my barrel of lenders to cover some of my clients,” Hanson said.

estate experts said the market may be becoming tougher to enter for first- time homebuyers or buyers with less cash and lower credit—a problem that is not new to Williamson County. In June, the average price for a home sold in Williamson County was $648,849, 3.8% higher than the aver- age price in 2019, according to WCAR. Additionally, median sales prices have risen by nearly 20% since 2016. Vaughn said issues not related to the coronavirus, such as lower avail- ability of new home lots and increases in land costs and municipal fees, have led to higher home costs overall, making new housing in Williamson County harder to get. “[Rising costs] just makes it more expensive to build, and ultimately, that just makes a more expensive end product, so attainable housing is a lit- tle bit harder,” Vaughn said.

Credit scores are also a factor to consider when going to purchase a home, and many lenders have raised their minimum credit scores needed to qualify for a mortgage, according to Bob Smith, a senior mortgage loan officer with Bell Bank Mortgage in Brentwood. “I don’t know if anyone is going as low as 580 anymore. Most lend- ers have moved up to 680 or above,” he said. “As a minimum credit score, we’re still at 640 on a conforming [loan], so, yes, those scores have been raised during this period. Some of that just has to do with controlling the vol- ume, I’mhearing, but that can exclude some individuals if their credit scores are lower than that.” However, with interest rates at a his- toric low, Smith said now is still a good time for buyers looking to purchase a new home or for owners looking to

OUTDOOR LIVING

Realtors also said many clients have recently expressed a preference for homes with outdoor living spaces with large trees that allow for more privacy. SOURCES: JORDAN VAUGHN, GABRIELLE HANSON COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER refinance their current mortgage if they are still employed. “I’ve had some clients that have taken reductions in income, 20% or 50%. … Even though they’ve had cuts, I have not seen any candidate yet that was excluded—as long as they were working,” Smith said.

Tell us what you think. Comment at communityimpact.com .

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FRANKLIN - BRENTWOOD EDITION • JULY 2020

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