Franklin - Brentwood Edition - June 2020

FRANKLIN BRENTWOOD EDITION

VOLUME XX, ISSUE XX  XXXXXXXXXX, 2020 2020 HEALTHCARE EDITION

ONLINE AT

VOLUME 2, ISSUE 3  JUNE 22JULY 26, 2020

“There was this thought

“We found it was easy

all of those issues)

either-or—that we can’t

reluctance to talk

acknowledge our pain,

particularly if it had to do with themselves

year where it changes in this community, and it

KEN MOORE, MAYOR OF FRANKLIN

AMY ALEXANDER, COFOUNDER OF THE REFUG

E CENTER

Mental health care providers are working to ght against mental health stigma and provide more resources for patient care, such as a future facility for The Refuge Center for Counseling planned near Long Lane in Franklin. (Courtesy The Refuge Center for Counseling)

Ocials, nonprotswork to provide relief during coronavirus pandemic

Initiatives ramp up to help those with mental health concerns

were not so easy to nd. “Wewere experiencing the rise in the use of various substances, and our ocers were having to respond with narcotic reversal agents, like Narcan, and there were some scary stories that concerned me,” Moore said. “For several years, we’ve recognized that we have a higher-than-average rate of suicide in our community, and the police chief and I have both had concerns about that.” Moore said despite having been recognized by the governor as one of the healthiest communities in the state, Franklin could improve resources for

those struggling with obesity, tobacco use and men- tal health, the last of which he said is the hardest for people to talk about and has only increased as a prob- lem during the coronavirus pandemic. “We found it was easy for people to talk about all of [those issues] except mental health. There was a taboo or reluctance to talk about those issues, partic- ularly if it had to do with themselves or their family,” Moore said. “Certainly, we’ve seen an uptick in anxi- ety and mental health issues during this pandemic.” Among the rst initiatives of the mayor’s Blue

BY ALEX HOSEY

In the lead-up to the creation of the Blue Ribbon Task Force in Franklin in 2019, Mayor Ken Moore said he heard from residents throughout his com- munity that the number of people struggling with substance abuse and mental health had been going up and that many local resources available to help

CONTINUED ON 16

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FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • JUNE 2020

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

NOWOPEN 1 Eat the Frog Fitness opened to members in June at 205 Franklin Road, Ste. 150, Brentwood. The studio, founded by 2008 Olympic gold medalist Bryan Clay and longtime tness executive Joe Culver, delivers highly personalized work- outs in a studio setting. 615-431-3764. www.eatthefrogtness.com 2 Pure Life Renal of Cool Springs opened in Brentwood on April 28. The facility will be able to accept patients in the center and oers home dialysis treatments along with yoga, mindfulness training and cooking demonstrations. 1648 Westgate Circle, Brentwood. 625-398-0100. www.plrenal.com 3 Four Paws Pet Spa opened in Franklin in June. The pet spa provides grooming services for dogs and cats with high-qual- ity shampoos, sprays and spa products. Four Paws also provides pet-sitting services for Williamson County residents, including those in Franklin and Brent- wood. 5070 Carothers Parkway, Ste. 106, Franklin. 615-431-1181. www.fourpawsfranklin.com COMING SOON 4 Curio Brewing Company is slated to open in July at 216 Noah Drive, Franklin. The full service coee shop and taproom will oer beer and house-made cold brew coee on tap. The company will also oer craft coee drinks and pastries. www.curiobrewing.com 5 Private school Thales Academy is slated to open a new location at 3835 Carothers Parkway, Franklin, in July. The school’s K-3 campus will be the rst Ten- nessee location for the company, which also operates schools in North Carolina and Virginia. 615-538-0649. www.thalesacademy.org RELOCATIONS 6 Watkins Decorating, LLC relocated its showroom from 1182 W. Main St. to 1118 W. Main St., Franklin, in March. The business specializes in renovating and decorating ooring, replaces, showers,

staircases and other products to enhance homes and businesses. 615-794-6151. www.facebook.com/watkinsdecorating 7 Triple Crown Bakery will relocate from 735 Columbia Ave., Franklin, to 118 Fourth Ave., N., Franklin, one block away from Main Street, according to a May 27 social media post. The bakery, which of- fers a selection of custom cakes, cookies and pastries, is expected to reopen in its new space in August. 615-721-8488. www.triplecrownbakery.com EXPANSIONS 8 Andrews Transportation Group held a groundbreaking ceremony June 18 to cel- ebrate the expansion of the Jaguar Land Rover dealership located at 3 Cadillac Drive, Brentwood. The expansion will add 16 new service bays and add 8,362 square feet to the dealership’s service and parts department. 615-986-6000. www.andrewstransportationgroup.com ANNIVERSARIES 9 Nashville Osteopathic and Integra- tive Medicine celebrated its rst anniver- sary May 29. The clinic has an osteopathic physician specializing in osteopathic manipulative medicine and integrative medical care on sta. It blends Western medicine with traditional Eastern and functional medicine. 4115 Mallory Lane, Ste. 100, Franklin. 615-669-2791. www.nashvilleosteopathicmed.com RENOVATIONS 10 The Franklin Abbey in Cool Springs reopened June 8 with renovations and changes, including a menu expansion and the creation of a coee shop and market. “We are excited to reopen per the governor’s guidelines to keep both our customers and employees safe,” owner Quinn O’Sullivan said in a release. “During the shutdown, we took the time to ren- ovate the restaurant so we could reopen nonsmoking.” The restaurant plans to introduce a full coee and breakfast menu in July. 9200 Carothers Parkway, Franklin. 615-435-8121. www.facebook.com/ tnfranklinabbey

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COURTESY PURE LIFE RENAL OF COOL SPRINGS

ALEX HOSEYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

IN THE NEWS The city of Brentwood announced that Assistant Police Chief Tommy Walsh will retire after 31 years of service eective June 28. Walsh was replaced by Captain Richard Hickey eective June 8. www.brentwoodtn.gov 11 Visit Franklin announced the results of its total visitor count for 2019 on June 9. According to the organization, a record 1.81 million visitors came to the county over the course of last year, marking an increase of 5.3% over 2018, in which 1.72 million visitors came to the county. 400 Main St., Ste. 200, Franklin. 615-591-8514. www.visitfranklin.com The First Horizon Foundation announced plans June 3 to donate $500,000 to nonprots throughout Middle Tennes- see toward COVID-19 emergency relief

eorts. According to a release from the foundation, the money will go towards assistance with nancial services, food relief and emergency services. www.rsthorizon.com CLOSING 12 Craft Love announced via social me- dia in May it will not reopen its location in Franklin at 107 Confederate Drive, Ste. 1, Franklin. The location had been closed since March. The business’s location in Nashville on Centennial Boulevard remains open. www.craftlove.com 13 All locations of Pier 1 Imports , including the one located at 1761 Galleria Blvd., Franklin, will close permanently after the company sells o its remaining product inventory. 615-771-7884. www.pier1.com

Row House opened June 1 in Franklin.

ALEX HOSEYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

FEATURED IMPACT NOWOPEN Owners Chad and Shelley Ramsey opened the rst Tennessee location of Row House on June 1. The studio, located at 1201 Liberty Pike, Ste. 107, Franklin, oers high-energy, low- impact workout classes using a rowing machine, also called an ergometer. The studio has a number of precautions in place to limit the spread of coronavirus in compliance with state and local guidelines, including screening employees, spacing machines apart to allow for social distancing and oering

no-contact check-ins and payment. The studio is also limited to half occupancy. 615-716-1174. www.therowhouse.com

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FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • JUNE 2020

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES Cool Springs traffic study shows areas for future improvements

COMPILED BY ALEX HOSEY & WENDY STURGES

GRADING INTERSECTIONS The city of Franklin is looking to identify areas with high levels of traffic congestion.

ONGOING PROJECTS

HARPETH RIVER

MACK C. HATCHER PKWY.

Study area

The preliminary results of a traffic study for the Cool Springs area were presented to the Franklin Board of Mayor and Aldermen at its May 26 work session, identifying potential areas for future improve- ment to roadways to combat traffic congestion. The Cool Springs Transportation Network Study, approved in 2019 and conducted by KCI Technologies, has finished its inventory of the traffic conditions of I-65 intersections in the Cool Springs area between Moores Lane and Murfreesboro Road. According to KCI Senior Project Manager Beth Ostrowski, the study has looked at traffic flow through the intersections throughout the day, with traffic congestion peaks from 7-9 a.m. and 4-6 p.m., and all of the intersections have been given grades by the organization based on how well traffic flows. Data for the study

was gathered using a mix of modeling software, drone footage and teams driving the roads throughout the day. “Essentially, we had two teams out driving the corridors and taking note of what we observed during those time periods,” Ostrowski said. Intersections assigned the grade E, the second-lowest grade given by the study, for the peak morning hours included those at Carothers Parkway and Cool Springs Boulevard; McEwen Drive and Cool Springs Boulevard; and Murfreesboro Road and I-65. Evening results showed even more problem areas in Cool Springs. Intersections assigned an F grade, the lowest possible, during the evening traffic peak include those at Moores Lane and Galleria Boulevard; McEwen Drive and I-65; and Mur- freesboro Road and I-65. Multiple mixed-use developments are currently under construction

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ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF JUNE 3. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT FRBNEWS@ COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM. ed in fall 2021, according to a recent update from TDOT. In April, crews completed portions of the bridge deck and are now working to place beams for the bridge over the Harpeth River. The project is split into two phases, the first of which will create a two-lane road. Timeline: 2019-2021 (Phase 1 only) Cost: $45.1 million Funding sources: TDOT, city of Franklin Mack C. Hatcher Parkway extension Phase 1 of a Tennessee Department of Transportation project to extend the Mack C. Hatcher Parkway from Hillsboro Road just outside downtown Franklin to Hwy. 96 West near the Westhaven development is on track to be complet-

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in the area. The engineering firm is currently working on evaluating projected impacts to traffic from approved future developments in the area. It will then create a list for rec- ommended improvements and policy strategies for the city to consider implementing in the future.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

DEVELOPMENT UPDATES

Developments underway in your community

COMPILED BY WENDY STURGES

MCEWENNORTHSIDE FRANKLIN Apartments at McEwen Northside, located in Cool Springs at 4015 Aspen Grove Drive, Franklin, will open to residents in August, according to a May press release from developer Northwood Ravin. Additional planned tenants at the development include Jeni’s Ice Cream, Shake Shack and wine bar Vintage Vine 100.

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PHOTOS BY WENDY STURGESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

FRANKLIN FIRE STATIONNO. 7 FRANKLIN Construction work continues on Franklin Fire Station No. 7, located along Long Lane near Peytonsville Road in Franklin. Franklin city ocials announced in late April that the station is slated to open in late summer or early fall. The station will also include a Williamson County EMS facility as part of a county partnership.

RESIDENCE INN BYMARRIOTT FRANKLIN Construction on a new Residence Inn by Marriott is nearing completion at Berry Farms near Goose Creek Bypass and Berry Farms Crossing. The 118-room hotel will feature suites for extended stays with kitchens, a business center, a gym, an on-site bar and a swimming pool. The Residence Inn is slated to open later this summer.

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FAIRFIELD INN& SUITES FRANKLIN A new Faireld Inn & Suites is under construction along Bakers Bridge Avenue near Mallory Lane in Cool Springs, according to signage posted near the construction site and to permit records from the city of Franklin. An opening date for the hotel has not yet been announced. The Marriott-owned hotel brand also operates a location in The Gulch in Nashville.

LEGACYMIDDLE SCHOOL FRANKLIN Work is wrapping up on Legacy Middle School on Henpeck Lane in Franklin. The new school is slated to open in August in time for the upcoming 2020-21 school year, according to ocials with Williamson County Schools. The district will rezone students from Heritage Middle School and Thompson’s Station Middle School.

BRENTWOOD POLICE HEADQUARTERS

BRENTWOOD Work is ongoing to complete a new 56,000-square foot Brentwood Police headquarters along Heritage Way on the east side of I-65. The police department is expected to move into the facility in early 2021, according to city ocials.

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FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • JUNE 2020

ELECTIONS Election officials prepare for increase in absentee voting inAug. 6 election

ABSENTEE VOTING State officials are projecting an increase in absentee ballots to prevent the risk of contracting coronavirus at a polling place. To vote via mail, voters must fill out an application before election day.

WHO CANVOTE VIA ABSENTEE BALLOT?

BY WENDY STURGES

voters typically vote via absentee ballot; however, county election administrators are being cautioned to prepare for that number to increase in August and November. “While unlikely, in order to be prepared, we suggest you plan for 100% of voters over the age of 60 voting absentee by mail,” officials said in the contingency plan. “The Division of Elections has ordered four million each of mailing envelopes, return envelopes and ballot envelopes.” In June, an order from the Davidson County Chancery Court expanded eligibility requirements to allow any registered voter who believes it is “impossible or unreasonable” to vote in person because of ongoing coronavirus concerns to request an absentee ballot. While a statement from the Ten- nessee Attorney General’s office disagreed with the order, the COVID-19 category was still listed on the state absentee ballot application as of press time. Those eligible to vote by absentee ballot must submit a written request to do so by mail, fax or email. The request must be received by July 30 in order to qualify. Voters can find an application at www.govotetn.com.

Only registered voters who meet state qualifications can cast an absentee ballot.

Per a COVID-19 contingency plan released by the Tennessee Secretary of State’s Office in late April, officials are preparing for a possible influx of voters to cast absentee ballots to avoid going to the polls for the Aug. 6 state and county elections. In a letter to lawmakers, Secretary of State Tre Hargett said the state is preparing for an increase in absentee ballots cast, particularly by older resi- dents. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, individuals age 65 and older are at a higher risk of serious illness if they contract the coronavirus. To qualify for an absentee ballot, the registered voter must be 60 years of age or older; be hospi- talized, ill or physically disabled; be a caretaker of someone who is physically ill or disabled; be living in a care facility outside their county of residence or be a member of the military or a resident living overseas, among other reasons. Voters can also qualify if their doctor files a statement with a local county election commission stating that they are medically unable to vote in person. Election officials estimate less than 2.5% of

Qualifications include: • Being 60 years of age or older • Being ill, hospitalized or disabled • Serving in the military or living overseas

• Caring for an

individual who is ill, hospitalized or disabled

• Being medically

unable to vote in person, per a filed physician’s statement

HOWCAN I RECEIVE A BALLOT? Voters can apply at www.sos.tn.gov with the following information.

• Election in which the voter wishes to cast a ballot (and their political party, if they wish to vote in a primary) • Reason for voting absentee

• Name • Address of residence • Social Security number • Date of birth • Mailing address for ballot • Signature

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

RECENT HIGHLIGHTS

Community event

COMPILED BY ALEX HOSEY

CANDLELIGHT VIGIL IN FRANKLIN

Chris Williamson, senior pastor at the Strong Tower Bible Church, spoke out against racism and the death of George Floyd while wearing a shirt that read, “I can’t breathe.”

The candlelight vigil was one of many gatherings across the country organized in response to the death of George Floyd, who died May 25 in police custody in Minneapolis, Minnesota. (Photos by Alex Hosey/Community Impact Newspaper)

Franklin City Administrator Eric Stuckey spoke at the event and said the city was committed to serving and protecting all of its residents.

Candles were lit and passed around as the names of black Americans who have been killed were read aloud. The hundreds gathered at the church knelt in prayer.

The vigil was held near downtown Franklin and was attended by community and faith leaders.

Adhering to strict COVID-19 protocols, we are accepting new residents. Physical distancing while connecting and socializing.

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FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • JUNE 2020

CITY& COUNTY

News from Franklin, Brentwood & Williamson County

FranklinBOMA considers delaying certain capital improvement projects

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BY ALEX HOSEY

flagged for deferral by city staff, Stuckey said the city will continue to look for additional ways to fund these projects, including using grants, trying to find private fund- ing or looking for private develop- ment to help drive the projects. Stuckey said 11 other capital projects requiring an additional $9.16 million in funding for FY 2020-21 were marked for the city to discuss how to proceed into construction, whether to phase the projects differently or whether to defer it further. Despite potential delays and economic downturn, the majority of capital improvement projects still have the green light from the city to move forward, including construction of a new fire station, improvements to the roundabout at East McEwen Drive, improve- ments to Franklin Road and additional lighting at the Goose Creek interchange. “I compliment the staff on this work,” Mayor Ken Moore said. “We can’t just stop. We have to move forward ... and continue to build the infrastructure that our city is going to need in the future.”

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FRANKLIN The city of Franklin is considering delaying four different capital improvement projects based on priority rankings from the Board of Mayor and Aldermen after City Administrator Eric Stuckey gave a presentation on the subject to the board at its May 26 work session. “What staff has done since we hit the economic slowdown related to the COVID-19 pandemic was to re-examine these [projects] and give you a sense of where we think those projects are,” Stuckey told the board. “We need to be prudent as we move forward, but we want to keep high-priority projects still progressing.” The projects slated for delay amount to $162,794 in estimated funds needed to move them forward in fiscal year 2020-21. They include the restoration of the Hayes home at Harlinsdale, the creation of a greenway from Pinkerton Park to the Franklin Road bridge, improvements to Carlisle Lane and improvements to the intersection of Peytonsville Road and Pratt Lane. Though these projects were

The city approved the land purchase back in March. (Courtesy city of Brentwood)

Brentwood closes on $5.2M land purchase for newpark

owners Wilbur and Lucy Sensing at an appraised value of $100,000 per acre. At the time, commissioners said the city opted to purchase the land to prevent it from being privately purchased and developed. “The Sensings have been wonder- ful stewards of the land for many years, and I think it is appropriate that the city play a role in ensuring this property remains a community asset for the future,” Brentwood Mayor Rhea Little said in a statement. Before the land is opened to the public as a park, the city will first develop a master plan and solicit feedback from the community, according to a release from the city. The park, now named Windy Hill Park, will feature only walking and biking trails and will not have any athletic facilities.

BY WENDY STURGES

BRENTWOOD Officials with the city of Brentwood announced May 20 that the city has closed on a $5.2 million expenditure to purchase a 52-acre portion of Windy Hill to turn it into a future park. Windy Hill, located near Old Smryna Road on the east side of the city, dates back to 1800s and is home to the historic Sneed House, which was built by one of the area’s first settlers, according to the city. The city finalized an agreement March 9 to purchase the land from

Williamson County Schools planning three scenarios for return in fall WILLIAMSON COUNTY SCHOOLS In a Wil- liamson County Schools board meeting May 18, Superintendent Jason Golden said that in light of the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, the school district is planning three different scenarios for when schools reopen this fall. “Our district goal for this fall is to provide students the maximum possible direct teacher ScenarioNo. 1: On-campus school According to Golden, the first scenario would allow students back into school buildings with health plans that match updated safety guidelines for if coronavirus cases go down. ScenarioNo. 3: Hybrid/blendedmodel of on-campus and remote school BY ALEX HOSEY

The superintendent described the third scenario as a “hybrid model,” which could include some instruction within school buildings while staggering instruction time to allow for more distance between students. Health protocols from the first scenario would be in place while students were in school buildings, and remote learning protocols from the second scenario would be in place outside of school. Golden said the district is committed to providing daily instruction regardless of which scenario is in place. “A theme I’ve heard among families is, ‘What will school look like even if we’re able to go back?’” Golden said. “We’re never going to be 100% the same, but I want everyone to know that when we start back ... we’re going to do everything we can to make this just as good and even better than where we’ve been in our high-performing school district.”

Health department protocols, such as frequent hand-washing, masks, surface sanitizing and social distancing, would be in effect, with daily schedule changes to cafeterias, recess, class transitions and extracurricular events. ScenarioNo. 2: Remote school If coronavirus case numbers grow again in the fall, the second scenario would be further promo- tion of learning from home by maximizing digital availability and planning ways to engage with students who do not have access to the internet. The planning team would also work on ways to provide food service and counseling for students learning from home.

instruction within the state and local health depart- ment COVID-19 safety guidelines,” Golden said. “Our priority is to be back in school, but at the same time, we recognize that we’re going to need to do some planning for some eventualities that, just six months ago, many people in the entire world never thought were possibilities.” An exact date for a specific scenario’s adoption was not given, as Golden said the response would be flexible based on guideline changes from state authorities.

10

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY HIGHLIGHTS FRANKLIN City officials announced June 3 that the city is allowing residents to rent out park pavilions for groups of up to 50 people. The athletic fields at Jim Warren and Fieldstone parks have also partially reopened. As is allowed through an executive order from Gov. Bill Lee, municipal meetings may be held virtually until at least June 30. Franklin Board of Mayor and Aldermen Meets June 23 and July 14 at 7 p.m. Workshop meetings are always held two hours prior. 615-791-3217 www.franklintn.gov Brentwood City Commission Meets June 22 and July 13 at 7 p.m. 615-371-0060 www.brentwoodtn.gov Williamson County Schools Board of Education Meets Aug. 17 at 6:30 p.m. 615-472-4000 • www.wcs.edu Franklin Special School District Board of Education Meets July 20 at 6:30 p.m. 615-794-6624 • www.fssd.org MEETINGSWE COVER

Franklin named one of 15 fastest- growing cities

FSSDmeal service to continue through summer

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DEL RIO PIKE

LIBERTY PIKE

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BY WENDY STURGES

BY WENDY STURGES

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FRANKLIN New data for 2019 from the U.S. Census Bureau released May 20 shows Franklin is one of the fast- est-growing cities in the nation with a population of more than 50,000 residents. Franklin saw a population increase of 32.8% from 2010-19, bringing its estimated 2019 population to 83,097. Franklin joins several cities on the list, including Irvine, California; Meridian, Idaho; and Frisco, Conroe, Cedar Park and New Braunfels in Texas. From 2018-19, Franklin saw a population increase of 2.5%. The city of Murfreesboro also made the list of fast-growing cities, having seen a 34.6% population increase over the last 10 years of estimates, according to census data. Since 2010, the Williamson County population has grown by nearly 30%.

FRANKLIN SPECIAL SCHOOL DISTRICT Officials with the Franklin Special School District announced that the district will continue to provide free meals for children age 18 and younger through July 27. “The FSSD understands that unique needs exist during these difficult times and our goal is to reduce barriers for families to feed children over the summer,” officials said. “Children do not have to attend an FSSD school or live in the district to receive free meals.” Meals will be provided Mondays and Thursdays at drive-thru sites. Multiple meals will be included in grab-and-go bags, according to the school district. Meals will not be available from July 6-10.

DRIVE-THRU SITES 1 Poplar Grove campus 2959 Del Rio Pike, Franklin Pickup time: 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. 2 Liberty Elementary School 600 Liberty Pike, Franklin Pickup time: 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. DELIVERY SITES • Hickey Drive at 11 a.m. • Liberty Oaks at 11:05 a.m. • Ash Drive and Chestnut Lane at 11:15 a.m. • Acton Street and Short Court at 11 a.m. • Park Street at 11:05 a.m. • Franklin Estates pool at 11:20 a.m. • Robin Hill Road at 11:35 a.m. • Cherokee Place at 11:40 a.m. • Edgewood Boulevard at 11:50 a.m. • Franklin Estates Section 3 at 12:05 p.m.

Accurate HOA Management Financial Services for Board Managed HOA’s - Local Service with 30+ years of experience - 50% of the cost of full-service management companies - Call or email for a free quote for your HOA - No long-term contracts We currently work with over 30 board managed HOA’s in Williamson & Davidson Counties

We passed the test. Southerland Place Senior Living Community

At Southerland Place Senior Living Community, we limited visitors before limited visitation was mandated; we quarantined before quarantines were required; we deep cleaned before deep cleaning was recommended. Now, we celebrate the successful completion of testing residents and staff for the coronavirus. With new ways to communicate, new activities and new clinical operations, Southerland Place Senior Living Community celebrates a future of safe and secure residents, healthy lifestyles and connected community. Come Join Our Family Carla Atwell, Executive Director 615-221-9001 Southerland Place Senior Living Community 200Winners Circle S | Brentwood, TN 37027 | 615-221-9001 southernlandplace.com

615.256.7146 | www.accuratetaxhoa.com | info@accuratetaxnashville.com

DeConstruct Are you remodeling your kitchen and don’t know what to do with those old kitchen cabinets? Our DeConstruct Team can carefully salvage your cabinets for reuse and resale in our ReStore. The service is FREE to you and supports our mission to build affordable housing for local families.

615-690-8094 | hfhwm.org/restore 1725 Columbia Ave, Franklin, TN 37064

SHOP-DONATE-DECONSTRUCT ION

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FRANKLIN - BRENTWOOD EDITION • JUNE 2020

Health Care Edition 2020

Data and information on health care trends in Williamson County

HEALTH CARE SNAPSHOT FRANKL IN & BRENTWOOD

COMMUNITYDATA

Williamson County ranks highly in several statewide rankings relating to the overall health of residents, including quality of life and other health factors.

Williamson County also has a high rate of insured residents and health care providers.

COMPILED BY WENDY STURGES

HEALTH CARE ACCESS

HOWHEALTHY IS YOUR COUNTY?

65

These rankings are updated annually but include data from previous years. There are other factors considered that are not listed below.

840

31

Uninsured adults: 8%

Uninsured children: 3%

HEALTH OUTCOMES:

Williamson County

N

• LENGTHOFLIFE • QUALITYOFLIFE , such as the number of poor mental and physical health days reported

Primary care provider rate: 1 PER 670

Mental health care providers:

2020 STATEWIDE HEALTH CARE RANKINGS (out of 95 counties)

Dentists:

1 PER 508 1 PER 1,290

HEALTH FACTORS:

1 1 1 1 1 1 1

HEALTH OUTCOMES

residents

residents

residents

• HEALTHBEHAVIORS , such as smoking, obesity, physical activity, excessive drinking, alcohol-impaired driving deaths, sexually transmitted infections and teen births • CLINICAL CARE , including health insurance coverage; number of physicians, dentists and mental health providers; preventable hospital stays; and u vaccinations • SOCIOECONOMIC FACTORS , such as educational attainment levels, children in poverty, income inequality and violent crime • PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT FACTORS , such as air pollution, drinking water violations, housing problems and long commutes

Length of life

EARLY CHILDHOOD HEALTH

Quality of life

HEALTH FACTORS

Infant mortality rate:

Health behaviors

Low birth weight: 7%

per 1,000 live births 3DEATHS

Clinical care

Socioeconomic

39

Physical environment

CORONAVIRUS CASE ANALYSIS

CASE BREAKDOWN IN WILLIAMSON COUNTY

STATEWIDE CASES BY AGE

Unknown: 112

Williamson County, home to the rst known case of coronavirus in the state, saw a slow increase in new cases in May. All data is as of June 12.

KEY:

Total cases: 670

38.5%

Active cases

1.8%

Deaths

NEW CORONAVIRUS CASES PER WEEK IN WILLIAMSON COUNTY

59.7%

Recoveries

March 15-21 37 March 22-28 48 April 4 144 April 5-11 73 April 12-18 30 April 19-25 39 May 2 38 May 3-9 22 May 10-16 30

Cases per 100,000 residents:

Tests conducted per 100,000 residents:

307

5,608

March 29-

STATEWIDE CASE BREAKDOWN

CASES PER COUNTY Coronavirus cases in the Greater Nashville area

KEY:

Total cases: 29,126

ROBERTSON 597

31.7%

Active cases

SUMNER 1,059

1.6%

Deaths

April 26-

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66.7%

Recoveries

CHEATHAM 152 DAVIDSON 6,379

WILSON 511

Cases per 100,000 residents:

Tests conducted per 100,000 residents:

40

414

6,073

May 24-30 May 17-23

32

65

WILLIAMSON 670

RUTHERFORD 1,653

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SOURCES: ROBERT WOOD JOHNSON FOUNDATION, UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN POPULATION HEALTH INSTITUTE, COUNTYHEALTHRANKINGS.ORG, TENNESSEE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTHCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

May 31- June 6

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All coronavirus data is up to date as of press time June 12. For updated coronavirus data and information, go to communityimpact.com.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

LOCAL CARE

Health Care Edition 2020

Information on local hospitals and clinics

COMPARING CARE

GRANNY WHITE PIKE

MACK C. HATCHER PKWY.

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PEWITT DR.

MALLORY LN. COOL SPRINGS BLVD.

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Below are the dierences between these dierent types of facilities. Note that the breakdowns are general and may not apply to every facility listed. Contact each facility for specic services oered.

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ALEX HOSEYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

RETAI L CL INI CS

FRANKLIN

CLOVERCROFT RD.

Can treat: minor conditions, such as the u, strep throat, colds, minor cuts and skin conditions Stang: nurse practitioners and physician’s assistants Equipment: can provide immunizations and physicals; can draw blood and swab for labs but will need to send tests out; pharmacies located in the same building Estimated cost: typically $25-$40* Can treat: same conditions as retail clinics as well as broken bones, stitches and burns Stang: nurse practitioners and physician’s assistants; more likely to have medical doctors on sta than retail clinics Equipment: may have X-ray, ultrasound and on-site lab test equipment Estimated cost: typically $35-$100* URGENT CARE CL INI CS

431

COVEY DR.

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HUGHES CROSSING

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PEYTONSVILLE RD.

MAP NOT TO SCALE N

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Hospital Williamson Medical Center 4321 Carothers Parkway, Franklin 615-435-5000 www.williamsonmedicalcenter.com The Williamson Medical Center was established in 1958 as the 50-bed Williamson County Hospital. In 1986, it was rebranded as the Williamson Medical Center, and it is now one of the largest employers in the county, according to Williamson Inc. Today, the center employs more than 600 physicians in 70 medical specialties and subspecialties. • NICU level: IIB • Total employees: 1,800+ • Total beds: 185 • Notable programs: Turner-Dugas Breast Health Center, Bone and Joint Institute of Tennessee, Monroe Carrell Jr. Children’s Hospital Vanderbilt at Williamson Medical Center, Cardiology and Chest Pain Center, Joint and Spine Center

2 The Little Clinic 3054 Columbia Ave., Franklin 6155500091 www.thelittleclinic.com 3 MinuteClinic 1154 Liberty Pike, Franklin 6157911164 www.cvs.com/minuteclinic

8 Vanderbilt Health and Williamson Medical Center Walk-in Clinic Brentwood 134 Pewitt Drive, Ste. 200, Brentwood 6153712481 www.vanderbilthealth.com Urgent Care Clinics FRANKLIN

4 Vanderbilt Health and Williamson Medical Center Walk-in Clinic Franklin 919 Murfreesboro Road, Franklin 6157917373 www.vanderbilthealth.com 5 Vanderbilt Health and Williamson Medical Center Walk-in Clinic Cool Springs 1834 W. McEwen Drive, Ste. 110, Franklin 6158754200 www.vanderbilthealth.com BRENTWOOD 6 America’s Family Doctors & Walk-In Clinics 1195 Old Hickory Blvd., Ste. 103, Brentwood

9 CareNow Urgent Care 2017 Mallory Lane, Franklin 6156563239 www.carenow.com 10 Physicians Urgent Care 155 Covey Drive, Ste. 100, Franklin 6154721550

*WITH INSURANCE SOURCES: TED CHAN, CEO OF HEALTH CARE DIRECTORY, CAREDASH COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

www.physiciansurgentcare.com 11 Physicians Urgent Care 5021 Hughes Crossing, Ste. 165, Franklin 6157948877 www.physiciansurgentcare.com BRENTWOOD 12 CareNow Urgent Care 210 Franklin Road, Ste. 4B, Brentwood 6159646160 www.carenow.com 13 Physicians Urgent Care 700 Old Hickory Lane, Ste. 207, Brentwood 6154573864 www.physiciansurgentcare.com

This is a noncomprehensive listing of local urgent care clinics, retail clinics and emergency rooms.

COMPILED BY WENDY STURGES

Retail, walk-in clinics FRANKLIN 1 The Little Clinic 1204 Murfreesboro Road, Franklin 6154654600 www.thelittleclinic.com

6153732000 afdclinics.com 7 The Little Clinic 210 Franklin Road, Brentwood 6153936550 www.thelittleclinic.com

Please joinus June30, at 2p.m. for anonline workshop designed

DiscoverWilliamsonCounty ’ s onlytrueLifeCarecommunity, where living is easy 900HeritageWay, Brentwood, TN37027 TheHeritageLCS.com

Is your parent or a lovedone

hesitant tomake a move? Let us help

especially for adult children.

youbegin the conversation.

To RSVP or for more information, call 615 - 507 - 2686 or visit www.TheHeritageLCS.com/events.

13

FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • JUNE 2020

No matter what part of town you're in, we’re nearby. Sleep like a baby Fertility treatments Andrology Endocrinology Genetics IVF laboratory services

NOW SCHEDULING IN THOMPSON’S STATION

NOWWITH 3 LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU

990 Elliston Way, Ste 101 Thompson’s Station, TN 37179 StonesRiverDermatology.com | 615-904-2010

Nashville 345 23rd Ave. N., Ste. 401 Nashville, TN 37203

Franklin 4601 Carothers Pkwy, Ste. 325 Franklin, TN 37067

Murfreesboro 1725 Medical Center Pkwy, Ste. 200 Murfreesboro, TN 37129

To learn more today call 615-321-4740 or visit www.nashvillefertility.com

Clarendale is fully licensed for assisted living and memory care.

A happy, healthy smile — for life

Affordable, Dedicated Care in the Nashville Neighborhood You Love. Discover the value of assisted living at the all-new Clarendale at Bellevue Place, where residents maintain independence longer with a skilled and compassionate hand to support the activities of daily living. And for individuals with Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia, we invite you to ask about the peace of mind that comes with Heart felt CONNECTIONS – A Memory Care Program ® and our Predictable Lifetime Pricing Guarantee. CALL 615-436-9777 TO SCHEDULE A VISIT .

• Conservative treatment plans according to the child’s needs • Preventative, restorative, orthodon- tic, or surgical procedures all at one place with the same doctor.

• Recognized leader in aesthetic and durable restorations • Nurturing approach and service for individuals with a wide variety of special needs

web ClarendaleAtBellevuePlace.com 17632 Highway 70 South | Nashville, TN 37221

(615) 383-0171 • mcnuttdentistry.com 3817 Bedford Avenue, Suite 120 • Nashville

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